Graduate Admissions

VICE PRESIDENT OF ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT:  Salvadore A. Liberto
OFFICE: 315 Marquette Hall

Admission to graduate studies at Loyola University represents a selection based on the personal and academic records of the applicants. The appropriate graduate studies committee of the discipline involved examines the applicant’s records for evidence of potential for graduate study.

Loyola’s graduate program is devised to select students with strong potential for graduate study, intellectual achievement, and personal character, without reference to age, creed, race, sex, or sexual orientation.

APPLICATION DEADLINES

Qualified applicants may enroll at the beginning of the fall, spring, or summer term. August 1 for the fall term, January 5 for the spring term, and May 1 for the summer term are the deadlines for admission as a degree-seeking student. Applicants for the communications program or for any of the education programs need to contact the respective departments for deadline dates. Students may be admitted as non-degree or transient students after these dates. Non-degree and transient students are ineligible for certain types of state and federal aid.

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS

An applicant for admission must present as proof of his or her preparation for graduate study the following: transcripts attesting to a bachelor’s degree, normally in a field appropriate to the graduate work, at least two letters of recommendation by professionals in the field who can attest to the applicant’s professional competence, a résumé of work experiences, and a statement of educational goals.

Admission to graduate studies allows the student to enroll in all graduate courses not restricted to degree candidates. A prospective student should examine the candidacy requirements for the appropriate degree very closely for requirements that must be met by each student. Please refer to the individual department regarding specific admission requirements.

DEFINITIONS FOR APPLICANTS


Educational Levels

UNDERGRADUATE
Students who have not received a bachelor’s degree or who wish to pursue a different bachelor’s degree than already earned.

GRADUATE
Students who have received a bachelor’s degree and wish to enroll in either graduate or undergraduate coursework.

Classifications

DEGREE SEEKING
Degree-seeking students are those students who wish to pursue a degree at Loyola University.

NON-DEGREE SEEKING
Non-degree-seeking students are those students who wish to enroll at Loyola on a continuing basis but not pursue a degree program.

Non-degree-seeking freshmen, transfer, and graduate students are required to meet the minimum standards set for degree-seeking students in those categories.

TRANSIENTS

Transient students may be admitted for any one semester. In order to continue their enrollment in the next semester, transient students must apply as non-degree-seeking students and submit those credentials required by the admissions committee.

Admit Types

GRADUATE FRESHMEN

Students who will have received an undergraduate degree prior to the planned term of enrollment. All degree-seeking graduate freshmen are required to submit the application, non-refundable application fee, two official undergraduate college transcripts from each college attended, two letters of recommendation and the results of national tests if required for the specific graduate program, a résumé of work experiences, and a statement of educational goals.

GRADUATE TRANSFER STUDENTS

Students who have attended another college or university at the graduate level. Transfer applicants must submit the same credentials as freshmen and, in addition, two official transcripts from each graduate institution previously attended, whether or not credit was earned.

GRADUATE READMITS

Students who have previously enrolled at Loyola at the graduate level (does not include continuing education and non-credit courses). Readmits need only complete the application form if they have not attended another institution since their last enrollment at Loyola or less than two years has elapsed. Readmits who have not been enrolled for two years and who plan to seek a degree are required to resubmit full credentials.

Admission Actions

ADMITTED
The applicant is admitted to the graduate program for the term designated on the application.

CONDITIONALLY ADMITTED
The applicant is admitted, but on probation. The circumstances of the probation are stated in the letter of admission.

DEFERRED DECISION
The decision is deferred until additional information is collected on the applicant. The applicant will be informed of the information needed.
DENIED
The applicant is not admitted to the graduate program. This action is taken after the applicant is considered for all other admission actions.

APPLICATION PROCESS

Decisions regarding admissions are made under a policy of rolling admissions. Notification of admission under this plan will be mailed as soon as possible after receipt of all necessary credentials. Applications to the Department of Communications will not be reviewed until the application deadline date. If admission is deferred, the applicant will be considered again when the requirements for consideration are met.

POLICIES AND REGULATIONS

Students are enrolled at Loyola in accordance with the policies and regulations defined in the university bulletins, the published schedules, and Student Handbook. Readmitted students are subject to the policies in effect at the time of their readmission. The university reserves the right to clarify and change policy in the course of a student’s enrollment.

All applicants and Loyola students are required to provide complete, correct, and truthful information on all university applications, forms, and correspondence. Administrative decisions and actions based on incomplete, incorrect, or false information are subject to immediate review and/or reversal. Applicants or students who provide such information are subject to corrective administrative and disciplinary proceedings including, but not limited to, dismissal from the university.

EXCLUSIONS

Students excluded by a university are ineligible for admission to Loyola depending on the exclusion regulations and recommendations of the excluding university.

EARLY ADMISSION

The programs of criminal justice, music education, music therapy, and education will admit, upon receipt of approved application for graduate studies, Loyola undergraduate students who meet all of the academic requirements for admission except a degree on a provisional basis provided they meet the following additional requirements: they must have a B average or better in their upper division major work; they must not lack more than six hours for their bachelor’s degree. Such students may schedule a total of six hours of graduate work; their schedule in any one semester may not exceed 12 credit hours. The graduate courses will not count toward the undergraduate degree requirements.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

International students who desire to enter Loyola must comply with the basic admission requirements established. In addition, these applicants must satisfy all provisions of the Immigration Act. Students are expected to be proficient in English.

The applicant whose primary language is not English must show a proficiency in English adequate for graduate level study by scoring at least 213 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). These scores are valid for two years from the date of the test. Graduates of United States institutions may substitute the obtained degree in lieu of the TOEFL. For information on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), write directly to: TOEFL/TSE Services, P.O. Box 6151, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6151. Additional testing options may be requested through the Office of Admissions.

TRANSFER OF ACADEMIC CREDIT

Students who have earned academic credit at another accredited college or university may be allowed to transfer a maximum of six credit hours, with the approval of the departmental chair and/or dean of the college. Each degree program has certain restrictions concerning acceptance of courses completed at other institutions. Transfer of credits earned more than five years prior to enrollment will ordinarily not be considered.

Transfer students will be informed of the amount of credit which will transfer prior to their enrollment, if possible, but at the latest, prior to the end of the first academic term in which they are enrolled.

TERM FOR COMPLETION OF DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Under all but extreme circumstances, all course requirements for a graduate degree must be completed in a seven-year span. Exceptions to this regulation require approval of the appropriate chair and/or the dean of the college.

POLICY ON NONDISCRIMINATION

Loyola University has fully supported and fostered in its educational programs, admissions, employment practices, and in the activities it operates the policy of not discriminating on the basis of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, sex/gender, or sexual orientation. This policy is in compliance with all applicable federal regulations and guidelines.

POLICY ON SEXUAL AND OTHER FORMS OF HARASSMENT

Loyola University New Orleans, consistent with its Goals Statement and the Character and Commitment Statement, fosters dignity and worth of all members of the Loyola community, and is committed to maintaining an educational and working environment free of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment is immoral and illegal, and will not be tolerated.

Sexual harassment may occur within a variety of relationships. Some such relationships involve unequal authority, while others occur between individuals who are of equal status. All allegations of sexual harassment will be scrutinized.

The university’s full policy and procedures governing sexual harassment and other forms of harassment can be found on the university web page for Human Resources Policies, Procedures, and Benefits. Appeal and grievance procedures can also be found in the text of the policy and in the university's Student Code of Conduct, Section 5: Sexual Misconduct, Discrimination, and Harassment Policies and Guidelines.

Loyola University New Orleans strongly supports equal opportunity in all aspects of university services and employment as provided in Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. Inquiries, concerns, and questions regarding the application of Title IX to university programs, services, employment, and policies should be addressed to the Title IX Coordinator. The Title IX coordinator for Loyola University is the director of Human Resources. The Title IX coordinator may be contacted at: Campus Box 16, (504) 864-7914.

DISABILITY SERVICES

Disability services helps students with disabilities meet the academic demands of university life. Academic counseling, assessment, and advocacy services are provided by the Academic Resource Center’s professional staff. Academic accommodations are offered to students with documented disabilities, including physical and learning disabilities. Such accommodations may include, but are not limited to, alternative test administration and academic support services including peer tutors, transcribers, note takers, readers, and computers with adaptive programs.
Disability services assists students in developing self-advocacy skills and advocates for the students with faculty and/or administrators when needed. Since it is the policy and practice of Loyola University to make its programs and facilities accessible to students with disabilities in an integrated manner, the professional staff from the Counseling & Career Development Center, Student Health Service, Physical Plant, library, and Residential Life work in conjunction with the Office of Disability Services to provide a comprehensive support service.

The Office of Disability Services is located on the main campus in the Academic Resource Center, Monroe 405. The director of disability services can be reached by phone at (504) 865-2990 or by e-mail at enrich@loyno.edu.

UNIVERSITY POLICY ON STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Loyola University is committed to ensuring equal access and reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities under Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Action and the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and to providing support services which assist qualified students with disabilities in all areas of the university. Disability Services was created to ensure the careful implementation of this policy by faculty and staff and to assist students with disabilities in meeting the demands of university policy.

Academic Regulations

Knowledge of Regulations

Students are responsible for compliance with the regulations of the university and should familiarize themselves with the provisions of this bulletin distributed by the Office of Admissions, the Registration Schedules distributed by the Office of Student Records, the Student Handbook distributed by the Office of Student Affairs, official publications distributed by individual departments, posted official notices, and official instructions given to students.

The university reserves the right to clarify and change its regulations in the course of the student’s enrollment. Faculty advisers, deans, and associate deans are available to assist students regarding compliance with current regulations. However, it is ultimately the student’s responsibility to comply with the regulations and completion of requirements for his or her chosen program of study.

Upon enrollment, it is understood that the student agrees to be governed by the university regulations and to abide by decisions made by proper authorities of the university. In addition, departments may have their own manuals regulating their graduate programs.

Faculty Advising

All students are assigned a faculty adviser. Faculty are usually assigned to advise students who have indicated an interest in their particular field of specialization. The names of assigned faculty advisers may be obtained from the office of the dean of one’s college or from the department chair in the College of Humanities and Natural Sciences, or the College of Social Sciences. Faculty advisers are available to students throughout the academic year, but their role is especially important during the orientation and registration periods. Advisers will help students plan their program, explore career alternatives, and aid in any academic problems. Faculty advisers will also ensure that the graduate academic experience is as valuable as possible by assisting students in the sequencing of their coursework. Students should be aware, however, that knowledge of and adherence to regulations of Loyola, both academic and otherwise, are the ultimate responsibility of the student.

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Registration

Currently enrolled students are encouraged to early register for the subsequent terms. Graduating seniors and transient students are not eligible to participate in early registration. Those admitted as transient students must complete their credentials during the term of their first admission and must be readmitted for the next term as a non-degree seeking student or degree-seeking in order to continue their enrollment. Students with financial obligations will be allowed to early register, but must sign a promissory note within the first 30 days of registration. Failure to do so will result in the cancellation of the early registration schedule. Students with a health hold will not be allowed to register. Loyola has continual registration for the upcoming semester, which extends through the last day of late registration. During the late registration period, a fee is assessed and a student may be required to pay tuition in full prior to registering. If a student decides not to return to the university in the term for which he or she has registered, the student must officially withdraw before the term begins to avoid financial penalties. (See Withdrawal from the University). Please refer to the calendar in the Course Reference Guide for additional information.

Drop/Add Period

Dropping and adding of courses may take place from the beginning of early registration until the last day of the late registration period, as indicated on the academic calendar.

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LORA

Loyola’s Online Records Access (LORA) is available to all students, current as well as alumni (1979 to present year). Students can check their grades, account balances, financial aid, transcripts and class schedules, and some students, with approval of their adviser, may register online. Access to the system requires the use of a personal identification number (PIN). The PIN is set as the student’s first two letters of their first name and the last four digits of their social security number. After the initial sign-on, the student is required to reset the PIN to another six character pin.

Auditing

Students who do not want to earn university credit for a course may elect to audit the course. Such courses are considered part of the student's term course load and are recorded on the transcript. Regular tuition and fees apply for audited courses. To audit a course, an audit request card signed by the student, his or her adviser, and the instructor must be filed in the Office of Student Records before the last day to add classes. The instructor of the course will advise the student what is expected as an auditor in the class. A course previously audited may be taken for credit by enrolling in the course in a subsequent term. A student may not change his or her status from audit to credit or from credit to audit without permission from his or her adviser and the student's dean's office. Such approval must be filed in the Office of Student Records before the last day to add classes as indicated in the academic calendar for the term. Upon completion of the semester, the audited course will receive a final grade of (AU) Audit, (AI) Audit Incomplete, or (FA) Failed Audit.

Withdrawal from Courses

After the drop/add period and up to approximately the midpoint of the term, students may receive an administrative withdrawal from a course. Students receive a grade of W for the course once the course withdrawal form has been completed and signed by the student, instructor, and adviser. This form must be handed into the Office of Student Records by the deadline indicated in the academic calendar. Course withdrawal is not complete or official until all signatures have been obtained and the form handed in to the Office of Student Records by the deadline indicated in the academic calendar. Students who stop attending but do not officially withdraw will receive a grade of F. Please refer to the calendar in the Course Reference Guide for additional information.

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Repetition of Courses

Loyola’s policy is to show all grades in repeated courses and the student receives no additional credit hours towards graduation. To determine academic standing, all grades and quality points are included.

Attendance

Each instructor must announce at the beginning of the semester how attendance in class will affect grading. For example, the instructor may judge that attendance in class is imperative and demand adherence to a policy that a student is liable to receive an F at the discretion of the instructor if he or she misses a specified number of the classes. Attendance will not be required on the major religious holidays of any faith. Failure to attend any term without applying for a leave of absence requires reapplication and readmission to the university.

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Classification

Classifications are determined by the Office of Admissions based upon the credentials and application submitted by the student.

DEGREE-SEEKING STUDENTS are officially admitted to a specific program and are classified as follows:

Classification Hours Earned  
Graduate Freshman 0 – 9  
Graduate Sophomore 10 – 18  
Graduate Senior 19 or above  

NON-DEGREE-SEEKING STUDENTS are admitted with official credentials but are not enrolled in a particular degree program. Students admitted as non-degree- seeking must enroll in consecutive terms or apply for a leave of absence in order to maintain their status. Failure to follow these procedures will require readmission. coursework taken while a non-degree-seeking student is subject to evaluation in terms of applicability toward a degree. There are limitations on financial aid available to non-degree-seeking students.

Academic Enrollment Status

Academic Full-time—any graduate student enrolled for 9 or more credit hours.
Academic Full-time per Summer Session—any graduate student enrolled for six or more credit hours.  Any graduate student not enrolled full-time is considered part-time.

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Classroom Discipline

In the realm of classroom conduct, a student does not have the right to engage in conduct which is disruptive to the educational process. Such conduct (e.g., abusive language, threats, disruptive talking and laughing, violent actions, etc.) may cause removal from that class meeting and can result in removal from the course with a grade of W. A second such disruption may result in exclusion for one or two semesters or dismissal from the university.

Appeals Procedure

It is hoped that discipline problems will be resolved either through the mutual agreement of the student and instructor or through the mediation of the department chair or the dean of the college.

In case of an appeal, the dean of the college in which the course is offered will decide whether the matter requires consideration. If he or she thinks it does, he or she shall appoint a committee composed of the dean or a representative, two faculty members, and a representative from student affairs. Both the instructor and the student should be apprised of the composition of this committee, and the dean should honor any reasonable objection which either might have to the appointed members. After reviewing the evidence, the committee shall render a decision which will be final.

If the dean should refuse to grant a committee hearing, the student has a right to appeal to the provost. The provost may convene a committee composed of the provost or a representative, two faculty members, and a representative from student affairs. Both the instructor and the student should be apprised of the composition of this committee, and the provost should honor any reasonable objection which either might have to the appointed members. After reviewing the evidence, the committee shall give a decision which will be final.

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Integrity of Scholarship and Grades

The principles of truth and honesty are recognized as fundamental to a community of teachers and scholars. The university expects that both faculty and students will follow these principles and in so doing, protect the validity of the university grades. Instructors will exercise care in the planning and supervision of academic work so that honest effort will be positively encouraged.

Academic Work

All academic work will be done by the student to whom it is assigned without unauthorized data or help of any kind. A student who supplies another with such data or help is considered deserving of the same sanctions as the recipient. Specifically, cheating, plagiarism, and misrepresentation are prohibited. A student who is found to have cheated on any examination may be given a failing grade in the course. In case of a second violation, the student may be excluded for one or two semesters or dismissed from the university. Plagiarism is defined by Alexander Lindley as “the false assumption of authorship: the wrongful act of taking the product of another person’s mind and presenting it as one’s own.” (Plagiarism and Originality). “Plagiarism may take the form of repeating another’s sentences as your own, adopting a particularly apt phrase as your own, paraphrasing someone else’s argument as your own, or even presenting someone else’s line of thinking in the development of a thesis as though it were your own.” (MLA Handbook, 1985).

A student who engages in cheating, plagiarism, or misrepresentation on term papers, seminar papers, quizzes, laboratory reports, and such, may receive a failing grade in the course. In such case, the student will not be permitted to withdraw from the course (even if the withdrawal request is prior to the final date to withdraw). A second offense may be cause for exclusion or dismissal from the university.
Faculty members are required to report immediately to the dean of the student’s college any case of cheating, plagiarism, or misrepresentation which he or she has encountered and later, the manner in which it was resolved.

The dean of the student’s college should apprise the student of the serious consequences of cheating, plagiarism, and misrepresentation as well as of the appeals procedure open to the student in such cases.

Appeals Procedure

If the matter cannot be amicably resolved in consultation with the instructor and chairperson up to 30 days after the beginning of the subsequent semester, excluding summers, the student has the right to appeal to the dean of the college in which the course was offered a decision of the instructor indicating that the student is guilty of cheating, plagiarism, or misrepresentation. The burden of proof will be upon the student.

The dean will decide whether the matter requires consideration. If he or she thinks it does, he or she shall appoint a committee consisting of the dean or a representative, two faculty members, and a student to render a decision. The dean or a representative will serve as the non-voting chairperson of the committee. The student and instructor involved should be informed of the membership of the committee and the dean should honor any reasonable objection either might have regarding the composition of the committee. The decision of this committee is final.

If the dean should refuse a committee hearing to the student, he or she may appeal to the provost. The provost may convene a committee composed of the provost or a representative, two faculty members, and one student from the college in which the appellant is enrolled. The student and instructor involved should be informed of the membership of the committee, and the provost should honor any reasonable objection either might have regarding the composition of the committee. The decision of this committee is final.

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Academic Standing

Criteria for academic standing are set by each department. However, the student must maintain a 3.0 or be placed on probation. The student has one semester to bring the grade point average back up to 3.0.

Grading

Each instructor has the option of using a grading method within each course that best meets the needs of students and the subject. However, all grades are translated by instructors into the following grades:

A Excellent. This grade is assigned 4 quality points per semester hour.
A- Excellent This grade is assigned 3.7 quality points per semester hour.
B+ Above Average This grade is assigned 3.3 quality points per semester hour.
B Average This grade is assigned 3 quality points per semester hour.
B- Below Average This grade is assigned 2.7 quality points
C+ Below Average This grade is assigned 2.3 quality points per semester hour.
C Below Average This grade is assigned 2 quality points per semester hour.
C- Below Average This grade is assigned 1.7 quality points.  This grade will not count toward graduation.
D+

Minimally Passing 

This grade is assigned 1.3 quality points per semester hour. This grade will not count toward graduation.
D Minimally Passing  This grade is assigned 1 quality point per semester hour. This grade will not count toward graduation.
F Failure No quality points are assigned.
I Incomplete. This grade is to be assigned only when the instructor has been presented with serious and compelling reasons why the student should be allowed to complete the course at a later date. These reasons are customarily medical. The I grade is not an automatic extension. An I grade which has not been made up by the sixth week of the subsequent term, excluding summer terms, will be changed automatically to F.

 

 

 

 

P Pass. Pass/fail grades are available only in courses designated as pass/fail. Grades of P are not counted toward quality point averages.
X No Grade Submitted.  
W
Withdrawal. Indicates that the student withdrew by the tenth week of class in the Office of Student Records. No credit is awarded.
AU Audit Complete.  
AI Audit Incomplete.  
AP Advanced Placement.  
EX Exempt from course requirement.  
FA Audit Failed.  
IP In Progress. An IP grade may be granted for certain courses that typically are longer than a normal semester.

The use of certain other administrative notations on student grade reports are explained in those reports. Averages are computed only on the basis of letter grades A through F.

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Grade Point Averages

A student’s grade point average is based on credit hours, grading method (pass/fail, etc.), grade awarded, and quality points. The following definitions apply.

LOYOLA EARNED HOURS
are the credit hours earned while taking courses at Loyola.
TOTAL EARNED HOURS are the credit hours earned while taking courses at Loyola as well as the hours awarded for transfer work toward a student’s degree.
QUALITY HOURS are the units upon which a student’s grade point average is calculated. They differ from earned hours because quality hours do not include the pass grade and do include failed courses.
QUALITY POINTS are calculated by multiplying the quality points associated with a grade (A=4, etc.) by the quality hours. (A three-credit-hour course with a grade of A will result in 12 quality points.
LOYOLA GRADE POINT AVERAGES are calculated by dividing the Loyola quality points by the Loyola quality hours.
LOYOLA CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGES include only the coursework taken at Loyola.
Attempted Hours are all courses registered beyond the drop/add period including W grades.

Grade Reports

A report of the grades made by a student in his or her scheduled courses is available through LORA. Students requiring a “paper copy” may also request this through LORA.

Loyola’s grade reports list the courses, grades, Loyola grade point averages (both cumulative and semester), and the total earned hours. Discrepancies must be appealed in writing to the Office of Student Records within 30 days of the last examination.

Change of Grade

An instructor may change a grade previously assigned by processing an official change of grade form. This form may be obtained in the Office of Student Records or in the dean’s office. The instructor must request the grade change and cite the reason for changing the grade. The form must be approved by the instructor, the department chair (Humanities and Social Sciences only), and the dean under whose jurisdiction the course was offered.

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Grade Appeals

The student has a right to know the grade he or she has earned, the right to know the grading systems of the instructor, and the right to know grades as they are given during the term. The grading system should be included in the course syllabus.

If the student feels that he or she is not being graded justly, the student should first consult the instructor. If this consultation proves unsatisfactory, the student should then consult the department chair. If the student still feels that the problem has not been resolved, he or she should consult the dean of the college in which the course is offered to request a committee hearing.

The student has the right to appeal a given grade to the dean up to 30 days after the beginning of the subsequent term, excluding summers. It may happen, however, that a hearing may not be able to be scheduled until after that time. Until the grade is finally determined, the student’s academic standing and all related rights and privileges are based on the grade as originally assigned.

The student shall collect and present any evidence (tests, papers, laboratory reports, etc.) to the dean. The dean may appoint a committee composed of the dean or the dean’s designated representative, two faculty members, who, if possible, should be familiar with the course, and one student who has taken the course, if possible. The dean or the dean’s designated representative, will serve as the non-voting chair of the committee.

The student and instructor are to be apprised of the composition of the committee, and the dean should honor any reasonable objection either might have to appointed members. Both the student and the instructor have the right to present their position in person to the committee. The burden of proof will be on the student. The decision of the committee is final, and the grade it decides upon becomes the official grade for the course.

If the dean denies a student a committee hearing, the student may appeal to the provost. The provost may convene a committee composed of himself or herself or a representative, two faculty members (who should, if possible, be familiar with the course), and one student from the college in which the course is offered and who has taken the course. Both the student and the instructor are to be apprised of the composition of the committee, and the provost should honor any reasonable objection which either might have to appointed members. Both the student and the instructor have the right to present their positions in person to the committee. The decision of the committee is final, and the grade it decides upon becomes the official grade for the course.
Loyola students enrolled in courses at other institutions are subject to the grade appeal policy at those institutions.

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Dismissal

Although dismissal is usually a function of the student’s inability to remove himself or herself from academic probation, all decisions regarding dismissal are made on an individual basis, and the university, through duly constituted judicial bodies, or through the deans, has the authority to dismiss a student whose conduct, attitude, or performance is in serious opposition to the aim of the university or to the spiritual, moral, or intellectual welfare of the university community.

Procedures for Exclusion or Dismissal

The dean of a college or his or her representative may initiate proceedings for exclusion or dismissal when he or she has reasonable cause to believe that a student has violated a university academic policy or has committed an offense which warrants such action. Grounds for exclusion or dismissal include, but are not limited to, the following: cheating, plagiarism, fraud, misrepresentation, and conduct which is disruptive to the educational process (e.g., abusive language, threats, disruptive talking, etc.).

The dean or a representative will form a committee to hold an exclusion or dismissal hearing. The purpose of the committee is to recommend to the dean any sanctions that should be taken against the student. In the case of fraud, cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation, or similar offenses, the committee will consist of the dean (or a representative), two faculty members, and a student from the college in question. In the case of disruptive conduct or other offenses related to the academic environment, the committee will consist of the dean (or a representative), two faculty members, and a representative from student affairs. In the event a committee had been formed to hear an appeal of a second offense, said committee may be convened to act as the hearing committee on exclusion or dismissal. The dean or a representative of the student’s college shall provide the student with a written statement outlining the reasons for the exclusion or dismissal hearing, which is held to consider what action should be taken with regard to the student’s future at the university in light of the findings against the student and not to reconsider the student’s guilt or innocence in cases of cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation, disruptive conduct, etc. The statement shall contain sufficient detail to inform adequately the accused of the time, date, place, and conduct serving as the basis for the complaint. The student shall also be advised that he or she has a right to appear before the committee and to present information and witnesses in support of his or her position concerning exclusion or dismissal. Alternatively, the student may present such information in writing. The accused student may make his or her presentation with the assistance of a faculty member, staff member, or another student, but legal representation will not be permitted at the hearing.

The hearing on the matter shall be held within a reasonable period of time (normally within 15 days), but at least 10 days after the student has received notice of the charges. Until final determination of the matter, the student shall be allowed to continue classes unless, in the opinion of the dean, the violation warrants immediate departure from the university.

Within five days after the hearing, the committee shall make its recommendations to the dean of the student’s college. Included in the committee’s recommendation shall be a record of the deliberations (a full transcript is not required) and a justification for the committee’s decision. A copy of these records shall be immediately forwarded to the provost.

Should the dean of the college decide that the student shall be excluded for one or two semesters or be dismissed from the university, the student may appeal the decision to the provost within 10 days following receipt of the dean’s decision. After receiving the written appeal from the student, the provost may affirm, modify, or reverse the action previously taken by the dean. The decision of the provost is final.

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Careers

Students may have an undergraduate, graduate, joint graduate/professional and/or professional career, or continuing education at Loyola University New Orleans. Each career has its own grade point average which will not reflect courses taken that are at a level different from a student’s career at that time. Therefore, for students who receive a bachelor’s degree and return to take undergraduate courses as a graduate student, their grade point average at the time of the awarding of the degree will not be affected by this later coursework. In addition, the graduate grade point average will not include quality points for undergraduate courses.

Residency

A minimum of 24 credit hours must be completed while registered at Loyola. Unless special permission is granted by the appropriate graduate chair or dean to pursue work elsewhere, the work of the final year must be completed at Loyola. This requirement applies to students who entered as graduate freshmen and to students transferring from other institutions. M.B.A. students must complete 27 hours of 700- and 800-level courses in residence, except for students who participate in the Jesuit consortium.

Eligibility for Graduation

Students must meet the specific requirements of their degree programs as set forth in this bulletin. The university, through the appropriate graduate department chairs or deans, may authorize changes and exceptions where it finds them desirable and consistent with the continuous and orderly review of its policies.
Applications for graduation should be filed during the previous fall term for May, August, and December candidates. Specific deadlines are published in the academic calendar.
To be certified to graduate at the end of the term for which the student applied, all degree requirements must be completed no later than July 1 for spring candidates, October 1 for summer candidates and February 1 for fall candidates. After that date, the original application for graduation will be deleted. If the student is unable to complete the requirements during this period of time, the student must reapply for graduation in a subsequent term.

Graduation

Loyola confers degrees in May, August, and December. After grades are received, the university determines graduation grade point averages. Subsequently, the Office of Student Records posts the degrees to transcripts and provides the students with their diplomas. Diplomas and transcripts are not released until the student has discharged all financial and contractual obligations to the university and has completed the required senior exit survey. After a student has graduated, no change may be made in his or her record except to correct a discrepancy (see Grade Reports) or as the result of a grade appeal (see Grade Appeals).  Graduation distinctions (cum laude, magna cum laude and summa cum laude) are not awarded at the graduate level.

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Commencement

Loyola University holds a commencement ceremony at the end of the spring semester. Students who are candidates for May, August, or December of the current year will participate in that ceremony. The commencement program is not a certification document of the university.

Diplomas

The diploma given to students upon graduation carries the university information, student’s name, and degree title. Diplomas will be released only to students who have discharged their financial and legal obligations to the university.

Enrollment at Other Universities

Students must obtain the prior written permission of the appropriate graduate chair, dean, or the department chair in the College of Humanities and Natural Sciences, or the College of Social Sciences, to enroll in courses at other institutions. No transfer credit will be awarded for such work unless the courses are approved by the dean or the student’s department chair in the College of Humanities and Natural Sciences, or the College of Social Sciences. Only students in good standing are granted permission to attend another institution. An official copy of the transcript from the other institution must be submitted to Loyola’s Office of Student Records prior to the completion of Loyola’s next term or the course will be subject to the provisions of evaluation of transfer coursework.

Students in the College of Business must obtain approval from the director of their program.

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Leave of Absence/Intent to Re-Enroll

Students enrolled in one term may apply to their dean for a leave of absence for either the next term or academic year and process a leave of absence in the Office of Student Records. Students returning from a leave of absence are subject to the policies of the bulletin under which they were originally admitted. A leave of absence is not granted to a student transferring to another university.
Students who did not formally apply for a leave of absence are eligible to complete an intent to re-enroll form in the Office of Student Records if the student did not attend another university during the absence period or have an active probation status at Loyola.

Withdrawal from the University

To withdraw officially from the university a student must:

  1. Obtain a withdrawal form from the Office of Student Records.

    Obtain signatures of the designated officials on the withdrawal form.

  2. Students should consult the official university calendar for the tuition refund schedule and deadlines.

Withdrawal is not complete or official until all signatures have been obtained and the student record’s copy is returned to the Office of Student Records.
Those students who withdraw officially from the university prior to the last day for dropping courses as recorded in the academic calendar will have the courses removed from their records. Students withdrawing from the university after the drop period but in the withdrawal period will receive Ws.
Students who have not been enrolled at the university for a period of two semesters or more must follow the degree requirements in effect at the time of their reentry.

Medical Withdrawal from the University

A student will be granted a medical withdrawal for medical or mental health reasons from the University within the term the student is incapacitated, on the condition that detailed written documentation is provided by the student’s health care professional to the Vice President for Student Affairs and Associate Provost. Written notification will be provided to appropriate parties by the Vice President for Student Affairs and Associate Provost. Any student receiving a medical withdrawal during the term may be required to remain out of class the succeeding term. (This decision will be based on seriousness of illness and time of withdrawal.) Medical withdrawals must be made within the term being requested (during illness), and are for the entire term. There are no partial medical withdrawals for a term. The Vice President for Student Affairs and Associate Provost will recommend the appropriate refund, if any.

Records Retention Policy

Admissions Documents

The admissions records of enrolled students are retained for 10 years. Acceptance letters, applications, correspondence, credit by examination, test scores, transcripts, transfer credit evaluations, and admissions decision information are retained on non-enrolled students for a period of two years.
Records and Registration Documents

Graduation certification forms are retained for a period of one year. Change of grade forms, final grade rosters, transcripts, catalogs, class schedules, and commencement information are retained indefinitely. Students are required to report and appeal all discrepancies regarding all academic records to the Office of Student Records within 30 days from the final class day of the semester in which the discrepancy occurred.

Veterans Certifications

Immediately following registration held in the beginning of each semester, students who are taking courses leading towards degree requirements are eligible for benefits through the Veterans Administration and can be certified by the Office of Student Records. In accordance with Title 38, United States Code, Veterans Benefits, Loyola certifies only those students who are admitted to a degree program and who are making satisfactory progress as determined by the probationary and exclusion policies of the university’s colleges.Reimbursement is certified for courses only and excludes noncredit courses. All inquiries concerning the certification should be directed to the Office of Student Records.

Credit Hour Certification Rules for All Students

Classification Full Time 3/4 Time 1/2Time 1/4Time
Undergraduate 12 9 6 3
Graduate 9 - 4.5 -
Law 9 6 4.5 -
Summer School 6   3 -

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Transcripts

Loyola is authorized to distribute only Loyola’s own transcripts, not the records of testing services or other universities. Students may have four records at Loyola which comprise the official transcript: undergraduate, graduate, law, or continuing education transcript. Upon a student’s request, all official transcripts are sent by the Office of Student Records to others. Transcripts marked “Issued to the Student” are given by the Office of Student Records to students. In accordance with recommendations of the American Association of College Registrars and Admissions Officers, official transcripts issued to students should not be treated as an official academic credential. Transcripts carry notations identifying major, minor, if applicable, degree program, Loyola term and cumulative statistics, degrees earned at Loyola and other institutions, transfer coursework by institution, credit by examination, date of birth, and prior academic level. Academic exclusion and academic dismissal are indicated on the transcript for students placed in this status.
Students who have attended Loyola as transients under the cross-enrollment/consortium policy will have their coursework posted on their home institution’s transcript.The Office of Counseling and Career Services issues copies of Loyola transcripts as part of its placement portfolio. This document should not be treated as an official transcript.Loyola will withhold transcripts, diplomas, letters of good standing, and statements of honorable dismissal until indebtedness to the university has been discharged.

Policy on Release of Information

Loyola endeavors to keep the student’s educational records confidential and out of the hands of those who would use them for other than legitimate purposes. All members of the faculty, administration, and clerical staff respect confidential information about students which they acquire in the course of their work. At the same time, Loyola tries to be flexible enough in its policies not to hinder the student, the institution, or the community in their legitimate pursuits.Documents submitted by or for the student in support of an application for admission or for transfer credit are not returned to the student or sent elsewhere by request. In exceptional cases, however, when another transcript is unobtainable, copies may be prepared and released to prevent hardship to the student. The student should present a signed request. Usually the copy, marked as a certified copy of what is in the student’s file, is released.

