A Message from the Dean

Loyola University New Orleans is a Catholic institution of higher learning in the Jesuit tradition. Loyola’s mission, therefore, in the broadest and deepest sense, is essentially religious and specifically educational and intellectual. The university is a community committed to:

Excellence in teaching and scholarship;

The search for the truth and a recognition of the critical intelligence needed to attain and communicate it;

The promotion of faith and justice in all spheres of activity—the city, the state, the region, and the world; and

Concern for the spiritual and moral development of each individual in the university.

While the Jesuit tradition is not wedded to any one philosophical, scientific, aesthetic, or political ideology, it is not compatible with every point of view. The Jesuit view of reality is concerned ultimately with choice and action, and is premised on the concept of moral responsibility. Therefore, the university must provide an environment in which all aspects of campus life, including administration and the curriculum, reflect a concern with ethical values. The Jesuit tradition is world-affirming. It is also deeply concerned with the promotion of service to others rather than self-aggrandizement. This commitment to social justice can be shared by all who are of good will, in keeping with a respect for ecumenical diversity and religious and academic freedom.

The College of Law is committed to excellence in legal education in the tradition of its spiritual heritage, with its goal being wisdom, not mere technical competence. It welcomes all persons who sincerely strive for the truth and are prepared to challenge all assumptions in light of this commitment.

The University and the College of Law

The College of Law at Loyola University New Orleans educates future members of the Bar to be skilled advocates and sensitive counselors-at-law committed to ethical norms and the pursuit of human dignity for all.

Loyola University New Orleans is a Jesuit university founded in 1912 by the Society of Jesus. All educational programs and activities are open to all qualified persons without regard to age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, sex/gender, or sexual orientation. Loyola admitted its first woman law student in 1918 and its first African-American law students in 1952.

Loyola is a medium-sized, comprehensive university with a total enrollment of 5,900 students comprised of 3,800 undergraduate students, 850 law school students, and 2,000 graduate students and students in other classifications. The faculty numbers 300 full-time and 200 part-time. The law faculty includes 33 full-time members and an adjunct faculty composed of judges and practitioners. Loyola’s student body is geographically diverse. Students represent all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and 62 foreign countries, representing a wide range of ethnic, social, and economic backgrounds. The law school student body includes students from 38 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and 10 foreign countries.

Loyola has two campuses located in a residential area of New Orleans known as the university section. Fronting on tree-lined St. Charles Avenue where streetcars are the mode of public transportation, Loyola’s main campus faces Audubon Park across the avenue. The 20-acre campus is a collection of Tudor-Gothic buildings and modern architecture. Two blocks farther up St. Charles Avenue is the four-acre Broadway campus, the home of the College of Law.

The College of Law operates both a day program for full-time students and an evening program for part-time students. The day program offers curricula in civil law for students who will practice law in Louisiana and in common law for students who will practice in other states. The evening program offers only the civil law curriculum.

Students of the College of Law issue four academic publications, the Loyola Law Review, the Loyola Journal of Public Interest Law, the Loyola Maritime Law Journal, and the Law and Technology Annual. Students also have the opportunity to participate in the Law Clinic where they, under the supervision of the clinic faculty, provide legal services to clients who are unable to afford representation. Additionally, students are required to participate in the College of Law’s skills curriculum, a program designed to foster the practical skills integral to the effective practice of law.

The College of Law participates in five joint juris doctor/master’s degree programs. Three of these programs are offered in conjunction with other colleges of Loyola University, and the other two are offered in conjunction with colleges of the University of New Orleans. In each of these programs, each participating institution accepts a limited number of hours earned at the other, and the total number of hours required in each program is reduced correspondingly. The joint degree programs are in business administration, religious studies, mass communications, urban and regional planning, and public administration.

The College of Law is home to the Gillis W. Long Poverty Law Center, a foundation devoted to the assistance of the poor. The center is named in memory of the late Louisiana congressman who demonstrated great concern for the disadvantaged.

Additionally, the College of Law, in keeping with its civil law tradition and a growing international emphasis, conducts summer sessions abroad in cooperation with prominent foreign law schools. The curriculum emphasizes comparative law, international law, and the legal systems of the host countries.

The College of Law is a member of the Association of American Law Schools and is approved by the American Bar Association. It also is approved by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York.

Loyola University New Orleans is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033 (404) 679-4500, to award bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral (juris doctor) degrees.

Mission Statement

Loyola University New Orleans, a Jesuit and Catholic institution of higher education, welcomes students of diverse backgrounds and prepares them to lead meaningful lives with and for others; to pursue truth, wisdom, and virtue; and to work for a more just world. Inspired by Ignatius of Loyola's vision of finding God in all things, the university is grounded in the liberal arts and sciences, while also offering opportunities for professional studies in undergraduate and selected graduate programs. Through teaching, research, creative activities, and service, the faculty, in cooperation with the staff, strives to educate the whole student and to benefit the larger community.

Admissions

Applicants for admission to the freshman class of the College of Law will be admitted only in the fall semester.

Both the Louisiana civil law curriculum and the general common law curriculum are available in the full-time day program. Only the Louisiana civil law curriculum is available in the part-time evening program. Although there is no application deadline, applications completed after March 1 generally will be processed on a space available basis only.

Accepted applicants must furnish prior to matriculation, a passport sized photograph, passport size, prior to registration, as well as transcripts from all degree granting undergraduate and graduate schools. All transcripts and documents submitted become the property of the university.

Applicants who have attended another law school, and who have been excluded for defective scholarship, or who are on scholastic probation, are not eligible for admission to the College of Law.

Students in good standing at an approved law school (one that is a member of the Association of American Law Schools or approved by the American Bar Association) may enroll as transient students with the permission of the dean. Members of the bar may be admitted as non-degree seeking students and register for courses on an audit basis.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Applicants to the College of Law must present satisfactory evidence that they have earned an undergraduate degree. In certain cases, applicants possessing an outstanding undergraduate record as well as an outstanding LSAT score may be considered for admission by presenting satisfactory evidence that they have completed a minimum of three-fourths of the requirements for an undergraduate degree. Applicants are in competition with one another under a rolling admissions system initially on the basis of undergraduate grade point average and Law School Admission Test (LSAT) score. The LSAT score attained must complement the undergraduate record sufficiently to indicate the applicant’s ability to successfully complete work undertaken in the College of Law. Other factors will be considered to determine the applicant’s acceptability including but not limited to letters of recommendation, college major, and graduate record.

For a profile of entrance credentials of the most recent entering class (both undergraduate grade point average and LSAT score), applicants are advised to read the Official Guide to U.S. Law Schools published by the Law School Admission Council in conjunction with the Association of American Law Schools and the American Bar Association.

All applicants must register with Law School Admission Services for both the LSAT and the Credential Assembly Service (CAS). Information packages for both are available at the College of Law or by writing directly to Law School Admission Services, Box 40, Newtown, PA 18940 or online at www.lsac.org.  Applicants should arrange to take the test as early as possible—preferably no later than the December prior to the planned enrollment year.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

Applicants for admission to the freshman class of the College of Law must:

  1. Complete an electronic application and attach a personal statement and any other required documents for questions 14B, C, D and E at www.lsac.org as well as at www.law.loyno.edu. September 1 begins the application period each year.
  2. Register with the Law School Data Assembly Service (LSDAS). A transcript from each college or university attended (a cumulative transcript from the last school attended will not suffice) should then be sent directly to: LSAT/LSDAS, P.O. Box 2000, Newtown, PA 18940.
  3. Applications will be evaluated when complete. An application is considered complete when the law school has received the application, fee, CAS report, personal statements and any required accompanying documents.  The CAS will analyze all transcripts submitted and will send a complete report as well as a copy of each transcript submitted to the Loyola College of Law.

Upon acceptance, applicants will then be asked to submit a final transcript, showing the award of a bachelor’s degree or completion of 96 hours in courses having substantial intellectual content, directly to this law school.

All students entering Loyola University for the first time must complete a Medical History Questionnaire, the results of which must be on file in the Office of Student Health Service prior to registration. New Loyola students must also present proof of required (MMR, PPD, Tetanus, and Bacterial Meningitis ) immunizations.

POLICIES AND REGULATIONS

All applicants and Loyola students are required to provide complete, correct, and truthful information on all university applications, forms, and correspondence. If a student falsifies a record and it is discovered between the time of application for admission and the beginning of classes, it may be considered cause for cancellation of acceptance. If such a falsification is discovered after the student has begun classes, it may be considered cause for dismissal. Whenever an applicant or student discovers that the application is incomplete or inaccurate, the applicant or student should update the application.

TRANSFER APPLICANTS

A limited number of applicants who have pursued a portion of their law studies in an approved law school successfully may be accepted as students with advanced standing. At a minimum, two year’s residence (60 credit hours at any time or, if they are the last remaining hours, 45 credit hours) in the Loyola University College of Law is required of students to be eligible for a Loyola degree.

A letter or certification of good standing as well as transcripts from the previously attended law school must be provided prior to evaluation. Applicants will be accepted for transfer if they present evidence of acceptance eligibility required of Loyola students in the year in which they began the study of law and evidence of above average academic study in their prior law school record.  Once a transfer applicant is accepted, the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs wil determine how many credits will be accepted by Loyola from their prior law school.  No credit will be awarded for a course taken at another law school unless the grade in that course is at least equal to the minimum grade point average required for graduation at that school.  If the transfer student has failed to earn a grade that is at least equal to the minmum grade point average required for graduation at the school from which the student seeks to transfer and that course is a Loyola required crouse, then the student must repeat that course at Loyola.  The right to refuse credit in whole or in part is reserved.  Transfer quality points are not used in calculating Loyola law school GPAs or rank in class. 

READMISSION

An excluded Loyola student may petition the Faculty Committee on Readmission for readmission to the College of Law. This request for readmission should be delivered to the assistant dean of admissions. Such a petition for readmission may be granted only if, in the judgment of the faculty, the academic record earned by the student in one or more semesters while enrolled in the College of Law was not indicative of the student’s ability to complete satisfactorily the requirements leading to a juris doctor degree. In addressing such a petition to the faculty, the student should specifically explain any hardships or other explanations which account for the deficient performance, and explain why those circumstances will not reoccur.

A student whose petition for readmission to the College of Law has been denied by the committee may not petition again for readmission until two years have passed since his or her last enrollment or petition for readmission. Any petition for readmission made at that time will be for admission as a beginning student with no academic credit for prior work attempted. Exceptions to the two-year requirement may be made by the committee for students who have completed more than the first year of law school study, and such students, at the discretion of the committee, may be readmitted to continue with advanced standing.

POLICY ON SEXUAL AND OTHER FORMS OF HARASSMENT

Loyola University New Orleans, consistent with its Goals Statement and the Character and Commitment Statement, fosters dignity and worth of all members of the Loyola community, and is committed to maintaining an educational and working environment free of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment is immoral and illegal, and will not be tolerated.

Sexual harassment may occur within a variety of relationships. Some such relationships involve unequal authority, while others occur between individuals who are of equal status. All allegations of sexual harassment will be scrutinized.

The university’s full policy and procedures governing sexual harassment and other forms of harassment can be found on the university web page for Human Resources Policies, Procedures, and Benefits. Appeal and grievance procedures can also be found in the text of the policy and in the university's Student Code of Conduct, Section 5: Sexual Misconduct, Discrimination, and Harassment Policies and Guidelines.

Loyola University New Orleans strongly supports equal opportunity in all aspects of university services and employment as provided in Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. Inquiries, concerns, and questions regarding the application of Title IX to university programs, services, employment, and policies should be addressed to the Title IX coordinator. The Title IX coordinator for Loyola University is the director of Human Resources, Marlise L. McCammon. The Title IX coordinator may be contacted at: Campus Box 16, (504) 864-7914. The law school contact person is Stephanie W. Jumonville, Associate Dean of Students, who can be reached at sjumon@loyno.edu or (504) 861-5438.

 

POLICY ON NONDISCRIMINATION

Loyola University New Orleans has fully supported and fostered in its educational programs, admissions, employment practices, and in the activities it operates the policy of not discriminating on the basis of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, sex/gender, or sexual orientation. This policy is in compliance with all applicable federal regulations and guidelines.

STUDENT GRIEVANCES AND COMPLAINTS

The university has procedures to handle student grievances and complaints. Please see the Student Handbook and the university web page under Policies, Procedures, and Reports at www.loyno.edu/provost/policies.html to determine the procedure to follow for a specific grievance or complaint.

Registration

LORA—(LOYOLA'S ONLINE RECORDS ACCESS)

Early registration, registration, late registration, and drop/add are conducted through LORA. Actual dates and times are listed on the LORA homepage. By registering through LORA, the student’s registration is automatically confirmed and he or she will be billed accordingly.
Students should note that if they are full-time day students, they can register for day classes. If, however, a day student wants to register for a required course offered in the evening, he/she must first receive permission from the associate dean of academic affairs. The same is true for evening students regarding required day classes.

Disabled students who notify the Dean of Academic Affairs or Office of Law Records will be assisted in their registration by a staff member.

Through LORA, students are also able to view their complete law school academic records and their financial obligations to the university.

REGISTRATION

Currently enrolled students may participate in early registration for the subsequent term. Early registration is conducted through LORA beginning in November for the spring term and April for the summer and fall terms. The Office of Admissions handles registration for first-year students. Upper division students wishing to register for first-year courses must contact the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs.

Registration remains open on LORA until the deadline for drop and add designated for each term. Drop and add deadlines are listed on each term’s academic calendar.

If a student decides not to return to the university in the semester for which he or she early registered, the student must officially withdraw before the semester begins. (See Withdrawal from the University.) Students with financial obligations to the university are subject to having their early registration cancelled according to the promissory note signed with the Office of Student Finance. Failure to have this hold removed will result in the cancellation of the early registration schedule. Students with a health hold due to remaining immunizations will not be allowed to register early.

DROP/ADD PERIOD

Because of external and internal reportings on enrollments, deadlines for drop/add activity must be strictly enforced. A dropped course is removed from the student’s record.
Registration for the audit grading option may be selected by students during any registration activity or the drop/add period and may not be changed at a later date. Students are referred to the course reference guide which contains specific instructions regarding this selection and other special registration procedures.

AUDITING

Students who do not want to earn university credit for a course may elect to audit the course. Such courses are considered part of the student's term course load and are recorded on the transcript. Regular tuition and fees apply for audited courses. To audit a course, an audit request card signed by the student, his or her adviser, and the instructor must be filed in the Office of Student Records before the last day to add classes. The instructor of the course will advise the student what is expected as an auditor in the class. A course previously audited may be taken for credit by enrolling in the course in a subsequent term. A student may not change his or her status from audit to credit or from credit to audit without permission from his or her adviser and the student's dean's office. Such approval must be filed in the Office of Student Records before the last day to add classes as indicated in the academic calendar for the term. Upon completion of the semester, the audited course will receive a final grade of (AU) Audit, (AI) Audit Incomplete, or (FA) Failed Audit. The revised Auditing policy is effective Fall 2007.

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES

Prior to the deadline for withdrawal stated in the academic calendar in the registration booklet for the term, students may receive an administrative withdrawal from a course. Students receive a W in the course(s). The transaction requires the adviser’s and the instructor’s signatures.
After this administrative withdrawal period, students may petition their instructors no later than two weeks before the last class day. Based on the student’s petition, a faculty member may award a UW or require the student to complete the course. Failure to obtain an administrative withdrawal or to petition the instructor may result in the grade of AF. The decision of the faculty member is recorded on the final grade roster.
Permission to drop Legal Research (LAW L898) or Independent Study (LAW L899) shall require prior written permission of the associate dean for academic affairs.
First-year students are not permitted to drop courses. First-year students cannot drop Moot Court. Other restrictions may exist.

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY

A student who withdraws from the university during a term before taking the final examinations for the term forfeits all credit work done in that term.
To withdraw officially from the university a student must:
1. Obtain a withdrawal form from the Office of Law Records, in the College of Law.
2. Obtain signatures of the designated officials on the withdrawal form.
3. First-year students attempting to withdraw must obtain the signature of the assistant dean of admissions on the withdrawal form.
4. Obtain all needed signatures and return all forms to the Office of Student Records on the main campus.
Students should consult the official university calendar for the tuition refund schedule in the registration booklet for the term.
Those students who withdraw officially from the university on or before the last day for dropping courses as recorded in the academic calendar will have the courses removed from their records. Students withdrawing from the university after the drop period but in the withdrawal period will receive Ws. After the withdrawal period, a grade is assigned by the instructor.
Students who have not completed at least two terms at the time of withdrawal must complete the degree requirements in effect at the time of their re-entry.

MEDICAL WITHDRAWAL

A student will be granted a medical withdrawal from the university within the term the student is incapacitated, providing that detailed written documentation is provided by the student’s health care professional to the associate dean for academic affairs.

Any student receiving a medical withdrawal during the term may be required to remain out of class the succeeding term. (This decision will be based on seriousness of illness and time of withdrawal.) Medical withdrawals must be made within the term being requested (during illness).

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

Students enrolled in a term may apply to the associate dean of academic affairs for a leave of absence for either the next term or the next academic year. Application requires the completion of a leave of absence form available in the Office of Student Records or Office of Law Records. Students returning from a leave of absence are subject to the policies of the bulletin under which they were originally admitted.
A leave of absence is not granted to a student transferring to another school.

Academic Regulations

HONOR CODE

Students in the College of Law are governed by the Honor Code. An elected student committee acts as a fact finding committee for honor code purposes. The committee reviews complaints and conducts hearings. If a complaint is found to be substantial and if it is sustained after hearing, the student may appeal to the dean.

KNOWLEDGE OF REGULATIONS

Students are responsible for compliance with the regulations of the university and should familiarize themselves with the provisions of this bulletin distributed by the Office of Admissions, the Registration Schedules distributed by the Office of Student Records, the Student Handbook distributed by the Office of Student Affairs, posted official notices, and instructions given to students.

The university reserves the right to clarify and change its regulations in the course of the student’s enrollment. Faculty advisers, deans, and associate deans are available to assist students regarding compliance with current regulations. However, it is ultimately the student’s responsibility to comply with the regulations and completion of requirements for his or her chosen program of study.

Upon enrollment, it is understood that both the student and the parents or guardians of a dependent student agree that the student will be governed by the university regulations and will abide by decisions made by proper authorities of the university regarding the individual student.

PETITION TO WAIVE A REGULATION

The faculty committee receives petitions from students seeking variances from the rules and policies of the College of Law. Requests must be made in a timely manner. For more information, please contact Associate Dean of Students.

CURRICULA

Loyola offers four curricula. In the full-time day program, Loyola offers two curricula leading to the juris doctor degree: in the tradition of the civil law for Louisiana students; in the common law for those students who will practice in other states. As part of the full time day program, Loyola also offers a LL.M. in United States Law.  The part-time evening program offers only the civil law curriculum leading to the juris doctor degree.

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS AND COURSE LOADS

The curriculum for full-time students covers a period of six semesters of resident study. Full-time students will not be permitted to schedule more than 16 hours of law work in any semester without special permission from the associate dean of academic affairs of the College of Law. ABA Accreditation Standard 304(e) prohibits students from enrolling in more than 20 percent of the credits needed for graduation in one semester. For Loyola, that maximum is 18 hours. Full-time first-year students must schedule 16 hours in the first semester and 15 hours in the second semester. The normal time frame for completion of the juris doctor degree is three academic years. Students are forewarned that this is a minimum time frame and the program may not be completed by acceleration in two and one-half years.

The curriculum for part-time students covers a period of usually four academic years plus one or two summer sessions. By attending three summer sessions and taking full loads each semester, it is possible to accumulate sufficient hours to graduate in three and one-half years. Part-time students may register for more than 12 hours only with the permission of the Petitions Committee or the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs by signing a pledge. All first-year part-time students are required to schedule 11 hours in the first semester and 10 in the second semester. Legal Profession must be completed and scheduled during the second year. Anyone who begins in the part-time program must stay with that program in the first year.

ABA STANDARD REGARDING EMPLOYMENT

All students, full-time and part-time, should be aware of the ABA Accreditation Standard 304(f) which provides: “A student may not engage in employment for more than 20 hours per week in any semester in which the student is enrolled in more than 12 class hours.” In addition, ABA Accreditation Standard 304(d) requires “regular and punctual class attendance.”

LAW PROGRAM MUST BE COMPLETED IN FIVE YEARS

Students must complete their requirements in five calendar years. For example, if you begin your program in the fall of 2004, you must complete your program before the start of the fall of 2010.

POLICY REGARDING LAW STUDENT ENROLLMENT IN 
   OTHER LOYOLA DIVISIONS

Students registered in the College of Law will not be permitted to register for courses in any other college of the university without the special permission from the associate dean for academic affairs of the College of Law. Permission will be granted only to upperclass students in special instances. Except for those students enrolled in the joint degree programs, no one will be permitted to take more than three hours of work in another school while enrolled in the College of Law.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR JURIS DOCTOR

All JD students must complete the following requirements to graduate:

  • A minimum of six semesters in residence
  • 90 academic hours with at least a 2.0 or C average (see details below)
  • eight skills credits
  • satisfy all finanical obligations to the Law School and the University

As part of the 90 academic hours needed to graduate JD students must complete the following:

  • all required courses as listed below
  • the Writing Requirement (2 hour requirement)
  • one Perspectives course (3 hour requirement)
  • the Law and Poverty requirement

A description of each of these requirements follows below.

Required courses for full-time

First Year

Fall Semester Hours Spring Semester Hours
LCIV L702—Common Law Contracts for Civil Law Students or
LCOM L700—Contracts I
3
LCIV L710—Conventional Obligations or LCOM L701—Contracts II
3
LAW L705—Torts I
3
LAW L710—Torts II
2
LAW L725—Civil Procedure I
3
LAW L730—Civil Procedure II
3
LCIV L706—Civil Law Property I or LCOM L705—Common Law Property I
3
LCIV L707—Civil Law Property II or LCOM L710—Common Law Property II
3
LAW L735—Criminal Law
2
LAW L765—Moot Court
2
LAW L715—Legal Research and Writing
2
LAW L770—The Legal Profession
2
Total Hours
16
Total Hours
15

Second Year

LAW L750—Constitutional Law
4
LAW L740—Administration of
Criminal Justice I
3
LCIV L715—Successions or
LCOM L715—Trusts and Estates
3
LAW L745—Business Organizations
4
LAW L760—Evidence
3
LCIV L725—Sales and Leases
3
Elective or Civil Law “Pool” Courses
5 or 6
Electives or Civil Law “Pool” Courses
5 or 6
Total Hours
15 or 16
Total Hours
15 or 16

Third Year

LAW L781—Law and Poverty
2
Electives
14 to 16
Electives or Civil Law “Pool” Courses
14 to 16
   
Total Hours      

Civil law students must also take at least two of the four “pool” courses listed below. These are:

LCIV L900— Civil Law of Persons 3
LCIV L920— Louisiana Donations and Trusts 3
LCIV L930— Community Property 3
LCIV L940— Security Rights 3

As a matter of sequencing, we recommend that Civil Law of Persons and/or Louisiana Donations and Trusts be taken in the second year and that Community Property and/or Security Rights be taken in the third year.

In addition to the required and “pool” courses listed above, students must take one of six courses emphasizing philosophical or historical perspectives on law and a course satisfying the writing requirement. These courses and the courses that satisfy the writing requirement are set forth in the Writing Requirement and Perspectives sections. Furthermore, students must satisfy the requirements of the skills training program in order to graduate. All freshman students are required to schedule and complete the full academic load listed for their respective curricula during the first year of study.

Students are cautioned to register for required courses in the years and semesters listed on this and the following page. Failing to do so may create a scheduling conflict in a subsequent semester which could delay graduation.

Required courses for part-time

First Year

Fall Semester Hours Spring Semester Hours
LCIV L702—Common Law Contracts for
Civil Law Students
3
LCIV L710—Conventional Obligations
3
LAW L705—Torts I
3
LAW L710—Torts II
2
LCIV L706—Civil Law Property I
3
LAW L765—Moot Court
2
LAW L715—Legal Research and Writing
2
LCIV L707—Civil Law Property II
3
Total Hours
11
Total Hours
10

Second and Third Year 2010-2011

LAW L750—Constitutional Law
4
LAW L740—Administration of Criminal Justice I
3
LCIV L715—Successions
3
LCIV L725—Sales and Leases
3
LAW L735—Criminal Law
2
Electives or Civil Law "Pool" Courses
4 or 5

LAW L770—The Legal Profession* (Second Year) or

Elective (Third Year)

 

 

2

 
 
Total Hours
11
Total Hours
10 or 11

Second and Third Year 2011-2012

LAW L760—Evidence 3 LAW L745—Business Organizations 4
LAW L725—Civil Procedure I 3 LAW L730—Civil Procedure II 3

LAW L770—The Legal Profession* (Second Year)

2 Elective 3 or 4
Elective or
Civil Law "Pool" Courses
3 or 5    
Total Hours 11 or 12 Total Hours 10 or 11

*LAW L770, The Legal Profession, offered each year, must be taken by second-year students. The other second-year courses alternate from one year to the next.

Fourth Year

Electives or Civil Law “Pool”
Courses
11 LAW L781—Law and Poverty 2
    Electives or Civil Law “Pool” Courses 9
Total Hours 11 Total Hours 11

To earn the 90 credit hours required for graduation, students in the part-time curriculum must earn additional hours by attending summer sessions or by obtaining permission to schedule more than 12 hours during fall or spring semesters.

Civil law students must also take at least two of the four “pool” courses listed below. These are:

LCIV L900— Civil Law of Persons 3
LCIV L920— Louisiana Donations and Trusts 3
LCIV L930— Community Property 3
LCIV L940— Security Rights 3

As a matter of sequencing, we recommend that Civil Law of Persons and/or Louisiana Donations and Trusts be taken in the second year and that Community Property and/or Security Rights be taken in the third year.

In addition to the required and “pool” courses listed above, students must take one of six courses emphasizing philosophical or historical perspectives on law and a course satisfying the writing requirement. These courses and the courses that satisfy the writing requirement are found below.  Furthermore, students must satisfy the requirements of the skills training program in order to graduate. All freshman students are required to schedule and complete the full academic load listed for their respective curricula during the first year of study.

Students are cautioned to register for required courses in the years and semesters listed in this bulletin. Failing to do so may create a scheduling conflict in a subsequent semester which could delay graduation.

Possible Curricular Changes for Students Beginning in 2010-2011

The faculty in spring 2010 began the process of reforming the curriculum with the goal of improving bar passage. Because the process is not completed, the purpose of this section is to give notice of the tentatively approved changes.

First-year students in the bottom quartile after the first semester will take a new course, Principles of Legal Analysis instead of Moot Court. They will take Moot Court in their second year. Students in the bottom quartile at the end of the second year will take an additional course, Consolidated Legal Analysis. Civil Law students in the bottom quartile after their first year must take Louisiana Security Rights. Common Law students in the bottom quartile after their first year must take Commercial Transactions and Secured Transactions.

WRITING REQUIREMENT (2 hour requirement)

As a requirement of graduation, each student must submit a piece of legal writing in which the student exhibits the ability to perform legal analysis.

Guidelines for preparing a paper that satisfies the writing requirement are available from the Law Records Office or online at http://law.loyno.edu/law-records. Students will receive writing requirement credit when their paper receives a grade of C or higher and the professor who grades the paper indicates on LORA or to Law Records that the paper met the writing requirement standard. Students must tell the professor at the beginning of the project that the paper will be used to satisfy the writing requirement. Students must attach the writing requirement form to the paper when the paper is submitted for grading. The form instructs professors to indicate on LORA or report to Law Records that the writing requirement was satisfied by the student's paper.

Papers written in the following courses, when taught for at least 2 hours, may be used to satisfy the writing requirement:

LAW L782 - Law and Poverty Seminar
LAW L802 - Law and Education Seminar
LAW L809 - American Legal History Seminar
LAW L813 - Evidence/Procedure Seminar
LAW L816 - Comparative Law Seminar (2- or 3-hour credit assignment)
LAW L819 - Construction Industry Law Seminar
LAW L822 - Capital Punishment and the Constitution
LAW L826 - Advanced Torts Seminar
LAW L827 - Contracts/Commercial Law Seminar
LAW L831 - European Union Law Seminar
LAW L834 - Environmental Justice Seminar
LAW L846 - Seminar in Scholarly Writing
LAW L853 - Family Law Seminar
LAW L855 - Child Advocacy Seminar
LAW L859 - Regulation of Sports Industry Seminar
LAW L862 - Criminal Law Seminar
LAW L865 - Juvenile Law Seminar
LAW L867 - Business Planning Seminar
LAW L877 - Constitutional Law Seminar
LAW L883 - Dialogues in Law and Ethics
LAW L884 - International Law Seminar
LAW L885 - Sex Discrimination Law Seminar
LAW L886 - Environmental Law Seminar
LAW L887 - Federal Taxation Seminar
LAW L890 - Regulation of Entertainment Industries Seminar
LAW L892 - Law Review Seminar
LAW L893 - Public Interest Law Journal Honors Tutorial (only for comment)
LAW L894 - Public Interest Law Journal Seminar
LAW L898 - Legal Research (2-hour credit assignment)
LAW L910 - Law and Religion Seminar

Any new seminar, course, or existing course, which is at least 2 credit hours and in which a paper of suitable length and quality is either required or offered by the instructor as an option.