The complete policy on release of student information follows.Public Law 93 – 380 (also known as the Buckley Amendment, and as the Privacy Rights of Parents and Students—Section 438 of the General Education Provisions Act) permits only the release of “directory information” about students without the student’s written consent. Directory information includes:

Student’s name, all addresses, telephone numbers, place of birth, college, major, honors, awards, photo, classification, dates of enrollment, degrees conferred, dates of conferral, any graduation distinctions, and the institution attended immediately prior to admission.The law provides that any student may, upon written request, restrict the release of or printing (in the student address directory) of such directory information.The student may so indicate at each registration.

The law requires such written consent of the student for the release to anyone (including parents) of other than “directory information” with the following exceptions—(a) other school officials within the educational institution who have legitimate educational interest; (b) officials of schools to which the student seeks to transfer; (c) the Comptroller General of the United States, the HEW Secretary, the administrative head of an education agency, or state educational authorities; (d) in connection with a student’s application for or receipt of financial aid; (e) state and local officials or authorities to which such information is specifically required to be reported under state statute adopted prior to November 19, 1974; (f) organizations or educational agencies conducting legitimate research, provided no personal identifiable information about the student is made public; (g) accrediting organizations; (h) in connection with an emergency when such information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other persons; and (i) the Veterans Administration.Loyola administrators and faculty may have access to information contained in students’ records on a need-to-know basis.Personal information shall only be transferred to a third party on the condition that such party will not permit any other party to have access to the information without the written consent of the student and that the information be utilized only for the specific purpose for which it was released.Under the law, any student has the right to inspect and challenge his or her own educational file, with the exception of letters of recommendation or other material when the author was guaranteed confidentiality prior to January 1, 1975. Positive identification of the student shall be required, and a university official shall remain in the immediate vicinity during the examination process.

Security of Student Records

Loyola University New Orleans maintains all student records in electronic format. Such records are maintained on an administrative system housed in a secured environment. Access to all electronically stored information is controlled through the use of user IDs and passwords. Additionally, all records are copied to magnetic tape on a daily basis and stored offsite.

Policy on Intellectual Property Rights

The university’s policy for students, faculty, and staff on intellectual property rights can be found on the university web page under Policy, Procedures, and Reports at www.loyno.edu/provost/policies.html.

Student Grievances and Complaints

The university has procedures to handle student grievances and complaints. Please see the Student Code of Conduct to determine the procedure to follow for a specific grievance or complaint.

Syllabi Policy

Beginning fall 2004, syllabi for courses are published at the web-based schedule of classes (https://lorasec.loyno.edu/) by term and subject and are available for review and downloading. Students requiring a copy of their syllabus prior to fall 2004 should request that information from the Office of Student Records http://www.loyno.edu/records/askstudentrecords.php).

E-mail address information

All students are assigned a Loyola University e-mail address. This is the only address that will be recognized and used by Loyola University. All official information from faculty, staff, and administrators will be sent to students at this address. It is the students’ responsibility to regularly check their e-mail account.

Student Assessments

The Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Assessment evaluates student learning and student perceptions through surveys of graduating seniors and alumni. Colleges and departments may also assess student learning outcomes and their perceptions of their Loyola experience.

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Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid

All regular students are assessed tuition and fees on a semester basis.

These fees and the tuition pay for only about 75 percent of the actual cost of operating Loyola for one year. The other 25 percent is made up with funds raised by the Annual Support Program from alumni, friends, faculty, staff, foundations, corporations, and revenues from the university endowment.

Applicants for admission to Loyola and students who need assistance in paying for their education are encouraged to apply for financial aid.

Tuition and Fees

Because of the uncertainty of the economy and budgetary projections, Loyola University reserves the right to change tuition, fees, or other charges printed herein. The rates for 2010-2011 only are listed below.

Tuition

Graduate tuition is assessed according to the graduate program of enrollment.

Counseling $702 per credit hr.
Business Administration—M.B.A.  $905 per credit hr.
Music $702 per credit hr.
Nursing (including Doctoral) $702 per credit hr.
Criminal Justice $702 per credit hr.
Loyola Institute for Ministry $351 per credit hr.

Fees

For Beginning Students

Application fee—M.B.A. (not refundable) $50
Application fee—other graduate (not refundable) $20
Acceptance deposit—full-time graduate except M.B.A. (not refundable)  
  Campus residents (includes housing deposit) $300
  Off campus $200

For All Students

University Center Fee

This fee is dedicated to the partial support of the Joseph A. Danna Center including the cost of utilities, furnishings, maintenance, and cleaning of the building, as well as the programming activities sponsored by the University Programming Board.

Full-time (9 cr. hrs. or more) $113 per sem.
Part-time (8 cr. hrs. or less) $56.50 per sem.
Summer Session $56.50 per sem.

Student Government Association Fee

This fee supports the operation of the Student Government Association to include funding the internal operations of the SGA and recognized student organizations.

Full-time $50 per sem.
Part-time $25 per sem.

Athletic Fee

This fee provides the majority of the support of the university’s intercollegiate athletic program supplemented only by fund-raising. No funds from tuition revenue are used to support the athletic program. All students are entitled to free admission to all regular season games by presenting their Loyola Express Card at the entrance.

Full-time $120 per sem.
Part-time $60 per sem.

Publications Fee

This fee, supplemented only by paid advertisements, supports the publication of the student magazine, The Wolf. Each student is entitled to a copy of each of the four issues published during the academic year.

Fall semester only $20

Information Technology Fee

This fee provides for unlimited high speed access to the Internet and intranet servers for e-mail, web, news, chat, FTP, TELNET, and online library research services. Access to these services is available from anywhere on campus—computer labs, classrooms, common areas, and residence hall rooms.

Full-time $225 per sem.
Part-time $112.50 per sem.

Graduation Fee

This fee is assessed once the student applies for graduation. It provides the graduate with a cap and gown, the diploma cover, the graduation ceremony, and lifetime transcripts. Students are billed during the graduation term.

Senior $250

Contingent Fees

Late registration $50
Late payment $250
Student Health Insurance (cost varies). $1,117 per year
M.S.N. Clinical Practicum $500 per clinic course

Students are encouraged to make payments via our online payment system at www.loyno.edu/bursar/billpay.html. Payments may also be made by check or money order made payable to Loyola University with the bill remittance stubs. Students not wishing to have their social security number or campus-wide identification number placed on their payments should contact the Office of the Bursar for available alternative options. Cash transactions are discouraged. A charge of $30 will be assessed for each check returned from the bank. VISA and MasterCard charges greater than $50 will be accepted as payment on the tuition account.

Residence Halls

Charges for room and board are due on a semester basis. Room rent is billed along with tuition and fees. The residence hall contracts are for both fall and spring semesters. Board is voluntary and therefore paid separately.

Room Rates 2010-11 Double Room Single Room
Cabra Hall $2,529 per sem. $3,497 per sem.
Room Guarantee deposit
(not refundable but total deposit is applicable to room rent)
  $100

Residence Council Fee

This fee applies only to students residing on campus and supports the programming efforts and activities of the respective residence councils.

Cabra Residence Council fee $30 per sem.

Rates apply to the academic semester only. The Christmas holiday period and between semesters are not included in the room charges. Information on accommodations may be obtained from the Office of Residential Life.

Meal Plans (Board)

Loyola Dining Services offers several meal plan options that offer a combination of all-you-can-eat meals and the declining balance dollars, known as Wolf Bucks. The all-you-can-eat meals include breakfast, lunch, and dinners. Wolf Bucks are used for snacks and late night dining. Additional Wolf Bucks may be purchased in $100 increments.

Weekly Plans: Any 19, 15, or 12 all-you-can-eat meals each week. The weekly plan includes $660 Wolf Bucks per semester.

19 meals per week $2,114 (includes $200 in WolfBucks)
15 meals per week $2,044 (includes $400 in WolfBucks)
12 meals per week $1,962 (includes $660 in WolfBucks)

Semester Plans: Any 50, 75, or 100 all-you-can-eat meals each semester in any combination and at any point in time. The semester plan includes $500 Wolf Bucks per semester.

50 meals per semester $ 906
75 meals per semester $1,069
100 meals per semester $1,245

Wolf Bucks Only: Students may select from four plans that provide only Wolf Bucks.  Plans may be purchased for their actual value of $500, $750, $1,500 or $2000.

Combination Plan:  Any 9 all-you-can-eat meals each week, plus any 75 all-you-can-eat meals each semester, plus $600 in Wolf Bucks

Combo Plan $2,135

For more information about our meal plans, please visit our website at www.loyno.edu/dining.

Loyola Express Card

A Loyola student identification card, known as the Loyola Express Card, is much more than just an identification card. It is a fast, safe, convenient, and economical way to make purchases all over campus. You simply deposit money into your Express Card account, and then purchases made are deducted from your balance. It has proven to be an excellent method to pre-plan and monitor expenditures.

As long as you have money in your Express Card account, you will be able to make purchases all over campus without carrying cash, checks, or change. All campus food service locations, Loyola Bookstore, Central Reproduction, the Convenience Store, Dunbar's, Student Health Service, Student Government Association, and residence hall laundry machines all accept the Loyola Express Card. Deposits to the card may be made in the Office of the Bursar, Marquette Hall, Room 270. For deposit information, please call (504) 865-2388.

Funds deposited to the Loyola Express Card carry over from one semester to the next until spent. Balances in excess of $10 in a Loyola Express Card account will be refunded only if a member officially severs ties with the university by graduating, transferring, or otherwise leaving the university. Refund forms may be completed at the Office of Student Finance and must be accompanied by written proof of separation unless you are graduating. Refunds will be applied first to any outstanding university debt, with remaining funds issued, by check, to the student.

Billing and Payment Policy

Incoming students and returning students who have preregistered are mailed a bill for tuition, fees, residence hall charges, and board plans prior to the beginning of the semester. All payments are due 30 days from the billing date unless other arrangements have been made. Accounts not paid by the due date will be placed in a past due status.

Students who are not early registrants, students taking special program courses or continuing education courses, and all international students must pay in full at the time of registration.

A late fee of $250 will be assessed on accounts in past due status. If a bill is not received or if an adjustment should be made to the bill, the student should contact the Office of Student Finance so that payment can be made by the deadline. Students who have not met their financial obligations or made appropriate arrangements through the Office of Student Finance have not officially completed registration and may be subject to removal from enrollment and will not be allowed to register for subsequent semesters. Students whose checks are returned from the bank as unpaid also are subject to removal from enrollment.

Loyola will withhold statements of honorable dismissal, transcripts, the diploma, and all other reports or materials until all indebtedness to the university has been paid or until satisfactory arrangements have been made with the vice president for finance and administration. No one will be allowed to enroll for subsequent semesters as long as prior financial indebtedness has not been satisfied. It is also the policy of Loyola to withhold transcripts, registration, and diplomas on any student who has defaulted on a Guaranteed Student Loan, Stafford Loan, Direct Loan, Perkins Loan, NDSL, or other student loan. In the event that the delinquent account is placed with an outside agency for collection, all collection costs, attorney fees, and court costs incurred will be passed on to the student.

Employer Tuition Reimbursement Program

For graduate business working students with employer reimbursement plans, the university will defer payment on 90 percent of tuition and regular fees. To become eligible for this deferment, the student must submit to the dean’s office a copy of the employer’s reimbursement policy and each semester submit verification on company letterhead of the student’s eligibility in the plan. By the university’s payment due date each semester, an Employer Reimbursement Agreement form must be submitted along with 10 percent of tuition and regular fees.  Any other charges must be paid within the normal deadlines.

Payment in full will be required 30 days after grades are due in the dean’s office. Other reports, such as transcripts and the diploma, are withheld until final payment is received.

Monthly Payments

Although Loyola has no monthly payment plan of its own, students may subscribe to one of two plans offered by outside companies.

TuitionPay by Sallie Mae and Tuition Management Systems, Inc. offer families several monthly payment options to help make education expenses more affordable. The interest-free monthly payment option enables families to spread all or part of the annual tuition, fees, residence hall charges, and board plans over equal, monthly payments. There are no interest charges, only a small annual fee.  Please contact the Office of Student Finance at (504) 865-3337, or visit our website at http://www.loyno.edu/studentfinance/monthlybudgetplans.html for more information on these programs.

Refund Policy

A student who withdraws from a course before the end of the term may be entitled to a refund of a percentage of the tuition charged for that course. The university’s general policy on refunds is described below. Federal statute requires an alternate calculation for recipients of federal Title IV financial assistance, and it is described as well.

TUITION—Students who withdraw from the university or from a course may be entitled to a refund of a percentage of their tuition. Students who withdraw must return a completed withdrawal form to the Office of Student Records. Mere cessation of attendance does not constitute withdrawal. The date of receipt of the withdrawal notice by the Office of Student Records will determine the amount of tuition refunded. Refunds are a percentage of the tuition payable in the semester in which the student withdraws, not a percentage of the total amount billed. Only tuition is refundable. No refunds are made when a student is suspended or dismissed for academic, disciplinary, or financial reasons. Tuition refunds are made for the normal fall and spring semesters on the following basis:

  1. If formal notice is received within two weeks after the beginning of the semester, a refund of 100 percent of tuition is made.
  2. If formal notice is received within five weeks after the beginning of the semester, a refund of 50 percent of tuition is made.
  3. If formal notice is received within nine weeks after the beginning of the semester, a refund of 25 percent of tuition is made.
  4. No refunds are allowed after the ninth week of classes.

Since special sessions, short sessions, and summer sessions vary in length, please refer to the academic calendar for those refund deadlines.

Students forced to withdraw for medical reasons should consult the Academic Regulations section of this bulletin for the university’s policy on medical withdrawals.

ROOM AND BOARD-Students who withdraw from the university may be entitled to a refund of all or a percentage of their room and board charges.  Students who withdraw must return a completed withdrawal form to the Office of Student Records that includes appropriate signatures from the Office of Residential Life and the Office of Student Affairs.  Mere cessation of attendance does not constitute withdrawl from the university.  Amount of refund will be determined by the date of receipt of the withdrawal notice by the Office of Student Records, or the date of official check out from the student's assigned residence hall, whichever is later.  No refunds of room or board will be made when a student is evicted, suspended, or dismissed for academic, disciplinary, or financial reasons.

  1. If formal withdrawal notice and residence hall check out are received within two weeks after the beginning of the semester, a full refund of room and board charges is made, less a sum pro-rated up to the next full week of actual usage of room and board, and actual Wolf Bucks used.
  2. If formal withdrawal notice and residence hall check out are received within five weeks after the beginning of the semester, a refund of 50% of room and board charges, less actual Wolf Bucks used, is made.
  3. If formal withdrawal notice and residence hall check out are received within nine weeks after the beginning of the semester, a refund of 25% of room and board charges, less actual Wolf Bucks used, is made.
  4. No refunds are allowed after the ninth week of classes.

During summer sessions, room and board charges will be pro-rated to actual usage, rounded up to the next full week when a student officially withdraws.  However, no refunds of room or board will be given after 50% of the session has expired.  Unused Wolf Bucks purchased for the summer sessions are not refundable other than by official withdrawal from the university, but are carried forward to the next academic year for students who continue their enrollment at Loyola.

Federal Financial Aid Programs

Federal financial aid programs assume students will complete a full semester. Aid eligibility must be recalculated if a student totally withdraws or is dismissed from the university before 60 percent of the semester has been completed. Aid will be adjusted based on the number of days in the semester that have elapsed before the student indicated an intent to withdraw to a university official.

Additional information on the calculation of refunds (with examples) and the manner in which refunds will be applied against the financial assistance received, may be obtained from the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid.

Overpayments / Excess Aid

If a credit exists on a student account due to an overpayment, withdrawal, or excess financial aid, a refund may be issued to the student upon request. If the student paid any portion of the bill by credit card, the refund will be issued to the credit card company for the appropriate amount. If the student paid any portion of the bill by personal check, a refund may be issued after the personal check clears. Please refer to the tuition refund schedule. Any form of financial aid (loans, grants, or scholarships) will be the priority form of payment to the tuition account. If a credit results from a combination of financial aid and a credit card payment after all adjustments have been made, the credit card will be refunded.

 

Financial Aid

The Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid provides information for and administers all aid programs on campus.

TYPE OF ASSISTANCE

LOANS

Long-term, low-interest loans provide students with an opportunity to borrow a part of the costs of education. The loans must be repaid when you are no longer enrolled “at least half time” at an approved school. Borrowers must be able to demonstrate financial need. Student loans are also available to non-needy students, or for amounts that exceed calculated need. Terms are not as attractive as for traditional student loans, because in-school interest payments are required.

MAKING AN APPLICATION

To apply for financial aid, complete a need analysis report, the FAFSA, readily available from high school guidance offices and college financial aid offices in your own area.

Your scholarships and financial aid file is not considered to be complete and cannot be evaluated until your FAFSA has been submitted and you have been admitted to the university. You may expect a response from Loyola to your request for financial assistance within six weeks after you mail your FAFSA to the processor, provided that you have been admitted to the university.
You are urged to apply well in advance of the beginning of the enrollment period. Offers which can be made before May 1 are considered timely.

HOW MUCH CAN I EXPECT?

How much financial aid a student receives depends upon what his or her need is. Need is the difference between the cost of education and what you and your family should be able to pay. Loyola bases the student/family contribution upon information provided on the FAFSA.

MAKING SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS

Students receiving scholarships and/or other financial assistance have the responsibility to make normal progress toward graduation and completion of their program of study. Recipients of assistance who habitually withdraw from classes or who habitually receive grades which show the coursework was not completed may be judged as not making progress.
All recipients who are in danger of losing financial aid eligibility for failure to make progress will be personally warned in writing of the conditions to be met in order to maintain progress. Recipients who fail to meet the terms of the warning will lose the right to participate in all financial aid programs until such time as they will have demonstrated, at their own expense, that they are capable of completing their course of study in an orderly manner. Additional information is available on request in the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid, Marquette Hall, Room 110 or on the internet at www.loyno.edu/financialaid.
Federal regulations now also require that all recipients of federal assistance who have completed four terms of study have a grade point average that will permit them to graduate. Students beyond the four terms whose average is below this level must be denied access to all federal aid programs until the required grade point average

Spiritual Formation

UNIVERSITY MINISTRY MISSION STATEMENT

University Ministry within the Office of Mission and Ministry at Loyola University New Orleans serves the holistic education of our students by attending to the spiritual formation of the university community. In collaboration with student leaders, staff, faculty, and administrators, we promote a vision of the "way of proceeding" set forth by St. Ignatius Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus. Embracing our common human dignity created in God’s image and likeness, we foster a greater respect for the truth, goodness, and grace to be found in a diversity of faith traditions and people of every culture, race, language, and economic status.

Our Christian, Catholic, and Jesuit traditions commission us to offer a welcoming environment and supportive services to all members of the university community. We assist the formation of our students as contemplatives-in-action: God’s spirit illuminating them with an ever deeper experience of the love of God and inspiring a more generous response to that love by their passionate commitment to service and justice as men and women with and for others.

SPIRITUAL GROWTH AND FAITH DEVELOPMENT

University Ministry supports the spiritual formation and faith development of the entire Loyola community through:

Pastoral Counseling and Spiritual Direction

University Chaplains are trained and available to assist the Loyola community with their spiritual formation and counseling needs. They offer a welcoming and trusting place to find a listening ear, an understanding heart, and a companioning mentor. Contact the University Ministry office or a university chaplain of your choice to inquire about pastoral counseling and spiritual direction. http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry

Worship and Communal Prayer

All faith communities are strengthened and missioned by their worship and prayer. University Ministry is dedicated to providing quality liturgies where community members actively participate in prayer, word, and sacrament. We offer a variety of worship opportunities and encourage students to share their gifts as a liturgical minister or volunteer.

Mass is celebrated on the main campus in Ignatius Chapel, Bobet Hall, Monday through Friday at noon, Monday through Wednesday at 9:00pm, and Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and 9:00 p.m. On the Broadway campus, Mass is celebrated at 12:20pm on Tuesdays and 12 noon on Wednesdays in the Martha and Mary Chapel in Greenville Hall. Contact Arlene Wiltz, 504-861-5494, for the weekly Broadway Campus schedule. For further information and for all listed Mass times, contact: http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry/area-church-services

The sacrament of Reconciliation is celebrated on the main campus from 8:15 to 8:45 P.M. on Sundays and by appointment with any priest. Contact the University Ministry office at 504-865-3226 to schedule an appointment. http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry

Sacramental Preparation

In addition to regularly administering the sacraments of Eucharist and Reconciliation, University Ministry provides instruction and guidance for students who are preparing for Confirmation and/or Marriage in the Catholic Church. For students considering joining or learning more about the Catholic Church, the RCIA (Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults) process will help them discern their decision and prepare them for the sacraments of Baptism, Holy Eucharist, and/or Confirmation. We also provide Anointing of the Sick as needed. Contact the University Ministry office for details about the formation process for any of the above mentioned sacraments. http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry

Retreats

University Ministry provides a variety of opportunities for retreats, discernment and days of reflection. This can be a time to experience God’s love more profoundly and intimately, to find rest and renewal, and to reflect upon God’s active presence in all the experiences of your life. For a complete list of retreat opportunities, please visit the retreat page at http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry/retreats.

Christian and Spiritual Life Communities

Ignatian spirituality and the Jesuit vision of education include: prayer, community, service, and working for peace and justice in the world. This tradition serves as a model for small groups of women and men who come together in a more intimate community for faith sharing. Christian Life Community (CLC) members meet on a regular basis to break open the word and to support and encourage each other in living out the gospel. Members also form a supportive community that socializes together and engages in works of social justice outreach. For people who would prefer to be involved with an interfaith community, there are opportunities to join a Spiritual Life Community (SLC) which centers their faith sharing on a rich diversity of spiritual resources. For further information on CLC, please visit the CLC page at http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry/christian-life-communities.

Interfaith and Ecumenical Opportunities

University Ministry provides many ecumenical and interfaith opportunities for students to celebrate their diverse faith and cultural traditions. We provide training for lay ministry and encourage involvement in a diversity of prayer experiences. We also facilitate relationships with local ministry offices from other faith traditions. Through our shared ownership and prayer, we seek enrichment through our differences while working to create community.

Faith Doing Justice

From the belief in the power of the Gospel to transform the world, University Ministry provides a variety of opportunities for a student to live a reflective life of action for service, justice, and peace. For more information, visit our web page at http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service.

LUCAP (Loyola University Community Action Program)

LUCAP provides numerous opportunities to serve, educate, and advocate for the poor and marginalized within the local community. LUCAP participants also meet weekly for reflection and mutual support. LUCAP provides the ideal environment for the integration of one’s deep motivational faith-based beliefs with their expression in action and world transformation. "Contemplation in Action" has long been a hallmark of Jesuit education. For more information, visit http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service/loyola-university-community-action-program.

Ignacio Volunteer Immersion Programs

In partnership with the Jesuit Center, University Ministry provides immersion opportunities in the U.S. and in various areas of the developing world with the Ignacio Volunteer Program. Contact the Jesuit Center, 504-865-2304, for more details. For more information, visit http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service/ignacio-volunteer-programs.

Office of Mission and Ministry Staff:

Vice President for Mission and Ministry and Director of the Jesuit Center: Fr. Ted Dziak, SJ
Director of University Ministry: Mr. Kurt Bindewald
Assistant Director of University Ministry/ Associate Chaplain, Christian Life Communities and Retreats: Ms. Laura Quigley
Executive Assistant for Mission and Ministry: Mrs. Deborah LaMarca
Associate Chaplain/Community Service and Sustainability Issues: Mr. Joshua Daly
Associate Chaplain/Liturgy and Music: Mr. Kenneth Weber
Associate Chaplain/College of Law Chaplain: Mrs. Arlene Wiltz
University Ministry Fellow: Mr. Joseph Albin
Assistant Director of the Jesuit Center: Dr. Ricardo Marquez
Jesuit Center Fellow: Mr. Scott Porot
Jesuit Center Fellow: Mr. Andrew Ryan
Jesuit Center Fellow: Ms. Katrina Weschler
Jesuit Center Administrative Assistant: Mrs. Leslie Fall

Loyola University Ministry: Main Office, 104 Bobet Hall, 504-865-3226, http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry.
Jesuit Center: 110 Bobet , 504-865-2305 http://mm.loyno.edu/jesuit-center.

Student Services

Living, learning, and leading happen in and out of the classroom, both on and off campus. Loyola University New Orleans supports students by cultivating a learning community that, in the Jesuit tradition, assists in developing student’s whole selves—mind, body, and spirit. We provide leadership with programs and services that enhance the curricular and cocurricular student experience.

ACADEMIC ADVISING

Each student at Loyola is assigned an academic adviser, a full-time faculty member, who will assist the student in planning his/her schedule, and who will discuss with him or her any problems encountered in his/her academic career. The student should see his/her adviser at least twice a semester.

CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER

The Career Development Center, in partnership with the academic community and employers, empowers students to identify and develop career decision-making and job search skills that help them establish purposeful, intentional, and authentic careers. Driven by a passion to help students find careers where they find their true calling.

  • deciding on a major in line with each student's interests.
  • exploring different types of careers and what appeals to each student–there is more out there than doctors, lawyers, and teachers!
  • taking and understanding career assessments in order to investigate how each student's personality and interests might lead to various careers.
  • finding internships and gain practical experience prior to graduation.
  • creating resumes and cover letters.
  • developing job search strategies.
  • connecting with employers through career fairs, workshops, and on-campus recruiting.
  • putting together graduate school applications and establish necessary timelines for admittance.
  • identifying each students' options if you change they chaing their mind about a career path.
  • discovering alternative opportunities for a gap year between college graduation and finding a real job or enrolling in graduate school.
     

UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER

The University Counseling Center (UCC) is located on the main campus in the Danna Student Center. The UCC provides personal counseling, group counseling, psychiatric services and psychological assessments to all registered students. It exists to assist students with meeting the varied challenges of community life at Loyola. Concerns for which students have sought services include homesickness, grief and loss, eating disorders, sexual violence, anxiety and depression. These services are offered free of charge and on a confidential basis in which the UCC records are maintained independently of all other university records. The UCC staff includes mental health professionals and a consulting psychiatrist who have been professionally trained in their areas of expertise. To schedule an appointment, please call (504) 865-3835.

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES

Loyola’s Student Health Services is located on the main campus on the lower level of the Danna Student Center. Medical professionals administer a program of primary healthcare, medical assistance for illness/injury, and referral for emergency and/or specialty medical care to all registered students. The primary goal for Student Health Services is to promote personal healthcare and healthy lifestyles. Services provided include immunizations, allergy injection referrals, intimate healthcare treatment, anonymous HIV testing, and a licensed in-house laboratory for various testing. Treatment by medical professionals is provided at no charge to students and on a confidential basis as dictated by the medical code of ethics and federal law. Prescribed medicines, referrals to off-campus medical specialists, immunizations, laboratory tests, and hospitalization are at the student’s expense. For more information about Student Health Services please call (504) 865-3326 or visit our website for the hours of operation.

IMMUNIZATION POLICY

Loyola University New Orleans and Louisiana law requires all incoming students and students residing on campus to submit vaccination documentation. This requirement includes proof of immunization for tetanus/diphtheria (within the past 10 years), meningococcal disease, and for students born after 1956, measles, mumps, and rubella (two doses).

Registration for any course will be “temporary” until the completed proof of immunization compliance form has been submitted to Student Health Services by the student and reviewed by Student Health Services staff. Failure to submit the completed form will result in a cancellation of classes. This requirement can be met by providing evidence of prior vaccinations or being vaccinated at Student Health Services. All immunization forms can be found on the Student Health Services website.

HEALTH INSURANCE

Loyola University New Orleans provides a student health insurance plan through Gallagher Koster. The plan is available for students who are United States citizens. Gallagher Koster manages the insurance program and United Healthcare StudentResources (UHCSR) is the insurance company and claims administrator.

To enroll in the plan, or for details about what’s covered, locate participating providers, and answers to Frequently Asked Questions, visit the Gallagher Koster website. Gallagher Koster’s Customer Service Team is available to assist you Monday through Friday, 8:30 am – 6:00 pm, EST at 800-457-5599 or by email at LoyolaStudent@gallagherkoster.com.

STUDENT HOUSING

Loyola operates three residence halls on the main campus: Biever Hall and Buddig Hall, which house undergraduate First-Year and upperclass students; and Carrollton Hall, which houses undergraduate upperclass students. Located approximately four blocks from the main campus on Loyola’s Broadway campus is Cabra Hall, which houses undergraduate upperclass students. Residence hall buildings are accessible to students who are physically disabled and each hall has resident rooms to meet the special needs of these students.

All First-Year and Sophomore undergraduate students under 21 years of age are required, as a condition of enrollment, to reside in university housing and participate in a meal plan. Advanced placement credits or transfer credits do not negate this requirement. First-Years and Sophomores from the New Orleans metropolitan area must either reside in university housing or with parents or a legal guardian at a permanent residence within commutable distance from campus. Information about current housing fees may be found on the Residential Life website.

LOYOLA EXPRESS CARDS

Picture identification cards, known as Loyola Express Cards, are issued during registration free to first-time Loyola students. Each student is responsible for obtaining a card at that time which shall remain in his/her possession at all times. After the start of classes, a $15 fee will be charged for all cards, including replacements. The cards are used to identify currently enrolled students and allow use of campus facilities. In addition, the card controls access to the Recreational Sports Complex and the residence halls, as well as serving as the card for students on a meal plan. Students may also deposit funds on the card for food, retail, vending, and laundry purchases.

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION

All newly admitted first year and transfer students must attend the New Student Orientation program immediately preceding their first semester. A fee to cover the cost of the program, all meals, lodging, and materials will be charged to all new day, undergraduate students, without exception. During this program, new students will meet with faculty and staff in both formal and informal venues to receive placement, advisement, and information about academic success. The orientation program also provides new students and their families with critical information regarding academic policies and support services, financial aid, campus life and activities, and student services such as counseling, career planning, and leadership development.

For more information, visit the New Student Orientation website or call the Office of Co-Curricular Programs at (505) 865-3623. 

Centers And Institutes

CENTER FOR ARTS AND MUSIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP

WEBSITE: cmfa.loyno.edu/center-arts-and-music-entrepreneurship

The Center for Arts and Music Entrepreneurship produces events involving industry professionals from the entertainment centers of the country, clinics and "how-to" tutorials for artists and musicians, video tapes and broadcast events produced by the member schools and by other arts and educational institutions in the region, and aggregates content produced by others.

CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATIONS

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/lucec/

The mission of the Center for Environmental Communications is to educate students in the field of environmental communications, to stimulate communications among environmental stakeholders, to provide the public with unbiased discussion of environmental issues, and to be a resource to the media for environmental information. Instead of focusing only on journalism, the Loyola program includes the following sequences: print journalism, broadcast journalism, broadcast production, public relations, advertising, photojournalism, and film studies. This diversity allows students to interact with faculty and students who approach communications issues with different perspectives. A hallmark of Loyola’s program is the Institute of Environmental Communications (IEC). Citizens from business, the scientific and environmental communities, government, and the rest of the Greater New Orleans community are encouraged to participate. The IEC consists of a semester’s worth of meetings during which participants will be exposed to a variety of environmental concerns and issues with discussion led by the region’s environmental leaders. Additionally, Loyola faculty and students are actively working on several projects that are increasing the communication among industry and its many stake-holders. This environmental intervention is intended to enhance the potential for win-win solutions to environmental issues. Loyola’s Center for Environmental Communications will focus on those issues unique to the Louisiana region, as well as those traditionally targeted by environmental programs (population, global warming, ozone depletion, etc.).

CENTER FOR FACULTY INNOVATION

WEBSITE: UNDER CONSTRUCTION

The Center for Faculty Innovation was established in 2008 to promote new modes of teaching and scholarship that foster an integrated curriculum and learner-centered pedagogies. The Center is dedicated to nurturing connections among faculty as learners, teachers and scholars and supporting the intellectual life of the Loyola community within the context of our unique Jesuit mission and identity.

The Center now supports faculty development through workshops, a new faculty seminar, support for teaching with technology, instructional design for online and hybrid courses, summer faculty academies on teaching and learning, a resource library, one-on-one consulting and support for faculty research and publishing.

CENTER FOR INTERCULTURAL UNDERSTANDING

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/ciu/

In the Jesuit and Catholic tradition, the Center for Intercultural Understanding was established to create and maintain a campus environment where students, faculty, and staff will be able to recognize, respect, and celebrate our differences and commonalities. These differences include, but are not limited to, age, social and economic status, sexual orientation, educational background, marital status, ethnicity, gender, individual traits, ability, race, cultural heritage, and religious beliefs.

The center will provide proactive leadership in fostering respect for the rights of others, including the right to be different. It strives to create a supportive and inclusive campus environment through programming, services, advocacy, research, and curriculum transformation, responding to the needs of students, faculty, and staff for the common good.

CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/cie/

The Center for International Education (CIE) at Loyola University New Orleans promotes the internationalization of the university by initiating, developing and supporting a wide range of international and intercultural educational opportunities for members of the Loyola community. CIE sponsors numerous cultural programs including International Education Week, the Country Fair, the Education Abroad Fair, and many others. Through these opportunities, CIE encourages students to develop an appreciation of other cultures and of their own, and to maximize their intercultural experience whether here at Loyola or on an education abroad program.

International Students

CIE provides innovative programs and services to the more than 100 international students currently enrolled at Loyola. International students include students with F-1 student, J-1 exchange visitor, or other nonimmigrant visas; students who are not citizens of the United States; students whose first language is not English; and students who do not reside within the continental United States. CIE helps these students adjust to life at Loyola and ensures that they are well integrated into the Loyola community. For non-immigrant F-1 students and J-1 exchange visitors, CIE provides assistance for all immigration issues, particularly those related to SEVIS, the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System.

All non-immigrant F-1 students and J-1exchange visitors are required to have health insurance which includes medical evacuation, repatriation, and other requirements listed on the CIE website. Non-immigrant students will be billed for and enrolled in an international student health insurance plan, administered by The Lewer Agency, unless their insurance company completes an insurance waiver available at www.loyno.edu/cie/healthcare-medical-insurance/ by the deadlines listed on the website.