PERSPECTIVE COURSE REQUIREMENT (3 hour requirement)

The faculty has also established a requirement that students take one of the following courses which give a philosophical or historical perspective on law: Jurisprudence, Western Legal Tradition, Comparative Law, Comparative Law Seminar (when taught for three hours of credit), American Legal History Seminar, or Law of European Union I. Other courses from time to time may be added to this list. Only Western Legal Tradition and Comparative Law fulfill the perspective requirement for Civil Law and Common Law certificates.

LAW AND POVERTY REQUIREMENT

Students may satisfy the Law and Poverty requirement by fulfilling any one of the following options: take the Law and Poverty course (LAW L781); take the Law and Poverty Seminar (LAW L782); take Street Law (LAW L833); Environmental Justice Seminar (LAW L834); represent low income people in the Clinical Seminar (LAW L897); Human Rights and the Global Marketplace (LAW L924); or perform 50 hours or volunteer pro bono legal services to the poor in one academic year in a setting approved in advance by the coordinator of the pro bono program. Students do not receive academic hours of credit for performing the pro bono services.

SKILLS CURRICULUM AND REQUIREMENTS

The Loyola skills curriculum offers courses that teach the practical lawyering skills that students will need to effectively do the work of their lifetime. Skills curriculum courses are completed in one to four class meetings and are scheduled each semester. Practicing attorneys and judges teach the courses which are designed to provide an overview of specific areas of the law.

History

The skills curriculum was approved by the College of Law faculty and instituted during the 1985 – 86 academic year. In 1992, the American Bar Association published the Report of the Task Force on Law Schools and the Profession: Narrowing the Gap, also known as the MacCrate Report, which outlines and analyzes the fundamental lawyering skills that students must learn to do the work of their lifetime. Over the years, the Loyola skills curriculum has been referred to as a model for structuring law skills instruction. During the 1998 – 99 academic year, skills advisory boards have reviewed and revised the curriculum so that categories and courses meet the recommendations made in the MacCrate Report.

Requirements

Each student is required to earn eight skills credits to be certified for graduation by the skills curriculum office. The required eight skills credits should be distributed with two courses in each of the first four categories for a total of eight credits.

Categories I through IV are:

Category I—Factual Investigation and Counseling
Category II—Trial Practice Skills
Category III—Communication and Negotiation
Category IV—Administrative Boards and Law Office Management
Category V is an elective category which will not be credited to the required eight courses, but which will be recorded on the official academic transcript.

Students are encouraged to attend more than the required eight courses. No tuition fee is charged for skills curriculum courses. The specially designed skills curriculum courses are taught by practitioners and judges from the local legal community. Students will examine and practice fundamental lawyering skills, including problem solving, legal analysis and reasoning, legal research, factual investigation, communication, counseling, negotiation, litigation and alternative dispute resolution procedures, organization and management, and recognizing and resolving ethical dilemmas.

SUMMER SCHOOL

A limited number of courses are offered each summer in an eight-week session. Schedules are available in the spring. A maximum of six credit hours may be earned in New Orleans in a summer session.

All students, after completion of their freshman year, are permitted to enroll in summer school classes.

CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS

Certificate in Civil Law—Requirements for Common Law Students

Common law students are eligible to receive the Certificate in Civil Law Studies at graduation upon the successful completion of all requirements for common law students plus three additional courses:

1. LCIV L706 Civil Law Property I 3 hrs.  
2. LCIV L710 Conventional Obligations 3 hrs.  
3. and one of the following courses:    
  LCIV L715 Successions 3 hrs.  
  LCIV L725 Sales and Leases 3 hrs  
  LCIV L900 Civil Law of Persons 3 hrs.  
  LCIV L920 Louisiana Donations and Trusts 3 hrs.  
  LCIV L930 Community Property 3 hrs.  
  LCIV L940 Security Rights 3 hrs.  

In addition, in order to be eligible to receive the certificate, a student must satisfy the “Perspective Course” requirement by taking either Western Legal Tradition (3 hrs.—LAW L803) or Comparative Law (3 hrs.—LAW L881).

Certificate in Common Law—Requirements for Civil Law Students

Civil law students are eligible to receive the Certificate in Common Law Studies at graduation upon the successful completion of all requirements for civil law students plus three additional courses:

1. LCOM L710 Common Law Property II . 3 hrs
2. LCOM L920 Commercial Transactions 3 hrs.
3. and one of the following courses:  
  LCOM L701 Contracts II 3 hrs.
  LCOM L705 Common Law Property I 3 hrs.
  LCOM L715 Trusts and Estates 3 hrs.
  LCOM L921 Secured Transactions 2 hrs.

In addition, in order to be eligible to receive the certificate, a student must satisfy the “Perspective Course” requirement by taking either Western Legal Tradition (3 hrs.—LAW L803) or Comparative Law (3 hrs.—LAW L881).

Requirements for Certificate in International Legal Studies

Students are eligible to receive the certificate upon the successful completion of all requirements for graduation in either the civil law curriculum or the common law curriculum plus four additional courses aggregating at least 10 credit hours selected from the following list of elective courses.

LAW L803 - Western Legal Tradition — 3 hrs.
LAW L805 - Law of European Union I — 3 hrs.
LAW L811 - Law of European Union II — 3 hrs.
LAW L832 - Immigration and Nationality Law — 3 hrs.
LAW G842 - Comparative Judicial Process — 1 hr.
LAW L876 - Conflict of Laws — 3 hrs.
LAW L878 - International Law — 3 hrs.
LAW G879 - International Trade Regulation — 2 hrs.
LAW L881 - Comparative Law — 3 hrs.
LAW G884 - Latin American Law Seminar — 2 hrs.
LAW L884 - International Law Seminar — 2 hrs.
LAW G890 -Current Issues in Japanese Law — 2 or 3 hrs.
LAW L924 - Human Rights and Global Marketplace — 2 hrs. 
LAW L925 - International Trade Law — 2 or 3 hrs.
LAW L926 - International Investment Law — 2 or 3 hrs.
LAW L927 - International Financial Services Law — 2 or 3 hrs.
LAW L928 - International Dispute Resolution — 2 or 3 hrs.
LAW L929 - Selected Topics in International Environmental Law — 2 hrs.
LAW L932 - Immigration Law Seminar — 2 hrs. 
LAW L974 - Canon Law 1 or 3 hrs.
LAW L981 - International Taxation — 3 hrs.

Other comparative or international law courses offered by Loyola or other accredited American law schools may be approved by the associate dean for academic affairs for partial fulfillment of the requirements of the certificate program.

Requirements for Certificate in Environmental Law

Students in their second and third year may elect to specialize in environmental law, earning a Certificate in Environmental Law. To do so, a student must apply no later than the end of the second year with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Students who have met the certificate requirements by the time of graduation will have this distinction noted on their transcripts and receive a certificate.

This certificate program is designed to recognize students who commit themselves to this fascinating and challenging area of study. But it is also intended to leave room to take other important core courses. We strongly believe that one must first be a good lawyer before one can become an effective environmental lawyer.

Requirements

1. Curriculum. Students must complete the following courses, totaling 13 hours

(a) LAW L858 Environmental Law - 3hrs.
(b) LAW L835 Natural Resources Law - 3hrs., or
LAW L836 Land Use Law - 3hrs.
(c) seven additional hours from the courses listed below

LAW L844 Administrative Law -3hrs.
LAW L905 Advanced Legal Writing (with approval of program chair) - 3hrs.
LAW L879 Advanced Legislative and Administrative Advocacy - 3hrs.
LAW L900 Clinical Externship (with approval of program chair) -1-2hrs.
LAW L835 Environmental Justice Seminar - 2hrs.
(This seminar also satisfies the Law & Poverty requirement)
LAW L886 Environmental Law Seminar - 2hrs.
(may take more than one; seminar topics include: Animal Law,
Brownfields, Redevelopment, Clean Air Act, Coastal Management,
Energy Law, International Environmental Law, Toxic Torts, etc.)
LAW L836 Land Use Law - 3hrs.
LAW L898 Legal Research (with approval of program chair) - 1-2hrs.
LAW L841 Legislative and Administrative Advocacy - 3hrs.
LAW L835 Natural Resources Law - 3hrs.
LAW L929 Selected Topics in International Environmental Law - 2hrs.
LAW L838 Mineral Law - 3 hrs.

2. Writing Requirement. Students must complete an academic research paper of high professional quality concerning environmental law. They may fulfill this requirement in conjunction with an environmental course listed above, as part of LAW L898 Legal Research, LAW L905 Advanced Legal Writing, or through one of the College of Law's journal offerings. This paper must be written for a grade and must be advised or co-advised by one of the designated environmental faculty. Advance approval of the topic is required.

3. Grade Point Average. Students must complete the certificate requirements with a combined grade point average of 2.5 or higher, and with no individual grade below C.

Requirements for Certificate in Taxation

Students are eligible to receive the certificate upon successful completion of all requirements for graduation plus:

Requirements

1. Take twelve credits of taxation classes;

2. Maintain an average of “B” or better in tax classes;

3. Obtain at least a graduating g.p.a. of 2.5;

4. Complete fifty hours (over two (2) filing seasons) of volunteer work for the VITA Program, which also satisfies the Law and Poverty requirement.  Please contact the Pro Bono Coordinator for information about using VITA hours to satisfy the Law & Poverty requirement.

The taxation classes are:
LAW L804 Legal Accounting
LAW L869 Taxation of the Family
LAW L870 Federal Taxation of Wealth Transmission
LAW L871 Advanced Federal Income Taxation
LAW L872 Federal Income Taxation of Corporations
LAW L873 Taxation of Partnerships and Other Pass-through Entities
LAW L874 Federal Tax Procedure
LAW L875 State and Local Taxation
LAW L887 Federal Taxation Seminar
LAW L898 Legal Research
LAW L980 Income Taxation
LAW L981 International Taxation

SUGGESTED COURSES FOR LOUISIANA BAR EXAM

Below in numerical order are the courses suggested to prepare for the Louisiana Bar Exam. Those courses in bold face are the suggested elective courses.

*LAW L705 Torts I
*LAW L710 Torts II
*LAW L725 Civil Procedure I
*LAW L730 Civil Procedure II
*LAW L735 Criminal Law
*LAW L740 Administration of Criminal Justice I
*LAW L745 Business Organizations
*LAW L750 Constitutional Law
*LAW L760 Evidence
*LAW L770 The Legal Profession
LAW L810 Negotiable Instruments
LAW L823 First Amendment
LAW L842 Courts in a Federal System
LAW L876 Conflict of Laws
LAW L946 Agency and Partnership
LAW L955 Advanced Constitutional Law--14th Amendment
*LCIVL706 Civil Law Property I
*LCIVL707 Civil Law Property II
*LCIVL710 Conventional Obligations
*LCIVL715 Successions
*LCIVL725 Sales and Leases
p* LCIVL900 Civil Law of Persons
p* LCIVL920 Louisiana Donations and Trusts
p* LCIVL930 Community Property
LCIVL935 Louisiana Code of Civil Procedure
p* LCIVL940 Security Rights
LCOML921 Secured Transactions
* = required, p* = pool required

SUGGESTED COURSES FOR COMMON LAW BAR EXAMS

Below in numerical order are the courses suggested to prepare for the Common Law bar exam. Those courses in bold face are suggested elective courses.

*LAW L705 Torts I
*LAW L710 Torts II
*LAW L725 Civil Procedure I
*LAW L730 Civil Procedure II
*LAW L735 Criminal Law
*LAW L740 Administration of Criminal Justice I
*LAW L745 Business Organizations
*LAW L750 Constitutional Law
*LAW L760 Evidence
*LAW L770 The Legal Profession
LAW L810 Negotiable Instruments
LAW L823 First Amendment
LAW L842 Courts in a Federal System
LAW L876 Conflict of Laws
LAW L946 Agency and Partnership
LAW L955 Advanced Constitutional Law--14th Amendment
*LCOML700 Contracts I
*LCOML701 Contracts II
*LCOML705 Common Law Property I
*LCOML710 Common Law Property II
*LCOML715 Trusts and Estates
LCOML920 Commercial Transactions
LCOML921 Secured Transactions
* = required

Check with your individual state about any requirements unique to your state.

LEGAL RESEARCH (LAW L898) and INDEPENDENT STUDY (LAW L899)

LAW L898 Legal Research 1 or 2 or 3 hrs.
This course is designed to develop skills in legal research, analysis, and writing, and to allow the student the opportunity to study a narrow subject in depth under the supervision of a full-time faculty member with expertise in the area. A written paper is required for satisfactory completion of this course, whether it is taken for one or two hours of credit. A letter grade is given for completion of the course. The course may be taken for two hours of credit to satisfy the writing requirement. Papers written for this course and used to satisfy the writing requirement should follow the writing requirement guidelines.

To register for this course a student must submit to Law Records an Independent Study Form signed by the professor under whom the paper is to be written and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Students must submit a brief outline and bibliography, which has been approved by the professor, when the Independent Study form is submitted to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for approval and signature. Students must be in good standing to register for this course.

LAW L899 Independent Study 1 or 2 or 3 hrs.
This course is designed to allow the student an opportunity to study a narrow subject in depth under the supervision of a full-time faculty member with expertise in the subject area. Appropriate written documentation pertinent to the study is required, but the course does not necessarily entail a single research paper as is the case with Legal Research (LAW L898). This course is only graded on a pass/fail basis and may sometimes involve working for an outside agency (i.e., an “extern” program), with general supervision and evaluation by the designated faculty member. This course cannot be used to satisfy the writing requirement.

To register for this course a student must submit to Law Records an Independent Study Form signed by the professor who will supervise the student’s work and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. A student must be in good academic standing to register for this course.

Limits on Law L898 Legal Research and Law L899 Independent Study
Under no circumstances can a student elect any combination of course numbers LAW L814, L846, L891, L892, L893, L894, L898, or L901 (group 1 below) that would result in more than six hours. Also, under no circumstances may a student elect any combination of course numbers L898, L899, and L900 (group 2 below) that would result in more than six hours.

Group 1
Law L814 Law Review Practicum
Law L846 Seminar in Scholarly Writing
Law L891 Law Review Honors Tutorial
Law L892 Law Review Seminar
Law L893 Journal of Public Interest Law Honors Tutorial
Law L894 Journal of Public Interest Law Seminar
Law L898 Legal Research
Law L901 Loyola Maritime Law Journal Honors Tutorial

Group 2
Law L898 Legal Research
Law L899 Independent Study
Law L900 Clinical Externship
 

LL.M. for INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

LL.M. in United States Law

The LL.M. in United States Law is primarily (but not exclusively) designed for lawyers who have obtained their first degree in law from a law school in a Civil Law country.  A concept of the program is that Louisiana’s Civil Law or perhaps more accurately “Mixed Jurisdiction” background will be attractive to lawyers from Civil Law countries.  The Loyola College of Law Civil Law faculty will be available for these students as interpreters and “mediators” to assist them in better understanding unfamiliar Common Law concepts and techniques and other aspects of American public and private law. By achieving this familiarity foreign lawyers can become more comfortable in those areas of their future practice when they interact with U.S. lawyers, businessman, government officials or other legal institutions.

A total of twenty-four credit hours is required for this degree.  It is anticipated that the degree will be completed in one academic year (two semesters), but students may take longer if they wish with the permission of the Director.  For example, it maybe possible to finish the few remaining hours in the summer following the academic year by taking summer courses either in New Orleans or one of several study-abroad programs.

The only specific required courses for this degree will be the three credit course in “Introduction to United States Law” and the two credit course in “Legal Research and Writing for Foreign Lawyers.”  There is also a separate research and writing requirement which may be fulfilled by taking a two hour law school seminar for credit or a two hour independent legal research project (LAW L898) under the supervision of a faculty member.  An LL.M. student may be able to complete a more extensive thesis under faculty supervision for up to a total of six hours credit.  (This would be instead of the two hour project, not in addition to it.)

The remaining credits of the twenty-four credit hours may be taken from among any other courses in the College of Law’s course catalog except for the “Legal Research and Writing” for JD students, as well as, courses that are associated with service on the school’s four officially recognized law journals.  The candidate should have a coherent plan of electives and have the approval of the director for all elective courses. 

Up to four credit hours may be earned through a pass-fail internship with a law firm, court or government agency.  The College of Law does not promise that an internship will be available to the potential LL.M. candidate, but will make best efforts to arrange one for interested candidates. 

If a candidate chooses to write a thesis this may be completed after the candidate’s one year period of residency on the Loyola campus, but the LL.M. degree will not be awarded until the thesis is satisfactorily completed. 

Students who have their first degree in law from a common law country other than the United States may elect, as part of their required twenty four credit hours, to take a limited concentration in Civil Law courses offered at Loyola and receive a certificate in Civil Law Studies reflecting this concentration. The additional requirements for the certificate in Civil Law Studies are that the candidate take one of the following Civil Law courses in our curriculum: Civil Law Property or Civil Law Conventional Obligations plus one other Civil Law course, i.e., one of those designed "LCIV" in the Law Bulletin. (see Academic Regulations and Requirements.)

ENROLLMENT AT OTHER LAW SCHOOLS

The associate dean for academic affairs may give written permission for a student to take courses at other law schools, thus assuring the student that the courses will be applied toward the student’s current program. An official copy of the transcript from the other school must be submitted to the Office of Law Records in the College of Law prior to the completion of Loyola’s next term. No credit will be awarded for a course taken at another law school unless the grade in that course is at least equal to the minimum grade point average required for graduation at that school. If a student fails to earn such a grade in a course required for graduation from Loyola, the course must be repeated. (See Academic Standards.) Credit earned at other schools will count toward total earned hours but will not affect the student’s cumulative grade point average.

Students are cautioned that the associate dean of academic affairs will only grant permission to take courses elsewhere when compelling reasons are demonstrated. Rarely will permission be granted to take a required course at another law school. At a minimum, two year’s residence (60 credit hours at any time or, if they are the last remaining hours, 45 credit hours) in the Loyola University New Orleans College of Law is required of students in order that they may be eligible for a Loyola degree.

SUMMER SCHOOL POLICY

Students pursuing degrees at Loyola are encouraged to advance their progress toward completion by attending Loyola’s summer sessions. Loyola students desiring to attend summer sessions elsewhere must have prior written permission from the associate dean of academic affairs if they want such credits to apply toward a Loyola degree.

Students are cautioned that the associate dean of academic affairs will only grant permission to take courses elsewhere when compelling reasons are demonstrated. Rarely will permission be granted to take a required course at another law school.

DESIGNATION OF YEARS IN COLLEGE OF LAW

Degree-seeking students are admitted to a degree program and classified, only after spring semester, as follows:

Freshmen Total Hours Juniors Total Hours
Day Program 0 – 18 Day Program 19 – 54
Evening Program 0 – 14 Evening Program 42 – 66
       
Sophomores   Seniors  
Evening Program 15 – 41 Day Program 55 – 90
    Evening Program 67 – 90

ATTENDANCE

Regular and punctual attendance is required. No student will be given credit for work done in any course in which he or she has failed to attend at least 80 percent of the scheduled classes. Each professor determines the effect of canceled classes on the total number of classes for the course. Excessive absences will result in a grade of UW. The student has the primary responsibility to keep a record of absences.

This attendance requirement is a “no fault rule”—that is, the professor shall not take account of any medical or other excuses in computing the number of absences that any student may have accumulated in the course. Upon a showing of compelling hardship and in exceptional circumstances, however, the petitions committee may relieve a student of the attendance requirement. Petitions for this purpose must be submitted in a timely manner—ordinarily within three days of notification of excessive absences. The committee may permit the student to take the examination or give no relief, in its discretion.

FINAL EXAMINATIONS AND GRADES

Final examinations are given at the end of each semester. The alphabetical system of grading is used. The quality of work indicated by these grades is as follows:

A Excellent  This grade is assigned 4 quality points per semester hour.
A- Excellent This grade is assigned 3.7 quality points per semester hour.
B+ Good This grade is assigned 3.3 quality points per semester hour.
B Good This grade is assigned 3 quality points per semester hour.
B- Good This grade is assigned 2.7 quality points per semester hour.
C+ Average This grade is assigned 2.3 quality points per semester hour.
C Average This grade is assigned 2 quality points per semester hour.
C- Minimally Passing This grade is assigned 1.7 quality points per semester hour.
D+ Minimally Passing This grade is assigned 1.3 quality points per semester hour.
D Minimally Passing This grade is assigned 1 quality point per semester hour.
F Failure or failure to withdraw No quality points are assigned.
I Incomplete This grade is to be assigned only when the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or the Instructor has been presented with serious and compelling reasons why the student should be allowed to complete the course at a later date. These reasons are customarily medical. The I grade is not an automatic extension. If the I grade is not made up by the end of the term subsequent to the term in which it was incurred, it can only be made up by special permission of the dean. A permanent I is not included in tabulation of hours or grade point average.

 

 

 

 

P Pass Pass/fail grades are available only in courses designated as pass/fail. Grades of P are not counted toward quality point averages.
X No Grade Submitted  
W
Withdrawal Indicates that the student withdrew by the tenth week of class in the Office of Student Records. No credit is awarded.
UW Unauthorized Withdrawal
Indicates that the student withdrew through excessive absences.
AF Absent from Examination  
AU Audit Complete  
AI Audit Incomplete  
AP Advanced Placement  
EX Exempted from course requirement  
FA Audit Failed  
IP In Progress An IP grade may be granted for certain courses that typically are longer than a normal semester.

An incomplete grade may only be given for Legal Research (LAW L898) upon presentation of written evidence of a medical or other handicap or compelling reason preventing the timely completion of the project. Incomplete grades must be approved by the faculty member supervising the project, and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs must be notified that the incomplete grade is being given.

In the case of a student who fails to appear for an examination without officially withdrawing, the following action will be taken:

  1. Upon timely petition addressed to the Faculty Petitions Committee, the student, when he or she presents evidence of sufficient cause, such as personal illness, death in the immediate family, or unavoidable detention out of town, may be permitted to take a deferred examination. In the interim, the record of the student will list the course(s) as “Incomplete” until the examination has been completed.
  2. In all other cases, the record will be marked AF. This grade will be considered as an F in determining grade point average and will indicate nonfulfillment of the examination for required course purposes.
  3. If a student is present to take an examination, but for serious medical reasons believes that he or she is unable to take or complete it, the student should immediately advise the dean’s office of the circumstances.

GRADING GUIDELINES

The faculty of the College of Law has adopted suggested grading guidelines for all first-year courses. These became effective in the fall of 2008. Faculty who deviate from these guidelines must provide justification to the dean’s office. The grading guidelines are:

Grade At Least But Not More Than
A
3 ⅓% 10%
A- 3 ⅓% 10%
B+
3 ⅓% 10%
B
7½% 22½%
B- 7½% 22½% 
C+
7½% 22½%
C
7½% 22½%
below C
5% 20%

RANKING SYSTEM

Students are ranked within their class at the end of each fall and spring semester. Grade point average and rank-in-class vary slightly from year to year. The range for the class of Spring 2009 graduating class was:

RANK  GPA
Top 10%  3.488
Top 20%  3.321
Top 25%  3.250
Top 33%  3.178
Top 50%  3.017

The College of Law suggests that prospective employers look primarily at the class rank of student/graduate applicants and not only at grade point averages.

THE GRADE APPEAL SYSTEM

I. No grade is appealable unless it is at least 1.5 points lower than the student’s overall grade point average or semester grade point average—whichever is lower, exclusive of the challenged grade. Any appeal is waived unless the appeal form is submitted within three weeks of the posting of a student’s last grade, except that the period is interrupted after the spring semester until the first day of fall classes.

II. To effect an appeal of a grade, a student must:

  1. Have discussed the examination and the grade with the professor unless the professor is unable or unwilling to do so prior to the waiver date,
  2. Have an honest and mature intellectual conviction that he/she deserved a higher grade than that received, and
  3. Have presented the examination to a student committee for the purpose of determining whether or not the appeal is frivolous. The student committee shall be appointed by the vice president of the Student Bar Association. A majority vote of said committee shall decide the issue. If the appeal is deemed frivolous, the student shall not be allowed to continue his or her appeal.

As a practical matter it may be several weeks before students can meet with professors to discuss an exam and grade.  Therefore, we recommend students file the appeal form very early in the waiver period to preserve the right to appeal, even if a student has not yet met with the professor. 

III. In order to appeal, the student should obtain an appeal form available in the Office of Law Records and complete the applicable portions of it. The completed form should be forwarded to the associate dean of students.

IV. If the student committee determines that the appeal is not frivolous, the associate dean for academic affairs shall appoint a committee composed of two faculty members who, if feasible, either teach the same course or have recognized expertise in the same field. The faculty committee will read the examination in question and shall have the option to read other papers from the same course for purposes of comparison. The faculty committee may allow both the student and the professor of the course in question to meet with them to present any relevant information.

V. If both faculty members agree that there is no reasonable basis for the grade assigned, it shall be changed to the nearest grade that is reasonable.

GRADE POINT AVERAGES

A student’s grade point average is based on the credit hours, grading method, grade awarded, and quality points. The following definitions apply:

QUALITY HOURS are the units upon which a student’s grade point average is calculated. They differ from earned hours because quality hours do not include the pass grade and do include failed courses.

  • LOYOLA EARNED HOURS are the credit hours earned while taking courses at Loyola.
  • TOTAL EARNED HOURS are the credit hours earned while taking courses at Loyola as well as the hours awarded for transfer work toward a student’s degree.
  • COURSE QUALITY POINTS are calculated by multiplying the quality points associated with a grade (A = 4, etc.) by the quality hours. (A three-credit-hour course with a grade of A will result in 12 quality points.)
  • LOYOLA GRADE POINT AVERAGES are calculated by dividing the Loyola quality points by the total quality hours.
  • LOYOLA CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGES include only the coursework taken at Loyola.

GRADE REPORTS

A report of the grades made by a student in his or her scheduled courses is available through LORA. Students requiring a “paper copy” may also request this through LORA. Grades may be released to parents or guardians if the student authorizes the university to do so. This authorization must be made each term at the time of registration in either the Office of Law Records or the Office of Student Records.

Loyola’s grade reports list the courses, grades, Loyola grade point average (both cumulative and term), and the total earned hours. Discrepancies must be appealed according to the grade appeal system.

CHANGE OF GRADE

An instructor may change a grade previously assigned by submitting a completed change of grade form to the Office of Student Records. The instructor must request the grade change form, cite the reason for changing the grade, and obtain the signed approval of the dean.

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

A student is expected to do satisfactory work and, therefore, to maintain a minimum average of 2.0 at all times.

A student who has failed a required course must repeat that course. A student who fails an elective course may repeat that course but in any event must make up the credit hours for the failed course. A student who has earned a grade of less than C may repeat the course for credit. In such cases, both grades will be posted on the student’s transcript. A student may not repeat a course in which the grade received was a C or above.

In the case of repeated courses, both grades are used to compute the cumulative grade point average but only the earned hours from the original course are used in the calculation of Loyola cumulative earned hours, except where the original grade was an F.

ACADEMIC PROBATION

A student will be on academic probation at any time the overall average is less than 2.0. Students on academic probation may not hold office or otherwise participate in formal extracurricular activities of the College of Law.

ACADEMIC SUCCESS PROGRAM

The Academic Success Program is a tutorial/practical course open to all Loyola College of Law students who wish to participate, and is geared towards those whose grade point averages have fallen below the required 2.0. The program’s aim is to increase students’ understanding of the material, enhance classroom comprehension, and improve law exam performance. Individual and group tutoring is available, and both essay and multiple choice practice exams are given weekly with answer reviews. Contact Assistant Dean of Admissions for more information at (504) 861-5577.

EXCLUSIONS

A student will be automatically excluded from the College of Law if:

  1. at the end of the first fall and spring semesters of College of Law work the student’s overall average is less than 2.0;
  2. at any time thereafter the overall average of a full-time or part-time student is less than 2.0, providing the student has been on academic probation for the semester immediately preceding exclusion.

COURSES OF STUDY

Students may have an undergraduate, graduate, and/or professional course of study at Loyola University. Each course of study results in a separate grade point average which will not reflect courses taken in other programs. Therefore, for students who receive bachelor’s degrees and return to take undergraduate courses as a law or graduate student, their grade point averages at the time of the awarding of the undergraduate degree will not be affected by this later coursework. In addition, the graduate or law grade point average will not include quality points for undergraduate courses. Students in joint J.D./M.B.A. programs have their law and graduate grade point averages computed separately.