Education Abroad

For students wanting an education abroad experience, the Center for International Education is the first stop with advising and information on both Loyola and non-Loyola programs, financial aid, and scholarships. A study abroad advisor along with experienced study abroad peer advisers works with students to help them find the right program that will meet their academic and personal goals, financial situation, and interests. Students must also meet with their academic adviser, the associate dean in their college, and the study abroad advisor in the CIE prior to applying to a non-Loyola study abroad program.

Numerous programs are available for Loyola students. There are semester and year-long programs, community service and immersion programs, components to academic courses, and summer study abroad. While the majority of students study abroad for short summer programs, a growing number of students are selecting semester or year-long programs. Students can attend both Loyola and non-Loyola programs, but Loyola financial aid can usually only be applied to Loyola programs. The university has a number of affiliations with study abroad programs that provide limited scholarships or discounts for Loyola students. All the information that a student needs can be found at studyabroad.loyno.edu

CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL CAPITAL

WEBSITE: www.business.loyno.edu/spiritual-capital

The Center for Spiritual Capital at Loyola University New Orleans is a new research, education, and outreach organization that works with scholars, policy experts, and business leaders to connect academic learning and real-world practice. The mission of the center is to promote sound interdisciplinary research to produce innovative ideas that advance in a sustainable way a free, prosperous, and responsible civil society.

The center seeks to establish a home for, and a new network of, business leaders, academic leaders, religious leaders, and community and political leaders in general, to focus on the search for new ethical norms to guide the evolving economic relationships of the post-modem era. Special efforts will be made to bring a variety of religious traditions to bear on the traditional functions and roles of today's corporations.

CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF NEW ORLEANS

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/csno

Building on the scholarly resources of Loyola University, the Center for the Study of New Orleans promotes research into the city's history, culture, and society. By integrating social justice and analytical thinking into courses, internships, research, and public programming, the Center fosters a critical understanding of New Orleans and an opportunity to aid its renewal.

GILLIS LONG POVERTY LAW CENTER

WEBSITE: law.loyno.edu/gillislong/

The Gillis W. Long Poverty Law Center was established in 1985 at Loyola School of Law by act of the United States Congress in memory of the late Congressman from Louisiana whose career exemplified service to the needs of the disadvantaged. The center provides training and financial summer internships in law offices that provide legal services to the poor; opportunities for law students to do pro bono work while in law school; loan forgiveness assistance to graduates providing legal assistance to the poor; sponsor lectures and other public interest events; and, provide support to organizations who are involved in the delivery of legal services to the poor. The Gillis Long Poverty Law Center is a vital part of the overall commitment of Loyola University to excellence in scholarship and the pursuit of social justice.

INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF CATHOLIC CULTURE AND TRADITION

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/iscct/

The mission of the Loyola Institute for the Study of Catholic Culture and Tradition is to foster and promote the distinctive Catholic identity of Loyola University New Orleans across the curriculum and throughout the university community. With a sense of special responsibility for the intellectual and moral education of the young, the institute seeks to foster the formation of students who are familiar not only with the content of the liberal arts tradition, but also with the extent to which that tradition both illuminates and is illuminated by the Catholic faith. While the institute affirms the varieties of ways in which this may be accomplished in all aspects of the university’s life, it commits itself to the specific task of developing an interdisciplinary approach, which seeks to foster the growth and understanding proper to a mature and reflective Christian mind. Specifically, the institute will administer resources to promote the interdisciplinary study of Catholic intellectual, cultural, and moral traditions. To this end, the institute will draw upon the talents and intellectual commitment of the university faculty through sustained dialogue and by supporting those faculty initiatives which further the goals of the institute. The institute will sponsor the development of curricular offerings, extracurricular faculty-student seminars, lectures, research projects, and other initiatives including the development of appropriate library collections. When possible, these courses and other programs sponsored by the institute will be structured so as to be of interest and benefit to a larger audience including, among others, students from Notre Dame Seminary, members of religious congregations, and religious education teachers.

INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATIONS

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/lucec/IEC.html

The Institute of Environmental Communications (IEC) brings together a diverse group of citizens (environmentalists, scientists, journalists, industrialists, Brown Field community people, politicians, government employees, teachers, and business persons) for 14 — 20 evening sessions to discuss issues of vital environmental importance to the region and nation. The Fellows Program is modeled after the highly regarded Institute of Politics that has been offered by Loyola University since 1968. The IEC’s first sessions began in fall 1999.

INSTITUTE OF POLITICS

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/poli.sci/iop.html

The Institute of Politics (IOP), an independent foundation that is housed on the Loyola campus, trains community leaders in practical politics. Its program is geared to the development of new political leadership in the area. The IOP educates selected young men and women in the practice and practicalities of politics, through a recognition of the professional character of politics and the need for broader understanding and training in politics. Meeting weekly at night, participants represent a broad cross-section of the metro area, geographically and professionally. Approximately 30 participants per course study voting patterns, issues and problems, organizing and conducting political campaigns, the uses of television and advertising, and political polling. Speakers represent local, state, and national levels of politics.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CENTER

WEBSITE: www.business.loyno.edu/international-business-center

The primary purpose of the International Business Center (IBC) is to support and strengthen the international business (IB) programs of the College of Business (CoB) at Loyola University New Orleans. Since its inception in 1992, the IBC has carried out 10 externally funded projects that have included applied IB research studies, community outreach services, the enhancement of the CoB’s IB curricula, and several publications. The center supports the CoB's international internship, summer study abroad, and international student exchange programs. Also, the IBC houses a mini-library with a specialized collection of IB journals and studies. The IBC coordinates and supports the activities of the CoB's International Business Advisory Board (IBAB) and Loyola’s International Business Organization (LIBO), the latter being open to all students at Loyola. The IBAB’s more than 40 community leaders in the IB field meet twice per year to review the CoB’s IB strategy and give advice to the CoB’s IB faculty and administration. IBAB members come regularly as guest speakers or panelists to events sponsored jointly by LIBO and the CoB, offer internships and jobs (after graduation) to students from the CoB, and support financially the CoB’s IB programs. Finally, the IBC maintains relations with external organizations, such as the World Trade Center, the Port of New Orleans, GNO, Inc., the Asian Chamber of Commerce of Louisiana, the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Greater New Orleans, the U.S. Department of Education, the Inter-American Development Bank, and the Institute of International Education.

JESUIT CENTER

WEBSITE: http://www.loyno.edu/jesuitcenter/

The Jesuit Center works to enhance the Jesuit mission and identity of Loyola University New Orleans.  It seeks to share the Jesuit traditions with the larger Loyola community.   It seeks to promote teaching and research integrated with Jesuit Educational pedagogy and Ignatian spirituality.   It invites Loyola community members -- faculty, staff, students, alumni, and families -- to deepen their faith commitment in light of the faith does justice and service.

Included among its many and varied activities are:  activities in spirituality that range from day-long retreats to offering Ignatius Loyola’s Spiritual Exercises; activities in service that offer international immersion trips to Jamaica, Belize and Mexico for students, faculty, staff & alumni. 

The Center also provided orientation and on-going development on the Jesuit heritage and vision of the university for faculty/ staff and students.  It also sponsors lectures, seminars and forums on issues relating to Loyola’s Jesuit mission and identity.   Among its activities is Loyola Week, a week-long university-wide celebration of Loyola’s Jesuit character held each fall. 

It’s office is located on the first floor of Bobet Hall, and its door is always open to all.

JESUIT SOCIAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/jsri

From a tradition based upon the principles of Catholic social thought, the Institute offers participatory research, social analysis, theological reflection and practical strategies for improving the social and economic conditions in the Gulf South states and in select countries of the Caribbean and Latin America, with a particular focus on issues of migration, poverty, and racism. Through fostering close collaboration with faculty, staff, and students of Loyola University -- within a network of Jesuit social centers in the United States, partnering countries, and links with other universities -- the Jesuit Social Research Institute combines academic research, education, and social action in a new paradigm based on the union of faith and justice, the integrating factors of all Jesuit ministries.

LINDY BOGGS NATIONAL CENTER FOR COMMUNITY LITERACY

WEBSITE: www.boggslit.org/

Located in the J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library, the Lindy Boggs National Center for Community Literacy is dedicated to promoting adult literacy as a vehicle for personal, economic, and community empowerment. The Boggs Center seeks to nurture collaborative partnerships between Loyola and its surrounding metropolitan community. Through its collaboration with local literacy providers, faith-based, social, and community service organizations, business, government, civic and philanthropic leaders, the center serves as the intermediary to ensure that adult literacy programs and other institutions that impact the lives of adult learners and their families have access to national research and best practices and technical support.   Solutions are within reach, if we take these steps:

Form Links
An effective response to the challenge of adult literacy in this region requires new partnerships between literacy providers and community institutions.

Train Teachers
Based on the latest reading research, we must shift from relying on volunteer tutors to trained teachers.

Create Opportunity
Effective literacy instruction must be tailored to the needs of the region.  We must link literacy instruction to local employers.

Start Strong
New Orleans’ adult literacy numbers will never change significantly until K-12 public education reform succeeds.  Our children must get a solid foundation allowing them to learn at and beyond high-school literacy.

LOYOLA INSTITUTE FOR MINISTRY (LIM)

WEBSITE: lim.loyno.edu/

The Loyola Institute for Ministry offers a master’s degree in religious education (M.R.E.), a master’s degree in pastoral studies (M.P.S.), and a post-master’s certificate in pastoral studies both on campus and through distance education. On-campus (LIMOC) M.P.S. focus areas include small Christian community formation, pastoral care and counseling, pastoral life and administration, religion and ecology, African-American ministries (on-campus only), Christian spirituality for pastoral ministry, marketplace ministry, Hispanic ministry, youth ministry, and the opportunity for an individualized program of study. The institute also serves the continuing education needs of adults on campus and in extension by offering a certificate in religious education (C.R.E.), a certificate in pastoral studies (C.P.S.), and a post-master’s and an advanced continuing education certificate in pastoral studies. The students, faculty, and staff of the Loyola Institute for Ministry form a learning community gathered to enhance the quality of pastoral ministry in the Church. The institute serves as an educational resource for professionals and paraprofessionals engaged in, or preparing for, ministry and religious education, as well as laity who want to address themselves intentionally to their ministry in the world. The institute seeks an integration of Christian theology with skills in pastoral leadership, a facility in social and cultural analysis, and an awareness of one’s self and one’s abilities and limitations.

LOYOLA PASTORAL LIFE CENTER

WEBSITE: lim.loyno.edu/lplc/

The Loyola Pastoral Life Center (LPLC) is a continuing education division within the Institute for Ministry (LIM). The mission and programs of the Loyola Pastoral Life Center flow directly from the mission and work of LIM. The mission of the LPLC is to provide continuing education opportunities, ministry studies programs, and spiritual enrichment for women and men involved in various aspects of the church’s life and ministries. The LPLC thus furthers the mission of the church community to promote the reign of God and the primary purpose of LIM: to educate persons for leadership in Christian ministries. In pursuing its important mission, the Loyola Pastoral Life Center is particularly dedicated to helping the national church, diocesan pastoral offices, and ministry leaders in local churches improve the quality of grass-roots level Christian life and ministry. The LPLC does so by providing seminars, training programs, resources, and networking opportunities, around emerging ministry issues, for these parties. In doing its work, the LPLC remains particularly attentive to the multicultural and ecumenical dimensions of the church in the United States, to smaller dioceses and Christian home missions, and to local church communities with new and emerging forms of lay pastoral leadership.

LOYOLA SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER

WEBSITE: www.business.loyno.edu/small-business-development-center

Loyola University New Orleans is a collaborative partner of the Louisiana Small Business Development Center Greater New Orleans Region (LSBDC GNOR). LSBDC GNOR provides business counseling, technical assistance, and business training for owners, operators, or managers of existing and new small businesses in the Greater New Orleans area. Business counseling services are no charge to the business owner. Assistance is provided in many areas such as business planning, loan package preparation, website development, logo design, marketing, management, research, finding sources of funding, accounting, and legal issues. Student internships are available through the LSBDC GNOR.

MATHEMATICS CENTER

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/mathlab/

The Loyola Mathematics Center was established in 1981 with the original purpose of providing assistance to students in basic skills (developmental) mathematics courses. It has since evolved into a multimedia resource center for virtually all Loyola  students taking mathematics courses. The Math Center is commonly referred to as the Math Lab, where economics, chemistry, biology, and physics students frequently use it as  a working center. Well-qualified students provide one-on-one tutoring for students taking mathematics courses. Interactive computer software as well as video tapes are available to those who prefer these methods of assistance. Scientific Notebook, Matlab, SPSS, Visual Basic, Java, and other programs are available on our computers for the use of our students and staff. Textbooks, instructor's manuals, and other reference materials are available for almost all undergraduate math courses taught at Loyola. Instruction and assistance using various types of graphing calculators are also provided.

SHAWN M. DONNELLEY CENTER FOR NONPROFIT COMMUNICATIONS

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/~dcenter/

Housed in the Department of Communications, the Shawn M. Donnelley Center for Nonprofit Communications was established in 1997 to allow students to work on real projects under the direction of a faculty supervisor for nonprofit clients who have advertising and public relations projects. Not only is this work used by the organizations, but the work by advertising students for nonprofit clients consistently wins Addy Awards from the Advertising Club of New Orleans. The center’s facilities consist of 16 PowerMac G4 computers, six flatbed scanners, one black and white laser printer, two color laser printers, two film/slide scanners, and a vast array of graphic and multimedia design software. Student assistants supervise the center about 60 hours per week to assist students with their work. The diverse clientele includes New Orleans Area United Cerebral Palsy, Greater New Orleans Youth Orchestra, YMCA of Greater New Orleans, American Red Cross, Bishop Perry Middle School, Each One Save One, U.S. Pirg, Habitat for Humanity, Cafe Reconcile, and many others. The work has been as simple as a flyer or as complex as a full-scale integrated communications campaign. To learn more about the Donnelley Center and to view a portfolio of works visit the website at www.loyno.edu/~dcenter

TWOMEY CENTER FOR PEACE THROUGH JUSTICE

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/twomey/

The goal of the Twomey Center for Peace Through Justice is to shape social justice consciousness through education and to take action on critical social issues confronting society. Thus, the center seeks to put into practice the principles enunciated in Goals of Loyola: Loyola is committed to a serious examination of those conscious and unconscious assumptions of contemporary American civilization that tend to perpetuate societal inequities and institutional injustices. These goals are achieved through programs including Blueprint for Social Justice, Bread for the World, the Global Network for Justice, Resolving Conflict Creatively Program (RCCP), the Twomey Training Center. The accomplishments of the center are reflected in the successes of these programs in addressing the critical issues of poverty, racism, violence, and education. Several of the programs have become model programs in the community. The Twomey Center also manages the Twomey Print Shop, which provides low cost printing to the university and does limited publishing.

WALKER PERCY CENTER FOR WRITING AND PUBLISHING

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/wpc

The goal of the Walker Percy Center for Writing and Publishing is to foster literary talent and achievement to highlight the art of writing as essential to a good education, and to serve the makers, teachers, students, and readers of contemporary writing by providing educational and vocational opportunities in writing and publishing. We envision the Center as a vital part of the University's commitment to the educational needs of its students and of the citizens of New Orleans, as specified in Loyola's Statement of Educational Purpose.

By naming the center for Walker Percy, we honor the memory and contributions of this prominent American author, Catholic, and former Loyola faculty member. By establishing such a center and encouraging publication, we can draw on and further the strengths of several arts departments on campus, including English, mass communication, music, theatre arts and dance, and visual arts.

WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/womenscenter/

The educational mission of the women’s studies program and of the university as a whole is supported by the programs and services offered by the Women’s Resource Center. The Women’s Center, located in Mercy Hall room 103, aims to provide Loyola women and men with a positive college experience by responding to their needs as gendered human beings and by fostering an environment that is free of sexism and other forms of institutional and individual forms of oppression. It strives to create a supportive and inclusive campus environment through programming, services, and advocacy. The Women’s Center encourages and promotes the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge about women amongst faculty by supporting research and course development in those areas. In all its endeavors, the center seeks to include and respond to the needs of staff members. To ensure that the community be involved in activities of the center and so that students can also find feminist role models and mentors outside of the university, the center maintains and encourages contact with alumni and the local community and links to other women’s centers, especially at Jesuit institutions. The center’s mission is to create a campus environment that addresses and responds to issues of concern relevant to the lives of women on campus, in the metro area, and beyond. In doing so, women’s services at Loyola form an integral part of the Jesuit mission in higher education.

The following resources are available at the Women’s Resource Center:

  • information about women’s studies courses;
  • information on Women’s Center programs and events;
  • information on graduate programs in women’s studies;
  • information about resources for women in the New Orleans metro area;
  • programming in support of the Women’s Studies minor and about issues relevant to women;
  • leadership initiative;
  • a comfortable conference and meeting room;
  • student-run support and consciousness raising groups;
  • support for the Women's Initiative for Learning and Leading Learning Community
  • support and resources for persons affected by sexual assault;
  • a library of feminist-friendly magazines and women's studies books
Student Activities

Student activities and programs are the best opportunities for students to achieve educational relevance outside the classroom. The Office of Co-Curricular Programs is committed to learning beyond the classroom and to providing students opportunities to actively engage in orientation and leadership development programs, student governance, and clubs and organizations. Through participation in campus activities, students may integrate the experiences of the classroom with everyday experiences of living and working in a society of people of varied interests, ideas, and values. Student activities are considered an extension of the classroom and hence an important part of the total educational program of the university.

There are over 100 student organizations recognized and active on the Loyola campus. Leadership development, Greek Life, and student government organizations are just a few of the opportunities for students. A complete listing of all recognized organizations is contained in the Student Handbook.

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

The Student Government Association (SGA) consists of elected members representing the four colleges and the School of Law. The SGA acts as the voice of the student body to the university. Through this body, students act as members on most of the university committees in an effort to insure input in areas of student concern. The SGA enacts legislation, provides services, and assists student organizations through sponsorship and funding of events. Meetings of the SGA are held once a week and are open to all students and members of the university community. Freshmen have the opportunity for representation through special freshman elections held each fall semester. All freshmen are eligible to run for one of these elected positions.

UNIVERSITY PROGRAMMING BOARD

As a primary part of the development of the whole person, the University Programming Board (UPB) serves as an organization for student interaction and involvement. The UPB is a student-run organization dedicated to providing educational, cultural, social, and recreational programs for the Loyola community.

Through activities such as movies, mini-music festivals, contemporary lectures, trips into the New Orleans community, and performing arts, students can discover other cultures, learn about current events, and meet other peers. UPB has sponsored major events such as the Stop Global Warming Tour featuring Sheryl Crow and Laurie David, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Jody Williams, civil rights activist and member of the Little Rock Nine Minnie Jean Brown-Trickey, trips to the New Orleans Museum of Art, Angola Prison Rodeo, Swamp Tours, and many others.
The University Programming Board encourages students to become engaged in their campus community by attending programs and activities. Through this involvement, students foster their learning and leadership skills outside the classroom.

CARDONER LEADERSHIP FELLOWS

The Cardoner Leadership Fellows program challenges first year students to develop their personal leadership style through engaging academics and co-curricular projects. Fellows live in a self-governing living and learning community, take academic leadership classes, create and follow a community code, and collectively address a social issue or concern. Students are nominated to apply to the program based on submitted applications for admission. Fellowships include financial aid and will be competitively awarded to each fellow. For more information, contact the Office of Co-Curricular Programs.

IGNATIUS LOYOLA INSTITUTE FOR VALUES EDUCATION

The Ignatius Loyola Institute for Values Education (ILIVE) provides each undergraduate student strategic co-curricular experiences to discover, develop, and apply principles for building ethical and meaningful lives. ILIVE provides students ways in which to learn and live the values of Loyola University New Orleans, enhance academic commitments, and transition into lives of service to others.

The Ignatius Loyola Institute for Values Education, formed by Jesuit and Catholic values, sponsors programs and activities encouraging the processes of reflection and discernment, which leads students to define their personal ethical code. Activities include opportunities for students to discover, develop and apply distinctive strengths, talents, and skills to the following: intentional exposure to wellness initiatives; speaker and lecture series on current issues and leadership topics; career discernment; commitment to diversity; character development; and service.

STRENGTHSQUEST™ AT LOYOLA

Every student is uniquely talented to engage themselves and the world around them. StrengthsQuest at Loyola equips students to leverage their own strengths for success as students, leaders and global citizens. Programs are offered to individuals and organizations as a mechanism by which students can achieve success by cultivating their natural talents.

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS AND WELLNESS

Intercollegiate Athletics and Wellness provides opportunities for Loyola students, employees, and alumni to participate in competitive and noncompetitive, organized and informal sports and fitness activities. It is the express purpose of Intercollegiate Athletics and Wellness to meet the diverse needs of the university community with a broad-based, comprehensive program including intramural sports, extramural sports, club sports, noncredit instructional programs, open recreation, and special interest programs. Students participating in all sports are responsible for ensuring that they are medically able to withstand the rigors of the physical activity in which they plan to engage. Likewise, all students should have sufficient personal injury insurance in the event of an accident.

The University Sports Complex is a multipurpose sports facility which includes: courts for basketball, tennis, volleyball, badminton, , and floor hockey; racquetball courts; an Olympic-style natatorium for swimming and diving; a whirlpool; a suspended jogging track; a weight-lifting/conditioning area; and the Loyola Athletic Hall of Fame. It also has locker rooms, each with a sauna and steam room. Students are admitted free with their university ID card and may purchase memberships for immediate family members.

The Loyola Wolfpack competes in the N.A.I.A. (National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics), Division I, as a member of the Gulf Coast Athletic Conference (GCAC). Loyola currently fields varsity teams in the following sports: men’s and women’s basketball, tennis, cross-country, men’s baseball, and women’s volleyball. By a student referendum conducted in 1991, the program is financially supported by a student fee dedicated to the intercollegiate athletic program. Loyola offers athletic scholarships in men’s and women’s basketball.

Graduate Faculty
  • BEVERLY A. ANDERSON, APRN, FNP, B.C.; Assistant Professor of Nursing; Social Sciences. B.A. Dillard University, 1967; BSN William Carey College, 1982; M.S. Texas Woman’s University, 1991; Post-Masters NP LSUMC, 1999.
  • JAMES H. BASKETT, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Accounting; Business. B.B.A., 1961; M.A., 1966, Texas Tech University; M.B.A., West Texas State University, 1968; Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1976; C.P.A.. 1982.
  • BARBARA BIHM, D.N.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing, Social Sciences. B.S.N., University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1973; M.S.N., Boston College, 1976; D.N.S., Louisiana State University Medical Center, 1991.
  • KIM BARRILLEAUX BRANNAGAN, Ph.D., MSN, MBA, RN. Assistant Professor of Nursing; Social Sciences. BS Ed., Nicholls State University, 1986; M.B.A., 1993, Nicholls State University; BSN, 1993, Nicholls State University; MSN, Louisiana State University Health Sciences. Center, 2001; Ph.D., 2006, Southern University and A&M College.
  • NICHOLAS CAPALDI, Ph.D., Clarence and Mildred Legendre-Soule Distinguished Scholar Chair in Business Ethics, Professor of Business Management; Business. B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1960; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1965
  • GEORGE E. CAPOWICH, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology; Social Sciences. B.A., Providence College, 1972; M.A., University of South Florida, 1980; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1997.
  • ANN H. CARY, Ph.D., MPH, RN, A-CCC, Professor and Director, School of Nursing, RWJ Executive Nurse Fellow, BSN, Louisiana State University Medical Center in New Orleans,1972; MPH, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans; PhD, The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C.
  • NIKHIL CELLY, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Management, Business. B.E., University of Delhi (India), 1990; M.S., University of Rochester, 1991; cand., Ph.D., University of Western Ontario (Canada).
  • RONALD C. CHRISTNER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Finance; Business . B.A., St. Procopius College, 1969; M.S., 1971; Ph.D., 1973, University of Minnesota.
  • ALICE V. CLARK, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Music, Coordinator of Music History and Literature; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., Ohio State University, 1984; M.M., University of Texas at Austin, 1987; M.F.A.,1989; Ph.D., 1996, Princeton University.
  • CYNTHIA COLLINS, DNS, ANP- BC, Associate Professor of Nursing, Social Sciences. B.S.N., Niagara University, 1971; M.S.N., The Catholic University of America, 1983; D.N.S., The Catholic University of America, 1999. 
  • DEBRA B. COPELAND, Ph.D., MSN, CNE, Associate Professor of Nursing, Social Sciences. M.S.N, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; Ph.D., Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center.
  • ANTHONY A. DAGRADI, M.F.A., Associate Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., Jazz Studies, Loyola University New Orleans, 1986; M.F.A., Tulane University, 1990.
  • DANIEL J. D'AMICO, Ph.D., Assisant Professor of Economics; Business. B.B.A., Loyola University New Orleans, 2006; M.A., Ph.D., George Mason University, 2008.
  • ANTHONY A. DECUIR, Ph.D., Professor of Music, Interim Dean for the College of Music and Fine Arts. B.S., Xavier University, 1970; B.M.T., 1970; M.M.T., 1974, Loyola University New Orleans; Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 1982.
  • MEHMET F. DICLE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Finance; Business. B.B.A., University of Massachusetts, 1995; M.B.A., Yeditepe University, Istanbul, 2003; M.S., University of New Orleans, 2006; Ph.D., University of New Orleans, 2008.
  • GERALD M. FAGIN, S.J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Theology; Social Sciences. B.A., 1962; M.A., 1963, Spring Hill College; M.Th., Regis College, Toronto, 1970; Ph.D., University of St. Michael’s Theology College, Toronto, 1974.
  • BARBARA J. FLEISCHER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pastoral Studies and Psychology, Humanities and Natural Sciences. A.B., 1970; M.S., 1975; Ph.D., 1978, St. Louis University; M.P.S., Loyola University New Orleans, 1990.
  • WING FOK, Ph.D., Dean Henry J. Engler, Jr., Distinguished Professor of Management; Business . B.B.A., Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1979; M.B.A., University of Baltimore, 1983; Ph.D., Georgia State University, 1992.
  • MARY C. FOLEY, MSN, RN, NE-BC, Instructor of Nursing, Social Sciences. A.S.N., Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; B.S.N., Loyola University New Orleans; M.S.N, Loyola University New Orleans.
  • MARGARET HULLEY FRAZIER, D.M.A., Francisco M. Gonzalez, M.D., Distinguished Professorship in Music, Associate Professor of Music, Director of Choral Activities; Music and Fine Arts. B.M.E., 1983; M.M., 1989, Sam Houston State University; D.M.A., Louisiana State University, 1998.
  • ELLEN FROHNMAYER, Artist Diploma, Associate Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.A., Beloit College, 1970; Artist Diploma, Curtis Institute, 1975.
  • PHILIP FROHNMAYER, M.M., Professor of Music, Coordinator of Vocal Activities; Music and Fine Arts. A.B., Harvard University, 1969; M.M., University of Oregon, 1972.
  • GWENDOLYN S. GEORGE, D.N.P., M.S.N, APRN, B.C, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Social Sciences. B.S.N., Loyola University New Orleans, 1991; M.S.N., Northwestern State University, 1996; D.N.P., The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 2008.
  • VALERIE W. GOERTZEN, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.A., Whittier College, 1976; M.M., 1980; Ph.D., 1987, University of Illinois.
  • JERRY R. GOOLSBY, Ph.D., Hilton-Baldridge Eminent Chair in Music Industry Studies, Professor of Marketing; Business. B.A., 1974; M.B.A., 1984; Ph.D., 1988, Texas Tech University.
  • DEE WOOD HARPER, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology; Adjunct Professor of Sociology; Social Sciences. B.A., George Peabody College, 1962; M.A., 1965; Ph.D., 1967, Louisiana State University.
  • JOSEPH G. HEBERT, JR., Ph.D., Professor of Music, Coordinator of Wind and Percussion Activities; Music and Fine Arts. B.M.E., Loyola University New Orleans, 1963; Mus.M., Manhattan School of Music, 1965; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi, 1978.
  • WENDY L. HICKS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Criminal Justice, Social Sciences. B.A., Illinois State University, 1991; M.A., 1994; Ph.D., 2001, Michigan State University.
  • SANFORD E. HINDERLIE, M.M., Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., Washington State University, 1974; M.M., North Texas State University, 1982.
  • WILLIAM P. HORNE, D.M.A., Professor of Music, Coordinator of Theory/Composition; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., Florida State University, 1974; M.M., Yale University, 1976; D.M.A., University of North Texas, 1983.
  • MICHELLE KIRTLEY JOHNSTON, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Management; Business . B.A., 1991; M.A., 1994, Auburn University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 1999.
  • GEORGE KARAMESSINIS, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Marketing; Business. B.S., University of Patras; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State Univeristy.
  • JEFFREY A. KRUG, Ph.D., Jack & Vada Reynolds Chair in International Business and Professor of Management; Business. B.A., M.S., 1982, 1984, Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., 1993, Indiana University.
  • HEIDI LANDRY, D.N.S, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing, Social Sciences. D.N.S., Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; M.S.N., Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center.
  • MICHAEL LANDRY, D.N.S, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing, Social Sciences. D.N.S., Louisiana State University; M.S.N., Louisiana State University.
  • KATHERINE LAWRENCE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Marketing; Business . B.F.A., University of Texas, 1986; M.B.A., University of the Incarnate Word, 1999; Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2004.
  • JOHN D. LEVENDIS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics, Business. B.B.A., Loyola University New Orleans, 1997; M.A. , University of Iowa, 2000; M.S. 2003; Ph.D. 2004.
  • JUSTIN E. LEVITOV, Ph.D., Professor of Counseling; Social Sciences. B.A., 1973; M.A., 1974, University of South Florida; Ph.D., University of New Orleans, 1980.
  • JING LI, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Management; Business. M.S., Zhejiang University (China), 1982; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, 1995.
  • LISA J. LINVILLE, J.D., M.S.N, RN, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Social Sciences. J.D., Loyola University New Orleans; M.S.N., Louisiana State University.
  • WILLIAM B. LOCANDER, Ph.D. Dean of the College of Business and Professor of Marketing; Business. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1966, 1970, 1973.
  • DAVID LUECHAUER, Ph.D., Associate Dean of the College of Business and Professor of Management; Business. B.S., Ohio Northern University; M.A., Miami University of Ohio; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati.
  • PATRICK M. LYNCH, M.S., Assistant Professor of Accounting, Business. B.S., University of New Orleans, 1972; M.S. 1987.
  • JAMES S. MACKAY, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., 1987; M.M., 1991; Ph.D., 2000, McGill University.
  • JOHN R. MAHONEY, M.M., Francisco M. Gonzales, M.D., Distinguished Professor of Music, Coordinator of Jazz Studies; Music and Fine Arts. B.S., SUNY at Potsdam, New York, 1970; M.M., Eastman School of Music, 1978.
  • DAPHNE MAIN, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Accounting; Business. B.S., University of Vermont, 1976; M.S., Western Michigan University, 1982; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1990.
  • BRETT P. MATHERNE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Management, Chase Minority Entrepreneurship Chair, Business. B.S. Louisiana State University, 1987; M.B.A., 1991; Ph.D., Georgia State University, 2004.
  • EDWARD R. McCLELLAN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Music Education; Music and Fine Arts. B.S., Duquesne University, 1983; MME, 1987; PhD., The University of North Carolina, 2007
  • JEAN MONTES, DMA, Assistant Professor of Music, Coordinator of String Activities; Music and Fine Arts. B. A., Duquesne, 1994; M. A., University of Akron, 1997; D. M. A., University of Iowa, 2003.
  • H. JAC McCRACKEN, M.M., Associate Professor of Music, Coordinator of Keyboard Studies; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., East Carolina University, 1970; M.M., University of Cincinnati, 1974.
  • LUIS MIRÓN, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology, Dean of the College of Social Sciences. B.A. Tulane University, 1972; M.A., Louisiana State University, 1981; Ph.D. Tulane University, 1986.
  • JOHN R. MURPHY, D.M.A., Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., Southern Illinois University, 1970; M.M., University of Washington, 1973; D.M.A., University of Michigan, 1977.
  • ALLEN NISBET, M.M., Associate Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., 1973; M.M., 1975, University of Illinois.
  • MARY ORIOL, Dr.P.H., MSN, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing and Coordinator of the Health Care Systems Management Program, Social Sciences. M.S.N., University of Southern Mississippi; Dr.P.H., Tulane University.  
  • MICHAEL M. PEARSON, Ph.D., Professor of Marketing; Business. B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1965; M.B.A., 1968; Ph.D., 1971, University of Colorado—Boulder.
  • KENDRA REED, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Management, MBA Director, and Area Chairperson of Management / Marketing / International Business; Business. B.S. Ed., Northwestern University, 1987; M.B.A., DePaul University, 1992; Ph.D., University of Nebraska—Lincoln, 1998.
  • MARITZA E. SALGADO, DNP, MSN, APRN, FNP-BC, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Social Sciences.  B.S., Tulane University, 1997; A.D.N., Charity School of Nursing, 1999; M.S.N., Loyola University New Orleans, 2004. D.N.P., The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 2010.
  • JANNA P. SASLAW, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.A., Barnard College, 1980; M.A., 1985; M.Phil., 1987; Ph.D., 1992, Columbia University.
  • A. MICHAEL SIBLEY, Ph.D., Professor of Finance; Business . B.S., 1966; M.A., 1968, Appalachian State University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1972.
  • JOHN N. SNYDER, J.D., Conrad Hilton Eminent Scholar in Music Industry Studies, Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.M.E., University of North Carolina, Greensboro, 1970; J.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1973.
  • WILLIAM E. THORNTON, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology, Chair of the Department of Criminal Justice; Social Sciences. Adjunct Professor; Social Sciences. B.A., 1969; M.A., 1973, East Carolina University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 1977.
  • GAIL TUMULTY, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.A.A., Professor of Nursing, Social Sciences. B.S.N., 1975; M.S.N., 1980, St. Louis University; Ph.D., University of Texas, 1990.
  • VICTORIA P. VEGA, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Music, Coordinator of Music Therapy; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., West Virginia University, 1980; M.M.T., Loyola University New Orleans, 1984; Ph.D., Temple University, 2007.
  • LYDIA VOIGT, Ph.D., University Distinguished Professor, The Rev. Joseph H. Fichter, S.J., Distinguished Professor of the Social Sciences, Academic Affairs; Professor of Sociology, Social Sciences. B.A., 1969, Boston University; M.A., 1971; Ph.D., 1977, Boston College.
  • NICHOLAS R. VOLZ, M.M., Assistant Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts.  B.M.E., Loyola University New Orleans, 2002; M.M., Southeastern Louisiana University, 2004; A.B.D., Indiana University, 2010.
  • PATRICK D. WALSH, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Criminal Justice, Social Sciences. B.C.J., Loyola University New Orleans, 1978; M.C. J.,2002, Loyola University New Orleans; Ph.D., 2006, University of Southern Mississippi.
  • FRANKIE J. WEINBERG, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Management; Business. B.B.A., 2000, Loyola College in Maryland; M.B.A., 2005, SUNY Binghamton; Ph.D., 2010, University of Georgia.
  • MICHAEL S. WILSON, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Management, Business.  B.S., Nicholls State University, 1976; M.E., Tulane University, 1980; Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 2004.
  • J. STUART WOOD, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics / Finance; Business. B.S., Tulane University, 1966; M.S., Princeton University, 1970; M.B.A., 1975; M.Phil., 1978; Ph.D., 1980, New York University.
  • LEE J. YAO , Ph.D., Associate Professor of Accounting, Joseph A. Butt, S.J., Distinguished Professor of Accounting, and Area Chairperson of Accounting / Economics / Finance; Business. B.S., Minnesota State University, 1980; M.B.A., 1981; Ph.D., Deakin University (Australia), 1993.

Professor Emeritus

  • BILLIE A. WILSON, R.N., Ph.D., Professor Emerita of Nursing, Social Sciences. B.S., Newton College of the Sacred Heart, 1965; M.S., Purdue University, 1973; B.S.N., Northwestern State University, 1978; M.N., Louisiana State University Medical Center, 1981; Ph.D., University of New Orleans, 1987.

 

College of Business

Dean: William Locander, Ph.D.
Associate Dean: Angela Brocato Hoffer

The deans are assisted by the leadership team:

  • M.B.A. Director: Stephanie Mansfield
  • M.B.A. Advisor: Kendra Reed, Ph.D.
  • Director of the Intl Business Center: Wing Fok, Ph.D.
  • Director of Portfolio and Internships: Kathy Barnett, Ph.D.
  • Exec. Director of Special Projects: David Luechauer, Ph.D.

For more information on the college, visit its website at:
http://www.business.loyno.edu/about-college

ASSOCIATIONS + ACCREDITATION

The Joseph A. Butt, S.J., College of Business, founded in 1947, holds membership in the American Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, Association of American Colleges, Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities, National Catholic Educational Association, the Southern Business Administration Association, and the Southwestern Business Administration Association.

The College of Business' baccalaureate program was accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) in 1950. The graduate division of the college was established in 1961, accredited by the AACSB in 1974, and reaccredited in 1983, 1999, and most recently in 2010. The College of Business is also accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). 

"AWAKEN, ENLIGHTEN, TRANSFORM" MISSION

The College of Business acts in accordance with the following mission:

Today, more than ever, businesses need ethical, empowered leaders who invite trust, build community, and value their professional responsibility more than self-interest. In the College of Business, our vision is to create a learning place that awakens, enlightens, and transforms students to become those kind of leaders and not to leave their values, ethics, and character behind when they graduate.

In the Ignatian tradition, the mission of the College of Business is to provide a superior values-laden education that motivates and enables our students to become effective and socially responsible business leaders. We strive to contribute quality research, serve local and intellectual communities, and graduate students who possess critical thinking skills and courage to act justly in a global business environment. 

Mission of the M.B.A. Program

The mission of the College of Business' M.B.A. program is to inspire leaders who employ the value-chain-creation model of business through systems thinking, critical analyses, effective business practices, and responsible actions.

AWARDS FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENTS

Each year in May, the College of Business hosts an annual awards ceremony to honor outstanding students and faculty. Awards are given to students of all class ranks. There are four types of student awards: college-wide awards, awards in each major, awards given by student organizations, and awards from outside agencies. There are also four types of faculty awards: for outstanding advising, research, service, and teaching.

The College of Business is proud to honor these awardees for their outstanding academic and professional achievements and to display their names on plaques located in the Miller Hall 3rd floor lobby. 

CHAIR ENDOWMENTS + DISTINGUISHED PROFESSORSHIPS

The College of Business recognizes exemplary faculty with the following honorary chairs and professorships:

Chairs

  • Gerald N. Gaston Eminent Scholar Chair in International Business: Len Treviño
  • Harold E. Wirth Eminent Scholar Chair in Economics: Walter Block
  • Hilton / Baldridge Distinguished Chair in Music Industry Studies: Jerry Goolsby
  • Jack + Vada Reynolds Chair in International Business: Jeffrey Krug
  • Legendre-Soule Distinguished Chair in Business Ethics: Nicholas Capaldi

Professorships

  • Bank One Distinguished Professorship of International Business: William Barnett
  • Barry + Teresa LeBlanc Distinguished Professorship of Business Ethics: Kate Lawrence
  • Chase / Francis C. Doyle Distinguished Professorship: Michael Pearson
  • Chase Minority Entrepreneurship Distinguished Professorship I: Brenda Joyner
  • Chase Minority Entrepreneurship Distinguished Professorship II: Brett Matherne
  • Dean Henry J. Engler, Jr., Distinguished Professorship in Management: Wing Fok
  • Dr. John V. Connor Professorship in Economics + Finance
  • Merl M. Huntsinger Distinguished Professorship in Investments + Finances: Ron Christner
  • Rev. Joseph A. Butt, S.J., Distinguished Professorship in Accounting: Lee Yao
  • Stanford H. Rosenthal Distinguished Professorship for Risk + Entrepreneurship
  • Thomas H. + Catherine B. Kloor Professorship in Entrepreneurship + Small Business

DEGREE PROGRAMS OFFERED IN BUSINESS

The College of Business offers the following graduate degree program:

Other programs offered include dual degrees in the following configurations:

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES + ELECTIVES

Descriptions of required and elective graduate business courses can be found in the following sections:

DUAL DEGREE GRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAMS

Because students often have multiple interests and because the demands of today's dynamic business environment often reach beyond the sphere of general management or business competency, the College of Business offers the flexibility of pursuing an M.B.A. degree at the same time as another graduate degree offered by one of Loyola's other graduate colleges.

Students must apply to each program separately.

Master of Business Administration / Juris Doctor

The M.B.A. / J.D. program is designed for those students seeking advanced education in business administration, in addition to an education in the law. Normal degree requirements of 51 credit hours for the M.B.A. program and 90 credit hours for the J.D. program are complemented and reduced to 42 credit hours for the M.B.A program and 81 credit hours for the J.D program. Each degree program's requirements are, thus, reduced by nine credit hours as each can accept, as part of its elective requirements, nine credit hours of coursework from the other program.

Upon completion of the program, the student will be awarded two separate degrees. The requirements for both must be completed, however, before either individual degree can be awarded. Students participating in the dual program must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in the College of Business and 2.0 in the College of Law. Students failing to meet the requirements of the dual program are awarded an M.B.A. or J.D. degree separately only if they fulfill the requirements for the individual degree as outlined in the graduate or law bulletin, respectively.

Master of Business Administration / Pastoral Studies

The M.B.A. / M.P.S. program is designed to provide the theological, ministerial, and pastoral foundation, as well as the business, organizational, and management knowledge that together will strengthen graduates' ability to respond to the needs of the Church and the world today. Normal degree requirements of 51 credit hours for the M.B.A. program and 36 credit hours for the M.P.S. program are complemented and reduced to 42 credit hours for the M.B.A program and 24 credit hours for the M.P.S. program, for a total reduction of 21 credit hours.

Upon completion of the program, the student will be awarded two separate degrees. The requirements for both must be completed, however, before either individual degree can be awarded. Students participating in the dual program must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in both the College of Business and the Loyola Institute for Ministry. Students failing to meet the requirements of the dual program are awarded an M.B.A. or M.P.S. degree only if they fulfill the requirements for the individual degree as outlined in the university's graduate bulletin.

ELIGIBILITY + REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

In order to graduate, a student must meet the graduation requirements of the university and college and must possess a Loyola grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0, as well as a GPA of at least 3.0 in all M.B.A. core and elective courses taken at Loyola. Students must also complete all of the required courses for their degree program(s) and earn at least a B in the M.B.A. capstone course.

After matriculation, at most 6 credit hours may be taken outside of Loyola University New Orleans to be applied toward required M.B.A. coursework. The capstone BA B850 "Total Global Strategy" course must be taken at Loyola. Course substitutions and exceptions to these guidelines or requirements are allowed only with permission of the associate dean and the M.B.A. director. 

EXCEPTIONS + LIMITATIONS ON COURSE CREDIT

Because each student's academic needs and life circumstances differ, the College of Business offers the flexibility of earning some course credit through independent study or transfer credit from other accredited institutions.

Independent Study

A student may apply for an independent study under the following conditions:

  1. The student needs a course for graduation which is not being offered in the desired time frame, or
  2. The student desires to study a topic(s) not presently covered in courses offered by the college.
  3. A student is only allowed one independent study in the course of their entire M.B.A. program.

A minimum GPA of 3.0 is required for enrolling in an independent study.

Students must also complete a formal application prior to registration and obtain approval from the desired instructor and the M.B.A. Director.

Application forms and additional information are available from the M.B.A. Director.

Transfer Credit

With the exception of courses taken at Jesuit consortium schools, a maximum of 6 credit hours of transfer work may be applied to 700- and 800-level courses in the M.B.A. program curriculum. Only courses taken at AACSB-accredited schools within 7 years prior to matriculation will be considered.

After matriculation, students may take up to 6 hours at another institution to be applied to 600-, 700-, or 800-level M.B.A. coursework. Prior written permission must be obtained. Permission will be granted only for schools accredited by the AACSB and only to students demonstrating compelling need.

A consortium agreement with selected AACSB-accredited Jesuit schools is in effect. Students may transfer up to 50% of course requirements at the 700- or 800-level under this agreement. The grade of B or higher is required in any course taken at another school in order to apply to degree requirements.

Students must meet the admission requirements of the other school.

EXCEPTIONS TO NORMAL ACADEMIC PROGRESS

In order to ensure that students graduate on time and are adequately prepared for their coursework, the College of Business monitors each student's course schedule and academic workload according to the following guidelines.

Prerequisite Courses

Most courses have specific prerequisites. Students may not register for a course until they have met the prerequisites listed in the course descriptions in this bulletin. It is the student’s responsibility to become familiar with course prerequisites.

Prerequisites are also listed in the semester schedule of course offerings in LORA.

Academic Probation

An M.B.A. student may be placed on probation or dismissed under the following circumstances:

Probation
  • Regularly admitted students must maintain a cumulative Loyola M.B.A. GPA of 3.0 to remain in good academic standing. If any student's GPA falls below 3.0, the student will be placed on academic probation and given one semester in which to bring the GPA back up to 3.0. Regularly admitted students can be placed on probation only once during their entire M.B.A. program. If a student's GPA falls below 3.0 a second time, the student will be dismissed immediately and indefinitely from the M.B.A. program.
  • Conditionally admitted students must maintain a cumulative Loyola M.B.A. GPA of 3.0 during their entire M.B.A. program. If such a student's GPA falls below 3.0 at any time, the student will be dismissed immediately and indefinitely from the M.B.A. program.
  • Except under special circumstances, a student who receives a grade of I ("incomplete") in any course may not register for any further courses until the relevant coursework is completed and a letter grade is received. If a student is already registered for the next semester's courses and receives a grade of I ("incomplete"), the student will be withdrawn from all next semester's coursres. If the I remains past the add date for that next semester, or any subsequent semester, the student will not be eligible to enroll for any courses in that semester. 
Dismissal
  • A student who receives a grade of F in any M.B.A. foundation, core, or elective course will be dismissed from the program.
  • A regularly admitted student who fails to maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 will be dismissed if they fail to bring the GPA back up to 3.0 after one semester on probation.
  • A conditionally admitted student who fails to maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 during any semester will be dismissed.
  • A student found guilty of academic dishonesty will be dismissed from the program.

Academic Workload

A full-time student not on probation may not take more than 15 credit hours during a fall or spring semester or 6 credit hours during a summer session without permission of the associate dean and M.B.A. director.

Except under special circumstances, a student may only take 15 credit hours during a maximum of 1 semester throughout their entire graduate enrollment at Loyola in the College of Business.

INTERNSHIP PROGRAM + REQUIREMENTS

Because many experiences in business are impossible to gain in the traditional classroom setting, M.B.A. students have the option to earn credit by participating in the internship program. The College of Business internship program provides students with an opportunity to:

  • Enhance their résumés with career-related experience,
  • Reinforce and reevaluate classroom study through a comparison of theory and practice, and
  • Pursue the study of specialized business topics in their fields of interest in a professional setting.

The internship program is open to M.B.A. students who have completed all of the foundation courses. To qualify for internship credit, a position must provide sufficient duties, new learning opportunities, and new responsibilities to allow for M.B.A.-level educational advancement. Evaluation of positions is done on a case-by-case basis. Typically they require a minimum of 150 hours at the job site and regular interaction with an academic supervisor. Students must also complete an academic component as defined and approved by the academic supervisor.

Internships, though encouraged to be taken during a student’s last semester before graduation, may take place in the summer or during the fall and spring semesters. The grade is reported as pass or fail and is based on the following criteria:

  • Completion of the academic component,
  • Meeting any additional requirements set by the academic supervisor, and
  • A confidential performance evaluation by the internship site supervisor.

PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITIES + STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Learning takes place both in and outside of the classroom. In addition to internships and study abroad programs, the following fraternities and organizations provide M.B.A. students with valuable experiences.

Beta Gamma Sigma

The purposes of this national honor society are to encourage and reward scholarship and accomplishment among students of business administration, to promote the advancement of education in the art and science of business and management, and to foster integrity in the conduct of business operations. Juniors, seniors, and graduate students who have achieved a high level of academic performance are considered for membership in this organization. Invitations go to the upper 20 percent of the graduating M.B.A. class.

Loyola M.B.A. Association

The M.B.A. Association offers an excellent means for M.B.A. students to interact with other students, faculty, and community leaders. In addition to special gatherings, meetings are scheduled with leaders from the civic and business community of greater New Orleans as invited guest speakers. Students are also afforded the opportunity to discuss and initiate positive changes within the M.B.A. program. Membership is open to all M.B.A. students. Officers are elected annually and nominations are open to all members of the M.B.A. Association.

STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS + REQUIREMENTS

All business students are encouraged to study abroad. Students considering study abroad must inform the staff in the Center for International Education of their intentions. The staff will assist in locating a suitable program and in pre-departure planning. Students will also be required to participate in the de-briefing session upon their return. Students should plan ahead to take advantage of these opportunities

The College of Business offers short summer programs in Europe and Asia and a winter program in Latin America. The programs are taught in English by Loyola faculty and by local guest lecturers. Site visits to local companies, meetings with public officials and multinational corporation executives, and field trips are included.

The college also participates in several exchange programs. Students can study in the native language in France and Spain. The host institution assists with housing, registration, and integration into the local society. Tuition is based on Loyola’s full-time tuition, and is paid to Loyola; no tuition is paid at the other school. The student will be assisted by the associate dean’s office or their academic advisor with selection of courses.

Students may also wish to engage in an internship while or after studying abroad. Interning, working, or studying abroad obviously requires planning well in advance, so any student considering such activities should make those interests known as early as possible.

Finally, for M.B.A. students in particular, Loyola is part of a consortium of Jesuit schools partnering with Peking University, which sponsors an M.B.A. program in English in Beijing. Two Loyola M.B.A. students per year are eligible to participate in this exciting program.

Master of Business Administration

Program Objective

The objective of the M.B.A. program is to graduate individuals who are able to apply management theory and current business practices; communicate effectively and work as members of a team; use well-developed problem-solving and ethical decision-making skills, as well as leadership abilities; and possess an understanding of global business issues and their impact on business.

Learning Goals

The M.B.A. program has the following learning goals:

  • Graduates will be able to engage a business problem head-on and make an informed and implementable decision based on a thorough analysis of the situation from multiple perspectives.
  • Graduates will be able to analyze the value proposition of a firm's marketplace offerings, understand the strategic fit of the firm, and create a comprehensive plan to deliver customer value.
  • Graduates will be able to act with a managerial perspective, synthesize information from many varied sources, communicate business information persuasively, and influence others to achieve goals.
  • Graduates will be able to confront ethical dilemmas with a balanced and coherent perspective, apply a principled method for responding to ethical issues, and reflect on bias in their ethical decisions.

Required Courses

The M.B.A. curriculum consists of 51 credit hours and has four parts:

  1. Foundation courses
  2. M.B.A. core courses
  3. M.B.A. elective courses
  4. Capstone + community service

Curriculum Design

Foundation Courses

Course
Title
Credits
ACCT B601 Financial Accounting* 3
DECS B601 Statistics* 3
ECON B603 Economics* 3
FIN B601 Financial Management* 3
MGT B600 Management* 3
MGT B605 Managerial Communication 3
  Prerequisite: College Algebra, Finite Math, or Calculus** 0

* It is possible to waive these courses if you have graduated within the last 7 years and earned a grade of B or better in the undergraduate equivalents of these courses from an AACSB-accredited business school. To waive ECON B603, Economics, a student must have taken both Microeconomics and Macroeconomics as an undergraduate.

** Must be completed at an accredited university or college with a grade of C or higher. It is also possible to waive this requirement with a GMAT Quantitative score of 20% or higher.

Core Courses

Course
Title
Credits
ACCT B715 Management Control + Decision-Making 3
BA B700 Ethical + Legal Responsibility 3
FIN B700 Advanced Financial Management 3
MKT B700 Marketing Management 3
MGT B711 Management Science + Operations 3
MGT B715 Global Supply Chain Management 3
MGT B725 Leadership Dynamics 3

Elective Courses

Course
Title
Credits
BA / FIN / MGT / MKT / etc M.B.A. Electives: May be chosen from any graduate-level business electives offered 9

Capstone + Service

Course
Title
Credits
BA B850 Total Global Strategy* 3
BA B795 Community Service 0
* The capstone must be taken during the last semester in residence and students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher in order to register for the course. A grade of B or higher is required in the capstone course to be eligible for graduation.

Total Credits

51

Other Information

M.B.A. Course Descriptions

 

Courses: Master of Business Administration

Accounting

ACCT B601 Financial Accounting 3 cr. hrs.

This course introduces the accounting cycle from recording financial transactions to the preparation and analysis of financial statements. The course emphasizes the uses of the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows.

ACCT B715 Management Control + Decision Making 3 cr. hrs.

This course discusses control and decision making from the information provided by management control and information systems. Course topics include discussion of a comprehensive management information system (MIS) and its supporting integration of the MIS with organizational strategy, and utilization of such systems to generate information to serve managerial needs.

Prerequisite: FIN B601

ACCT B780 Intermediate Fraud Examination 3 cr. hrs.

This course is a more in-depth study of fraud and the detection and resolution of fraud than the principles of fraud examination course. The course includes such topics as who commits fraud and why, the symptoms of fraud, investigative methods, financial statement fraud, fraud against the organization, bankruptcy, divorce and tax fraud, and the criminal and civil litigation process.

Prerequisites: ACCT B202, ACCT B203, Principles of Fraud Examination

ACCT B782 Adv. Forensic Accounting + Bus. Valuation 3 cr. hrs.

This course is an in-depth study of a host of litigation support techniques in addition to fraud detection. The course includes such topics as indirect methods of reconstructing income, money laundering, calculating commercial damages, computing economic damages, business valuations, and litigation support in Antitrust and Federal False Claims litigation.

Prerequisite: ACCT B780 + associated prerequisites

ACCT B784 Theory Science + Practice of Forensic Invest. 3 cr. hrs.

This course will give an overview of forensic investigation, including the fraud problem, traditional fraud detection methods, fraud investigation techniques, financial statement fraud and a proactive detection model, the nature and types of asset misappropriation, bankruptcy code and how perpetrators fraudulently conceal and transfer assets and income in bankruptcies or divorces, money laundering, the civil and criminal litigation process, and expert witness testimony.

Prerequisites: ACCT B202, ACCT B410, Principles of Fraud Examination

ACCT B786 Courtroom Evidence to Forensic Accounting 3 cr. hrs.

This course will cover the Federal Rules of Evidence and significant Supreme Court decisions relating to the Rules. It is the aim of the course not only to familiarize students with evidentiary rules and caselaw, but also especially to instruct students on litigation skills relating to evidentiary issues that occur in court at trial and appellate levels.

ACCT B830 Personal Financial Planning for the Professional 3 cr. hrs.

This course is the study of personal financial planning including goal setting, cash budgeting, planning for insurance needs, retirement planning, tax planning, investment, and estate planning. The course requires an integration of the various types of planning with client goals. The course makes use of forecasts, computer models, and macroeconomic data. The emphasis is on planning for the professional planner who has a diversified clientele.

Prerequisites: ACCT B601; a working knowledge of present value concepts is assumed; this should not be the first M.B.A. course taken, and a background in any of the following will be helpful: Accounting, Tax, Insurance, Investments.

ACCT B893 Special Topics in Accounting 3 cr. hrs.

This course will research and discuss current issues and problems in accounting.

ACCT B899 Independent Study in Accounting 3 cr. hrs.

See description in College of Business overview

Business Administration

BA B700 Ethical + Legal Responsibility 3 cr. hrs.

This course will help students become aware of (a) the ethical and legal norms internal to commerce, (b) the larger ethical and legal context within which commercial activity takes place, (c) the reciprocal interaction between commerce and the other institutions in society, (d) the new ethical and legal challenges posed to business by the evolution of science, technology, globalization, bureaucratization, government, law, politics, and religion, and (e) specific ethical and legal challenges to management, marketing, accounting and finance.

Prerequisite: MGT B600

BA B710 Individual + Corporate Entrepreneurship 3 cr. hrs.

This course will relate and integrate the student’s academic and professional experience through the analysis of an independent/corporate new venture start-up. The course will take a systems approach to problems which are confronted in developing a new business over time, intuition and creative problems solving techniques.

Prerequisite: FIN B601

BA B795 Community Service 0 cr. hrs.

This course involves 30 hours of volunteer work (without compensation) that must be completed in a not-for-profit setting located in the greater metropolitan New Orleans community. The organization must be approved by the M.B.A. director.

BA B850 Total Global Strategy 3 cr. hrs.

This course integrates the student’s academic and professional experiences with the purpose of enhancing her/his capacity to formulate and implement successful global strategies.  Its basic methods are discussion of cases and a project.  The cases focus on the skills, knowledge, and expertise appropriate to a leader’s role, functions, and expected contributions to the corporation and society at large.  As a result, students will enhance their capacity to (1) creatively identify alternative courses of action, (2) objectively and thoroughly assess these options’ pros and cons, and (3) convincingly argue and support their conclusions and recommendations.  The project has two components.  In the first, team members identify key factors shaping the future structure and competitive behavior of a global industry; and in the second, each student does a strategic audit of a company within this industry, with the purpose of presenting and defending strategic recommendations to the company’s board of directors.

Prerequisites: MGT B711, FIN B700, MKT B700

BA B893 Special Topics in Business 3 cr. hrs.

This course will research and discuss current issues and problems in business administration.

BA B897 Internship in Business Administration 1 – 3 cr. hrs.

See description in College of Business overview

BA B899 Independent Study in Business Administration

See description in College of Business overview

Decision Science

DECS B601 Statistics 3 cr. hrs.

This course introduces the statistical methods which have found wide application in business. Topics covered include descriptive statistics, probability concepts and distributions, estimation, hypothesis tests, contingency tables, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression analysis, and decision theory. Business applications and extensive use of microcomputer statistical software, including spread sheets, are an integral part of the course.

DECS B899 Independent Study in Decision Science 3 cr. hrs.

See description in College of Business overview

Economics

ECON B603 Economics 3 cr. hrs.

This course is an introduction into economic analysis; efficiency and equity; production and exchange; costs, supply and demand; markets, organizations, and government; competition, cooperation and coercion, international trade.

ECON B810 International Economics 3 cr. hrs.

This course considers exchange rate systems; adjustments in international disequilibrium situations; relationships among rates exchange, inflation, interest, and unemployment; and domestic and international economic policies. It also considers various theories of competitive advantages in international trade, the nature and effects of commercial policies, and international economic integration.

ECON B893 Special Topics in Economics 3 cr. hrs.

This course will research and discuss current issues and problems in economics.

ECON B899 Independent Study in Economics 3 cr. hrs.

See description in College of Business overview

Finance

FIN B601 Financial Management 3 cr. hrs.

This course introduces the principles of financial analysis and management of a business. Students learn how to think in terms of the present values of alternatives so that they can choose the proper course of action to follow. The effects of time and uncertainty on business decisions, especially in the selection of assets and the raising of funds for asset purchases, are studied. Students learn how the unencumbered system of financial markets and firms allocates scarce resources to benefit consumers. Analysis of alternative courses of action in terms of a system of cash flows is covered.

Prerequisite: ACCT B601

FIN B700 Advanced Financial Management 3 cr. hrs.

This course advances the graduate student’s knowledge and comprehension of financial management by providing a deeper understanding of the theory, practice, and application of the principles of business finance. The course emphasizes the application of financial theory by giving the student a framework analyzing and recommending alternative solutions to business financial problems. Case analysis will be used.

Prerequisite: FIN B601

FIN B800 Management of Financial Institutions 3 cr. hrs.

This course analyzes management policies of financial institutions, including asset, liability, and capital management. Various risks faced by financial institutions will be studied along with detailed analysis of the tools used to measure and manage these risks in the financial services industry.

FIN B805 Investments 3 cr. hrs.

This course examines different types of investments, all of which have the dimensions of risk and expected return. Students study the flow of funds in the economy which leads to the term structure of interest rates underlying investment; they learn how to analyze and forecast interest rates and their effects on the values of securities; they compute anticipated and realized rates of return; and they learn portfolio theory, which explains how the risk borne by the investor affects the rate of return he/she requires on a stock. Fundamental analysis of publicly-traded securities is a major portion of the course, and students forecast the earnings and dividends of firms and study how these fundamental factors affect the stock price. The functioning of financial markets, and their efficiency, is also explored.

FIN B810 International Finance 3 cr. hrs.

This course examines common financial problems faced by business firms engaged in international trade or investment. A significant portion of the course is devoted to a study of the environment within which international financial decisions are made, with particular emphasis on the market for foreign exchange. Topics include the international economic environment, foreign exchange markets, factors influencing exchange rates, measurement and management of foreign exchange risks, financing international trade, foreign financing alternatives, direct foreign investment, and political risk analysis.

FIN B820 Financial Statement Analysis 3 cr. hrs.

This course teaches techniques of analysis to uncover the events which have been hidden by the financial statements. Lenders or investors who can determine the truth regarding the recent financial management of the firm and make more accurate predictions regarding its financial future are more successful. The course focuses on the financial decisions the firm has made and its financial condition, as revealed by the financial statements, and on forecasting pro-forma financial statements which reflect alternative possible courses of action. Students learn to discover funds flows, construct and interpret financial ratios, understand operating and financial leverage, analyze growth and its effects, predict bankruptcy, and prepare pro-forma statements.

FIN B835 Advanced Cases in Finance 3 cr. hrs.

This course will teach students to value the quity of the firm under the present plan, and changes in that value under newly-designed alternative plans. This systemic approach includes: 1) Forecasting the future pro-forma financial statements through the Terminus (“horizon date”) T under the forecast assumptions inherent in the identified course of action; 2) forecasting the free cash flows through the Terminus T; 3) Forecasting the Terminal Value at the Terminus T; and 4) Discounting the stream of future forecasted cash flows and Terminal Value at the risk-adjusted cost of equity to the

FIN B893 Special Topics in Finance 3 cr. hrs.

This course will research and discuss current issues and problems in finance.

FIN B899 Independent Study in Finance 3 cr. hrs.

See description in College of Business overview

Legal Studies

LGST B893 Special Topics in Legal Study 3 cr. hrs.

This course will examine selected topics in legal study.

LGST B899 Independent Study in Legal Studies 3 cr. hrs.

See description in College of Business overview

Management

MGT B600 Management 3 cr. hrs.

This course provides a foundation of performance management principles and skills for graduate business students. Students will learn management’s role in facilitating organizational performance and achieving a competitive advantage. Students will use management tools in making sound financial and ethical decisions for the organization. Through class assignments and projects students will build skill in performing research, developing performance measures, making decisions, influencing others, and presenting results with impact.

MGT B605 Managerial Communication 3 cr. hrs.

This course will improve the abilities of managers to communicate effectively throughout their organization. The course will improve the participants’ communication skills by requiring them to make effective presentations (individually, in groups, and using the latest software packages), analyze case studies, conduct a communication audit on an existing New Orleans company, and explore contemporary business trends and issues.

MGT B711 Management Science + Operations 3 cr. hrs.

The course introduces fundamental quantitative approaches for decision making in the field of operations management. Students will learn how to use quantitative tools to enhance their ability to analyze real world problems, identify possible solutions, and make right decisions to achieve performance excellence of operations.

Prerequisite: DECS B601

MGT B715 Global Supply Chain Management 3 cr. hrs.

This course will examine global supply chain management as a systematic approach to managing business through analyzing and controlling flows of information, materials, and cash from raw material suppliers to the final customers. It represents a philosophy of doing business that stresses processes and integration. As a graduate course, it focuses on how to design and manage the supply chain to match firms’ competitive strategies and achieve the high profits of the whole supply chain. Topics include decision making on supply chain design, sourcing, coordination, inventory management, logistics management, and information sharing.

Prerequisite: FIN B601

MGT B725 Leadership Dynamics 3 cr. hrs.

This course is a study of the interactions that exist between people, especially in the context of organizations. In particular, it examines two important processes in organizations: leadership and team-building. Topics include the roles of context and followers in the emergence of leaders, exercise of power, ethical issues faced by leaders, influence, diversity, team influences on beliefs and perceptions, the development of teams and team norms, conformity and deviance in teams, team decision making, and designing teams for effective performance and decision making. Other related issues associated with human behavior in organizations, including coaching, conflict resolution, negotiation, and empowerment, will also be studied.

Prerequisite: MGT B600

MGT B815 Cross-cultural Management 3 cr. hrs.

This course prepares managers to solve strategic business and work-group problems that arise from cross-cultural differences. Such problems can be seen in discord over task assignments, low levels of productivity in internationally mixed teams, difficulties in transferring management or production practices to overseas units, and unrealistic expectations at the personal, work-group, and business-unit levels. We divide the course into thirds that examine (1) the meaning of culture, (2) the culture’s impact on management practices, and (3) how to manage cultural differences. There is some reading that is more theoretical but many cases emphasize the practical side of dealing with international cultural differences.

MGT B820 Negotiations 3 cr. hrs.

This course emphasizes formulating objectives and building effective negotiation strategies to achieve those objectives. The course builds skills by requiring students to analyze, in a variety of exercises and specific strategies and tactics within the overall negotiations process.

MGT B893 Special Topics in Management 3 cr. hrs.

This course will research and discuss current issues and problems in management.

MGT B899 Independent Study in Management 3 cr. hrs.

See description in College of Business overview

Marketing

MKT B700 Marketing Management 3 cr. hrs.

This course covers the process of designing products and services and the processes of marketing products and services. Important concepts covered are decreasing cycle time; determining opportunities; determining customer needs; translating needs into requirements; estimating sales potential; and setting price, distribution, and promotion strategies. An applied project is an important element of this course.

Prerequisite: FIN B601

MKT B715 Cases in Marketing Strategy 3 cr. hrs.

This course acquaints the student with the nature and scope of marketing strategy. It outlines how marketing strategies are formed based on detailed market analysis. Students will learn how to approach marketing problems from different perspectives.

MKT B800 Global Marketing 3 cr. hrs.

This course will equip students to understand why organizations seek to globally market their products’ resources and how global marketing programs are shaped by historical, geographical, infrastructural, cultural, political/legal, economic, and competitive factors. Also, they will be prepared to make decisions with respect to the standardization or adaptation of the strategic elements of the marketing mix, the use of various foreign market entry strategies, and the most appropriate approaches to pursue strategic alliances, among others. These topics are identified and discussed via in-depth case analysis.

MKT B810 Global Retailing + Distribution 3 cr. hrs.

This course examines retail institutions and their relationships with customers, distribution partners and competitors within global environments. Specifically this course addresses retail institutions, internationalizations, trade area analysis, supply chains, promotions, operations, and financial strategies. Projects require feasibility analyses and strategic comparisons.

Prerequisite: MKT B700

MKT B840 Services Marketing 3 cr. hrs.

This course's primary theme is that service organizations (e.g., banks, transportation companies, hotels, hospitals, educational institutions, professional services) require a distinctive approach to marketing strategy – both in development and execution. A second theme focuses on the role of service in manufacturing businesses.

MKT B893 Special Topics in Marketing 3 cr. hrs.

This course will research and discuss current issues and problems in marketing.

MKT B899 Independent Study in Marketing 3 cr. hrs.

See description in College of Business overview

Music and Fine Arts

DEAN AND DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES: Donald Boomgaarden, Ph.D., Communications/Music Complex, Room 165
ASSOCIATE DEAN: Anthony A. DeCuir, Ph.D., Communications/Music Complex, Room 165

Mission Statement

The College of Music and Fine Arts serves as the preeminent center of fine and performing arts study among all Jesuit colleges and universities throughout the United States offering professional and liberal arts programs within a rigorous academic environment. Students are prepared for fine and performing arts professions in a manner that reflects the Jesuit ideals of truth, service, and justice. The College of Music and Fine Arts provides the campus, region, and nation with music, theatre, dance, and visual arts activities demonstrating the University's commitment and service to the fine and performing arts.

Accreditation

The College of Music and Fine Arts, founded in 1932, is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. The college also holds membership in the Association of American Colleges, Jesuit Educational Association, National Catholic Educational Association, and the American Music Therapy Association. The music therapy program is approved by the American Music Therapy Association.