CHANGE OF DIVISION

Students may request a change of division (Civil Law Day, Civil Law Evening, or Common Law) by completing the appropriate form and submitting it to the College of Law records coordinator or the assistant dean of admissions. Submission of this form should be done prior to registration for the term in which the change is to take effect.

ELIGIBILITY FOR GRADUATION

Students must meet the specific requirements of their degree programs as set forth in this bulletin. The university, through the deans, may authorize changes and exceptions where it finds them desirable and consistent with the continuous and orderly review of its policies.

To be eligible for graduation, students must have fulfilled their specific degree program requirements and college requirements, must have a 2.0 Loyola cumulative grade point average, and have been certified to graduate by their dean. Students who are short six or fewer hours of fulfilling their degree program requirements will be allowed to participate in the May Commencement.

In order to be certified for graduation and in order to be certified to the appropriate bar admission authorities for eligibility to take a bar exam, the student must satisfy all financial obligations to the university. Graduating students are expected to complete an exit survey before graduation.

In the fall semester prior to the calendar year in which a student expects to graduate, he or she must apply for graduation with the law records director. If unable to graduate in that calendar year, the student must reapply for graduation.

To be certified to graduate at the end of the term for which the student applied, all degree requirements must be completed no later than October 15 for spring or summer candidates and March 15 for fall candidates.

GRADUATION

Loyola confers degrees in December, May, and August. However, a commencement ceremony is only held in May. After grades are received, the university determines graduation grade point averages and distinctions. Subsequently, the Office of Student Records posts the degrees and distinctions to transcripts. Diplomas and transcripts are not released until the student has discharged all financial and contractual obligations to the university and has completed the required senior exit survey. After a student has graduated, no change may be made in his or her record, except to correct a discrepancy.

GRADUATION DISTINCTIONS

Graduation distinctions are determined on the basis of the student’s Loyola cumulative grade point average.

A student who has made a cumulative average of 3.4 graduates cum laude; one who has made an average of 3.6, magna cum laude; and one who has made an average of 3.8, summa cum laude. These distinctions are inscribed on the diplomas, noted in the list of graduates published for the commencement exercises, and listed on the transcripts.

  • Crowe scholars

    In 2000, the faculty at the College of Law established an honor, in memory of their late colleague, for students graduating in the top 10 percent of their class. These students are designated the William L. Crowe, Sr., Scholars. This determination is based on cumulative grade point averages after the previous fall semester is updated by changes in grades received by March 1.

COMMENCEMENT

Loyola will hold commencement only at the end of each spring term. Students who are candidates for May, August, or December of the current year will participate in that ceremony. The commencement program is not a certification document of the university.

TRANSCRIPTS

Loyola is authorized to distribute only Loyola’s own transcripts, not transcripts from other universities. Only the Office of Student Records may issue transcripts. Students may have four records at Loyola which comprise the official transcript: undergraduate, graduate, law, and continuing education. Upon a student’s signed request, all official transcripts are sent by the Office of Student Records to others. Transcripts marked, “Issued to the Student,” are given by the Office of Student Records to students. In accordance with recommendations of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, official transcripts issued to students should not be treated as an official academic credential. Transcripts carry notations identifying major, degree program, Loyola term and cumulative statistics, degrees earned at Loyola and other institutions, date of birth, and prior academic level. Academic exclusion and dismissal are indicated on the transcript for students placed in this status. Loyola will withhold transcripts, diplomas, and statements of honorable dismissal until indebtedness to the university has been discharged.

BAR EXAMINATION ELIGIBILITY

Students are strongly advised to consult the state bar in which they plan to sit for a bar exam for student registration requirements. Students are urged to do this during the first semester of their first year.

POLICY ON RELEASE OF INFORMATION (FERPA)

Loyola makes every endeavor to keep the students’ educational records confidential and out of the hands of those who would use them for other than legitimate purposes. All members of the faculty, administration, and clerical staff respect confidential information about students which they acquire in the course of their work. At the same time, Loyola tries to be flexible enough in its policies not to hinder the student, the institution, or the community in their legitimate pursuits.
Documents submitted by or for the student in support of an application for admission or for transfer credit are not returned to the student nor sent elsewhere by request. In exceptional cases, however, when another transcript is unobtainable, copies may be prepared and released to prevent hardship to the student. The student should present a signed request. Usually, the copy, marked as a certified copy of what is in the student’s file, is released.

The complete policy on release of student information follows.
Public Law 93-380 (also known as the Buckley Amendment and as the Privacy Rights of Parents and Students—Section 438 of the General Education Provisions Act) permits only the release of "directory information” about students without the student’s written consent. Directory information includes:

Student’s name, address, telephone number, place of birth, college, major, awards, photo, classification, dates of enrollment, degrees conferred, dates of conferral, any graduation distinctions, and the institution attended immediately prior to admission.

The law further provides that any student may, upon written request, restrict the release of or the printing of such directory information in the student address directory. The student may so indicate at each registration.

The law requires written consent of the student for the release to anyone (including parents) of other than directory information with the following exceptions: (a) other school officials within the educational institution who have legitimate educational interests; (b) officials of schools to which the student seeks to transfer; (c) the comptroller general of the United States, the HEW secretary, the administrative head of an education agency, or state educational authorities; (d) in connection with a student’s application for, or receipt of financial aid; (e) state and local officials or authorities to which such information is specifically required to be reported under state statute adopted prior to November 19, 1974; (f) organizations or educational agencies conducting legitimate research, provided no personal identifiable information about the student is made public; (g) accrediting organizations; (h) in connection with an emergency when such information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other persons; and (i) the Veterans Administration.

Loyola University administrators and faculty may have access to information contained in students’ records on a need to know basis.

Personal information shall only be transferred to a third party, however, on the condition that such party will not permit any other party to have access to the information without the written consent of the student and that the information be utilized only for the specific purpose for which it was released.

Under the law, any student has the right to inspect and challenge his or her own educational file, with the exception of letters of recommendation or other material when the author was guaranteed confidentiality prior to January 1, 1975. Positive identification of the student shall be required for such examination and a university official shall remain in the immediate vicinity during the examination process.

SECURITY OF STUDENT RECORDS

Loyola University New Orleans maintains all student records in electronic format. Such records are maintained on an administrative system housed in a secured environment. Access to all electronically stored information is controlled through the use of user IDs and passwords. Additionally, all records are copied to magnetic tape on a daily basis and stored offsite.

POLICY ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS

The university’s policy for students, faculty, and staff on intellectual property rights can be found on the university web page under Policies, Procedures, and Reports at http://www.loyno.edu/provost/policies.html.

UNIVERSITY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Loyola University New Orleans is committed to ensuring equal access and reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and to providing support services which assist qualified students with disabilities. The policy of Loyola prohibits and discourages discrimination against students with disabilities in all areas of the university. The Office of Disability Services was created to ensure the careful implementation of this policy by faculty and staff and to assist students with disabilities in meeting the demands of university life. Disability services are housed in the Academic Resource Center which is located on the main campus in Monroe Hall, Room 405, (504) 865-2990.

Any student with a disability wishing to receive accommodations must identify him/herself as soon as possible to the associate dean of students or to the director of disability services in order to comply with the requisite time limits and other procedures related to receiving accommodations. It is incumbent on the student to meet the deadlines and to inform him/herself of procedures in order to ensure reasonable accommodations.

Any student with a physical disability who may have difficulty evacuating the law building in an emergency is required to make an appointment with the associate dean of students at his/her earliest convenience to review the Loyola University emergency evacuation procedure.

VETERANS CERTIFICATIONS

Immediately following registration held in the beginning of each semester, students who are taking courses leading towards degree requirements are eligible for benefits through the Veterans Administration and can be certified by the Office of Student Records. In accordance with Title 38, United States Code, Veterans Benefits, Loyola certifies only those students who are admitted to a degree program and who are making satisfactory progress as determined by the probationary and exclusion policies of the university’s colleges.

Reimbursement is certified for courses only and excludes noncredit courses. All inquiries concerning the certification should be directed to the Office of Student Records.

Credit Hour Certification Rules for Veterans

Classification Full Time 3/4 Time 1/2 Time 1/4 Time
Law        
Day or Evening 9 6 3 2
Summer School 6 3 - -

SYLLABI POLICY

Beginning fall 2004, syllabi for courses are published at the web-based schedule of classes (https://lorasec.loyno.edu/) by term and subject and are available for review and downloading. Students requiring a copy of their syllabus prior to fall 2004 should request that information from the Office of Student Records (http://www.loyno.edu/records/askstudentrecords.php).

E-MAIL ADDRESS INFORMATION

All students are assigned a Loyola University e-mail address. This is the only address that will be recognized and used by Loyola University. All official information from faculty, staff, and administrators will be sent to students at this address. It is the students’ responsibility to regularly check their e-mail account.

STUDENT ASSESSMENTS

The Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Assessment evaluates student learning and student perceptions through surveys of graduating seniors and alumni. Colleges and departments may also assess student learning outcomes and their perceptions of their Loyola experience.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees as well as revenues produced by the university endowment and with funds raised through the annual support program from alumni, friends, faculty, staff, foundations, and corporations provide for the actual cost of operating the College of Law.

Applicants for admission to the College of Law and students who need assistance in paying for their education are encouraged to apply for financial aid. Forms may be obtained from the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid.

Because of the uncertainty of the economy and budgetary projections, Loyola University reserves the right to change tuition, fees, or other charges printed herein. The rates for 2010-2011 are listed below:

TUITION

New students and continuing students $1,172 per cr. hr.

FEES

For Beginning Students

  • Application Fee (nonrefundable) $40
  • Acceptance deposit (nonrefundable, applicable to tuition) $500
    • ($150 due by April 1, nonrefundable, if accepted by March 15)
    • ($350 due by May 1, refundable only until June 1)
  • Student Bar Association Fee $150

For All Students

Full-time ( 9 hours or more)    Part-time (under 9 hours)
  • Student Center Fee
    Fall and Spring $113/sem.
    Summer Session $56.50
  • Student Government Association Fee
    Fall and Spring $50/sem.
  • Publications Fee
    Fall $20/year
  • Athletic Fee
    Fall and Spring $120/sem.
  • Information Technology Fee
    Fall and Spring $225/sem
  • Student Center Fee
    Fall and Spring $56.50/sem.
    Summer Session $56.50/sem
  • Student Government Association Fee
    Fall and Spring $25/sem.
  • Publications Fee
    Fall $20/year
  • Athletic Fee
    Fall and Spring $60/sem.
  • Information Technology Fee
    Fall and Spring $112.50/sem
  • Graduation Fee $250
  • Contingent Fees
    Late registration $50
    Late payment $250
  • Student Health Insurance
    (cost varies) $1,117/year

Students are encouraged to make payments by check or money order made payable to Loyola University using their bill remittance stub. Students not wishing to have their social security number or campus-wide identification number placed on their payment should contact the Office of the Bursar for available alternative options. Cash transactions are discouraged. A charge of $30 will be assessed for dishonored checks. VISA and MasterCard charges greater than $50 will be accepted as payment on the tuition account.

All students accepted by the College of Law for the first time who wish to be assured a place in the first-year class must, after notification of acceptance, make the application deposit listed in the above schedule.

RESIDENCE HALLS

Unavailable for 2010-2011 for any graduate students.

Meal Plans (Board)

Loyola Dining Services offers several meal plan options that offer a combination of all-you-can-eat meals and the declining balance dollars, known as Wolf Bucks. The all-you-can-eat meals include breakfast, lunch, and dinners. Wolf Bucks are used for snacks, and late night dining. Additional Wolf Bucks may be purchased in $100 increments. All students living in the residence halls are required to participate in a meal plan.

Weekly Plans: Any 19, 15, or 12 all-you-can-eat meals each week.

19 meals per week $2,114 (includes $200 in Wolf Bucks)
15 meals per week $2,044 (includes $400 in Wolf Bucks)
12 meals per week $1,962 (includes $660 in Wolf Bucks)

Semester Plans: Any 50, 75, or 100 all-you-can-eat meals each semester in any combination and at any point in time. The semester plan includes $500 Wolf Bucks per semester.

50 meals per semester $ 906
75 meals per semester $1,069
100 meals per semester $1,245

Wolf Bucks Only: Students may select from four plans that provide only Wolf Bucks.  These plans may be purchased for their actual value of $500, $750, $1500 or $2000.

Combination Plan:  Any 9 all-you-can-eat meals each week, plus any 75 all-you-can-eat meals each semester, plus $600 in Wolf Bucks.

Combo Plan $2,135

For more information about our meal plans, please visit our website at www.loyno.edu/dining.

Loyola Express Card

A Loyola student identification card, known as the Loyola Express Card, is much more than just an identification card. It is a fast, safe, convenient, and economical way to make purchases all over campus. You simply deposit money into your Express Card account, and then purchases made are deducted from your balance. It has proven to be an excellent method to pre-plan and monitor expenditures.

As long as you have money in your Express Card account, you will be able to make purchases all over campus without carrying cash, checks, or change. Deposits may be made in the Office of the Bursar, located in Marquette Hall, Room 270, who can be reached by phone at (504) 865-2388. All campus food services locations, Loyola Bookstore, Central Reproduction, the Convenience Store, Dunbar's, Student Health Services, Student Government Association, and residence hall laundry machines all accept the Loyola Express Card.

Funds deposited to the Loyola Express Card carry over from one semester to the next until spent. Balances in excess of $10 in a Loyola Express Card account will be refunded only if a member officially severs ties with the university by graduating, transferring, or otherwise leaving the university. Refund forms may be completed at the Office of Student Finance and must be accompanied by written proof of separation unless you are graduating. Refunds will be applied first to any outstanding university debt, with remaining funds issued, by check, to the student.

BILLING AND PAYMENT POLICY

Incoming students and returning students who have preregistered are mailed a bill for tuition, fees, residence hall charges, and board plans prior to the beginning of the semester. All payments are due 30 days from the billing date unless other arrangements have been made. Accounts not paid by the due date will be placed in a past due status.

Students who are not early registrants, students taking special program courses or continuing education courses, and all international students must pay in full at the time of registration.

A late fee of $250 will be assessed on accounts in past due status. If a bill is not received or if an adjustment should be made to the bill, the student should contact the Office of Student Finance so that payment can be made by the deadline. Students who have not met their financial obligations or made appropriate arrangements through the Office of Student Finance have not officially completed registration and may be subject to removal from enrollment and will not be allowed to register for subsequent semesters. Students whose checks are returned from the bank as unpaid also may be subject to removal from enrollment.