Admission Requirements

The College of Music and Fine Arts requires an appropriate undergraduate music degree with a GPA of 3.0 or higher and a performance audition for matriculation in the college, in addition to university requirements for admission. Applicants are required to complete the College of Music and Fine Arts Audition Application prior to scheduling their audition on one of the published audition dates. Contact the College of Music and Fine Arts for specific requirements. The required performance level may vary according to the degree program Master of Music or Master of Music Therapy (M.M. or M.M.T.) specified by the applicant. Those applicants whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0, or whose undergraduate major was not in music, may be admitted conditionally. This especially applies to students who have considerable work experience in the field of music. Students given conditional admission must achieve a 3.0 GPA in their first nine hours of non-remedial graduate music coursework.

All Master of Music students must take placement exams in music history and music theory to ensure an adequate foundation in these disciplines before graduate study is begun. Depending on the results of these tests, students may be required to enroll in remedial or undergraduate courses in music history and/or music theory; these courses will not count toward the degree. Remedial courses must be passed with the grade of B or higher or the course must be repeated. The exams should be taken prior to the first semester of enrollment. Without permission from the director of graduate studies, students may not enroll in any graduate theory or history course until they have taken the exams and remedied any deficiencies.

Introduction to Graduate Studies (MUGN M705) is normally taken during the first semester of enrollment. Without the permission from the director of graduate studies, students are not allowed to register for a graduate music theory or history course unless they are enrolled in or have already completed MUGN M705.

A broad segment of the music faculty will be involved in the development, administration, and evaluation of entrance auditions and examinations. The competency levels for each of the areas of expertise have been determined by general agreement among the graduate faculty.

 

Scholarships

The College of Music and Fine Arts administers talent-based music scholarships for graduate students. These awards vary according to the student’s potential for continued musical and academic progress, and the performance needs of the college. Retention of a music scholarship depends on satisfactory musical and academic progress and the student’s fulfillment of performance requirements as stipulated in the scholarship contract.

Admission to Candidacy

Students are admitted to candidacy in the College of Music and Fine Arts after the following degree program requirements have been met:

Master of Music

a. Completion of nine credit hours of non-remedial graduate coursework with a minimum grade point average of 3.0.
b. Completion of remedial courses required as a result of the theory and history entrance examinations.
c. Completion of Introduction to Graduate Studies (MUGN M705) with a grade of B or higher.

Master of Music Therapy

a. Completion of nine credit hours of non-remedial graduate coursework with a minimum grade point average of 3.0.
b. Successful completion of a functional music proficiency examination administered by the music therapy faculty.

Individual degree programs and departments stipulate a variety of specific proficiencies. Students must consult their advisors concerning these requirements.

Comprehensive Examinations for Master of Music (M.M.)

All students in M.M. programs must take a comprehensive exam during or after their final semester of coursework; this exam must be passed within the two years following the completion of other degree requirements, or additional coursework may be required before the exam can be taken. The exam, graded pass-fail, will cover topics such as performance, pedagogy, and repertoire. The exam committee will consist of the student’s applied teacher or the area coordinator, ensemble director or a faculty member with whom the student has studied, one member of the faculty, to be requested by the student, and the Associate Dean (ex officio). The associate dean will select the committee, with input from the student and the relevant area coordinators.

The comprehensive exam, includes written and oral components, with the oral component usually scheduled at least a week after successful completion of the written component. The three sections of the written exam may be taken over the course of a single ten-day period, with not more than four hours allotted to each section; at the student’s request, the exams may be taken during a single business day.

The specific format and content for each part of the exam will be determined in advance between the student and the individual members of the exam committee. Each student must pass the written exam in all three areas before proceeding to the oral exams. Each section of the written exam may be taken up to three times; if the student has not passed the written exam by the third attempt, additional coursework may be required to remediate deficiencies before the student is allowed to retake the test. The oral exam, which usually lasts from one and a half to two hours, may address any problems identified in the written exam and test the student’s ability to synthesize knowledge in different areas. The student must pass at least two sections of the oral exam, in addition to all three sections of the written exam, in order to graduate. The graduate recital serves a final project for the Master of Music in Performance degree.

Graduation

In addition to fulfilling all degree requirements (courses, exams, thesis, recital, etc.), each student must maintain an overall minimum GPA of 3.0 in order to graduate.

Graduate Committee

For purposes of administering comprehensive exams, a graduate committee will be selected for each student and will consist of the following:

a. The student’s applied teacher or the area coordinator.

b. The ensemble director or a faculty member with whom the student has studied.

c. One member of the faculty, to be requested by the student.

d. The Associate Dean (ex officio).

Residence

Residency in the College of Music and Fine Arts is defined as a minimum of one semester, or its equivalent in summer terms, as a full-time student. Ordinarily, two summer terms will be interpreted as meeting this minimum requirement. A student may enroll for a maximum of 16 credit hours during the regular terms and a maximum of 12 credit hours during the two terms (10 weeks) of a summer session.

Transfer Credit

Students may transfer up to six hours of graduate-level or upper division undergraduate coursework toward masters’ degrees in the College of Music and Fine Arts, with the approval of the Associate Dean and Director of Graduate Studies. Transfer courses will not normally fulfill major course requirements, but may be credited toward graduate electives, as determined by the Associate Dean and Director of Graduate Studies. Transfer credits earned more than seven years prior to enrollment will ordinarily not be considered.

Music Therapy Thesis Process

A quantitative experimental thesis in the field of music therapy is required of all students in the M.M.T. program. The current APA Publication Manual will serve as the source for style and format. The thesis proposal will be submitted to the thesis advisor no later than mid-semester preceding the semester in which data are to be collected. There are four levels of approval in the thesis process: thesis advisor, the Music Therapy Graduate Council, the university’s Institutional Review Board, and the thesis committee.

The Graduate Council which is composed of resident graduate students, the thesis advisor and the department chair provide a community of students and faculty of sufficient size and scope to permit the formal and informal sharing of clinical experiences, research ideas, and knowledge in the treatment of individuals with special needs. Meeting several times during the semester, Graduate Council also functions has an important step in the approval process of the thesis.

The thesis committee is composed of the major adviser, another music therapy faculty member, a faculty member from outside the department, and one other person. The candidate may request that one member of the committee be a music therapist from an institution in the area. The initial thesis committee meeting will be called to approve the proposal or to suggest modifications. If changes are made, a second meeting will be called to approve the proposal. Following acceptance of the proposal by the thesis committee, the candidate is free to write the first three chapters. The first three chapters of the thesis are presented to the thesis committee for approval prior to data collection. With the approval of the first three chapters, the candidate is free to begin data collection and complete the project.

The completed thesis is submitted to the thesis committee for approval. The committee could accept the project or return the document to the candidate for further revision. With the approval of the thesis, a meeting is scheduled to defend the project. The defense is a ninety-minute thesis committee meeting in which the committee questions the candidate on various elements of the thesis. The project is complete with the signing of the title page by each member of the committee. Prior to receiving the diploma, the candidate must submit two hard cloth-bound copies of the thesis. One copy is for the candidate and the other for the department.

MUSIC GRADUATE COURSES

Master of Music in Performance (30 hrs.)

I. Applied Study (11 hrs.) cr. hrs.

MUPR M721 – 748 Applied Lessons 6
MUPR M800 Graduate Recital 3
MUEN M700 - 910 Ensembles 2

II. Studies in Music (12 hrs.)

MUGN M705 Introduction to Graduate Studies 3
MUHL M801 – 815 Graduate Music History 1 3
MUTH M720– 809 Graduate Music Theory 2 3
MUTH/MUHL/MUPD Elective 3

III. Cognate Studies 3 (7 hrs.)

  Cognate Studies   7
    Total cr. hrs. 30

1 According to the results of the entrance test, specific courses may be required. In addition, three remedial music history courses may be required prior to enrollment in any graduate music history course. Students must earn a B or better in remedial courses.

2 Composition will not fulfill this requirement. Depending on the results of the placement test, one remedial course may be required prior to enrollment in any graduate theory course. Students must earn a B or better in remedial courses.

3 If approved by the associate dean, six credit hours of non-music, undergraduate courses may be acceptable in situations where
graduate-level courses are not available.

MUSIC GRADUATE COURSES

Master of Music Therapy (34 hrs.)

The music therapy degree program is approved by the American Music Therapy Association (AMTA). Students who have not completed an approved undergraduate program in music therapy will be required to fulfill deficiencies. This coursework will be taken concurrently with graduate studies.

I. Music Therapy Major Field (17 hrs.)

MUTY M702 Music Therapy Research 3
MUTY M703 Advanced Music Therapy Practicum 3
MUTY M704 Music Therapy Supervision and Education 3
MUTY M705 Advanced Music Therapy Models 3
MUTY M706 Music Therapy in Medicine 3
MUTY M714 Graduate Council 1
MUTY M714 Graduate Council 1
  Total 17

II. Supportive Studies in Music (11-13 hrs.)

MUGN M810* Thesis 1-3
MUPR, MUEN, MUGN, MUPC, MUED, MUJZ** Electives 10
  Total 11-13

III. Studies in Psychology/Counseling (6 hrs.)***

PSYC/CNSL Psychology/Counseling Electives 6
 
Total 34-36

*MUGN M810 - Depending on the student's progress, thesis may be registered for more than one semester.

**MUTY music therapy, MUPR private lessons, MUEN ensembles, MUGN general music, MUPC class lessons, MUED music education, MUJZ jazz studies, PSYC psychology, CNSL counseling

***Group Counseling (CNSL 840) and Statistics in Education (CNSL 703) are strongly recommended.
Only 300 level psychology courses apply.

Music Therapy Thesis Process


MUSIC GRADUATE COURSES

Courses: Music

Music Ensembles

MUEN M700 – 706 Major Ensemble 1 cr. hr.

Loyola Symphony Orchestra, Loyola Chamber Orchestra, University Band, University Chorale, University Chorus, Jazz Band I, Jazz Workshop Band, Jazz Training Ensemble, and Wind Ensemble. These courses involve regular rehearsals and performances in groups of various sizes and constitutions. Course may be repeated for credit. Open to non-music students by audition only.

MUEN M800 – 803 Minor Ensemble 1 cr. hr.

Training Orchestra, Opera Workshop, and Vocal Chamber Ensemble. These courses involve regular rehearsals and performance in groups of various sizes and constitutions. Course may be repeated for credit. Open to non-music students by audition only.

MUEN M900 – 910 Chamber Ensemble 1 cr. hr.

String Ensemble, Woodwind Ensemble, Brass Ensemble, Percussion Ensemble, Jazz Combo, Guitar Ensemble, Clarinet Ensemble, Flute Ensemble, Saxophone Ensemble, Trombone Ensemble, and Piano Chamber Ensemble. These courses involve regular rehearsals and performances in groups of various sizes and constitutions. Course may be repeated for credit. Open to non-music students by audition only.

Music—General

MUGN M705 Introduction to Graduate Studies 3 cr. hrs.

Required of all graduate music students except those in music therapy. Techniques in research and writing necessary to the completion of theses or other formal documents are addressed.

MUGN M810 Thesis arr.

Formal, written, research study of a specific area of music, music education, or music therapy.

Music History

MUHL M710 Survey of Wind Literature 3 cr. hrs.

This course is a survey of wind literature, (from the Middle Ages through the 20th century), instruments, and the development of bands. Classes will consist of listening to recordings, basic score study, and discussions of selected readings and repertoire lists. Class discussions will focus on both the historical and pedagogical value of the selected wind music.

MUHL M711 Topics in Solo Vocal Literature 3 cr. hrs.

This is a seminar-style study of a single topic in the history of solo vocal literature other than opera. Course may be repeated for credit, as long as topic is different.

MUHL M712 Keyboard Literature I 3 cr. hrs.

This course is a survey of piano literature from the Baroque era to the present. It includes a survey of important keyboard repertoire that precedes the Baroque.

MUHL M713 Keyboard Literature II 3 cr. hrs.

This course is a continuation of Keyboard Literature I.

MUHL M807 Topics in Operatic Literature 3 cr. hrs.

This is a seminar-style study of a single topic in the history of opera. Course may be repeated for credit, as long as topic is different.

MUHL M810 Orchestral Literature 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers a survey of orchestral literature from the Baroque to the present and includes stylistic analysis of selected works.

MUHL M812 Topics in Music History: before 1600 3 cr. hrs.

A seminar-style study of a topic concerning music before c. 1600. Course may be repeated for credit, as long as topic is different.

MUHL M813 Topics in Music History: 1550 – 1800 3 cr. hrs.

A seminar-style study of a topic concerning music between the birth of opera and the French Revolution, usually focusing on some aspect of western art music but including consideration of influences from non-western and popular musics. Course may be repeated for credit, as long as topic is different.

MUHL M814 Topics in Music History: 1770 – 1920 3 cr. hrs.

A seminar-style study of a topic concerning music between the era of the French Revolution and the First World War, usually focusing on some aspect of western art music but including consideration of influences from non-western and popular musics. Course may be repeated for credit, as long as topic is different.

MUHL M815 Topics in Music History: 1850 – present 3 cr. hrs.

A seminar-style study of a single topic concerning music from Wagner to the present, usually focusing on some aspect of western art music but including consideration of influences from non-western and popular musics. Course may be repeated for credit, as long as topic is different.

Music Performance—Private Instruction

MUPR M721 – 748 Applied Study 2 – 3 cr. hrs.

This is a concentrated study of voice or of string, woodwind, brass, percussion, or keyboard instruments. Students must display a degree of performance proficiency appropriate to graduate level work. Creditable as needed.

MUPR M800 Graduate Recital 3 cr. hrs.

This course is a full, individual program of music of a level appropriate to graduate level study of applied music.

Music Performance—Class Instruction

MUPC M709 Advanced Instrumental Conducting 3 cr. hrs.

This course looks at conducting techniques, score reading, and analysis in the context of literature, style, and interpretation.

MUPC M711 Advanced Choral Conducting 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers a detailed study of advanced conducting problems with an emphasis on score reading and analysis in the context of contemporary literature, style, and interpretation.

Music Pedagogy

MUPD M700 General Music Pedagogy 3 cr. hrs.

This course looks at current issues and developments, teaching-learning systems, materials, media, teaching strategies, and research relevant to general music education at the preschool, elementary, and secondary levels.

MUPD M705 Piano Pedagogy 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers instruction in teaching materials and literature for the upper intermediate and advanced levels of keyboard students, with a look at varying approaches to pedagogical problems encountered at these levels.

MUPD M706 Vocal Pedagogy 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers a survey of various approaches to the teaching of singing, with an emphasis on the physiology and acoustics of the voice.

MUPD M707 String Pedagogy 3 cr. hrs.

This course looks at past and present teaching techniques and materials, string instrument maintenance and repair, and tone-modification adjustments.

MUPD M708 Woodwind Pedagogy 3 cr. hrs.

This course looks at pedagogy materials, methods, solo and ensemble literature, embouchure, and mechanical and acoustical difficulties peculiar to woodwind instruments.

MUPD M709 Brass Pedagogy 3 cr. hrs.

This course focuses on the historical development of the capabilities of brass instruments, embouchure, acoustical, and intonational considerations relating to performance and pedagogy; and instructional materials and literature.

MUPD M710 Choral Pedagogy 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers instruction in choral organization, blend, balance, intonation and vocal production, interpretation of literature, program building, and rehearsal psychology.

MUPD M711 Guitar Pedagogy 3 cr. hrs.

Techniques of problem diagnosis, technical presentation, methodology and evaluation; supervised teaching of guitar classes, weekly meetings for reports, discussion, and performance evaluation.

Music Theory

MUTH M720 Topics in Music Theory 3 cr. hrs.

A seminar-style study of a single analytical technique, such as Schenkerian analysis or pitch-class set theory, or an analytical survey of a particular body of literature, such as the Classical string quartet or 20th-century sacred music for chorus and orchestra.

MUTH M808 Style Analysis I 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers a theoretical analysis of selected works from the Baroque through post-romantic periods in correlation with historical development of compositional practices.

MUTH M809 Style Analysis II 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers a theoretical analysis of selected works of 20th-century music and an introduction to the theories of Heinrich Schenker and their application to the tonal repertoire.

MUTH M810 Composition 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers private instruction in musical composition. Substantial theoretical background and experience in writing in neotonal styles is assumed. A rehearsed presentation of an original work written during the term is required. Creditable repeatedly.

Music Therapy

MUTY M702 Music Therapy Research 3 cr. hrs.

This is a seminar that examines techniques of scientific writing and data collection. A completed experimental research project dealing with handicapped individuals is required.

Required.

MUTY M703 Advanced Music Therapy Practicum 3 cr. hrs.

This course will focus on advanced music therapy clinical techniques and clinical practice. It will also enhance the student’s knowledge of the current music therapy research done with a client population of the student’s choice.

MUTY M704 Music Therapy Supervision and Education 3 cr. hrs.

This course will address issues in both clinical and academic supervision. The student will also be introduced to curriculum planning and syllabus development.

Required.

MUTY M705 Advanced Music Therapy Models 3 cr. hrs.

This course will address advanced music therapy methods and techniques.

Required.

MUTY M706 Music Therapy in Medicine 3 cr. hrs.

This course will address music therapy within the medical field. The student will be introduced to receptive improvisational recreative and compositional approaches with medical clients.

Required.

MUTY M714 Graduate Council 1-2 cr. hr.

This is a council of music therapy graduate students whose function is the approval of research proposals and papers produced within the department.

Counseling

Counseling

INTERIM CHAIR/ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: LeAnne Steen, Ph.D.
OFFICE: 210 Mercy Hall
PROFESSOR: Justin E. Levitov
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Timothy Dwyer, Ph.D.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Thomas Foster, Ph.D.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR/SCHOOL COUNSELOR DIRECTOR: Christine Ebrahim, Ph.D.
ADJUNCT: Ellen Levitov, MRC
WEB PAGE: css.loyno.edu/counseling

The Department of Counseling offers advanced courses leading to the Master of Science degree in counseling. Upon completion of the program, graduates will meet the course and education requirements to pursue their license as a Licensed Professional counselor (LPC). Courses are available for state certification in school counseling as well.

Accreditation

The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), has granted accreditation to the Department of Counseling’s Community Counseling (M.S. degree) program.

Admission to the Graduate Program

Admission to the degree program requires a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university. Acceptance is based on a combination of criteria: 1) GPA accumulated during the last 60 hours of undergraduate work; 2) standardized test results (Graduate Record Examination); 3) written recommendations; 4) admission interview; and 5) writing sample.

Conditional Acceptance:

Students who are accepted on a conditional basis are expected to receive a grade no lower than a “B” in the first 18 hours of their counseling department required coursework. Students accepted conditionally who receive a grade lower than a “B” in any of the first 18 hours of coursework will be dismissed from the program.

Degree Requirements

All candidates are required to complete at least 60 credit hours of graduate work to receive the degree. A course in which the student has earned a grade of D or F cannot be counted toward the completion of graduation requirements, but is used in determining the grade point average.

A degree candidate whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0 will automatically be placed on probation, and his or her status will be reviewed by the Graduate Committee of the Department of Counseling.

Grade Point Average Requirements

All students in the counseling program must maintain a 3.0 GPA in their counseling coursework throughout their tenure in the counseling program as outlined in the student handbook and the Graduate Bulletin (which is published online through the Loyola webpage). Students who are in a dual degree program may not count the courses from the other degree towards their Counseling GPA. Students who fall under the 3.0 GPA requirement (who are not under the conditional requirements outlined in the previous section), will be notified in writing that they are on Academic Probation. The Graduate Committee of the Department of Counseling will meet to review the students status and make recommendations (including possible dismissal from the program).
It is important to note here, however, that there are several courses for which students are not allowed to receive less than a “B”, even if they are able to maintain the 3.0 GPA. The courses listed as a “Core Requirement” are considered by the counseling faculty to be so important, that if a student receives a “C” or lower, the student will be asked to retake the course and will not be allowed to take further courses which require the core requirement class as a prerequisite, until they have received a “B” or higher in the core requirement course. The student who retakes a core requirement course and is still unable to receive a “B” or higher will be dismissed from the program. There is a worksheet outlining all of the courses, prerequisites, and core requirements in the following section of the student manual.

A comprehensive written examination covering the student’s major area and graduate core courses must be passed upon completion of coursework. The examinations are scheduled in November, April, and July. Within the first four weeks of the semester in which the degree candidate is to graduate, he or she must file an application to take the comprehensive examination. (This is usually the last semester in which he or she is enrolled in courses.) If performance on the comprehensive examination is not satisfactory, the candidate will be required to reschedule an examination no sooner than the time regularly scheduled for the next comprehensive examination. The Graduate Committee of the Department of Counseling may elect to require an oral examination in addition to or in lieu of a second written examination.

Transfer of Academic Credit

Students who have earned academic credit at another accredited college or university may be allowed to transfer a maximum of six credit hours, with the approval of the departmental chair and/or dean of the college. Transfer of credits earned more than five years prior to enrollment will ordinarily not be considered.

Students are not normally allowed to transfer core courses or required courses into their programs of study. The Counseling Department will not accept transfer credit for Practicum or Internship courses. Students wishing to obtain graduate transfer credit for any other classes taken at another university must petition the Graduate Committee of the Counseling Department.
Transfer students will be informed of the amount of credit which will transfer prior to their enrollment, if possible, but at the latest, prior to the end of the first academic term in which they are enrolled.

Course Program

The student’s course of study is planned in collaboration with the major area adviser.

All students must take the following graduate primary courses in the beginning of their programs:

  • CNSL A702 Research and Statistical Methods in Counseling 
  • CNSL A704 Research Writing Lab
  • CNSL A706 Philosophy and Counseling

All courses, including those taken in the Department of Counseling of Loyola University, must have been completed within seven years. Students wanting to take independent study courses must petition the department faculty at least one month before registration. Please consult program adviser for details.

Counseling Program Philosophy and Mission Statement

Loyola’s Counseling Program offers eligible counseling graduate students a carefully designed curriculum that will prepare them personally, academically, and professionally to become skilled mental health counselors. One of the program’s core beliefs is that effective professional counselor preparation requires a continuous blend of three types of learning: academic learning, experiential learning, and learning about self. Thus this program, consistent with the Jesuit philosophy of educating the whole person, is designed to help students gain knowledge, understanding, and skills in a planned sequence that builds toward more advanced concepts and more sophisticated clinical interventions, all the while emphasizing ethical, social, and cultural concerns.

Academic Learning

Completion of prerequisite coursework ensures that beginning students have fundamental knowledge of the range of normal and abnormal human growth and development and possess basic computer utilization skills. The professional education core extends knowledge to include an understanding of the range of exceptionalities among young people and/or adults and a sensitive understanding of the nature of our pluralistic society. Within the professional education core, students also learn to conduct and evaluate research and become informed consumers of the research in their professional field. In the counseling core, students are introduced to the counseling profession in CNSL 830—Counseling Theories, CNSL 835—Counseling Practice, and CNSL 864—Ethics in Counseling. Subsequent core coursework will provide students with specialized knowledge, skills, and understanding about career development and counseling, diagnosis, appraisal and assessment techniques, group process in counseling, counseling theory, and legal, ethical, and professional issues in counseling.

Experiential Learning

Laboratory or experiential learning is provided early in the student’s program, and opportunities to advance and refine counseling skills continue throughout the program. CNSL 830—counseling Theories, the introductory counseling core course, systematically teaches theory and basic clinical applications. CNSL 835—Counseling Practice builds upon this foundation and presents an opportunity for basic counseling skills and provides students an opportunity to assess their comfort with the role of counselor. CNSL 836—Individual Counseling Skills Lab is completed in conjunction with CNSL—Counseling Practice. Students are assigned client actors to practice their individual counseling skills. CNSL 840—Group Counseling, also taught by laboratory method, enables students to learn group leadership and facilitation skills. CNSL 843 Group Counseling Skills Lab is completed simultaneously with CNSL 840—Group Counseling. Students have the opportunity to gain hands on experience facilitating counseling groups with client actors. Other courses in the counseling core and elective courses contain experiential components to ensure the continuous blend of the three types of learning. The laboratory learning sequence culminates in the Practicum and Internship. The entire sequence provides opportunities for students to observe counseling activities, develop counseling skills, and interact with clients. Students can expect constant feedback and supervision as they develop a unique and effective personal counseling style.

Learning About Self

The faculty believes that counselors are more effective when they are able to examine their own values, personal characteristics, motivations, and relationships with others. Students are therefore expected to extend their personal philosophies and become sensitive to their outlooks and ways of dealing with others. Opportunities are provided throughout the program for students to maximize their self-awareness and self-understanding. The faculty believe that self-understanding contributes to personal and professional maturity as well as to the capacity for good judgment.
Finally, the faculty believe that personal and professional development are enhanced when close, cooperative relationships exist among students, between student and professor, and among professors. A close working relationship must exist between student and adviser to facilitate the selection of a sequence of studies that provides optimal preparation to meet the student’s specific career goals. Class size and program size are limited to the number of students that can be adequately served to meet the goals of maintaining close relationships, providing quality clinical or lab training, and enhancing self-understanding.

Program Objectives

In accordance with the program’s mission to incorporate academic, experiential, and intrapersonal learning, Loyola University New Orleans offers a carefully chosen curriculum that blends these three components of learning. The overarching goal of the counseling program is to educate and train students to be ethical, competent, effective, and thoughtful mental health practitioners. The program’s objectives include the following:

  1. To educate students to be clinically and theoretically competent in the practice of counseling.
  2. To insure that all counseling students are exposed to and that they understand the ethical principles that govern counseling.
  3. To insure that all students practice in an effective and ethical way.
  4. To provide a diverse and enriched collection of training experiences during the course of the student’s academic preparation.
  5. To integrate course offerings so that students realize how each area of specialization is integrated into practice.
  6. To encourage students to pursue additional training and advanced certification throughout their professional careers.
  7. To pursue creative training methods that enhance student learning while honoring ethical concerns.

Master of Science in Counseling

The Department of Counseling offers a 60-hour master of science degree in counseling. Upon Graduation, students pursuing this master’s degree are eligible to pursue licensure as a Licensed Professional Counselor (L.P.C.) in Louisiana. Graduates of the program who qualify for school counselor certification work in public, private, and parochial schools. Graduates obtain the L.P.C. only after successfully completing 3,000 hours of supervised post-master’s clinical experience and passing the state licensing examination. These counseling professionals work in a variety of settings, including community mental health centers, hospitals, substance abuse centers, and private practice. In addition, students may select degree plans leading to Louisiana Elementary or Secondary School Counselor Certification, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT), and/or Registered Play Therapist (RPT).

Applicants and students can obtain more detailed information from the Student Handbook available in the counseling department office, Mercy Hall Room 210. The counseling curriculum which follows contains required and elective courses offered in the counseling program. Students should consult with their adviser regarding course selection and requirements.

Required Primary Courses (7 Hrs.)

 Course  Cr. Hrs.
CNSL A702 Research and Statistical Methods in Counseling
CNSL A704 Research Writing Lab
CNSL A706 Philosophy and Counseling
3
1
3

Required Counseling Courses (44 Hrs.)

 Course  Cr. Hrs.
CNSL A725 Developmental Psychology
CNSL A776 Measurement and Assessment
CNSL A830 Counseling Theories
CNSL A835 Counseling Practice
CNSL A836 Individual Counseling Skills Lab
CNSL A840 Group Counseling
CNSL A842 Multicultural Counseling
CNSL A843 Group Counseling Skills Lab
CNSL A841 Vocational Counseling
CNSL A846 Ethics and Counseling
CNSL A855 Adult Diagnosis and Treatment
CNSL A854 Child Diagnosis and Treatment
CNSL A363 Fundamentals of Practicum and Internship
CNSL A865 Practicum
CNSL A866 Internship I
CNSL A866 Internship II
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
 

Recommended Elective Courses (9 Hrs.)

Course Cr. Hrs.

CNSL A722 Advanced Child Psychology 

CNSL A837 Counseling Children: Play Therapy 

CNSL A845 Systematic Substance Abuse Counseling
CNSL A846 Ethics in Individual, Marriage and Family Counseling

CNSL A848 Play Therapy Theories
CNSL A849 Activity Group Therapy
CNSL A850 Introduction to Family Counseling

CNSL A851 School Counseling
CNSL A852 Marriage and Couples Counseling

CNSL A853 Child/Parent Relationship Therapy
CNSL A862 Family Systems
CNSL A894 Experimental Courses (with adviser’s approval)
CNSL A866 Internship III
 

 

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

*In addition to all information provided in the bulletin, there is a more detailed description of the program’s policies in the student handbook. A hard copy can be requested through the Counseling Department (504)864-7848 or through the departmental website.

COUNSELING GRADUATE COURSES

Courses: Counseling
College of Social Sciences
 

CNSL A702 Research and Statistical Methods in Counseling 3 cr. hrs.

The course examines research methods commonly used in the social and behavioral sciences, including survey, field, and experimental research designs. The coursework included the development of a research proposal. Throughout this course students will: learn about research methods research design and data analysis, find scientific resources for information, develop critical thinking skills, understand the logic that governs the use of statistical methods, interpret statistical findings and recognize the facotrs that can bias statistical conclusions.

CNSL A704 Research Writing Lab 1 cr. hr.

This one hour lab requirement offers development of graduate level research writing skills including APA format and development of a research proposal. The coursework includes identifying scientific research literature in the Research A702 course which is taken simultaneously with this lab. The lab will be utilized to hone the skills of developing a research proposal, including a literature review, at the graduate level.

CNSL A706 Philosophy and Counseling 3 cr. hrs.

This course provides an inquiry into the relationship between major philosophies and the professional practice of counseling. 

CNSL A722 Advanced Child Psychology 3 cr. hrs.

This course is a thorough study of child behavior from birth through the elementary school age with reference to the recognition and development of personality.

CNSL A723 Advanced Adolescent Psychology 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers an advanced study of the adolescent personality and subculture, with analysis of emotional and intellectual development, basic problems, and adjustments.

CNSL A725 Developmental Psychology 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers an advanced study of human development from conception to death. Topics include childhood and adolescent subcultures, developmental theory, and socialization.

CNSL A726 Advanced Educational Psychology 3 cr. hrs.

This course studies the nature of learning and learning processes with emphasis on the critical examination and evaluation of selected theories of learning.

CNSL A776 Measurement and Assessment 3 cr. hrs.

This course is designed to survey the test theories and critical analysis of tests and their application in schools. Content includes validity/reliability, standardized testing, teacher-made tests, norm/criteria referencing, and item analysis.

CNSL A830 Counseling Theories 3 cr. hrs.

This is a study of selected counseling theories, and replaces Principles and Administration of Guidance and Principles of Elementary School Guidance.

CNSL A835 Counseling Practice 3 cr. hrs.

This course is a study of counseling principles, practices, and techniques.

CNSL A836 Individual Counseling Skills Lab 1cr. Hr.

This course develops clinical skills by providing a series of weekly half-hour counseling sessions to trained actors who will serve as clients. The departmental laboratory includes digital video recording equipment and software that makes it possible to code and catalog each counseling interventions. This technology allows more precise study of group counseling sessions and accurate charting of progress over time. Making and analyzing these digital recordings will efficiently improve clinical skills and provide preparation for the challenge of working with “real” clients in practicum and internship. This lab requirement is taken simultaneously with CNSL A835 Counseling Practice.

$100 Lab fee.

CNSL A837 Counseling Children: Play Therapy 3 cr. hrs.

Counseling Children: Play Therapy explores the range of school and clinic-based approaches used by mental health professionals to help children. This course is an introduction to play therapy theory, and includes a on site practicum experience. Topics will include theory, developing a therapeutic relationship with a child, fostering involvement with the parent(s), family play therapy, sandtray skills, and using play therapy with groups.  

CNSL A840 Group Counseling 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers an experiential investigation of group process theory as it pertains to counseling practice.

CNSL A841 Vocational Counseling 3 cr. hrs.

This course is a study of history, theories, research, and techniques of career counseling.

CNSL A842 Multicultural Counseling 3 cr. hrs.

This course addresses the similarities and differences among various culturally diverse groups, and informs counselors of the characteristics and processes necessary to become a culturally skilled counselor.

CNSL A843 Group Counseling Skills Lab 1cr. hr.

This course one hour laboratory required of all students enrolled in CNSL A840 Group Counseling, which develops clinical skills by providing a series of weekly 45-minute counseling sessions to a group of trained actors who will serve as clients. The departmental laboratory includes digital video recording equipment and software that makes it possible for you to code and catalog each group counseling sessions. This technology allows more precise study of group counseling sessions and accurate charting of progress over time. Making and analyzing these digital recordings will efficiently improve group counseling skills and provides preparation for the challenge of working with “real” groups in practicum and internship.

$150 lab fee.

CNSL A845 Systematic Substance Abuse Counseling 3 cr. hrs.

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This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the issues associated with counseling clients with issues of substance use and abuse. In this course, we will focus on the systemic interventions of individuals with substance problems, and the importance of treating the whole family. Course content includes historical foundations of substance abuse, psychological and physiological affects of common abused substances, various theoretical etiologies of abuse, and an overview of multiple treatment strategies for individuals (adults and adolescents), couples, families and groups.

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CNSL A848 Play Therapy Theories 3cr. hrs.

This course is designed to use both didactic and dynamic components of knowledge acquisition of skill competencies in play therapy as a therapeutic intervention for children, adolescents, and families. Students will become capable of articulating: theoretical conceptualizations of child clients; stages of therapy according to a variety of theories as applicable to child clients; ethical issues; diagnostic possibilities; and treatment plans. <!--StartFragment--> <!--EndFragment-->

CNSL A849 Activity Group Therapy 3cr. hrs.

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This course is designed to assist people who work with children in obtaining an understanding of the philosophy and rational for group work with children. This course will focus on the goals of group play/ activity therapy, the role of the play therapist, screening and selection of group members, and planning and structuring of sessions with emphasis on principals as well as application methods. 

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CNSL A850 Introduction to Family Counseling 3 cr. hrs.

This course explores the family systems theory and presents research on the family as an open system that functions in relation to its broader sociocultural context and that evolves over the life cycle. Various techniques of family counseling are covered as well as the ethical considerations of such a model.

CNSL A851 School Counseling 3 cr. hrs.

This course provides the theoretical and philosophical foundation and structural paradigm that forms the focus of school counseling. Practical information about programs, practices, resources, and research pertinent to the field of school counseling is intertwined with practical experiences. Cognitive learning through reading and research pertains to the history and evolution of school counseling, the role of the school counselor, comprehensive guidance programs, and program evaluation. This course develops the necessary knowledge to work at all levels of school counseling (elementary, middle, and secondary).

CNSL A852 Marriage and Couples Counseling 3cr. hrs. 

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After successful completion of this course students will have: a clinical, theoretical and personal knowledge of basic couples counseling techniques, a personal understanding of the dynamics common to couples, an effective way to assess the overall health of a couple, a set of clinical skills that honor the inherent difficulties of providing counseling services to a couple instead of an individual, experience conducting sample Tandem Couples Counseling therapy, and methods for managing a range of events that can seriously threaten the survival of the relationship. 

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CNSL A853 Child/Parent Relationship Therapy 3 cr. hrs.

In this course, students will learn about the dynamic of the parent child relationship and how to work with parents and children in therapy. Students will learn how to navigate parent consults in play therapy, how to introduce, utilize and create filial therapy with parents individuals and in groups, how to intervene in the parent/child relationship in a positive way, how to assess a problem in the parent child relationship, and incorporating the family into child parent relationship therapy.

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CNSL A854 Child Diagnosis & Treatment  3cr. hrs.

This course is designed to provide you with a comprehensive review of the child psychological disorders as contained in the DSM_IV-TR. By the end of the semester students will:  have a working knowledge of the DSM_IV-TR, its terminology, its limitations and strengths when applied to a diverse client population; be able to identify disorders usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood, or adolescents; accurately diagnose childhood mental disorders; correctly prepare a multiaxis diagnosis; formulate appropriate treatment plans; possess a general knowledge of the major psychotropic medications, their uses and implications in the treatment of  infant, child, and adolescent mental disorders.

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CNSL A855 Adult Diagnosis and Treatment 3 cr. hrs.

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The purpose of this course is to introduce the graduate student to the common diagnostic language used by mental health clinicians and researchers for communicating about the disorders for which they have professional responsibility. The course will introduce the student to the adult psychological disorders as contained in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders and will also include practice in the writing of treatment plans to accompany the various diagnostic categories.

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CNSL A862 Family Systems 3 cr. hrs.

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In this course students will immerse themselves in Family Systems theory by learning the basic concepts and then understanding them as they relate to their own family and life experiences. Students will see that their efforts will be rewarded with a richer and more complete understanding of themselves, those with whom they relate, and clinically useful patterns of interaction will flow from their understanding of the concepts that Family Systems Theory is based upon.  Students will become familiar with Family Systems core research literature.  Students will learn to use Family Systems to: understand their own behavior patterns, explain client behavior patterns, explore potential patterns of interaction between yourself and hypothetical clients, develop evaluation and counseling techniques that honor a Family Systems Approach, understand how a Family Systems approach uniquely explains psychological problems, illustrate how Systems Theory can be used to enhance the counseling relationship, and identify caveats and weaknesses that may be found within Family Systems Theory. 

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CNSL A863 Fundamentals of Practicum and Internship 3 cr. hrs.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the necessary tools to begin their clinical experience. In other courses students receive knowledge about: Theory, Diagnosis, Practice, Group Counseling and Research. This course will provide students with the knowledge of how to handle day to day activities in their Practicum and Internship setting such as: Documentation, Client Fees, Agency Policies, Supervision, etc.

CNSL A864 Ethics 3 cr. hrs.

This course examines ethical standards of practice as outlined by the American Counseling Association. The student is introduced to the process of ethical decision-making and common ethical dilemmas facing mental health practitioners.

CNSL A865 Counseling Practicum 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers a supervised field experience in counseling for 10 hours a week in an off campus service learning site

CNSL A866 Internship I - 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers a supervised field experience in counseling for 20 hours a week in an off campus service learning site.

CNSL A866 Internship II - 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers a supervised field experience in counseling for 20 hours a week in an off campus service learning site.

 

CNSL A866 Internship II - 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers a supervised field experience in counseling for 20 hours a week in an off campus service learning site.

 

CNSL A894 Experimental Course-3cr. hrs.

CNSL A895 Special Project 1 – 3 cr. hrs.

CNSL A896 Seminar/Workshop 1 – 3 cr. hrs.

CNSL A898 Research Project 1 – 3 cr. hrs.

Criminal Justice

DEPARTMENT CHAIR: William E. Thornton, Ph.D., Office: 559 Monroe Hall
PROFESSORS: Dee W. Harper, William E. Thornton
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Wendy L. Hicks
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Patrick D. Walsh, Vincenzo A. Sainato, Rae Taylor
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT:  David M. Aplin Office: 122 Stallings Hall
WEB PAGE: www.css.loyno.edu/criminaljustice/

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the criminal justice program at Loyola University New Orleans is to prepare individuals, through a state-of-the-art curriculum, to assume positions in the public or private justice system and/or to pursue advanced educational/professional specialties. In all of its endeavors, the criminal justice program seeks to develop in students the ability to critically analyze complex issues and master bodies of knowledge, yet seek truth, wisdom, and social responsibility in the Ignatian tradition.

Criminal justice and private/corporate security are among the fastest growing fields in the new millennium. An advanced degree is fast becoming a necessity for most careers in criminal justice, both in the public and private sectors. The Master of Criminal Justice (MCJ) program is offered in response to the growing need for professionally trained public and private criminal justice administrators, planners, and researchers as well as professionals in the field of private/corporate security.

Students will receive theoretical and methodological training in criminal justice and private/corporate security along with applied studies in areas such as organizational management, budgeting and resource allocation, strategic planning, program evaluation, public relations, human resource management, and computer information systems. The graduate curriculum takes the student well beyond the content and instruction of their undergraduate education and fosters independent learning and application of knowledge enabling the individual to contribute to the profession. The emphasis on values and ethics and a solid liberal arts grounding, along with a strong criminal justice curriculum including theoretical as well as applied courses, has distinguished the Loyola program.

DEGREE PROGRAMS

The Department of Criminal Justice offers two graduate programs:

Outstanding Features of Loyola’s Master of Criminal Justice Program

  • Accelerated course format
  • 30 semester hours
  • 16-month completion
  • Multi-disciplinary format
  • Solid foundation in theoretical and applied knowledge
  • Crime data and analysis skills
  • Administrative and management skills
  • Designed for professionals in criminal justice or private security and for those
    seeking to enter the criminal justice or private security fields
  • Prestigious faculty with real-world experience universities/colleges)
  • Assistantships
  • Career counseling services available

Admission Requirements

Prospective students must submit ALL required documentation before they can be considered for admission into the MCJ program. Students are admitted into the MCJ program based on a thorough review of all materials provided to the Department of Criminal Justice. Admission to the program requires:

  • A bachelor’s degree and a record of academic achievement from an accredited college or university;
  • A $20 application fee must accompany the completed application (the application fee is waived if the applicant completes the on-line application);
  • An official transcript from each institution attended sent directly to the appropriate
    admissions office. For transcripts other than English, please provide a certified English translation with an explanation of the grading system;
  • Satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE);
  • Three letters of recommendation from persons knowledgeable about the applicant’s
    aptitude for graduate work, such as former professors or master’s prepared supervisors;
  • A résumé of professional work experience, if applicable;
  • A statement of educational goals that addresses the following points:
    1. How do you think the MCJ degree will enhance your professional development?
      and;
    2. What expectations do you hope to realize by earning the degree?
  • A formal interview with one or more graduate faculty members at Loyola may be required.

International Students

In addition to meeting the above requirements, all international applicants:

  • must submit results of the TOEFL, scoring 550 or higher (213 on CBT), unless their previous degree is from a college or university in which the language of instruction is English;
  • requiring F-1 or J-1 visas must submit an affidavit of support.

Types of Admission

The Department of Criminal Justice Admission Committee reviews all applications and makes admissions decisions. Applicants are notified of the decision by letter. Two types of admission can be recommended:

  • Unconditional Admission: Applicants are admitted unconditionally when they have submitted all required materials and met admission standards. Since admission into the MCJ program is limited, the committee reserves the right to determine which applicants are the best matches for Loyola’s graduate program.
  • Conditional/Probationary Admission: The decision to grant conditional/probationary admission is based on perceived academic promise and is granted to an applicant to provide an opportunity for the applicant to demonstrate his/her academic ability. The student with probationary admission remains on probation until he/she has completed a minimum of six graduate hours and has achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher. If, after the completion of six graduate hours, the student’s cumulative GPA is less than 3.0, the student will not be eligible to return to the MCJ program.

Evaluation of Transfer Credits

Students who have earned graduate academic credit at an accredited university or college may be allowed to transfer a maximum of six credit hours. In all cases, coursework will be evaluated for equivalence to MCJ program requirements; therefore, students must provide course syllabi and other supporting materials to assist faculty in the evaluation process.

Academic Probation and Student Progression

In order to remain in good standing and progress through the MCJ program, a student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher. A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0 will be placed on academic probation. A student on academic probation has one semester (fall, spring, or summer semester) to remove the academic deficiency. If the deficiency is not removed in the allotted time, the student may not be eligible to continue in the MCJ program. The final decision to allow a probationary student to remain in the program will be made by the department chairperson.

Progression Through the Curriculum

The MCJ program is a cohort model meaning the student moves through the curriculum taking a prescribed set of courses each semester. If, for some reason, the student cannot adhere to the set schedule, graduation in the 16-month period may not be possible. The department will make every effort to accommodate the student by modifying his/her progression plan.

Length of Time to Complete MCJ Program

Students are required to complete the MCJ program within 5 years of enrolling in coursework.

Comprehensive Examination

By submitting the application to graduate, students are also declaring their candidacy in the Master of Criminal Justice (MCJ) program. As part of the requirements for graduation, they are required to pass the comprehensive examination for the program. Students will not be allowed to sit for or complete the comprehensive exam until they have received satisfactory grades in all of their previous coursework.

Degree Candidacy

MCJ students must apply for candidacy after completion of 18 credit hours with an overall 3.0 average in the program.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE GRADUATE COURSESThe Master of Criminal Justice (MCJ) is a 30-credit-hour program. This program is designed to be flexible both with regard to course delivery as well as completion time.

Master of Criminal Justice

Degree Requirements
CRJU 700 Theories of Criminal Behavior 3 crs.
CRJU 705 Seminar in Criminal Justice 3 crs.
CRJU 710 Research and Statistical Methods 3 crs.
CRJU 712 Graduate Statistics 3 crs.
CRJU 720 Seminar in Criminal Justice Administration II 3 crs.
CRJU 800 Selected Problems in Criminal Justice 3 crs.
CRJU 805 Program Planning, Implementation and Evaluation 3 crs.
CRJU 850 Seminar in Criminology 3 crs.
CRJU 893 Directed Readings in Criminal Justice 3 crs.
CRJU 900 Master's Research and Practicum 3 crs.
Total 30

Master of Science in Criminal Justice Administration

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice Administration (MSCJA) degree program consists of a rigorous graduate-level curriculum that integrates the overlapping skills of public and private sector law enforcement and corporate risk practitioners into a common framework. This framework makes it possible for those practitioners to also obtain the specialized education and skills in their particular sub-area(s) of interest. Moreover, this program consciously and purposefully embeds core Jesuit concepts- spreading social justice into both the traditional venues of criminal justice and into a domain that is not frequently thought of as part of the social justice paradigm- private sector risk mitigation. Find out more about the program »

Degree Requirements
 

Semester 1

  • MSCJ 702 Media Relations
  • MSCJ 701 Crime and Organizational Theory into Practice
6 hrs
 

Semester 2

  • MSCJ 704 Assessing Organizational Performance
  • MSCJ 703 Budget Analysis
6 hrs
 

Semester 3

  • MSCJ 705 Applied Data Analysis and Decision Making
  • MSCJ 706 Ethics
6 hrs
 

Semester 4

  • Specialization Anchor
  • Advanced Analytics Course
6 hrs
 

Semester 5

  • Specialization Course/Elective
  • Specialization Course/Elective
6 hrs
 

Semester 6

  • Specialization Course/Elective
  • Specialization Course/Elective
6 hrs
 

Post-Semester 6

MCJSA Exam

 
Total 36 hrs

View Master of Science in Criminal Justice Administration Courses »

Courses: Master of Science in Criminal Justice Administration (MSCJ)

College of Social Sciences

MSCJ 701 Crime and Organizational Theory into Practice

This course introduces student to the critical theories that help explain or give context to both criminal behavior and how organizations function. Particular emphasis is placed on applying the theoretical frameworks to policy formation and analysis.

MSCJ 702 Crisis Management and Media Relations

This course begins with the conceptual frameworks that explain how the modern 24/7 ‘mediated’ world impacts the way organizations, agencies, and firms function or relate to citizens and customers. Importantly, the class will show how agency leaders can avoid making problems or the perceptions of problems worse by mishandling or communicating. Case studies will be utilized to show students how to handle specific types of crisis management situations.

MSCJ 703 Budget Analysis

This class will teach students the core skills associated with the development and management of budgets for agencies or functional departments. Students will synthesize and apply budgeting concepts using Microsoft Excel through real-world examples and case studies

MSCJ 704 Assessing Organizational Performance

This course will build-off of previous coursework and learn more refined approaches to assessing the outcomes and methods organizations employ to meet their goals. This course will look at a broad range of topics and case studies from critical incidents to human resource issues.

MSCJ 705 Applied Data Analysis and Decision-Making

This class will teach students how to empirically analyze and present data for informed decision-making. Students will use Excel analyze macro level trend issues such as crime rates as well as micro level inter-departmental problems. This course is designed to ensure that students are informed consumers of administration statistics and prepare them for the advanced quantitative electives offered later in the curriculum.

MSCJ 706 Ethics and the Administration of Justice

The course will provide students with an overview of ethics and ethical dilemmas which practitioners will face in the course of their profession. Using both classical and modern models students will develop skills necessary to identify and evaluate ethical and moral challenges in policing, bioethics, and corporate practices.

MSCJ 811 Survey of Justice Administration

MSCJ 812 Bureau Pathology in Justice Administration

MSCJ 813 Critical Problems in Forensic Administration

MSCJ 814 Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation

MSCJ 815 Special Topics in Justice Administration

MSCJ 815 Applied Situational Crime Prevention

MSCJ 816 The Evolution of American Prevention

MSCJ 817 Responses to Crime Victimization

MSCJ 818 Predictive Policing

MSCJ 821 Corporate Risk Administration and Management

MSCJ 822 Premises Liability and Crime Foreseeability

MSCJ 823 Law for Private Sector Security Professionals

MSCJ 824 Security and Loss Prevention

MSCJ 825 Emerging Trends in Security Technology

MSCJ 826 International Risk Analysis

MSCJ 831 Inspector General Administration

MSCJ 832 Forensic Interviewing and Interrogation

MSCJ 833 Financial Fraud Investigations

MSCJ 834 An Academic Approach to Investigative Technique and Management

MSCJ 835 Specialized Investigations: Retail Fraud

MSCJ 836 Organized Retail Crime

MSCJ 841 Homeland Security and Emergency Management Anchor Course

MSCJ 842 Operations Research

MSCJ 843 Critical Incident Analysis

MSCJ 844 Fundamentals of Emergency Management

MSCJ 845 Bureau Pathology in Emergency Management

MSCJ 846 Data Mining for Intelligence Analysis

MSCJ 847 Emergency Crisis and Victim Response

MSCJ 851 Information and Cyber Data Intelligence

MSCJ 852 Cyber Surveillance Law and Governance

MSCJ 853 Forensic Management of Digital Evidence

MSCJ 854 Geo-Spatial and Crime Mapping Analysis

MSCJ 855 Cyber Criminology

MSCJ 856 Cybercrime and Digital Law Enforcement

MSCJ 861 Forensic Administration from Crime Scene to Court Room

MSCJ 862 Quality Assurance in the Crime Laboratory

MSCJ 863 Special Topics in Forensic Science

MSCJ 864 Crime Laboratory Management: Utilizing Science for Justice

Courses: Criminal Justice

CRJU C700 Theories of Criminal Behavior 3 cr. hrs.

An intensive overview of the major etiological theories of crime as they relate to contemporary crime control and correctional models with special emphasis on criminal justice applications. Linkages between current paradigms of criminal behavior and current developments in criminal justice policy will be explored.

CRJU C705 Seminar in Criminal Justice 3 cr. hrs.

Any of several different courses can be offered including security administration, premises liability and crime prevention, corrections, international terrorism, and deviant behavior.

CRJU C710 Research and Statistical Methods 3 cr. hrs.

The course examines research methods commonly used in the social and behavioral sciences, including survey, field, and experimental research designs. Advanced inferential statistical procedures for data analysis are covered using SPSS. Computer application and data bases are employed.

CRJU C712 Graduate Statistics I 3 cr. hrs.

This course examines descriptive, inferential and multivariate statistics employed in criminal justice research regarding the nature of crimes, criminals, and the criminal justice system.  The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, or SPSS, will be employed in the course to aid students in the calculation and interpretation of key statistical techniques commonly employed in the field.

CRJU C720 Seminar in Criminal Justice Administration II 3 cr. hrs.

Current topics in the management and administration of criminal justice systems. A case approach examining topics such as community policing, community policing as a part of community government, zero tolerance, race, and ethnic conflict in the criminal justice system.

CRJU C800 Selected Problems in Criminal Justice 3 cr. hrs.

This course examines current topics and issues related to the field of criminal justice.

CRJU C805 Program Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation 3 cr. hrs.

The application of social science research methods to effective policy making and evaluation. Topics include conceptual, methodological, bureaucratic, political, and organizational factors in the evaluation process as well as specific program evaluation research techniques. 

CRJU C850 Seminar in Criminology 3 cr. hrs.

          This seminar examines advanced subjects in the discipline of criminology including crime measurement and analysis, crime and victim typologies, white               collar and organized crime, etc.

CRJU C893 Directed Readings in Criminal Justice 3 cr. hrs.

This seminar allows students to study specialized works in the field by reading and analyzing both classical and contemporary works.

CRJU C900 Master’s Research and Practicum 3 cr. hrs.

This capstone course consists of directed research in criminal justice under the guidance of a graduate faculty member. The student must complete a practicum report demonstrating mastery of professional skills in one of the following:

  1. Write a 5,000- to 10,000-word research paper written in a research journal format based on quantitative data
  2. Write a 5,000- to 10,000-word research paper written in a research journal format based on a comprehensive review of the literature; or,
  3. Write an evaluation of a criminal justice policy or program; or,
  4. Write an acceptable grant proposal following, for example, National Institute of Justice guidelines;
Loyola Institute for Ministry (LIM)

DIRECTOR: Thomas Ryan, Ph.D. OFFICE: 200 Stallings 



WEB PAGE: http://lim.loyno.edu

The Loyola Institute for Ministry’s (LIM) programs are designed to enable students to develop an integration of knowledge and practice through an increased awareness and analysis of their ministry contexts. These contexts include their own ministry site, the society and culture within which it is situated, the Jewish-Christian tradition, and their own personal background. The programs address the needs of adult practitioners within the actual context of their ministry and provides a formation for those new to the fields of pastoral ministry and religious education.

The focus of its programs is contextual learning for those already involved in ministry and in possession of the intellectual and cognitive abilities that come through undergraduate studies. The program seeks to broaden students’ information base in pastoral studies and religious education, and to provide a laboratory for their learning and practice of appropriate skills.

The mission of the Institute is to prepare women and men for religious education and ministerial leadership in Catholic and other Christian communities through professional graduate education and through professional continuing education. The Master of Religious Education and the Master of Pastoral Studies degrees are offered in the Institute. A number of continuing education options are also part of Institute programming.

The students, faculty, and staff of the Institute form a learning community and educational resource for professionals and paraprofessionals engaged in or preparing for ministry and religious education, as well as for others who want to address themselves intentionally to their ministry in the world. In fidelity to its mission, the Institute seeks an integration of knowledge of the Christian tradition, a sensitivity to the dynamics of institutional structures, an appreciation for the times and culture within which one works, and a reflection on personal experience.

The mission of LIM is carried out through on-campus and a variety of distance education programs. The Institute has a particular (though not exclusive) mission to areas that do not have benefit of proximate resources for professional graduate education in pastoral studies and religious education.

The Institute offers a master’s degree in religious education (M.R.E.), a master’s degree in pastoral studies (M.P.S.), and a post-master’s certificate in pastoral studies both on campus and through distance education. On-campus (LIMOC) M.P.S. focus areas include small Christian community formation, pastoral care, pastoral life and administration, religion and ecology, African-American ministries, Christian spirituality for pastoral ministry, marketplace ministry, Hispanic ministry, youth ministry, and the opportunity for an individualized program of study. The Loyola Institute for Ministry Extension Program focus areas include small Christian community formation, pastoral life and administration, religion and ecology, marketplace ministry, Christian spirituality for pastoral ministry, Hispanic ministry, and youth ministry. Extension students may also do the pastoral care focus area, however they will need to take some of their coursework in New Orleans. The institute also serves the continuing education needs of adults on campus and in extension by offering a Certificate in Religious Education (C.R.E.), a Certificate in Pastoral Studies (C.P.S.), and an Advanced Continuing Education Certificate in Pastoral Studies.

Admission to University

The admission requirements include:

  1. A formal completed application. Students may apply online or send their application by postal service directly to the LIM enrollment office.
  2. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university, with a minimum 2.5 GPA for all degree-seeking students.
  3. For degree-seeking students, submission of official transcripts from the college or university that awarded the applicant’s bachelor’s degree, plus any coursework taken beyond the bachelor’s degree. Transcripts are mailed directly from the academic institution and may not be submitted online.
  4. A statement of educational purpose. Read the instructions for the statement »
  5. A résumé of work experience including professional and/or voluntary ministerial responsibilities.
  6. Two recommendations (on forms supplied by the institute) attesting to student’s capability for graduate study.
  7. $20 nonrefundable application fee. This fee is waived for applicants who apply online.
  8. For extension students, a notification of application form (supplied by Loyola) should be sent directly to the sponsoring agency. This form is generated automatically if an applicant applies online and checks the appropriate diocese/sponsoring agency. All materials should be submitted online or sent directly to the LIM enrollment office two months prior to the start of the student’s first course or semester. (International extension students not applying online have these materials sent directly to their administrative liaison at their sponsoring agency.) This allows time for transcripts and other supporting documents to reach the LIM enrollment office and subsequently for the admissions committee to come to an admission decision. Late applications are accepted, but such applicants may only be admitted to their first LIM course as transient students. All admissions requirements must be fulfilled in order for a student to be enrolled in their second course or semester.

Admission to Candidacy

The Institute offers courses of instruction leading to the degrees of Master of Religious Education and Master of Pastoral Studies for properly qualified students who have been admitted to degree candidacy.

To apply for candidacy the student must file a formal petition to the Institute’s Graduate Studies Committee on the basis of items listed below. (Extension program students are advanced to candidacy by the graduate studies committee when the following criteria are met.)

  1. Not less than 12 credit hours nor more than 15 credit hours in the institute’s graduate courses with a minimum grade point average of 3.0. For on-campus students, of these hours at least six must consist of core courses, including Introduction to Practical Theology.
  2. Students must evidence responsible and competent participation in the learning process.
  3. Currently registered for credit at Loyola. Appropriate recommendations will be made by the graduate studies committee to the dean of College of Social Sciences as a result of their review. Degree candidates will be notified and such notification will become part of their permanent records. Students not admitted to candidacy will be informed of their deficiency. Removal of such deficiency under the direction of the student’s adviser must take place upon completion of 15 credit hours. The student must then reapply for degree candidacy.

Course Requirements

The candidate must complete a total of at least 36 credit hours of graduate work including the work earned prior to his or her admission to degree candidacy. A course in which the student has earned a grade of less than a C cannot be counted toward the completion of the credit hour requirement, but will be used in determining the student’s grade point average.

The capstone course, Pastoral and Educational Praxis, is required of all students (except those in the pastoral care focus area) for graduation, and is taken at the end of their program. Students, in their final synthesis-praxis paper, give evidence of understanding and competence in the following areas: 1) articulation of the meaning of practical theology; 2) identification and interpretation of their ministry as an expression of practical theology; 3) evidence of critical reflection on their understanding and practice of ministry through an examination and responsiveness to the influence and interplay of multiple contexts of ministry; and 4) an ability to identify, integrate, and act on significant learnings and challenges emerging from engaging the curriculum.

Students in the pastoral care focus area participate in clinical pastoral training or experience, ordinarily arranged through a local CPT or CPE supervisor in a hospital, prison, or other pastoral counseling setting. This praxis experience is the capstone course of the pastoral care focus area. One unit of CPT is the minimum requirement. Students may complete one unit of CPE to fulfill this requirement.

Academic Probation

In order to remain in good standing, a student must earn at least a C in all graduate courses taken and must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher in Loyola University graduate coursework. A student who earns below a C in a graduate course, or whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0, will be placed on academic probation. Students admitted under the conditional status are admitted on academic probation and will be notified of their probationary status in their letter of admission.

A student on probation has nine hours or two semesters (whichever comes first) to remove the academic deficiency. If the deficiency is not removed in the allotted time, the student will be excluded from the program as a graduate student.

  1. Upon receipt of course grade transcripts from the Office of Student Records, the Institute will notify students who have been placed on academic probation.
  2. Conditionally admitted students, or students on probation who do not remove their academic deficiency in the next term, will receive a second letter notifying them that subsequent academic deficiencies will lead to exclusion from the university as a graduate student.
  3. A probationary student who fails to make up his or her academic deficiency in the nine hours or two semesters will be excluded from the university as a graduate student.

Change of Academic Status

Students may change from graduate status in the program to continuing education status by written request. Continuing education students may apply to the LIM enrollment office for graduate status, subject to the standard graduate admissions requirements. Either change of status must occur only between courses or semesters. Students have the option of changing their status only once during their course of study.

Academic Advisement

Each on-campus and online student consults with an institute adviser in planning his or her full program of graduate courses. The student should meet each semester with his or her academic adviser, a full-time faculty member. Extension students are assigned an academic adviser when admitted. Instructors of record are available for consultation on academic concerns. Both may be contacted via a toll-free telephone number, e-mail, or fax. Extension students are required to participate in a three-session discernment process.

Transfer Credit

On-campus students are allowed to transfer up to six hours of credit for graduate coursework done in theology, religion, religious education, or pastoral ministry studies from an accredited institution. Original transcripts must be presented along with a request to the Graduate Studies Committee. For transfer credit in areas other than those mentioned, it is incumbent upon students to justify a clear and systematic relevance of the work to their LIM degree program. A request must be made to the Graduate Studies Committee, along with a 3 – 5 page rationale. If the transfer is accepted, the learning from the transferred courses is to be integrated into the student’s Pastoral/Educational Praxis course.

Because of the extension program’s unique educational methodology and sequential curriculum format, extension students are allowed to transfer up to six hours of approved graduate coursework only in lieu of focus area courses. The above process for applying for this transfer credit must be followed, with the same obligation to integrate their learning into the pastoral/educational praxis course.

Continuing Education Units (CEUs)

Persons who participate under the continuing education status are persons who have extensive ministry experience, often in diocesan, school, or parish leadership positions, and have the ability to do the graduate-level reading. Some CEU students lack the required bachelor’s degree to enroll for the graduate degree, while others already have graduate credentials and do not wish to earn another graduate degree. Persons who register as CEU students will receive continuing education units as defined by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. CEUs are recorded on a Loyola CEU transcript and kept in the permanent records of the university.

Continuing education credit is determined by class attendance, competent participation in the learning group or on-campus course, completion of reading assignments, and other activities necessary for participation in those sessions. Three CEUs are granted for each course in the extension program. On campus, one credit hour equals one CEU. Focus courses require CEU students to submit written responses to reflection questions. All CEU students who complete the extension or on-campus program receive a continuing education certificate in religious education or pastoral studies.

Requirements for Continuing Education Admission

Those who are applying to the institute for admission under the continuing education status are required to complete the institute (graduate) application, pay a nonrefundable application fee, submit a résumé and statement of educational purpose, and supply two recommendations (on forms provided by the institute) from professionals in ministry and/or education (pastor, DRE, etc.) who can attest to the applicant’s involvement in ministry and ability to do graduate-level reading. This ability to engage in graduate-level reading must be evidenced in the application process.Continuing Education (Certificate) students may apply online or send their application by postal service directly to the LIM enrollment office.

Financial Aid

Because Loyola offers substantial tuition discounts, additional university scholarships and grants are not available. Federal Student Financial Aid is only available to full-time and half-time students in New Orleans; thus, part-time Extension students are not eligible. Other loan options are available. For information, contact the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid at (504) 865-3231.

Programs of Study

The LIM on-campus master’s degree programs are designed for those laypersons, members of religious orders, and ordained persons who are currently engaged in or are preparing for pastoral or educational ministries and who seek to enhance the quality of their ministry activities through a systematic ministry education. On-campus courses focus on the development of ministers who are critically reflective about themselves, their vision, and their efforts. The LIM on-campus student identifies his or her educational goal for the program and critically reviews the theological assumptions underlying his or her ministerial action. Specific courses may be waived based on a student’s prior academic experience.

Degree Requirements

The requirements for both the Master of Religious Education degree and the Master of Pastoral Studies degree consist of 36 credit hours:

  1. The theological core courses (18 credit hours)
  2. Focus area courses and capstone course (12 credit hours)
  3. Elective courses (6 credit hours) chosen by the student.

Theological core courses| 18 credit hours

LIM C703 Introduction to Practical Theology 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C711 Jewish Roots of Christian Faith: Intro to Old Testament 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C712 Christian Origins: Intro to New Testament 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C714 Grace, Christ, and Spirit 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C722 Church, Sacraments, and Ministry 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C704 Spirituality, Morality, and Ethics . 3 cr. hrs

 Focus Area courses 12 credit hours

Master of Religious Education (MRE)

View required Theological Core Courses

LIM C701 Foundations of Religious Education 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C715 Curriculum Development 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C716 Religious Education Across the Curriculum 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C886 Pastoral and Educational Praxis 3 cr. hrs.

Master of Pastoral Studies (MPS) 

View required Theological Core Courses

Christian Spirituality for Ministry

LIM C827 Spirituality for Ministers 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C828 History of Christian Spirituality 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C861 Pastoral Leadership and Organization 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C886 Pastoral and Educational Praxis 3 cr. hrs.

Pastoral Life and Administration

LIM C844 Parish Life and Ministry  3 cr. hrs.
LIM C861 Pastoral Leadership and Organization  3 cr. hrs.
LIM C845 Contemporary Issues in Pastoral Ministry  3 cr. hrs.
LIM C886 Pastoral and Educational Praxis  3 cr. hrs.

Pastoral Care

LIM C849 Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling 3 cr. hrs.
CNSL A830 Counseling Theories 3 cr. hrs.
CNSL A835 Counseling Practice 3 cr. hrs.
CNSL A836 Individual Counseling Skills Lab 1 cr. hr.
LIM C897 Practicum: Clinical Pastoral Training (CPT) 2 cr. hrs.

Marketplace Ministry

 LIM C819  Spirituality and the Theology of Work 3 cr. hrs.
 LIM C820  Ministry in the Marketplace 3 cr. hrs.
 LIM C861  Pastoral Leadership and Organization 3 cr. hrs.
 LIM C886  Pastoral and Educational Praxis 3 cr. hrs.

Religion and Ecology

 LIM C813  The Universe as Divine Manifestation 3 cr. hrs. 3 cr. hrs.
 LIM C814  The Emergent Universe: Our Sacred Story 3 cr. hrs. 3 cr. hrs.
 LIM C861  Pastoral Leadership and Organization 3 cr. hrs.
 LIM C886  Pastoral and Educational Praxis 3 cr. hrs.

Youth Ministry

LIM C870 Foundations of Youth Ministry 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C876 Adolescent Spirituality and Methods of Faith Development 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C861 Pastoral Leadership and Organization 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C886 Pastoral and Educational Praxis 3 cr. hrs.

Hispanic Ministry

LIM C833 Hispanic Experience of Religion and Culture 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C834 Pastoral Ministry in Hispanic Communities 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C861 Pastoral Leadership and Organization 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C886 Pastoral and Educational Praxis 3 cr. hrs.

African-American Ministries

LIM C815 African-American Experience in Religion and Culture 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C816 African-American Religious Experience and Black Church History 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C861 Pastoral Leadership and Organization 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C886 6 Pastoral and Educational Praxis 3 cr. hrs.

Small Christian Community Formation

LIM C809 Inner Life of Small Christian Communities 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C810 Public Life of Small Christian Communities 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C861 Pastoral Leadership and Organization 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C886 Pastoral and Educational Praxis 3 cr. hrs.

Individualized Program

  Six credits from LIM focus areas/electives in consultation with an academic adviser. 6 cr. hrs
LIM C861 Pastoral Leadership and Organization 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C886 Pastoral and Educational Praxis 3 cr. hrs.

Electives                                                                                                            

Six credit hours of elective courses chosen by the student to suit his or her own needs and interests.

Dual Degree Programs

Master of Pastoral Studies (M.P.S.) with focus area in Pastoral Care and Master of Science (M.S.) in Counseling

The Master of Pastoral Studies degree at LIM with a focus area in pastoral care provides theological and spiritual grounding for pastoral care in a variety of local church contexts and other pastoral settings. The Master of Science in Counseling, through the Department of Counseling at Loyola, provides in-depth education on counseling models and meets all educational requirements for state licensure as a professional counselor.

Students in this program must be admitted separately to the Department of Counseling, as well as the Institute for Ministry. Individually taken, these two degrees would require 84 credits of graduate work. However, the joint degree program allows for certain courses in one master’s program to count as required courses or electives in the other. The total number of credits for the joint degree program is 69 credits—a reduction of 23 graduate credits.

Coursework

A complete listing of coursework required for this dual degree can be found on the M.P.S./M.S.C. degree requirements page.

Tuition

Tuition is charged based on your program. For example, you will be charged the M.P.S. rate for LIM courses and the graduate counseling rate for your counseling courses.