Loyola will withhold statements of honorable dismissal, transcripts, the diploma, and all other reports or materials until all indebtedness to the university has been paid or until satisfactory arrangements have been made with the vice president for finance and administration. No one will be allowed to enroll for subsequent semesters as long as prior financial indebtedness has not been satisfied. It is also the policy of Loyola to withhold transcripts, registration, and diplomas on any student who has defaulted on a Guaranteed Student Loan, Stafford Loan, Direct Loan, Perkins Loan, NDSL, or other student loan. In the event that the delinquent account is placed with an outside agency for collection, all collection costs, attorney fees, and court costs incurred will be passed on to the student.

MONTHLY PAYMENTS

Although Loyola has no monthly payment plan of its own, students may subscribe to one of two plans offered by outside companies.

TuitionPay by Sallie Mae and Tuition Management Systems, Inc. offer families several monthly payment options to help make education expenses more affordable. The Interest-free Monthly Payment Option enables families to spread all or part of the annual tuition, fees, residence hall charges, and board plans over equal, monthly payments. There are no interest charges, only a small annual fee. Please contact the Office of Student Finance at (504) 865-3337, or visit our website at http://www.loyno.edu/studentfinance/monthlybudgetplans.html for more information on these programs.

REFUND POLICY

A student who withdraws from a course before the end of the term may be entitled to a refund of a percentage of the tuition charged for that course. The university’s general policy on refunds is described below. Federal statute requires an alternate calculation for recipients of federal Title IV financial assistance, and it is described as well.

TUITION—Students who withdraw from the university or from a course may be entitled to a refund of a percentage of their tuition. Students who withdraw must return a completed withdrawal form to the Office of Student Records. Mere cessation of attendance does not constitute withdrawal. The date of receipt of the withdrawal notice by the Office of Student Records will determine the amount of tuition refund. Refunds are a percentage of the tuition payable in the semester in which the student withdraws, not a percentage of the total amount billed. Only tuition is refundable. No refunds are made when a student is suspended or dismissed for academic, disciplinary, or financial reasons. Tuition refunds are made for the fall and spring semesters on the following basis:

  1. If formal notice is received within two weeks after the beginning of the semester, a refund of 100 percent of tuition is made.
  2. If formal notice is received within five weeks after the beginning of the semester, a refund of 50 percent of tuition is made.
  3. If formal notice is received within nine weeks after the beginning of the semester, a refund of 25 percent of tuition is made.
  4. No refunds are allowed after the ninth week of classes.
  5. Since summer sessions vary in length, please refer to the academic calendar for summer refund deadlines.

Students forced to withdraw for medical reasons should consult the Academic Regulations section of this bulletin for the university’s policy on medical withdrawals.

ROOM—Students who withdraw from the university for any reason are not entitled to any refund on the cost of their room.
MEALS—Students who withdraw from the university may receive a refund on the meal plan, prorated to the date of withdrawal. However, no refunds will be granted after the last day for refunds according to the academic calendar (last day for 25 percent refund). These refunds must be approved by the Office of Residential Life.

Tuition Refund Insurance

An elective medical withdrawal insurance plan administered by A.W.G. Dewar, Inc. is offered to full-time students. This insurance provides a refund of 75 percent of tuition in the event the covered student is forced to withdraw due to illness or accident. The insurance reimburses the insured for the remaining tuition not refunded by the university’s refund policy described above.

Enrollment forms and descriptive materials are mailed to the student in mid-summer prior to the start of the academic year. More information may be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs.

Refund/Repayment of Title IV Financial Aid Funds

Loyola follows the requirements mandated by the Department of Education for the treatment of Title IV funds when a student withdraws. These requirements were added to the law by the Higher Education Amendments of 1998 (Public Law 105 – 244) and are found in section 484B of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, and in the implementing final regulations published on November 1, 1999 (64 FR 59016).

A repayment to the federal aid programs (Perkins Loan and Stafford Loan programs) may be required when cash has been disbursed to a student from financial aid funds in excess of the amount of aid the student earned during the term. The amount of Title IV aid earned is determined by multiplying the total Title IV aid (excluding Federal College Work-Study funds) for which the student qualified by the percentage of time during the term that the student was enrolled.

If less aid was disbursed than was earned, the amount of Title IV aid that must be returned is determined by subtracting the earned amount from the amount actually disbursed.

The responsibility for returning unearned aid is allocated between the university and the student according to the portion of disbursed aid that could have been used to cover university charges and the portion that could have been disbursed directly to the student once university charges were covered. Loyola University will distribute the unearned aid back to the Title IV programs as specified by law. The student will be responsible for any balance on his or her account, which results from these adjustments.

Overpayments/Excess Aid

If a credit exists on a student account due to an overpayment, withdrawal, or excess financial aid, a refund may be issued to the student upon request. If the student paid any portion of the bill by credit card, the refund will be issued to the credit card company for the appropriate amount. If the student paid any portion of the bill by personal check, a refund may be issued after the personal check clears. Please refer to the tuition refund schedule. Any form of financial aid (loans, grants, or scholarships) will be the priority form of payment to the tuition account. If a credit results from a combination of financial aid and a credit card payment after all adjustments have been made, the credit card will be refunded.

Financial Aid

LAW SCHOOL FINANCIAL AID OFFICE

This office administers all federal and private loans for law students. A member of the Office of Financial Aid of the university is available in LS 345. The telephone number is (504) 861-5551.

LOANS

Long-term, low-interest loans provide students with an opportunity to borrow the cost of education. Repayment begins when the student either graduates or is no longer enrolled at an approved school. Borrowers must be able to demonstrate financial need for some federally sponsored loans. Loan sources include subsidized and unsubsidized, and grad plus loans. Loyola University will participate "exclusively" in the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan program. 

All applicants for financial aid must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).  FAFSAs must be processed online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.

Offers of financial assistance are not made if admission status is pending or uncertain. The student may expect a response to the completed financial aid application after acceptance to the College of Law.

Students are urged to apply early and to supply all documentation well in advance of the beginning of the enrollment period.

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS

In order to be eligible to receive assistance from any federal source, a student must be found to be making reasonable progress toward the completion of his or her degree program in addition to the demonstration of requisite need. A student is said to be making progress when he or she completes at least nine semester hours for each regular semester (fall or spring) of enrollment. A student who fails in this respect will be disqualified from receiving financial assistance from any program unless the student can be placed on financial aid probation and allowed to continue to receive assistance as long as he or she meets the terms of the probation. The terms of a financial aid probation will not necessarily coincide with the terms of an academic probation imposed by the College of Law. In addition, students who have completed two terms must have at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA.

Details are available in the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid or at http://law.loyno.edu/lawaid

LOAN REPAYMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

Many Loyola College of Law graduates devote their careers to public service work as advocates for traditionally underserved communities. Given a significant law school debt burden, such careers might not be feasible without some form of assistance. Since 1991, the Gillis Long Poverty Law Center’s Loan Repayment Assistance Program (LRAP) has tried to address this problem and remains committed to furthering its goal of providing quality legal assistance to communities throughout the country.

  • Eligible Jobs
    LRAP is available for Loyola College of Law J.D. Program graduates who work full-time as attorneys in government or nonprofit jobs throughout the United States. Employment in private law firms, teaching positions, animal rights organizations, etc. do not qualify under the program guidelines. Applicants are eligible to apply for a loan immediately upon accepting a qualifying position unless awards have already been finalized for the current year. In that event, the request for assistance would be delayed until the following September. Students and alumni who are unsure if their planned employment will meet program criteria should consult the Gillis Long office.
  • Eligible Assistance
    LRAP assistance is not available for periods of unemployment or volunteer employment. LRAP is also not available for loans from family and friends, for personal loans from banks or other sources. Although LRAP includes undergraduate loans, it does not include loans for other graduate school debt.

    There is no retroactive LRAP assistance and no LRAP assistance for periods of loan forberance or deferment. In order to be, and remain, eligible for LRAP, graduates must provide proof of good standing from the servicers of all applicable loans, including undergraduate/joint degree loans, and may not have an outstanding term bill balance with Loyola University. LRAP assistance is solely and specifically intended to be used to repay eligible education loans. Graduates may apply yearly as long as they remain in an approved program job position.

  • Application Process
    Applications are mailed annually in August. Applicants may reapply each year while in a qualifying position. Funds are sometimes awarded in two payments. The first payment is awarded in December and the second in April. Graduates who receive two payments are required to submit a second employer certification form before the second payment is awarded. It is the participant’s responsibility to report any change in employment, address, income, or other financial circumstances promptly to the Gillis Long office.

    Under new program guidelines, in addition to the Employer Certification Form(s), a letter from the employer is required by September 1st following receipt of an award confirming the applicant’s employment for the previous year. If the employer letter is not received, your grant will be reported to IRS as income and will be taxed. 

1. Part I: Contact Information
2. Part II: Employment and Income Information 

  • Start date, annual salary, and effective date of annual salary and spouse’s annual salary
  • Additional income information (other taxable, untaxed income, etc.)

3. Part III: Asset Information 

  • Amount of cash or savings (broken down by participant, spouse, and jointly held)
  • Home value, investments, etc.
  • Other loan repayment assistance amounts received

4. Part IV: Loan Certifications

  • Current balance and required monthly payment amounts for all lenders (documentation must include the monthly payment amount, current amount due as well as past due amounts, and the outstanding loan balance)
  • Spouse current loan balances and required monthly loan payments
    Forbearance and/or deferment information

5. Part V: Information Certification Form
6. Part VI: Employer Certification form with information release
7. Part VII: Signature Page for applicants and spouses

No application will be reviewed until all requested information is received.

  • Awards
    The associate director, Barbara Wilson, administers the program for the Gillis Long Poverty Law Center. Each application is reviewed for program requirements and presented to the LRAP Committee. The Committee is comprised of law faculty members, the Director and the Associate Director. This Committee reviews and approves the awards.

    Awards vary each fiscal year dependent on the number of applicants and the available funds in the budget.

    LRAP assistance is not considered taxable income if the participant works for a government agency or a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization (specifically legal services) and receives the repayment assistance in the form of a loan. For this reason, recipients of non-taxable LRAP awards must sign a promissory note for the amount of any LRAP assistance. These loans are then forgiven in the following year provided the graduate has complied with the rules of the program. The LRAP promissory notes are voided and returned to the graduate.
    On September 1 of each year, recipients must forward a letter (on office letterhead) from the employer confirming employment for the previous year.

The LRAP application requests the following information:

  • Income Level
    The Gillis Long LRAP program has a current salary ceiling of $47,500.00. Salary information is requested for the applicant’s spouse, but, at present, is not used in determining the LRAP award.
  • Acknowledgment
    The Gillis Long Poverty Law Center publicly extends heartfelt thanks to John and June Mary Makdisi and the Kendall Vick Public Law Foundation for their generous financial support of the LRAP Program.

For additional information, please contact: Barbara J. Wilson, 7214 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118, (504) 861-5762, bjwilso1@loyno.edu.

DIVERSITY FUNDING

In accord with its commitment to extend opportunities in education to all qualified students, regardless of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, sex/gender, or sexual orientation, and being cognizant of the underrepresentation of minorities within the legal profession, Loyola has established a fund to assist minorities in obtaining a legal education.

OTHER FUNDING

The Council on Legal Education Opportunity (CLEO) conducts summer tutorial programs each year to assist students of “low income” or “disadvantaged background” to obtain entrance into the College of Law. Those students successfully completing the program will, upon enrollment in the College of Law, be awarded an annual living stipend. For further information, students should contact: CLEO, 740 15th St. N.W., 9th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20005 or call (202) 216-4343 or www.cleoscholars.com. Minority students may also wish to contact the Earl Warren Legal Training Program, Inc., 10 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019 for further information concerning the availability of assistance.

Scholarships

University Academic Scholarships

Scholarships are awarded to outstanding entering first-year students with superior academic records and LSAT scores. These scholarships are awarded as tuition waivers and are renewed automatically if the required grade point average is maintained. After the freshman year, students may apply to the Faculty Scholarship Selection Committee to be considered for one-year awards based on a combination of merit and need. Loyola may conclude that gift and grant aid from other sources precludes or limits a student’s eligibility for scholarships administered by the College of Law. Unless otherwise specified, scholarship awards shall not exceed actual tuition. The College of Law administers the following scholarships.

Annual Scholarships

Alumni Legacy Scholarship. The University Alumni Association awards partial annual scholarships to children and grandchildren of alumni based on merit and need.

Carimi Scholarship. 

Gordon, Arata, McCollam & Duplantis Scholarship. An annual partial scholarship is awarded to a student on the Law Review by Gordon, Arata, McCollam & Duplantis.

Herman Kohlman Scholarship. 

Law Alumni/SBA Scholarship. The Law Alumni Association and the Student Bar Association award this annual partial scholarship to a second- or third-year student based on need, student leadership, and/or community service.

Lemle & Kelleher Scholarship. The law firm of Lemle & Kelleher awards annual scholarships to worthy students who are on the boards of the Law Review and the Moot Court.

Liskow and Lewis Scholarship. The firm of Liskow and Lewis annually awards three partial scholarships at the discretion of the dean.

Michael X. St. Martin Scholarship. Created by Michael X. St. Martin, a 1967 law graduate, this scholarship is awarded on the basis of merit and need. Preference is given to native residents of St. Mary, Terrebone, or Lafourche Parishes.

Phelps Dunbar Scholarship. Phelps Dunbar awards annual scholarships to two students on the Law Review Editorial Board and to one student on the National Moot Court Team. Preference is given to students from the New Orleans area.

Endowed Scholarships

Martha A. Alvendia Endowed Scholarship in Law. This scholarship was established in 2006 with a gift from Roderick "Rico" Alvendia, A'94, L'98, as a way to give back and provide financial support for students involved in Moot Court teams and also as a way to honor his mother, for whom the scholarship is named.

Dr. and Mrs. Jack Andonie Endowed Scholarship for Law. A gift of rare currency was given to Loyola University New Orleans in 1987 by Dr. and Mrs. Jack Andonie. Dr. Andonie, a 1958 graduate of the College of Arts and Sciences, stipulated in the act of donation that if the collection were ever sold, the proceeds would be used to fund a scholarship in biological sciences and pre-med and another in law. This scholarship is awarded to deserving law students from Louisiana.

Anzelmo-Stewart Scholarship. The scholarship is administered by the College of Law and is awarded to a Louisiana student who demonstrates need and who expresses an interest in some area of Louisiana public law. While the primary consideration for qualification is financial need, every reasonable effort will be made to ensure that the benefits of this scholarship extend equally to both male and female students who will further complement the diverse cultural fabric encouraged by the Jesuit tradition.

Asian Law Student Scholarship. 