Master of Pastoral Studies (M.P.S.) with focus area in Pastoral Care and Master of Science (M.C.J.) in Criminal Justice

The dual degree program is designed to prepare students for careers in pastoral ministry such as chaplaincy positions within prisons, detention centers, police departments, and other criminal justice institutional structures.  It also provides preparation for careers in the criminal justice system, with special knowledge and skills in promoting rehabilitation and community reintegration, and serving as a liaison between justice institutions and religious organizations and chaplains.

Students in this program must be admitted to both the Department of Criminal Justice, and the Institute for Ministry. Individually taken, these two degrees would require 66 credits of graduate work. However, the dual degree program allows for certain courses in one master’s program to count as required courses or electives in the other. The total number of credits for the dual degree program is 54 credits—a reduction of 12 graduate credits.

Coursework

A complete listing of coursework required for this dual degree can be found on the M.P.S./M.C.J. degree requirements page.

Tuition

Tuition is charged based on your program. For example, you will be charged the M.P.S. rate for LIM courses and the graduate criminal justice rate for your criminal justice courses.

Master of Pastoral Studies (M.P.S.) and Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.)

The dual Master of Pastoral Studies and Master of Business Administration degree responds to the growing interest among practitioners with an interest in issues of spirituality and faith and the desire for an understanding of sound business practices. It also reflects an important trend among scholars who have created scholarly journals and acdemic conferences in the field. It is designed for current and future religious leaders seeking greater knowledge of business practices and for current and future business leaders seeking a greater understanding of spirituality and the religious search for meaning that underpins all human efforts.

Coursework

A complete listing of coursework required for this dual degree can be found on the M.P.S./M.B.A. degree requirements page.

Tuition

Tuition is charged based on your program. For example, you will charged the M.P.S. rate for LIM courses and the graduate business rate for your business courses.

Graduate Certificate in Theology and Ministry

A Graduate Certificate in Theology and Ministry may be awarded to persons who have completed a total of 18 credit hours of graduate study at the Institute for Ministry. Twelve of the 18 hours must be in theological core courses; six elective credits complete the certificate. Transfer credits from other institutions are not accepted. Upon completion of 12 hours, graduate certificate students must apply for the certificate or apply for candidacy in a LIM master’s degree program; the 12 credits already earned will then be applied to a candidate’s work toward a Master of Religious Education or Master of Pastoral Studies degree.

Advanced-level certificates

The Institute for Ministry offers two, advanced-level professional credentials for those who qualify for admission to these programs.

Post-Master’s Certificate in Pastoral Studies

A Post-Master’s Certificate in Pastoral Studies is available to those who have already earned a master’s degree from LIM or an appropriate graduate-level degree from another accredited college or university. This program consists of 12 graduate credit hours of study through the completion of two LIM focus areas. Transfer credits from other educational institutions are not accepted.

Advanced Continuing Education Certificate in Pastoral Studies (12 credits)

Those who have already earned a master’s degree from LIM, one of the continuing education certificates that the institute offers (Certificate of Pastoral Studies or Certificate of Religious Education) or an appropriate graduate degree from another accredited college or university—may choose to seek an additional professional, continuing education-credit credential from the Institute called the Advanced Continuing Education Certificate in Pastoral Studies. This program consists of 12 hours of specialized, continuing education (CEU credits) study through the completion of two LIM focus areas. Transfer credits from other educational institutions are not accepted.

On-campus Summer Program

In addition to year-round evening/weekend courses in the on-campus program, LIM offers an intensive four-week summer program on campus which includes weekend, one- and two-week courses that provide the student with multiple course options along with community building, shared prayer, and social activities. A master’s degree program can usually be completed in four summers, except for the pastoral care and African-American ministries focus area courses which are only offered in fall and spring semesters. These must be completed in a year-round format.

On-campus and Outreach Tuition

All LIM graduate credit students receive a reduced tuition rate because of the Jesuit commitment to ministry education.

Loyola Institute for Ministry | Extension Program | Master of Pastoral Studies or Religious Education

In partnership with a sponsoring diocese, parish, or other religious institution, Loyola Institute for Ministry (LIM) offers its degree and certificate programs by extension. Students meet in learning groups led by a Loyola-certified facilitator under the direction of Loyola faculty for 10 of the courses. In these common courses, students engage in 10 three-hour sessions that involve discussion of printed lectures and other assigned readings, videotaped input by nationally known scholars, and other educational interactions. Students also choose two additional courses in a focus area from a variety of available options. These courses are taken in a semi-independent study format. The program is designed to provide in-depth information and reflection on the theory and skills appropriate to ministry and religious education in a variety of settings. A complete program prospectus is available online, and a Policy Manual on the extension program can be obtained from the Institute’s office.

Because of the geography and size of the greater New Orleans area, the Institute for Ministry offers the LIM Outreach format as an option for students at a variety of off-campus locations

Extension program curriculum

The requirements for both the master of religious education degree and the master of pastoral studies degree consist of 36 credit hours:

  • the theological core course (18 credit hours)
  • the context of ministry courses and the capstone course (12 credit hours)
  • focus areas chosen by the student (6 credit hours).

Theological Core Courses (18 credit hours)

LIMX G703 Introduction to Practical Theology 3 cr. hrs.
LIMX G711 Jewish Roots of Christian Faith: Intro to Old Testament 3 cr. hrs.
LIMX G712 Christian Origins: Intro to New Testament 3 cr. hrs.
LIMX G714 Grace, Christ, and Spirit 3 cr. hrs.
LIMX G722 Church, Sacraments, and Ministry 3 cr. hrs.
LIMX G704 Spirituality, Morality, and Ethics 3 cr. hrs.

Context of Ministry Courses and Capstone Courses (12 credit hours)

LIMX G840 Faith and Culture  3 cr. hrs.
LIMX G860 Faith Development and Spirituality  3 cr. hrs.
LIMX G861 Pastoral Leadership and Organization  3 cr. hrs.
LIMX G886 Pastoral and Educational Praxis  3 cr. hrs.

Focus Area Courses (6 credit hours) The first focus course is a prerequisite to the second course of a focus area.

Master of Religious Education

LIMX G701 Foundations of Religious Education 3 cr. hrs.
LIMX G715 Curriculum Development 3 cr. hrs.

Master of Pastoral Studies

Christian Spirituality for Ministry (focus area):

LIMX G827 Spirituality for Ministers 3 cr. hrs.
LIMX G828 History of Christian Spirituality 3 cr. hrs.

Pastoral Life and Administration (focus area):

LIMX G844          Parish Life and Ministry  3 cr. hrs.                    
LIMX G845 Contemporary Issues in Pastoral Ministry  3 cr. hrs.  

Youth Ministry (focus area):

LIMX G870  Foundations of Youth Ministry                                                                 3 cr. hrs.
LIMX G876 Adolescent Spirituality and Methods of Faith Development 3 cr. hrs.

Hispanic Ministry (focus area):

LIMX G833 Hispanic Experience of Religion and Culture 3 cr. hrs.
LIMX G834 Pastoral Ministry in Hispanic Communities 3 cr. hrs.

Religion and Ecology (focus area):

LIMX G813 The Universe as Divine Manifestation 3 cr. hrs.
LIMX G814 The Emergent Universe: Our Sacred Story 3 cr. hrs.

Marketplace Ministry (focus area):

 

Small Christian Community Formation (focus area):

LIM C809 Inner Life of Small Christian Communities 3 cr. hrs.
LIM C810 Public Life of Small Christian Communities 3 cr. hrs.

Pastoral Care Focus Area Options for Extension and Online Students

Extension and online students considering the Pastoral Care focus area need to assess their ability to complete the four required courses. Extension students who choose this focus area need to be able to complete the equivalent of the two required counseling courses (Counseling Theories and Counseling Practice) from an accredited graduate program in their local area, if on-campus work is not possible for them during a regular fall semester at Loyola University New Orleans. Students also need to come on-campus for a two-week summer session to complete the Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling course. The fourth course in this focus area requires one unit of Clinical Pastoral Education from an accredited site. Available accredited sites for CPE may be found on the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education web site: <www.acpe.edu/directories.htm>.

Extension students choosing this focus area complete their program as on-campus students, and, consequently, will not finish the program with their learning group. Normally, they will complete with their learning group the six theological core courses, and two context of ministry courses: Faith and Culture and Faith Development and Spirituality. This focus area choice may not be feasible for all extension or online students or be available in all extension locations or where an online student resides.

Attendance Policy

Attendance in the extension program is compulsory. Each course meets at least 10 times to carry out a three-hour learning design provided by the institute. In the event of illness or emergency, a student who misses three sessions may make these sessions up and remain in the course. Any request for a waiver of this policy must be put in writing.

Withdrawal From Courses

The administrative withdrawal period ends with the fifth session of the course. Through this time, students may withdraw from a course and receive a W in the course. After the fifth session, a student may withdraw from the course and receive a WP in the course. Failure to obtain a withdrawal will result in the grade of F.

Refund Policy

Students who cancel or withdraw from a course are in some cases entitled to a percentage refund of their tuition. Those who cancel or withdraw must do so by completing an official cancellation/withdrawal form found in their policy manuals.

Mere cessation of attendance does not constitute official withdrawal. The date and circumstances of official withdrawal will determine the amount of tuition refund. No refunds are made when a student is suspended or dismissed for academic, disciplinary, or financial reasons. Tuition refunds are made on the following schedule:

  • nonattendance at the first session, a 100-percent refund, less a $50 administrative fee;
  • nonattendance after the fifth session, a 50-percent refund;
  • if a physician’s certificate is attached to the cancellation/withdrawal form for nonattendance at any point in the course, a 100-percent refund.

Writing Assistance

Assistance with writing assignments for courses in the graduate program is offered in conjunction with Loyola’s Writing Across the Curriculum center. This gives graduate students the opportunity to confer with a writing tutor on all phases of the writing process. Students may contact a writing consultant by calling the LIM office or e-mailing the consultant at limwrite@loyno.edu.

Disability Services

Extension students with learning, physical or other disabilities may contact the Director of Disability Services at Loyola for information on the services and accommodations which are available. Students may call the LIM office and ask to be transferred to the Office of Disability Services or ask to speak to the Associate Director (Administrative Services) who works directly with the Office of Disability Services on LIM issues. Students may also write directly to the Director of Disability Services at the following address: Loyola University New Orleans, Campus Box 41, 6363 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 or e-mail the director at ssmith@loyno.edu. All contacts and information provided are confidential. In order to receive any reasonable special services or accommodations, students will be asked to provided documentation of the learning or physical disability. Copies of the university policy are available from the Office of Disability Services.

Extension Students and Library Services

Any extension student may come to Loyola University and use the catalogs, print and electronic indexes, and all other materials available for use by Loyola students. Borrowing privileges are the same for all students, and the circulation desk will issue bar codes for any students wishing to borrow materials from Loyola’s libraries. Extension students with Internet access may log on to the library’s web page and link onto the library’s online public access catalog. Any articles not held by the university library may be requested through interlibrary loan.

Additionally, extension students may contact  by phone 504-864-7152 or 504-864-7138 or toll-free in the U.S. and Canada 877-614-0633; by fax 504-864-7142; or by email distlib@loyno.edu the Loyola University distance education librarian and request to have mediated searches of automated databases performed for them, but in some cases they will be billed for the search, just as all other students would be so charged. Other services of the extension librarian include searching the Loyola library for books and journals. Internet access to the Loyola University Library Catalog Information is available to extension students if they have access to a personal computer and a modem.

The practicalities involved in obtaining books when the student needs them through the mail often make it difficult to use the campus library. It is for this reason that the Extension Program requires that a professional library be established locally for extension students which must include, but is not limited to, the books on the Common Curriculum bibliographies.

Sponsoring agencies also agree to provide access for students to college, public, and theological libraries in their area. These local libraries enhance student access to a great variety of additional resource materials. It is through these local libraries that extension students may gain access to the Internet.

Tuition and Fees

All extension students are assessed tuition and fees on a per course basis. Tuition and fee schedules are available from the LIM office. Because of the uncertainty of the economy and university budgetary projections, the institute reserves the right to change tuition, fees, or other charges.

Extension program students are exempt from most university fees, such as student government and university center fees. There are, however, some fees charged for returned checks and processing late papers. Graduate students are also subject to the university graduation fee mentioned earlier in this bulletin.

Some diocese and other sponsoring agencies charge an administrative fee to help defray administrative costs in the local area.

The institute does not have a monthly tuition payment plan. Tuition and fees are paid in full at registration which should occur at least five weeks prior to the first session of the course. VISA and MasterCard are accepted.

Learning Group Discipline

A student who engages in behavior which is disruptive to the learning group environment is in violation of the Learning Group Agreement and Loyola Policy. Such conduct may cause removal from that learning group and can result in removal from the course with a grade of W. A second such disruption may result in suspension or dismissal from the university. The student has the right to appeal the decision in accord with Loyola policy.

Specialized Certificate in Pastoral Life and Administration (On Campus or Extension)

The specialized certificate program offers specialty-level ministry education courses, readings, and integrating project work for persons currently engaged or soon to be engaged in pastoral ministry leadership roles in local Christian faith communities.

Entrance into the program requires one of the following:

  1. An earned master’s degree (or master’s degree candidacy) in pastoral studies, religious
    studies, religious education, or a closely-related field of study;
  2. A Certificate in Pastoral Studies (C.P.S.) or Certificate in Religious Education (C.R.E.) from Loyola University New Orleans;
  3. A bachelor’s degree plus three or more years of documented ministry leadership
    experience; or
  4. The ability to do advanced-level readings/study, plus in-depth and documented,
    practical ministry leadership experience (five years or more).

This certificate program consists of six courses. Each course earns two CEUs. On-campus students who qualify may also take the courses for graduate credit. Upon successful completion of all coursework, the student earns a Specialized Certificate in Pastoral Life and Administration from the Loyola Pastoral Life Center (LPLC).

This program is available either at an extension site or at the New Orleans campus during the summer session. Students opting for on-campus study can complete their program in three years of two-week sessions.

Specialized Certificate Curriculum

  • The Dynamic Parish Today
  • Effective Leadership and Pastoral Administration
  • Canon Law and Civil Law for the Pastoral Minister
  • Stewardship and Financial Management in the Local Faith Community
  • Presiding Skills in Parish Prayer and Worship
  • Cultural Diversity and Parish Ministry

Specialized Certificate in Christian Spirituality (Extension)

The Specialized Certificate in Christian Spirituality program offers specialty-level continuing education courses, readings, and integrating project work for leaders who are currently engaged in many types of spiritual-development work within a wide variety of local contexts—church parishes, private schools, retreat centers, service centers, and other institutions and organizations.
Entrance into the program requires one of the following:

  1. An earned master’s degree (or master’s degree candidacy) in pastoral studies, theology,religious studies, religious education, divinity, or a closely-related field;
  2. A Certificate in Pastoral Studies (C.P.S.) or Certificate in Religious Education (C.R.E.) from Loyola University New Orleans;
  3. A bachelor’s degree plus three or more years of documented ministry leadership
    experience; or
  4. No academic degree, but has the ability to do advanced-level readings/study, plus five
    years or more of documented ministry leadership experience.

This certificate program consists of six courses. Each course earns two CEUs. Upon successful completion of all coursework, the student earns a Specialized Certificate in Christian Spirituality from the Loyola Pastoral Life Center (LPLC).

Specialized Certificate Curriculum

  • Christian Spirituality Through the Ages
  • Spirituality, Prayer, and Everyday Life
  • Discernment Skills for Christian Life and Ministry
  • Spiritual Companionship: Methods and Approaches
  • Spirituality, Discipleship, and Justice
  • Emerging Forms of Christian Spirituality 

Specialized Certificate in Catechetical Leadership (Extension)

The Specialized Certificate in Catechetical Leadership program offers specialty-level continuing education courses, readings, and integrating project work for leaders who are currently engaged in many types of catechetical work within a wide variety of ministries – pastors, pastoral associates, and deacons; parish catechetical leaders, directors and coordinators of religious education and faith formation; school administrators, campus ministers, and religion department heads; RCIA and small faith community coordinators; religious community members; and experienced volunteers in leadership roles in catechesis. 

Entrance into the program requires one of the following:

  1. An earned master’s degree (or master’s degree candidacy) in pastoral studies, theology, religious studies, religious education, divinity, or a closely-related field;
  2. A Certificate in Pastoral Studies (C.P.S.) or Certificate in Religious Education (C.R.E.) from Loyola University New Orleans;
  3. A bachelor’s degree plus three or more years of documented ministry leadership
    experience; or
  4. No academic degree, but has the ability to do advanced-level readings/study, plus five years or more of documented ministry leadership experience.

This certificate program consists of six courses. Each course earns two CEUs. Upon successful completion of all coursework, the student earns a Specialized Certificate in Catechetical Leadership from the Loyola Pastoral Life Center (LPLC).

Specialized Certificate Curriculum

  • Foundations of Catechetical Ministry
  • Catechesis for a Worshipping Community
  • Developing and Managing Catechetical Programs
  • Essential Skills for Catechetical Leaders
  • Catechetical Methods and Approaches
  • One of the following: Cultural Diversity and Catechesis; Catechesis for Justice and Social Transformation; Canon Law and Civil Law for Catechetical Leaders

LOYOLA INSTITUTE FOR MINISTRY GRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Loyola Institute for Ministry

LIM/LIMX 701 Foundations of Religious Education 3 cr. hrs.

An exploration of the contextual roots of the field that includes the Christian theological tradition, family, church, and socio-cultural influences and responses, as well as creation itself. Through this model of contextual reflection, participants will trace the evolution of the theory and practice of religious education in its Christian expression with special attention to its contemporary Roman Catholic character and responsibilities in ecclesial and academic settings.

LIM/LIMX 702 Invitation to the Catechism 1 cr. hr.

This course introduces students to the Catechism of the Catholic Church as a resource for faith and prayer. It examines the history, including catechisms in other denominations. It also studies its structure, artwork, spirituality, and relation to other catechetical documents, such as the U.S. Catholic Catechism for Adults.

LIM/LIMX 703 Introduction to Practical Theology 3 cr. hrs.

This initial course in ministry education introduces students to a process of “pastoral praxis,” through a method of keeping theological reflection in constant dialogue with action. Students explore the interplay of the Christian tradition and the dynamics of living out that tradition through the sociocultural, personal, and institutional contexts of their ministries. The method of theological reflection is based upon the work of the Rev. Bernard Lonergan, S.J., and David Tracy.

LIM/LIMX 704 Spirituality, Morality, and Ethics 3 cr. hrs.

Traditional Catholic ethics are examined in the light of Vatican II. Students study the nature of the human person and the meaning of freedom and sin. They also explore the role of Scripture, reason and the natural law, norms, conscience, and Church authority in making moral decisions. Throughout the course, Christian living is placed in the context of personal spirituality and the call to discipleship. Sexual ethics and Catholic social teaching are discussed at length in the course.

LIM/LIMX 711 Jewish Roots of Christian Faith: Intro to Old Testament 3 cr. hrs.

This course introduces students to the literature, history, and theology of ancient Israel as embodied in the ancient Hebrew scriptures commonly known as the Old Testament. It examines the major themes of Exodus, promise-fulfillment, and covenant in Israel’s history from the time of the patriarchs to the period of late Second Temple Judaism, which was the context of Jesus’ life and teachings. In particular those texts, events, and beliefs of ancient Israel which form an indispensable background for understanding the New Testament are highlighted.

LIM/LIMX 712 Christian Origins: Intro to New Testament 3 cr. hrs.

This course introduces students to the literature, history, and theology of the early Christian scriptures commonly known as the New Testament. It examines the historical context of Jesus’ teachings, his parables and preaching of the “reign of God,” and the theology of Paul and the Gospels. Particular attention is given to the experience of faith that was engendered by Jesus among his first disciples and the lived faith of the earliest Christians.

LIM/LIMX 714 Grace, Christ, and Spirit 3 cr. hrs.

This course introduces students to the rich Christian tradition of theological reflection and teaching on the person of Jesus Christ, the Trinity, and grace, as well as the role of the Holy Spirit in Christian life. In the context of this tradition, students are invited to a deeper understanding of the meaning of salvation in their lives and in their ministry. Contemporary theologies of Christ and salvation are also explored, using Karl Rahner’s writings as an example of a modern theology of grace.

LIM/LIMX 715 Curriculum Development 3 cr. hrs.

This course enables participants to distinguish three models of teaching and learning that are practiced in various educational contexts and to consider their strengths and weaknesses as well as their value, relevance, and appropriateness in the practice of religious education in church and school. Special attention will be given to contemporary guidelines, curricula, and concerns in Catholic religious education.

LIM 716 Religious Education Across the Curriculum 3 cr. hrs.

This course envisions a school in which religious education is set at the center of the academic curriculum. Within such a school, religious education would obviously take the traditional form of a discrete subject that is concerned with passing on to students the distinctive teachings of the Catholic faith. This explicit focus of necessity remains but a part of the whole curriculum. What is needed and taken up in the course is a more comprehensive and integrated understanding and practice of religious education in which the religious educator partners with teachers to illumine the presence and activity of God, of the sacred, that ultimately and intimately pervades every subject and discipline as well as to affirm and support these teachers’ more implicit practice of religious education.

LIM/LIMX 722 Church, Sacraments, and Ministry 3 cr. hrs.

This course presents the experience and theology of church, sacraments, and ministry as they have unfolded throughout Christian history. A major part of the course is dedicated to a deeper understanding of the meaning of sacramentality and the theology of the individual sacraments in the Catholic tradition. Special emphasis is given to Vatican II and post-conciliar developments in the church’s self-understanding and in the theology and practice of ministry, sacraments, and liturgy.

LIM 744 Stewardship and Financial Management 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers a rationale for the integration of foundational issues in pastoral ministry with the principles of sound financial management in parish settings. Application and management of stewardship programs in ecclesial environments, measurement and reporting issues, managerial accounting, and financial data for decision making are studied.

LIM 750 Dynamics of Small Group Life 3 cr. hrs.

This course addresses communications skills, developmental stages of group life, leadership styles and models, group dynamics, conflict and negotiation in educational, pastoral, and small community contexts. (This course is required for all M.P.S. focus areas except pastoral care and counseling.)

LIM 800 Topics in Religious Education 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course explores specific issues and concerns in religious education. Topics may include history of faith sharing, experiential education, development of educational theory, educational programming, art of teaching, developing a community of educators, and religious education in Latin America.

LIM 804 Models of Religious Education 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course is designed for those students who are already or soon to be director of religious education. Four interrelated areas will be explored: the role and responsibilities of the DRE, administrative skills, models of educating and learning, and the prophetic dimensions of educational ministry.

LIM/LIMX 809 Inner Life of Small Christian Communities 3 cr. hrs.

A true Christian community is both gathered (faith’s internal life) and sent (faith’s public life). This course examines the internal life of small Christian communities: their leadership, communications, worship, and decision making. It includes historical and theological perspectives of the functioning of Christian communities inside their own boundaries.

LIM/LIMX 810 Public Life of Small Christian Communities 3 cr. hrs.

The course focuses on how small Christian communities can together engage in ministry and social justice. The course includes historical and theological perspectives on the relationship between Christian communities and their surrounding cultures and society.

LIM 811 Old Testament Topics 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course focuses on particular books or themes from the Old Testament collection. Topics may include Pentateuch, Prophets, the historical writings or the Psalms, and themes such as creation, promise and fulfillment, or ritual patterns may be considered.

LIM 812 New Testament Topics 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course explores specific books and themes in the New Testament literature. The focus may vary from the Pauline writings to the Gospel of John, from an inquiry into the teachings of the historical Jesus to the vision of the Church in the Pauline mission.

LIM/LIMX 813 The Universe as Divine Manifestation 3 cr. hrs.

This course engages students in a process of discernment, interpretation, and response to the natural world as revelatory, as a primary mediation and distinctive focus of divine presence and activity. Our exploration begins with searching out this revelation in the cosmological order through scientific insights into the structure and functioning of the universe. From this macrophase perspective, the course shifts to the more proximate witness to the divine as this finds expression in and through the planet Earth. Out of this experience and insight we will articulate the meaning of this revelation for ourselves and for people of faith in our times.

LIM/LIMX 814 The Emergent Universe: Our Sacred Story 3 cr. hrs.

This course asks participants to immerse themselves in contemporary discoveries and understandings of the emergent universe and to reflect on its spiritual dimensions and significance. As we become familiar with this new story, this sacred story, we will also attend to the data which describes the urgency of the ecological issue with an eye to discerning its implications for the physical, psychic, and spiritual dimensions of our lives.

LIM 815 African-American Experience in Religion and Culture 3 cr. hrs.

The course provides a means by which African-American culture and religion can be better understood and appreciated each for its own sake as well as its contribution to world civilization and culture. During the course, participants examine the interplay of religion and culture in the African-American experience ranging from African antiquities through the African Diaspora to present day expressions such as theomusicology.

LIM 816 African-American Religious Experience and Black Church History 3 cr. hrs.

This course examines the history and institutional life of Africans and African-Americans in the Diaspora, especially the Western Hemisphere. The study starts in Africa with ancient and traditional African religions, continues into Latin America, and then on to North America with Roman Catholicism, Protestantism, and their synthesis with their African antecedents. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the black church in the United States as an institution.

LIM/LIMX 819 Spirituality and the Theology of Work 3 cr. hrs.

Oriented to those students who understand their ministry as primarily taking place outside of parish or other explicit ecclesial communities, this course investigates work and profession from the standpoints of vocation and community. Vocation is considered as a transformation of toil into creative work, and profession is viewed as an expression of the way one professes commitment to a particular community. Creativity, redemption, and collaboration are explored in light of workplace systems and the difference that Christians can make in the world.

LIM/LIMX 820 Ministry in the Marketplace 3 cr. hrs.

This course helps students discern practical approaches to working toward mutually respectful, caring, and just communities in diverse and pluralistic work and community settings. The course will explore how images of collective life rooted in the biblical image of the reign of God can be translated into contemporary societies and community life with respect for persons of varying backgrounds and tradition.

LIM 821 Topics in Christian Theology 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course explores specific issues in Christian theology, including the broad categories of sin, reconciliation, and political theory, or such issues as the contrast in ecclesiologies between Trent and Vatican II.

LIM 825 Methods of Theological Reflection 3/1 cr. hrs.

Students explore a variety of methods for theological reflection, including theology of story; journal keeping; process theology; liberation theology; the interaction of culture, tradition, and personal experience; and case studies. In any given semester, one of these methods may become the focus of the course.

LIM/LIMX 827 Spirituality for Ministers 3 cr. hrs.

This course discusses the theological foundation of Christian life and explores how ministry is rooted in and gives expression to the minister’s relationship with God. Students are invited to reflect on prayer, discernment, and spiritual growth in the context of finding God in the midst of ministry.

LIM/LIMX 828 History of Christian Spirituality 3 cr. hrs.

This course is an introduction to the variety of experiences and expressions of Christian spirituality from the roots of the Hebrew Scriptures to contemporary spiritual writing. The course focuses on monasticism, mysticism, and modern apostolic spirituality as a way of exploring the recurring questions and challenges that shape the human search for God.

LIM 832 Sacramental Topics 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course focuses on particular sacraments or groups of sacraments such as Reconciliation or Marriage, sacraments of initiation, or sacraments of healing. In any given semester, the focus of this course will change to address particular sacramental concerns.

LIM/LIMX 833 Hispanic Experience of Religion and Culture 3 cr. hrs.

This course presents an overview of the diversity of Hispanic cultures in the United States and introduces participants to the history and development of Hispanic/Latino/Latina theologies that have emerged in the U.S. context since the second half of the 20th century. Participants will gain an appreciative awareness of various cultural symbols and expressions of religious life among Hispanic communities and explore the implications of these for ministry among Hispanic peoples.

LIM/LIMX 834 Pastoral Ministry in Hispanic Communities 3 cr. hrs.

Rooted in an understanding of cultural and religious experiences of Hispanics in the U.S. context, this course explores various pastoral approaches that address issues particularly significant in Hispanic communities. Theological reflection on ministry is interwoven throughout the course.

LIM 835 Current Moral Issues 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course explores current moral issues in personal life, work/profession, and sociopolitical life. Students will focus on a particular moral issue such as abortion or nuclear war or on the theoretical and practical implications of contemporary moral theory in a broad category of contemporary life such as sexuality or politics.

LIM 836 Human Sexuality and Christian Faith 3/1 cr. hrs.

The course explores the significance of human sexuality, its expression in personal experience, and cultural influence.

LIMX 840 Faith and Culture 3 cr. hrs.

This course explores the mystery of faith operating within the context of contemporary culture. Students are introduced to a broad array of social science perspectives and analytical skills. Powerful cultural forces, such as the news and entertainment media, generational differences, ritual, and technology are analyzed for insights in improving ministerial praxis and personal spiritual understanding.

LIM 842 Peace and Justice Ministry 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course explores the theoretical and practical issues involved in peace and justice ministry today. Particular issues such as the morality of nuclear war, world hunger, and human rights as well as pastoral approaches to community organizing and political participation will be studied in any given semester.

LIM 843 Women’s Issues in Church and Culture 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course offers an exploration of the historical, psychological, and sociological factors which continue to influence the patriarchal tradition in the Western World. The course focuses on the perspective and experience women offer Church and society.

LIM/LIMX 844 Parish Life and Ministry 3 cr. hrs.

The aim of this course is to help participants reflect on today’s experience of the parish in its many shapes and forms. Pastoral practice and canon law are used during the course as reference points for discussion of the pastoral and canonical issues raised by the student and the course content.

LIM/LIMX 845 Contemporary Issues in Pastoral Ministry 3 cr. hrs.

This course examines a number of challenges facing parishes and pastoral leaders in a variety of ministry settings. Topics include issues related to evangelization, collaborative ministry, parish mergers and transitions, and the spirituality of lay ecclesial ministers, among others. Course participants also examine in more depth the needs and models of ministry related to a particular population (for example, ministry to homebound elderly) in their faith community.

LIM 849 Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling 3 cr. hrs.

This course is a religious and social psychological introduction to the basic stance of pastoral care and counseling. It explores how pastoral counseling is like and not like secular counseling practice and articulates the unique characteristics of forms of counseling calling themselves pastoral.

LIM 855 Psychology and Spirituality 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course offers an examination of psychological theories and classical theological models of spirituality.

LIM 856 Topics in Christian Spirituality 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course explores particular classical spiritualities such as St. Ignatius’ spiritual exercises or the spiritual vision of Meister Eckhart, or more generic themes such as prayer and contemporary spiritual discipline.

LIM/LIMX 860 Faith Development and Spirituality 3 cr. hrs.

This course invites students to develop a life-long commitment to faith formation and growth. Adult faith development and integrated spirituality are explored as students reflect on their own growth and the growth of those to whom they minister. Topics of adult development, learning, and faith are presented, including vocation, relationships, prayer, liturgy, and justice.

LIM/LIMX 861 Pastoral Leadership and Organization 3 cr. hrs.

This course explores the meaning of pastoral leadership in light of the current research in organizational development and ecclesiology. Current literature is surveyed in light of the mission of the church and the ecclesial vision of participants. Special emphasis is placed upon participative strategic planning processes and organizational development. Participants will analyze an organizational system for its strengths and weaknesses and propose interventions that would strengthen its organizational functioning.

LIM 863 Family Systems 3 cr. hrs.

This course offers an integrational perspective on family systems. The primary purpose of this course is to help participants understand more deeply how the web of family relationships continues to affect all of our interpersonal relationships, including our professional ones. A parallel goal is to sensitize ourselves to the effects of family history on those with whom we interact as professionals in counseling and ministry.

LIM/LIMX 870 Foundations of Youth Ministry 3 cr. hrs.

The course examines the broad foundations of youth ministry with younger and older adolescents. It then investigates a model for comprehensive youth ministry that incorporates developmentally sound youth programs, strengthens the family’s role in the lives of young people, involves adolescents as integral members of the local church, and reaches out to key individuals and organizations in the wider community in the dynamic effort to promote healthy youth formation.

LIM 874 Special Topics in Ministry 3/1 cr. hrs.

Students in this course will focus on particular topics critical to their concerns in ministry. Such topics as ministry to the sick and dying, ministry to the aged, and ministry in minority communities will be explored in any given semester.

LIM/LIMX 876 Adolescent Spirituality and Methods of Faith Development 3 cr. hrs.

With this course, students first examine in depth the phenomenon and characteristics of adolescent spirituality today. They then examine typical stages of religious development during the adolescent years. Finally, students direct their attention to a study of a variety of methodologies to enhance and encourage the faith development of youth, and appropriate to helping youth grow in religious knowledge and religious expression.

LIM 880 Ministry and the Arts 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course explores the use of music, mime, art, dance, media, poetry, and storytelling in ritual and religious education. The arts are considered as vehicles of theological expression and liturgical celebration.

LIM 885 Religious Communication 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course explores how a variety of communication media can benefit ministers in their particular settings. Both theory and practice of contemporary communication media, especially the use of television, are explored with hands-on experience.

LIM/LIMX 886 Pastoral and Educational Praxis 3 cr. hrs.

In this capstone course, students employ the method of practical theology to reflect on concerns related to their ministerial and educational praxis. Careful analyses that include the social and cultural circumstances surrounding their identified praxis will be undertaken, as well as an appreciative and critical retrieval of the voice of the faith tradition. Based on that reflection, possible educational and ministerial interventions that meet criteria of pragmatic feasibility and religious faithfulness will be imagined and articulated verbally and in writing for evaluation and feedback.

LIM 890 Special Topics 3/1 cr. hrs.

This course number is used to offer courses on an infrequent basis. Typically, the course is offered once using this number with a unique title. For a full description, contact the institute office.

LIM 897 Practicum 3/1 cr. hrs.

Students wishing to explore the practice of ministry in specific contexts may apply to the director to arrange a practicum of 1-3 hours, which will include a reflective paper and supervised experience.

LIM 899 Independent Study 3/1 cr. hrs.

Students may apply to the director for independent study based on specific situations or needs. Forms are available in the institute office.

Nursing

Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N)

DIRECTOR: Ann H. Cary, Ph.D., MPH, RN, A-CCC OFFICE: 203 Stallings Hall
COORDINATOR FOR NURSE PRACTITIONER PROGRAM: Cynthia Collins, DNS, MSN, APRN, ANP-BC 
COORDINATOR FOR HEALTH CARE SYSTEM MANAGEMENT PROGRAM: Lisa Linville, JD, MSN, RN

WEB PAGE: css.loyno.edu/nursing/

The School of Nursing offers three different tracks in the M.S.N. program. Two are clinical tracks to prepare family and adult nurse practitioners, which are available for continuing nurse practitioner students only. The other track prepares nurse managers and accepts new students each semester.