Stephen & Schezy Barbas Scholarship. This scholarship was established by Stephen M. and Schezy Barbas. Mr. Barbas, a 1979 graduate of the College of Law and a native of Tampa, Florida, was a scholarship recipient while attending law school. The scholarship was established to benefit common law students from the State of Florida. The recipient must have financial need; be a member of the Law Review or be in the top 25 percent of his or her class; and participate in the Law Clinic or be involved in law school extracurricular activities.

The Harold A. Buchler Scholarship. This scholarship was established in honor of Mr. Buchler, a 1947 graduate of the law school, by his children—two of whom also graduated from the law school, Harold, Jr., in 1976 and Conrad in 1981. This scholarship is awarded to students who are residents of Jefferson arish and have a 2.5 or better grade point average.

The Aloysius Joseph Cahill Scholarship. This partial scholarship was established by William A. Cahill in memory of his father, Aloysius Joseph Cahill. It is awarded to qualified law students.

Peter J. Castano Scholarship. This scholarship was established by the late Wendell Gauthier, L’70, in memory of Peter J. Castano, L’70. It will be awarded to outstanding students at the discretion of the Office of the Dean.

Phillip Collins Scholarship. 

The Jeffrey J. Clemente Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of Jeffrey J. Clemente, a 1981 graduate of the College of Law, by his family and friends. The donors’ preference is that the scholarship be awarded to a student with an undergraduate degree in instrumental music from the state of New York. If there is no eligible candidate, the criteria may be broadened. All students with a background or interest in instrumental music are encouraged to apply.

William L. Crowe, Sr. Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established through contributions from the law class of 1973 as their 25th reunion gift. Steven Hansen, L’73, and Professor of Law Kathryn V. Lorio made leadership gifts in memory of Bill Crowe who taught at the law school for many years until his death in 1997. The scholarship is to be awarded to a second-year student based on academic merit since entering the law school. Candidates who were not eligible for merit-based scholarships upon enrollment will be given first consideration.

Cuneo Law Scholarship. 

The Samuel S. Dalton Scholarship. This fund was created in 1993 to honor a courageous lawyer, community servant, and Loyola alumnus. Mr. Dalton, a 1954 graduate, has for years served as a leader in the pro bono practice in Louisiana and has been particularly devoted to helping the less fortunate in the field of criminal defense. This partial scholarship is awarded annually to the Loyola law student best demonstrating Mr. Dalton’s commitment to community service and, in particular, in working with the poor involved in the criminal justice system.

Judge Adrian G. Duplantier Jesuit High School Scholarship. Established in 2004 by Judge Adrian G. Duplantier, L’49, this endowed scholarship is awarded annually to a student who has attended Jesuit High School in New Orleans and one of the 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the United States. It is awarded on the basis of financial need. The amount of principal for this scholarship is such that the annual award will produce a significant sum to offset tuition.

Raúl V. Fonte Scholarship. This scholarship was established through a gift from Raúl V. Fonte, a 1977 graduate of the College of Law. The scholarship will be awarded to one student on the basis of academic merit.

Major Ted Frois Military Scholarship.

William Holland Garrett Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of William Holland Garrett, who was a student in the College of Law. The scholarship was established by his family and friends, and is awarded at the discretion of the dean.

Cynthia George Scholarship.

Jesuit Social Justice Scholarship. This endowed scholarship was established by an anonymous donor in 2003. The scholarship will go to a second- or third-year law student who demonstrates a commitment to the principles of the Jesuit mission of being a person for others. The student recipient will be someone who has worked for social justice and who has a track record of service, and who wants to continue working in the social justice field after graduation from law school.

Kaiser Settlement Scholarship.

Matthew J. Kennedy, III Scholarship. This scholarship has been established in memory of Matthew Kennedy, III, a 1950 graduate of the College of Law. Family, friends, and former business associates established the scholarship, which is awarded to a third-year student planning a career in tax law.

L.E.A.-Rightor-McDonald Scholarship. The Louisiana Elks Association established this scholarship in memory of Edward Rightor and Willis McDonald—Loyola graduates, members of the New Orleans Elks Lodge No. 30, and past national presidents of the Benevolent and Protective Order of the Elks. It is awarded to a Louisiana resident in the top half of the class who demonstrates financial need and academic worthiness.

Providence Sarah LaNasa Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established by the LaNasa-Greco Foundation in memory of Providence Sarah LaNasa. It will be awarded to outstanding students at the discretion of the Office of the Dean.

Law Class of 1977 Scholarship. In recognition of their 20th reunion, the law school class of 1977 established this scholarship that is awarded to a second- or third-year student demonstrating both academic merit and financial need. The scholarship will be awarded to civil and common law students in alternating years. The fund-raising effort continues to be led by Mark C. Surprenant, a 1977 graduate of the College of Law and reunion gift chair for his class.

Law Dean’s Scholarships. These scholarships were established in 1993 by law alumni with the proceeds from a gala event honoring former deans of the College of Law. Scholarships are awarded to deserving students.

Hannah and Herman Levy Scholarship Fund of the Lupin Foundation. This fund was endowed by the Lupin Foundation and by Dr. Louis Levy, II, and his family in loving memory of his parents. Funds are awarded to entering students who exhibit the Levy Family’s dedication to academic excellence.

Stephen M. Little Memorial Scholarship Fund. This scholarship was established by the Blue Williams law firm and others in memory of Stephen M. Little, a former partner in the firm and a member of the College of Law’s class of 1973. This scholarship is awarded annually to a deserving second-year student who has excelled academically.

Mrs. Eva Ponson Martinez and P. Davis Martinez Law Scholarship. This scholarship was established in the form of a bequest in memory of Mrs. Eva Ponson Martinez and the Honorable P. Davis Martinez, the latter a 1933 law graduate. Scholarship awards are given to deserving law students.

Lydia Knobloch McAulay Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of Lydia Knobloch McAulay who served the university for 50 years. The scholarship was made possible by gifts from her husband, the late Dean Emeritus John J. McAulay, her family, and her friends. This scholarship is awarded to a student at the discretion of the dean.

Michael McGlone Scholarship.

Jim and Sonia Miller Scholarship. This scholarship was established through a gift from Dr. David J. “Jim” Miller, a 1977 graduate of the College of Law. It will be awarded to outstanding evening division students at the discretion of the Office of the Dean.

The Warren E. Mouledoux Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established by the family and friends of Warren E. Mouledoux, a member of the College of Law class of 1948. It is awarded to a second-year student on the basis of need and academic achievement.

Ruth and Frank Normann Scholarship. This scholarship was established in loving memory of Ruth Hernandez Normann and Frank S. Normann, Sr. by their children. The scholarship is awarded to a student in the evening division on the basis of scholarship and need and academic merit.

The N. Curtiss Petitjean Memorial Scholarship. This award was established by Miss Irene M. Petitjean in loving memory of her brother, Mr. N. Curtiss Petitjean, a 1934 graduate of the College of Law and a distinguished member of the Louisiana legal community. A second-year student is awarded the scholarship on the basis of integrity of character, concern for others, and financial need.

Daniel F.J. Picchio Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of Daniel F.J. Picchio, a 1979 graduate of the College of Law, by his classmates, friends, and teachers. It is awarded annually to an officer of the Student Bar Association on the basis of need and merit.

Jerome J. Reso, Jr. Scholarship. This scholarship was established by Jerry Reso, a 1961 graduate of the College of Business and the College of Law. It is awarded to a law freshman from the greater New Orleans area for three years. Undergraduate GPA and LSAT score must be consistent with the upper third of the law school class, a ranking that must be maintained while carrying a course load of 30 hours per year.

River Parishes Claimants’ 1988 Refinery Explosion Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established through a $100,000 settlement made by Shell Oil Co. as the result of a suit following an explosion at Shell’s refinery in Norco, Louisiana. It is awarded to residents of St. Charles, St. James, and St. John the Baptist Parishes, who demonstrate financial need and scholastic merit.

Sakla Family Scholarship. This scholarship was established through a gift from Dr. Sherif K. Sakla, a 1996 graduate of the College of Law. It will be awarded to civil law students at the discretion of the Office of the Dean.

Eleanor Legier Sarpy Scholarship. This scholarship was established by Adelaide Wisdom Benjamin, in memory of Eleanor Legier Sarpy. It will be awarded to outstanding students at the discretion of the Office of the Dean.

Douglas and Gustavus Schmidt Endowed Scholarship. This scholarship is reserved for Louisiana students studying civil law or civil/common law. The recipient must also be working on a volunteer basis while attending Loyola.

St. Paul Scholarship.  The purpose of the scholarship is to promote excellence in the field of law by offering incentives to talented law students.

Clem H. and Norris Tricon Sehrt Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of Clem H. Sehrt, a 1932 graduate of the College of Law, by his family and friends. The scholarship is awarded to a student on the basis of academic performance, participation in law school activities, and need.

Mark and Monica Surprenant Endowed Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 2004 by Mark, L’77, and Monica, L’78, Surprenant. It will be awarded in fall 2004 to the first law student recipient with high academic achievement as well as financial need.

A.T. Webber, Jr. and Herbert W. Christenberry, Jr. Scholarship. This scholarship was created through the estate of Absolom Theodore Webber, Jr. in his memory and in honor of his attorney, Herbert W. Christenberry, Jr., a 1957 law graduate. It will be awarded to outstanding law students at the discretion of the Office of the Dean.

Louis Westerfield Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of Louis Westerfield, former dean of Loyola’s College of Law, and a 1974 law graduate. Upon his death in 1996, friends and former colleagues made contributions which will be used to fund minority scholarships. For criteria on awarding this scholarship, please contact the executive assistant to the dean of the College of Law.

Michaelle Pitard Wynne—Loyola Law Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of the Hon. Michaelle Pitard Wynne, a 1970 law graduate. The gift was made by T. Allen Usry, a former member of the university’s Board of Trustees. The Michaelle Pitard Wynne—Loyola Law Scholar is selected based on academic merit. This award is given to an incoming freshman and it is carried throughout the student’s three years of law school.

Fred Gesivius Scholarship.

For additional information concerning scholarships and awards, http://law.loyno.edu/scholarships.

 

 

Facilities

LAW LIBRARY

The law library houses approximately 395,000 volumes and microform equivalents to support the common law and civil law programs of the College of Law. Statutes, reporters, digests, treatises, looseleafs, journals, and foreign and international materials can all be found on the library’s three floors. A staff of 18, including eight librarians, are ready to assist students and faculty in locating the materials they need.

Special effort has also been made in acquiring materials to support scholarly research, particularly materials from civil law jurisdictions. The library is a depository for federal, Louisiana, and European Union documents. Audiovisual materials and microforms also help supplement the collection.

LEXIS and WESTLAW are available for students’ educational use. Both LEXIS and WESTLAW offer students personal passwords providing access to the systems from home computers.

The library has ample table, carrel, and lounge seating available for library users. In addition, six group study rooms and seven audiovisual rooms are located on the third floor of the library. Photocopiers, divided between the three floors, accept copicards which can be purchased in the library.

COMPUTER AND INSTRUCTIONAL LABORATORIES

The main computer lab is located on the first floor of the law library and provides ample computer access to law students. It is equipped with forty-eight networked workstations and three high output printers. The computers are configured for word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database management software and provide students with access to the Internet, e-mail, and the two primary web-based legal information research services; Lexis-Nexis and Westlaw. All Loyola students are given a Loyola e-mail account as well as passwords for Lexis-Nexis and Westlaw during their first semester. Computer assisted legal instruction exercises are also available to students. The instructional laboratory is located on the second floor of the law library and is equipped with thirteen student workstations, one instructor workstation and one high output printer. Students and staff receive instruction in the use of various computer-based systems in this laboratory. When this facility is not being used for instructional purposes, it serves students as a secondary computer lab. Computer lab assistants are available to provide technical support during the posted hours.

PHYSICAL FACILITIES

The College of Law is housed in a 131,760-square-foot facility on the Broadway campus. The four-story building includes a combination appellate moot court room-auditorium, a trial court room, five lecture rooms, seminar-meeting rooms, placement interviewing facilities, staff and faculty lounges, faculty and administrative offices, Law Review and Moot Court offices. An extensive system of built-in audiovisual equipment has been installed for the use of students, faculty, and staff. The facility also houses the Loyola Law Clinic, an operational law office providing legal services to those who might not otherwise be served. Plans for remodelling the former Dominican Conference Center will provide an additional 24,190 square feet which will be available for use by the College of Law.

Loyola University Police Department

Loyola University complies with Louisiana R.S. 17-3351(c) and the Federal Clery Act by annually publishing crime statistics and other required information. Following is a synopsis of some of the information required under these acts.

The Reporting of Criminal Actions

The Loyola University Police Department (LUPD) is a fully-authorized police department that is open seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year. LUPD responds to any and all criminal activity brought to the attention of the department. Such activity is handled in accordance with the guidelines and laws set forth by local, state, and federal criminal justice systems. Crimes or suspicious activity may be reported in person at the department’s headquarters located in Biever Hall on the main campus. LUPD can also be reached through any campus telephone by dialing extension 3434. Silent Witness is another way to report anonymously any suspicious activity that may need the attention of university police (http://www.loyno.edu/police/silentwitness.php). Emergencies should be reported by dialing 911 from any campus telephone or from the blue light emergency telephones located on the campus grounds and all floors of the parking garages.
The Loyola University Police Department (LUPD) routinely issues warnings to the campus community of potentially dangerous campus and/or neighborhood situations (BOLO’s). In addition, a daily dispatcher log is distributed to the Maroon student newspaper and the university annually publishes its campus crime statistics. Copies of the pamphlet outlining the university’s Security Policies and Crime Statistics may be obtained from the Office of Admissions or the Loyola University Police Department headquarters or on line at http://www.loyno.edu/police/.

Campus Law Enforcement

Officers at Loyola University who are P.O.S.T. certified and commissioned by the state of Louisiana are designated as sworn university police officers. Under the authority of Louisiana Revised Statute R.S. 17:1805, officers are empowered to enforce all local and state laws and have the power of arrest while executing their duties in connection with campus crime. They are also authorized to obtain and execute search warrants and arrest warrants, both on and off campus, for all crimes committed on campus. At the request of NOPD in March of  2007, university police officers were also commissioned as NOPD officers. All commissioned officers are authorized to carry firearms and must meet the minimum qualifications for firearms training set forth by the Louisiana P.O.S.T. Council. LUPD also employs a small number of non-sworn officers known as Public Safety Generalists (PSG) who assist with a number of duties.

LUPD has cultivated and benefits from a positive and open working relationship with other police agencies. This is a relationship in which many police agencies, including other university police departments and NOPD, work very closely together to control campus crime and address specific problem areas as needed.