Mission of the M.S.N. Program

The mission of the M.S.N. program is to prepare nurses to function in advanced roles in a variety of health care settings. The M.S.N. program seeks to develop critical thinking and ethical decision making skills as primary skills needed by all nurses in advanced roles. The curriculum is designed to educate nurses to provide effective and cost-efficient nursing care, and to provide leadership in improving and extending health care to specific populations.

Accreditation

Loyola’s bachelor of science in nursing and master of science in nursing degree programs are accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) through spring 2015. To contact the NLNAC, use the following information. Address: 3343 Peachtree NE, Suite 500, Atlanta, GA 30326; Phone: (404) 975-5000

Nurse Practitioner Program Goals and Objectives

The goals of the N.P. program are to:

  1. Provide graduate nursing education in the Jesuit tradition of respect for individuals from diverse cultures.
  2. Create opportunities for the development of expertise in an advanced practice role.
  3. Foster development of advanced interpersonal and communication skills.
  4. Prepare advanced practice nurses capable of improving health care and initiating change in the health care delivery system.
  5. Foster professional identity as an advanced practice nurse.

The objectives of the N.P. program are that graduates will be prepared to:

  1. Evaluate the influence of beliefs, values, and economic status on the provision of health care and client health behaviors.
  2. Demonstrate critical thinking and diagnostic reasoning in the implementation of advanced therapeutic interventions with clients across the life cycle.
  3. Function in collaborative advanced practice roles as members of interdisciplinary teams in a variety of health care settings.
  4. Demonstrate mastery in the use of contemporary communication tools and techniques.
  5. Contribute to the development of the discipline of nursing through the application of nursing and related theory and research to practice.
  6. Critically analyze current health care policies and practices.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of and appreciation for legal and ethical standards of advanced practice.
  8. Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for advanced nursing practice.

Health Care Systems Management Program Goals and Objectives

The goals of the H.C.S.M. program are to:

  1. Provide graduate nursing education in the Jesuit tradition of respect for diverse cultures.
  2. Create opportunities for the development of expertise as client care managers or managers of health care systems.
  3. Foster development of advanced interpersonal and communication skills.
  4. Prepare nursing graduates capable of assuming advanced care management and leadership roles in health care systems.
  5. Foster professional growth and provide a foundation for doctoral study.

The objectives of the H.C.S.M. program are that graduates will be prepared to:

  1. Evaluate the influence of beliefs and values on the coordination and management of health care and health care systems in a cost-conscious environment.
  2. Demonstrate critical thinking in managing and coordinating health care programs and services for specified client populations and health care organizations.
  3. Function in collaborative and facilitative roles as members of interdisciplinary teams.
  4. Demonstrate mastery in the use of contemporary communication tools and techniques.
  5. Contribute to the discipline of nursing through the application of nursing and related theory and research to practice as a care manager or systems manager.
  6. Critically analyze current health care policies and practices.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of legal, ethical, and regulatory standards related to care management and systems management.
  8. Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for one’s personal nursing practice.

Admission to the M.S.N. Program

Students are admitted into the M.S.N. program based on a thorough review of all materials provided to the Graduate Admissions Committee of the School of Nursing. Students may be admitted unconditionally or provisionally.

Sixty days prior to enrollment, the student is required to apply for a certified background review at their own expense, by a provider designated by Loyola University New Orleans with the results reported to Loyola University New Orleans School of Nursing: Attention Vanessa Bailey. Information on this process will be provided to the student upon acceptance of an admission offer. 

Admissions Requirements for Persons with Bachelor’s Degrees

  1. A B.S.N. degree from an accredited school or a bachelor’s degree in any field in conjunction with completion of the Loyola M.S.N. Bridge program.
  2. Official transcripts from each college/university attended.
  3. A current unencumbered R.N. license.
  4. A minimum of one year of recent/appropriate work experience in clinical nursing for NP applicants.
  5. A cumulative GPA of either 2.8 or higher on all prior undergraduate work or a GPA of 3.0 or higher on all Loyola Nursing courses.
  6. Three recommendations (on the form provided by Loyola) from persons knowledgeable about the applicant’s aptitude for graduate school, such as former professors or master’s prepared nursing supervisors.
  7. A thoughtful, typed, double-spaced goal statement of approximately to one page in length describing career goals and interest in graduate education.
  8. The undergraduate equivalent of three semester credit hours in statistics.
  9. For the N.P. program: The undergraduate equivalent of the following number of semester credit hours: 10 in biological sciences and three in chemistry and one year of recent/appropriate clinical experience.
  10. A formal interview with one or more graduate faculty at Loyola.
  11. Sixty days prior to enrollment, the student is required to apply for a certified background review at their own expense, by a provided designated by Loyola University New Orleans with the results reported to Loyola University New Orleans School of Nursing: Attention Ann Cary. Information on this process will be provided to the student upon acceptance of an admission offer. 

Admissions Requirements for R.N.-to-M.S.N. Option in the M.S.N. Program

Graduates of associate degree and diploma nursing programs may apply for admission to the R.N.-to-M.S.N. option for the M.S.N. program. In this option, students complete requirements for both the B.S.N. and M.S.N. degrees.

  1. A graduate of an associate degree or diploma nursing program is first admitted to the Loyola B.S.N. program and classified as a “B.S.N.” student.
  2. Requirements for admission to B.S.N. program include:
    a.) Application for Undergraduate Admission.
    b.) Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended.
    c.) Proof of a current R.N. license.
    d.) Application fee of $20 ($40 for online program). Checks to be made payable to Loyola University.
  3. Upon admission to the B.S.N. program, a student will be advised to first complete most
    core, adjunct, and elective courses.
  4. In the semester prior to taking the first 700-level nursing course, the student
    must submit an application to M.S.N. program.

Types of Admission

The School of Nursing reviews all applications and makes admissions decisions. The committee may recommend two types of admission:

  1. Unconditional Admission: Applicants are admitted unconditionally when they have submitted all required materials and met all admission standards. Since admission into the M.S.N. program is limited, the Committee reserves the right to determine which applicants are the best match for Loyola’s graduate program.
  2. Provisional Admission: If an applicant appears to meet admission standards but is unable to provide one or more documents required for admission by the time admissions decisions are made, provisional admission may be granted. A provisionally admitted student has until the beginning of the second academic term to provide required materials. The Graduate Admissions Committee reserves the right to deny any provisionally admitted student the right to enroll in courses if needed documentation has not been provided by the beginning of the second academic term.

Transfer Credits

Students who have earned academic credit at another accredited college or university may be allowed to transfer a maximum of six credit hours into the M.S.N. program. In all cases, course work will be evaluated for equivalence to Loyola requirements; therefore, students must provide course descriptions and/or other supporting materials to assist faculty in the evaluation process.

Registered Nurse Licensure Requirements

Upon entering the M.S.N. program, each student must sign a declaration stating that she/he has a current, unencumbered, unrestricted, and valid registered nurse license and there are no grounds for disciplinary proceedings. If at any point during the program a student’s R.N. license becomes encumbered or restricted, the student is obligated to immediately inform the director of the School of Nursing.

A.N.P Program

The M.S.N. Adult Nurse Practitioner curriculum is 39 semester credit hours in length. In addition to theoretical course work, the program requires direct, hands-on client contact in a variety of ambulatory settings. The A.N.P. curriculum follows.

The A.N.P. Curriculum

Core Courses:

  NURS C700: Theoretical Perspectives in Nursing    
  NURS C735: Advanced Research Methods    
  NURS C740: Health Care Systems    
  NURS C765: Research in Advanced Nursing Practice    

Cognate Courses:

  NURS C705: Advanced Health Assessment    
  NURS C706: Advanced Health Assessment Practicum    
  NURS C710: Advanced Pathophysiology I    
  NURS C715: Advanced Pathophysiology II    
  NURS C720: Advanced Pharmacology I    
  NURS C722: Advanced Pharmacology II    

Major Courses:

  NURS C725: Primary Care Concepts    
  NURS C745: Primary Care I: Theory    
  NURS C750: Primary Care II: Theory    
  NURS C772: A.N.P. Practicum I    
  NURS C775: A.N.P. Practicum II    
  NURS C776: A.N.P. Practicum III    

F.N.P. Program

The M.S.N. Family Nurse Practitioner curriculum is 45 semester credit hours in length. In addition to theoretical course work, the program requires direct, hands-on client contact in a variety of ambulatory settings with clients across the life cycle. The F.N.P. curriculum follows.

The F.N.P. Curriculum | Core Courses:

  NURS C700: Theoretical Perspectives in Nursing    
  NURS C735: Advanced Research Methods    
  NURS C740: Health Care Systems    
  NURS C765: Research in Advanced Nursing Practice    

Cognate Courses:

  NURS C705: Advanced Health Assessment    
  NURS C706: Advanced Health Assessment Practicum    
  NURS C710: Advanced Pathophysiology I    
  NURS C715: Advanced Pathophysiology II    
  NURS C720: Advanced Pharmacology I    
  NURS C722: Advanced Pharmacology II    
  NURS C730: Family Theory    

Major Courses:

  NURS C725: Primary Care Concepts    
  NURS C745: Primary Care I: Theory    
  NURS C750: Primary Care II: Theory    
  NURS C755: Primary Care III: Theory    
  NURS C771: F.N.P. Practicum I    
  NURS C773: F.N.P. Practicum II    
  NURS C774: F.N.P. Practicum III    

N.P. Examinations

All NP students will be required to take the HESI examination. The Adult Nurse Practitioner HESI examination is a required graded component of NURSC750. Additionally, all Family Nurse Practitioner students will take the Family Nurse Practitioner HESI examination in NURS755.

H.C.S.M. Program--On-Campus, Hybrid, or Online

The H.C.S.M. program focuses on the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in a variety of leadership positions in health care organizations. Of the 36 credit hours required, 12 are devoted to core courses. The remaining 24 credit hours focus on didactic and clinical aspects of the major. The H.C.S.M. curriculum is delievered either on-campus or online.

The H.C.S.M. Curriculum | Core Courses:

  NURS C700: Theoretical Perspectives in Nursing    
  NURS C724: Outcome Measurements and Data Management    
  NURS C735: Advanced Research Methods    
  NURS C740: Health Care Systems    

Major Courses:

  NURS C704: Advanced Role Integration    
  NURS C709: Legal and Ethical Issues in Healthcare    
  NURS C712: Financial Resources I    
  NURS C716: Managed Care Methodologies    
  NURS C732: Disease Resource Management    
  NURS C744: Financial Resources II    
  NURS C748: Human Resources Management    
  NURS C752: H.C.S.M. Practicum    

The H.C.S.M. Practicum

A preceptor model of mentorship will be used in which care managers and nurse managers in local and regional health care organizations play a substantial role in the practical component of the program.

Academic Probation and Student Progression

In order to remain in good standing and progress through the MSN program, a student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher. A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0 will be placed on academic probation. A student on academic probation has one semester (fall, spring, or summer semester) to remove the academic deficiency.  If the deficiency is not removed in the allotted time, the student may not be eligible to continue in the program. The final decision to allow a student to remain in the program will be made by the department faculty. Generally, no course with a grade below C may be used toward degree requirements and must be repeated. Each program has published policies in the handbook indicating the minimal grade required in each course to progress in the program. A grade of "F" in any course will result in dismissal from the program.

Length of Time to Complete the M.S.N. Program

Students are required to complete the program within five years of their first term of enrollment.

Students should be advised that, for purposes of application for an advanced practice license, the Louisiana State Board of Nursing sets a time limit on the age of courses in advanced pharmacology. Thus, students cannot apply for an advanced practice registered nurse (A.P.R.N.) license in Louisiana unless course work in advanced pharmacology is deemed current.

Nursing Course Descriptions

Doctor of Nursing Practice

DIRECTOR: Ann H. Cary, Ph.D., MPH, RN, A-CCC OFFICE: 203 Stallings Hall
COORDINATOR FOR DNP PROGRAM: Gwendolyn George, DNP, FNP-BC

WEB PAGE: css.loyno.edu/nursing/

The School of Nursing offers a Post-masters Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. Students admitted to the this program are licensed nurse practitioners certified in the following areas: adult, gerontology, family, pediatric or women's health. There is no campus residency required. One week of campus orientation each year is required

Mission of the Doctor of Nursing (DNP) Practice Program

The mission of the DNP program is congruent with the philosophy and organizing framework of the School of Nursing and flows from the mission statement of the College of Social Sciences and the statement of purpose of Loyola University New Orleans. The mission of the DNP program is to provide a rigorous Jesuit education: to prepare advance nursing practice leaders to direct health care systems and interprofessional teams; to refine critical thinking and ethical decision-making skills to reduce health disparities and advance quality of care; to translate the science of nursing and health care to clinical practice; and to execute new practice options for doctorally prepared nurses in health care systems.

Accreditation 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (2006-2016): School of Nursing Accredited by NLNAC (2007-2015).

Goals of the DNP Program

The goals of the DNP program are as follows:

  1. Prepare advanced nursing practice leaders in doctoral nursing education in the Jesuit tradition of social justice.
  2. Prepare advanced nursing practice leaders to improve and extend health care to diverse populations.
  3. Prepare advanced nursing practice leaders to evaluate scientific knowledge to ensure quality and improve outcomes in health care systems.
  4. Prepare advanced nursing practice leaders to promote culturally relevant health care to reduce health disparities.
  5. Prepare advanced nursing practice leaders to demonstrate information literacy to improve and transform health care.\
  6. Prepare advanced nursing practice leaders to influence health care policy.

Objectives of the DNP Program

Upon completion of the DNP program, graduates will be able to:

  1. Analyze critical practice and system elements to provide comprehensive and ethically defensible health care delivery;
  2. Design systems of care recognizing organizational dynamics and independent and interprofessional practices, which result in improved health status for populations;
  3. Demonstrate leadership that facilitates health care system changes in practice delivery, resulting in improved quality of care;
  4. Evaluate new practice approaches based on the critical appraisal and integration of nursing and interprofessional sciences;
  5. Use best available evidence to assure quality in clinical practice;
  6. Lead the development of culturally relevant systems;
  7. Evaluate system influences which can remediate health disparities globally;
  8. Demonstrate information literacy in complex health care decision-making;
  9. Provide leadership for health care that shapes health care financing, policy, regulation, ethics, and delivery.

Admission Requirements For The DNP Program

Admission into the DNP program is competitive. Students are admitted into the DNP program based on a review of all materials provided to the School of Nursing faculty. Students will be admitted unconditionally.

DNP Admission Criteria

As a condition of the application process, all applicants must provide the following:

  1. BSN or equivalent and master’s in nursing from a school accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.
  2. Official transcripts from each degree-granting college or university attended.
  3. Copies of current, unencumbered RN license and advanced practice license (if applicable), in the state in which all clinical practica for this program will occur.
  4. Cumulative GPA of 3.2 or higher on earned graduate degree course work.
  5. Minimum of one year’s recent post-master’s work experience.
  6. Three letters of recommendation (using the form provided by Loyola) from persons knowledgeable about the applicant’s aptitude for doctoral study, such as former professors.
  7. Copy of a current Basic Cardio Life Support (BCLS).
  8. Essay addressing three areas: 1) description of goals for doctoral study, 2) research translation area of interest, and 3) career goals.
  9. Formal interview with one or more Loyola School of Nursing faculty members.
  10. Prior to admission or as a condition of progression, evidence of completion of a 3 credit hour graduate-level statistics course with an earned grade of C or better prior to NURS 920 Biostatistics.**
  11. Evidence of a minimum of 500 practice hours at the master’s level in the area of specialty for which this application is being considered. 
  12. Sixty days prior to enrollment, the student is required to apply for a certified background review at their own expense, by a provider designated by Loyola University New Orleans with the results reported to Loyola University New Orleans School of Nursing: Attention Vanessa Bailey. Information on this process will be provided to the student upon acceptance of an admission offer.
  13. Applicant is required to attend an applicant interview at Loyola University New Orleans as part of the admission criteria and process. 

** Graduate-level statistics course must be taken prior to the Spring term of the first year.

A deposit will be required when a student accepts an offer of admission to the DNP program. This deposit will be applied to the tuition bill after the final drop/add period in the second semester. The deposit will not be refunded for any reason should the student who accepts admission subsequently not enroll in the semester authorized for admission.

Transfer Credits

Students who have earned academic credit at another accredited college or university may be allowed to transfer up to six credits into the DNP program. In all cases course work will be evaluated for equivalency to Loyola requirements; therefore, students must provide course descriptions and syllabus to assist faculty in the evaluation process. However, 36 of 38 credits of course work must be earned at Loyola for the DNP.

Registered Nurse Licensure, Certification and Background Check Requirements

Upon entering the D.N.P. program, each student must supply a copy of a current unencumbered, unrestricted and valid registered nurse license in the state in which  practicum course will occur. All D.N.P. students must show proof of licensure as an advanced practice registered nurse and proof or certification in one of the following tracks: adult, family, gerontology, pediatric or women's health.

Sixty days prior to enrollment, the student is required to apply for a certified background review at their own expense, by a provider designated by Loyola University New Orleans with the results reported to Loyola University New Orleans School of Nursing: Attention Vanessa Bailey. Information on this process will be provided to the student upon acceptance of an admission offer.

DNP Program

The DNP program is 38 semester credit hours in length. In addition to theoretical coursework, the program requires 540 hours of practice experience conducted in the practicum, and capstone courses beyond the master's level. The overall practice hours for the DNP are a minimum of 1000 hours of which 540 hours are satisfied by the DNP curriculum. The remaining hours are validated in the master's curriculum by a transcripts analysis or certified letter describing the number of practicum hours earned from the accredited school awarding the masters degree. All new DNP students are required to attend a 5 day orientation on the campus of Loyola annually prior to the first semester of enrollment (May). All continuing students are required to attend a 5 day on campus session on Capstone projects at the conclusion of the first year of study.

DNP Curriculum

Semester I Total Credits: 6

                                        N900 Philosophy of Science (3 credits)

N905 Ethics & Social Justice (3 credits)


Semester II Total Credits:9

N910 Epidemiology (3 credits)

N925 Program Planning (3 credits)

N950 Integrating Behavioral Health in Primary care (3 credits)

Semester III Total Credits: 8

N920 Biostatistics (3 credits)

N915 Evidence-based Practice & Research Translation (3 credits)

N930 DNP Advanced Practicum I (2 credits)


Semester IV Total Credits: 6

N945 DNP Advanced Practicum II (3 credits)

N940 Health Policy & Economics (3 credits)


 

Semester V Total Credits: 6 

N955 Informatics & Finance (3 credits)

N935 Leadership of Systems Change & Innovation (3 credits)

Semester VI Total credits: 3-6

N960 Capstone Project (3-6 credits)


View Nursing Course Descriptions

DNP Clinical Practice Hours

  1. The DNP program will require 480 hours of practice experience conducted in the practicum, and capstone courses beyond the master’s level. Those students (NPs) taking N950 will have an additional 60 practice hours. The total number of practice hours is 540.
  2. Clinical experiences for DNP students will occur at health care organization sites in the state in which the nurse is licensed. The practice component is conducted with the assistance of preceptors who practice in the community where the student lives. Goals and objectives of the clinical experience are negotiated with the student’s faculty committee and advisor. Oversight of the practice experience is the responsibility of the faculty.
  3. The overall practice hours for the DNP are a minimum of 1000 hours of which 540 hours are satisfied by the DNP curriculum. The remaining hours are validated in the masters curriculum by a transcripts analysis or a certified letter describing the number of practicum hours earned from the accredited school awarding the masters degree.

Capstone Project Course and Other Program Requirements

The Loyola University New Orleans Doctor of Nursing Practice degree is a terminal practice degree in the same sense as the M.D. (physicians), PharmD (pharmacists) and D.P.T. (physical therapists) degrees and requires a rigorous analytical capstone project. The practice doctorate differs from the Ph.D. in Nursing. The Ph.D. focuses on the generation of research for new knowledge and culminates in a dissertation by the student. The D.N.P., however, is focused on translating the scientific research generated by the Ph.D. to health care in a timely manner so that patients experience the best applications of science and practice. The D.N.P. degree includes an integrated practicum or practice immersion experiences that generate a final scholarly project as a vital part of the experience. A completed scholarly practice portfolio provides evidence of student achievement of the Essentials and will result in at least one publishable scholarly paper to disseminate the results. The development, implementation and evaluation of this project will occur over three semesters throughout the practicum courses and culminates in the capstone course during the final semester. Each student will defend their DNP Capstone Project proposal in an open forum to an interprofessional committee of at least two members.

Practice Affiliation Agreement

Affiliation Agreements between the University and a clinical agency are required before a student commences the practicum. These are to be completed before the semester of the practicum and the student must verify with the faculty of record that all requirements noted in the affiliation are met prior to the practicum, i.e. immunizations, etc.

Human Subjects Review

Capstone projects are to be subjected to University Human Subject Review process. The organization in which Capstone is performed may also require an HSR at the organization prior to execution. 

Student Progression

Students must maintain a cumulative of 3.0 GPA and not earn a grade below B in any course to progress in the curriculum. Only DNP courses are calculated for the GPA.

Length of Time to Complete the Program

Students are required to complete the program within five years of their first term of enrollment.

View Nursing Course Descriptions

Nursing Graduate Courses:

NURS C700 Theoretical Perspectives in Nursing 3 cr. hrs.

This course focuses on the exploration of the nature of theory development in nursing, analysis of selected nursing and related theories, and the relevance of theory to research and practice in nursing.

NURS C704 Advanced Role Integration 3 cr. hrs.

This course examines the roles, responsibilities, multidisciplinary interaction, and accountability of managers in a variety of health care settings. The theoretical and contextual elements of the role of care manager and mid-level system manager are emphasized. Care coordination, quality management, and continuity of care are examined in light of organizational theory and behaviors. A systems approach is used to access integration in complex health care organizations.

NURS C706 Advanced Health Assessment Practicum 1 cr. hrs.

           This is a clinical course that focuses on development of advanced health assessment skills of adult clients with emphasis on data analysis and differential              diagnosis. 

NURS C709 Legal and Ethical Issues in Health Care 3 cr. hrs.

This course introduces students to legal and ethical issues affecting health care and nursing management responsibilities in an ever-changing health care industry. The influence of economic and sociopolitical factors on health care laws will be explored from the perspective of health care providers. The extent to which health care laws attempt to order relationships between providers, payers, and consumers will be examined. There is a focus on principles and theories of ethics as they relate to health care delivery, as well as health care administration. Emphasis will be placed on ethical/legal issues encountered in professional nursing practice. This course prepares graduates to appreciate the concepts and principles of ethical legal dilemmas and their application in practice.

NURS C710 Advanced Pathophysiology I 3 cr. hrs.

This course is an in-depth study of the pathophysiologic basis of disease as it affects individuals across the life cycle. Emphasis is placed upon endogenous and exogenous environmental factors which contribute to altered functional balance. The focus of the course is on mechanisms of disease and specific mechanisms (e.g., genetic, autoimmune) which cause aberrations resulting in dysfunction in the immune, neurologic, cardiovascular, and renal systems. Disease states commonly encountered in primary care settings and managed by primary care practitioners are emphasized.

NURS C712 Nursing Financial Management 3 cr. hrs.

This course explores the principles and practices of finance and the impact of reimbursement models and regulation in health care. Within this framework, content regarding finance and economics, analysis of financial statements, strategic financial planning and cost/benefit analysis are examined. Quantitative and qualitative approaches to decision making in the complex relationships among provider, payer, employer and client are addressed. 

NURS C715 Advanced Pathophysiology II 3 cr. hrs.

This course is an in-depth study of the pathophysiologic basis of disease as it affects individuals across the life cycle. Emphasis is placed upon endogenous and exogenous environmental factors which contribute to altered functional balance. The focus of the course is on mechanisms which cause aberrations resulting in dysfunction in the respiratory, endocrine, reproductive, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, hematologic, and lymphatic systems. Disease states commonly encountered in primary care settings and managed by primary care practitioners are emphasized.

NURS C716 Managed Care Methodologies 3 cr. hrs.

This course explores the theoretical, contextual and practical elements of managed care, quality management and care management. Tools, processes and methods required to effectively manage quality and implement case management practice across the healthcare continuum are examined. Quality improvement tools, clinical paths, clinical practice guidelines and other tools in managing care are analyzed for usefulness n achieving desired outcomes. 

NURS C720 Advanced Clinical Pharmacology I 2 cr. hrs.

This course focuses on clinical pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics with emphasis on major drug classes. Special emphasis is placed on drugs and drug classes used to treat problems commonly encountered in primary practice.

NURS C722 Advanced Clinical Pharmacology II 2 cr. hrs.

This course is a continuation of NURS C720. It focuses on clinical pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics with emphasis on major drug classes. Special emphasis is placed on drugs and drug classes used to treat problems commonly encountered in primary practice.

NURS C724 Outcomes Measurement and Data Management 3 cr. hrs.

This course focuses on the analysis and application of theory and skills needed to assess, plan, and evaluate the care of populations within health systems. The evaluation of current outcome measures as well as the acquisition and management of outcome data will be studied. Program design is discussed as it relates to effective outcomes of care. Clinical outcomes, functional outcomes, financial outcomes, and satisfaction indicators will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: NURS 735

NURS C725 Primary Care Concepts 3 cr. hrs.

This course focuses on current concepts and issues related to the family nurse practitioner role, legal and ethical parameters of advanced nursing practice, and examination of principles of epidemiology and their application to primary health care. Theories of health promotion, health maintenance, and health restoration across the life cycle are explored. Populations at risk are identified and implications for advanced practice are explored.

NURS C730 Family Theory 3 cr. hrs.

This course provides an in-depth study of concepts, theories, research, and public policy relevant to families. Emphasis is placed on developing a theoretical basis for intervention with families in need of health care. The role of the F.N.P. is explored in terms of appropriate family interventions. Emphasis is placed on collaboration with other health professionals to influence family policy. Environment as an external variable affecting family development, function, interaction, and health is discussed.

NURS C732 Disease Resource Management 3 cr. hrs.

This course focuses on promoting optimum health and functional balance for clients enrolled in disease management programs. The etiology and manifestations as well as the long-term management of complex chronic disorders and disabilities are analyzed. Appropriate management strategies are examined. Emphasis is placed on accessing, coordination, monitoring, and evaluating available options and services for enrolled clients.
Prerequisite: NURS C716.

NURS C735 Advanced Research Methods 3 cr. hrs.

This course is an in-depth study of nursing research methodologies. The focus will be on the interrelationships among theory, advanced nursing practice and research. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills used in critical analysis of nursing research for the purpose of determining app
Prerequisite/Co-requisite: NURS C700.

NURS C740 Health Care Systems 3 cr. hrs.

This course is designed to enable the learner to understand the health care delivery system in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the nursing role related to formulating health care policy and political processes that have the greatest impact on health care. The course focuses on the business of health care including the internal and external environments, financing of health care, and resource management and utilization. Legislative and regulatory processes as related to changing the health care system are explored.

NURS C744 Advanced Financial Management 3 cr. hrs.

This course explores the principles and practices of finance in healthcare. Emphasis is on the development of a comprehensive business plan for a new organization related to health care. Capital expenditure analysis is addressed.

Prerequisite/Co-requisite: NURS 712

NURS C745 Primary Care I: Theory 4 cr. hrs.

This course focuses on promoting optimum health and functional balance for the adult client with common, acute, and chronic health problems. Topics include immunologic, neurologic, cardiovascular, peripheral vascular, genitourinary, gynecologic, and respiratory dysfunctions, as well as psychosocial and behavioral concerns. Pathophysiological, social, and developmental theories, relevant research findings, and the implications of these for health care are explored. Collaborative management of common health problems is emphasized in the clinical component of the course.


NURS C748 Human Resource Management in Nursing 3 cr. hrs.

This course explores the knowledge and skills required for effective human resource management. Managerial processes and behaviors that promote and maintain a professional nursing practice environment are emphasized.

NURS C750 Primary Care II: Theory 3 cr. hrs.

This course is a continuation of NURS C745. It focuses on promoting optimum health and functional balance for the adult client with common, acute, and chronic health problems, including dermatologic, endocrine/metabolic, gynecologic, gastrointestinal, ophthalmologic, hematologic, psychosocial, and behavioral concerns. Pathophysiological, social, and development theories, relevant research findings, and the implications of these for health care are explored. Collaborative management of common health problems is emphasized in the clinical component of the course.

NURS C752 Healthcare Systems Management Practicum 3 cr. hrs.

This practicum provides a guided experience in an agency or agencies appropriate for the student’s selected concentration area. Designed as a capstone course of the master’s program in Health Care Systems Management, students are expected to be able to demonstrate theory and practice in the field under supervisors of selected preceptors.

$500 Practicum course fee.


NURS C755 Primary Care III: Theory 3cr. hrs.

This course focuses on promoting optimum health and functional balance for infants, children, and adolescents with common, acute, and chronic health problems. Physiological, social, and developmental theories, relevant research findings, and the implications of these for health and health care are explored. Collaborative management of common health problems of infants, children, and adolescents is emphasized in the clinical component of the course.

NURS C765 Research in advanced Nursing Practice 2 cr. hrs.

This course focuses on evaluating research findings for use in practice. Research which focuses on practice guidelines, therapeutic management, and cost containment is examined. Emphasis is placed on the integration of research findings into advanced practice. Students will be required to complete a research utilization project.

NURS C771 F.N.P. Practicum I 1 cr. hr.

Clinical experience in a variety of primary care settings with adult clients in the focus of this practicum experience.

$500 Practicum course fee.


NURS C772 A.N.P. Practicum I 2 cr. hrs.

Clinical experience in a variety of primary care settings with adult clients in the focus of this practicum experience.

$500 Practicum course fee.

NURS C773 F.N.P. Practicum II 2 cr. hrs.

Clinical experience in a variety of primary care settings with adult clients in the focus of this practicum experience.

$500 Practicum course fee.

NURS C774 F.N.P. Practicum III 2 cr. hrs.

Clinical experience in a variety of primary care settings with OB/GYN and pediatric clients is the focus of this practicum experience.

$500 Practicum course fee.

NURS C775 A.N.P. Practicum II 2 cr. hrs.

Clinical experience in a variety of primary care settings with adult clients in the focus of this practicum experience.

$500 Practicum course fee.

NURS 776 A.N.P. Practicum III 1 cr. hr.

Clinical experience in a variety of primary care settings with adult clients in the focus of this practicum experience.

$500 Practicum course fee.

Doctor of Nursing Practice Courses

NURS 900 Philosophy of Science 3 cr. hr.

This course systematically analyzes epistemological and meta-theoretical perspectives in the philosophy of science and the implications for knowledge development in nursing science.

NURS 905 Ethics and Social Justice 3 cr. hr.

This course examines the nature and practice of biomedical, administrative and population ethics with an emphasis on the application of ethical and social justice frameworks for analysis and decision making for patients, systems and populations experiencing ethical conundrums. A conceptual analysis of social justice in health care allows the student to seek ethically defensible solutions to health care dilemmas.

NURS 910 Epidemiology 3 cr. hr.
This course explores concepts, language and principles of epidemiology. Emphasis is on description and interpretation of modes of transmission of diseases. Students will gain knowledge critical to understanding the natural history of diseases, the evaluation of preventive interventions, and relevance of epidemiological methods in advanced nursing practice.

NURS 915 Evidence-Based Practice, Research Translation & Implementation Science 3 cr. hr.

This course explores the science of research translation. Emphasis is on analysis, evaluation and use of evidence-based practice models. It examines the methods to promote the systematic uptake of science into routine practice to improve the quality and effectiveness of health care by providers and organizations.

NURS 920 Biostatistics 3 cr. hr.
This course examines statistical methods utilized in the biological, social, and health care sciences. Emphasis is on the understanding of statistical procedures and analysis of data fundamental to critical evaluation of health services and nursing research.

NURS 925 Program Planning, Evaluation, and Quality Management 3 cr. hr.

This course provides students with the tools to develop, implement, and evaluate evidence-based clinical and administrative programs in nursing and healthcare delivery systems. Emphasis is on the synthesis of evidence for evaluating program planning frameworks, strategic implementation, and program evaluation to improve health care outcomes.

NURS 930 DNP Advanced Practicum I 3 cr. hr.

This course integrates the use of evidence-based practice tools in the analysis of clinical phenomenon in an existing system. Students will complete 128 clinical hours.

$500 practicum fee

NURS 935 Leadership of Systems Change and Innovation 3 cr. hr.

This course analyzes theory and research on intrapersonal, interpersonal, and organizational leadership for application in leading change and innovation in a global health care market. Systems leadership and organizational behavior concepts are also reviewed as they relate to leadership. Implications for interprofessional team leadership, sustainability, legacy development, and renewal are emphasized. Leadership coaching practice is included.

$500 practicum fee

NURS 940 Health Policy and Economics 3 cr. hr.

This course analyzes the economic and organizational foundations of health care systems. Social, economic, ethical, political and global health factors affecting health policy will be analyzed as well as the role of health practitioners to influence policy relative to health institutions, governmental agencies, and patients.

NURS 945 DNP Advanced Practicum II 3 cr. hr.

This course utilizes the outcomes analysis generated in Advanced Practicum I to design science-based program interventions to remediate the clinical phenomenon. The student will complete 192 practice hours.

$500 practicum fee

NURS 950 Prescribed NP Elective: Integrating Behavioral Health in Primary Care 3 cr. hr.

This course examines the role and practice of integrating behavioral health care in the primary care environment. This course includes a 64 hour practicum experience.

$500 practicum fee

NURS 955 Informatics and Finance 3 cr. hr.

This course examines the essential knowledge needed to understand information systems and technologies that are transforming health care. The student gains the ability to critique informatics program proposals, understand the role of the informatics specialist in managing health care information for decision-making and program planning, and analyze the utility and functionality of technology. Students will explore financial and business principles, as sources of information that are used to make health care decisions.

NURS 960 DNP Capstone Project 3 cr. hr.

This course allows the student to implement and evaluate the program intervention generated in DNP Advanced Practicum II. The capstone project will require the student to synthesize and apply the competencies in the program to improve outcomes in health care systems. The student will complete 192 practice hours.