The administrative office responsible for public safety/university police services is through the Division of Finance and Administration under the direct supervision of the Assistant Vice President for Administration.

University Police Personnel

FULL-TIME

 

1 director

4 corporals

1 captain

15 officers

1 lieutenant

3 dispatchers

1 administrative assistant

3 shuttle drivers

3 shift sergeants

officers hired as needed
1 Parking/I.D. coordinator  

PART-TIME

 

2 university police officers and student workers who also patrol and do clerical, dispatching, and parking enforcement duties

Access to Campus Facilities

Students, faculty, and employees at Loyola have access to academic, recreational, and administrative facilities on campus. Access to the residence halls is limited to resident students and their guests and is a controlled access system. Access to residence halls by university employees is on an "as needed" basis, and incorporates strict key and/or card control procedures. The general public may attend cultural and recreational events on campus; however, their access is limited to parking lots and the facilities in which these events are held. LUPD officers patrol these areas on a 24-hour basis, as well as other areas of the campus community.

Firearms

The possession of firearms, chemicals, fireworks, explosives, knives, weapon replicas of any type, or other instruments used as weapons except as explicitly authorized by the university is prohibited upon the land owned by the university. Violation of this regulation is cause for disciplinary action up to and including dismissal from the university. In addition, criminal prosecution and penalties may be applicable under federal, state, and/or city law.

Monitoring Criminal Activities of Off-Campus Student Organizations

The Loyola University Police Department has an excellent working relationship with the Second District of the New Orleans Police Department and neighboring Tulane University Police Department. This positive relationship and communications link permits us to keep track of criminal activity off-campus in areas where some of our students may live or frequent. An LUPD command officer usually attends weekly NOPD Compstat meetings to discuss crimes in the university area.

Loyola University Police also requests annual crime statistics from New Orleans Police regarding any off-campus property owned or controlled by student organizations and recognized by Loyola. In addition, the recognized officers of these organizations are required to report specific crimes, as mandated by federal law, to the Loyola University Police within 48 hours of occurrence.

Alcohol and Drugs

The possession, consumption, and sale of alcoholic beverages on the Loyola University campus is permitted within the limits prescribed by state and federal laws, and in accordance with the specific regulations that have been established by the university. These rules and regulations can be found in the Student Handbook.

The misuse of marijuana and other drugs in this context includes barbiturates, amphetamines, cocaine, tranquilizers, LSD compounds, and any and all substances so defined by state criminal law and is a violation of federal, state, and municipal laws. Loyola University cannot and will not protect students from prosecution under federal, state, and municipal laws.

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Education Programs

The Loyola University Alcohol and Drug Education Program offers education, information, and assistance for individuals and groups concerned about substance abuse issues. Counseling, assessment, and referral services are available for individuals. An education group is available for students who have been referred to the program because of disciplinary incidents involving alcohol and drugs. A resource library has been created for students, faculty, and staff which contains books, pamphlets, and videotapes addressing a variety of substance abuse issues.

Crime Prevention
The Loyola University Police Department has an ongoing Crime Prevention Program designed to inform all students, faculty, and staff members of services and protection offered. These programs include BOLO’s by e-mail, lectures during orientations, residence hall meetings, and special events (spring break, Christmas, Mardi Gras, etc.). There is an ongoing dedication to educating the campus community on personal safety, not only while on campus, but also while living and traveling in the local community.

Security Lighting and Maintenance
Loyola University maintains a high level of dedication for a safe environment by ensuring proper lighting of the campus at nighttime, along with the trimming of trees and bushes to enhance a safe community. Also, various security measures are evaluated for implementation to reduce risks and add to this safe environment during the construction and maintenance of new or existing buildings.

Other Specialized Services
As support to help provide the Loyola community with a safe and secure campus, Loyola’s University Police Department offers specialized services. These services include 24-hour safety escorts, shuttle runs between the two campuses, security alarms and closed circuit television (CCTV), officers trained in first-aid and CPR, free self-defense training for women (RADs), free fingerprinting, free bicycle registration, motorist assistance, lost and found, use of property ID engravers, and parking and traffic enforcement.

CAMPUS PARKING

Students may park on campus by purchasing a parking permit from the Loyola parking services office located at university police headquarters in Biever Hall. Parking regulations are enforced 24 hours every day, weekends and holidays included. Please refer to the Loyola University parking and traffic regulations brochure, available at the Parking Services office or Loyola University Police Headquarters or online at http://www.loyno.edu/police/parking/ for a complete listing of parking regulations.
For further information about on-campus parking, please contact the Loyola Parking Services office at (504) 865-3000 or view our website at http://www.loyno.edu/police/parking/.

Student Services

Student Life at Loyola is based on the philosophy that education occurs in the context of total human development. Development of the whole person involves not only the intellectual development of the student but also the moral, social, cultural, and physical development of the individual. Programs and services exist which provide opportunities for this total educational experience.

Career Services Program

The mission of the Office of Career Services at the College of Law is to equip law students and alumni with the ability to define and achieve their career aspirations, and assess their interests and values. The office is staffed with licensed attorneys and legal recruitment professionals who have both law school and law firm experience.

Located in LS 402, the Career Services staff offers one-on-one counseling to assist students and alumni with local and out-of-state job searches.  Professional development programming, internships, recruitment programs, job fairs, networking events, mentoring programs, and other services are offered to educate law students and alumni regarding the methods of achieving career ambitions and employment options for those in possession of a Juris Doctor degree. By cultivating relationships with legal employers (e.g., the judiciary, private law firms, government agencies, legal services), alumni, local and national associations, and other members of the legal community, the Office of Career Services develops employment opportunities for law students and alumni.

Career Services maintains an interactive website at http://www.law.loyno.edu/career to inform students and alumni of current events, useful links, and job listings. 

Academic Counseling

For those students who need advice and counseling about their law program, the members of the faculty are available on a designated basis. The dean and associate deans will assist the student with scheduling courses and are available to discuss other problems that may arise in the academic year.

Academic Success Program

The College of Law Academic Success Program complements the law school curriculum to assist students in attaining academic success and is an integral part of Loyola Law School’s commitment to the academic achievement of all students. The Academic Success Program recognizes that students have diverse learning methods and backgrounds that affect their performance in law school. The program provides presentations, workshops, skills seminars and study groups on such topics as brief writing, test taking, issue spotting, essay writing, and time and stress management. The program also provides professional academic guidance and one-on-one tutorials to enhance studying, analysis, comprehension and writing. Individual meetings allow students to focus on their specific academic strengths and weaknesses to assess the best approach for achieving academic success. The Program is open to all students. Information about specific times and locations for activities and office hours will be posted on the web page and bulletin boards. The Academic Success Program office is located in Room 420.

Marie D. Tufts Director, Academic Success Program,Telephone (504) 861-5689 Room: 420, Email: mdtufts@loyno.edu.

University Counseling Center

The University Counseling Center (UCC), located on the main campus on the second floor of the Danna Student Center (room 208) provides personal counseling, psychiatric services and psychological assessments to all registered students. The UCC exists to assist students with meeting the varied challenges of community life at Loyola. Concerns for which students have sought services include adjustment issues, grief and loss, eating disorders, sexual violence, anxiety and depression. These services are offered free of charge and on a confidential basis in which the UCC records are maintained independently of all other university records. The UCC staff includes mental health professionals and a consulting psychiatrist who have been professionally trained in their areas of expertise. For more information about the University Counseling Center or to schedule an appointment, please call (504) 865-3835.

Student Housing

Cabra Hall, located on the Broadway campus adjacent to the College of Law, is a residence hall primarily housing undergraduate upperclass men and women. Law students may apply for housing in Cabra Hall, and every effort will be made to house law students in a suite with other law students. There are some spaces available for law students. There are no accommodations for married students on campus. The Office of Co-curricular Activities operates an active computerized apartment listing service for students seeking off-campus accommodations.

Requests for further information should be forwarded directly to the Office of Residential Life, following notification of acceptance to the College of Law.

Cabra Hall is a five-story residence with a capacity of housing 213 students. Each suite houses eight students in double occupancy rooms with a shared bath, living room, multi-purpose room, and an individual heating and air-conditioning control. Each room is furnished with two closets, two single beds, two chests of drawers, two desks, bulletin boards, computer network connection, basic cable service, and local telephone service with voice mail. Mail boxes, laundry facilities, study lounges, a computer room, television lounge, a community kitchen, and a sundeck are located within the residence hall. A limited food service facility is located immediately adjacent to Cabra Hall in the Broadway Activities Center. The main campus provides a full-service board program. A free shuttle service connects the Broadway and main campuses during posted hours.

Requests for further information and/or accommodations should be forwarded directly to the Office of Residential Life, following notification of acceptance to the College of Law. Reservations are confirmed only after receipt of a signed contract and a $100 application fee, of which $50 is refundable if the Office of Residential Life is notified of the cancellation in writing by July 1. The total application fee is credited as partial payment for the first semester room fee.
Housing contracts are for a full academic year (fall and spring semesters). A significant financial penalty is assessed for breaking the contract. Students residing in university housing are required to have adequate sickness and accident insurance coverage. Students without their own personal insurance coverage will be required to enroll in the university-sponsored insurance plan.

Campus Parking

Students may park on campus by purchasing a parking permit from the Loyola Express Card office located on the first floor of Biever Hall. Visitors may park in the Freret Street Parking Garage by paying an hourly rate or at a paid parking meter. Parking regulations are enforced 24 hours every day, weekends and holidays included. Please refer to the Loyola University parking and traffic regulations brochure, available at the Loyola Express Card office or Loyola University Police Headquarters, for a complete listing of parking regulations.For further information about on-campus parking, please contact the Loyola Express Card office at (504) 865-3000.

Commuter Services

The Office of Co-Curricular Activities serves the needs of Loyola University’s commuter students, which represent over 75 percent of the student population. The university recognizes its responsibility for responding to their unique needs.

Resources for commuter students including brochures, apartment listings, car pooling information, bus schedules, and programs are available in the Office of Co-Curricular Activities located in the Danna Student Center.

Student Health Services

Loyola’s Student Health Services is located on the main campus on the lower level of the Danna Student Center and hours of operation are Monday-Friday 8:30am-4:45pm.  Medical professionals administer a program of primary healthcare, medical assistance for illness/injury, and referral for emergency and/or specialty medical care to all registered students.  The primary goal for Student Health Services is to promote personal healthcare and healthy lifestyles.  Services provided include immunizations, allergy injections, intimate healthcare treatment, anonymous HIV testing, and a licensed in-house laboratory for various testing.  Treatment by medical professionals is provided at no charge to students and on a confidential basis as dictated by the medical code of ethics. Prescribed medicines, referrals to off-campus medical specialists, laboratory tests, and hospitalization are at the student’s expense.  For emergency medical assistance after-hours, residence hall students can utilize the Physician On-Call service at (504) 889-3352.  This service is available Monday-Friday, 5:00pm-8:00am and on weekends (excluding summer).  For more information about Student Health Services please call (504) 865-3326.

Immunization Policy

Loyola University New Orleans and Louisiana law requires all incoming students and students residing on campus to submit vaccination documentation.  This requirement includes proof of immunization for tetanus/diphtheria (within the past 10 years), meningococcal disease, and for students born after 1956, measles, mumps, and rubella (two doses). 

Registration for any course will be “temporary” until the completed proof of immunization compliance form has been submitted to Student Health Services by the student and reviewed by Student Health Services staff.  Failure to submit the completed form will result in a cancellation of classes.  This requirement can be met by providing evidence of prior vaccinations or being vaccinated at Student Health Services.  All vaccination forms can be found on the Student Health Services website.

Health Insurance

Loyola University cannot assume responsibility for health care costs incurred by students at other medical facilities and through off-campus physicians.  It is imperative that all students have adequate health insurance.  The Student Health Insurance Plan is available to all students at Loyola University and provides coverage to a student for 12 months at a cost of the yearly premium.  Residence hall students must furnish proof of comparable coverage with their housing contract or must purchase this insurance.  Housing space will not be assigned without insurance coverage.  All international students who are in non-immigrant status must purchase this insurance or show proof of comparable coverage for approval by the Director of the Center for International Education.

Information and premium rates for the Student Health Insurance Plan are sent to all students each summer by the insurance company. Pamphlets, enrollment applications and claim forms are available at Student Health Services.  For more information visit Student Health Services located on the main campus on the lower level of the Danna Student Center or call (504) 865-3326.

Identification Cards

Picture identification cards, known as Loyola Express Cards, are provided free to new students during the registration period. After class starts, all cards cost $15. Only one I.D. card is allowed per student. The cards are used for admittance to the Recreational Sports Complex, the residence halls, the parking garage, as well as serving as the card for students on a board plan and/or students who deposit funds for future food or bookstore purchases, vending purchases or laundry, campus events, and for other activities. They are required for use of campus library facilities.

Students must obtain their Loyola identification cards from the Loyola Express Card Office in the Danna Student Center., lower level. Students must have the cards on their persons at all times to present to university officials on demand. Loan of the card to anyone is prohibited. Use of another’s card subjects the user and the lender to a fine and/or disciplinary action. Lost or stolen cards should be reported immediately to the Express Card office. There is a $15 charge for replacement cards. The cards are used for the full term of enrollment at Loyola. Law students’ cards must be validated at the beginning of each semester at either the Office of Student Records at the College of Law or the Express Card office on the main campus at (504) 865-3000. Cards must be validated at the beginning of each semester at Loyola's Parking/ID office located in university police headquarters in Biever Hall.

Student Organizations

Membership in student organizations provides opportunities for law students to achieve educational and professional relevance in non-class time activities. Through participation in law student organizations, students have the opportunity to integrate the experiences of the classroom with the concerns and issues of the legal profession. Of the more than 120 student organizations chartered by the university, approximately 25 are affiliated directly with the College of Law under the umbrella of the Student Bar Association. Please contact the Student Bar Association at (504) 861-5541.

Law students are also eligible for membership in non-law student organizations based upon personal interest and the membership criteria of the student organization.

Student Government Association

The Student Government Association consists of elected members representing the four colleges and the College of Law. The SGA acts as the voice of the student body to the university. Through this body, students participate as members on most of the university committees in an effort to insure input in areas of student concern. The SGA sponsors programs and services as well as funding student organizations of the university. Meetings of the SGA are held once a week and are open to all students and members of the university community.

Center for International Education

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/cie/

The Center for International Education (CIE) at Loyola University New Orleans promotes the internationalization of the university by initiating, developing and supporting a wide range of international and intercultural educational opportunities for members of the Loyola community.CIE sponsors numerous cultural programs including International Education Week, the Country Fair, the Education Abroad Fair, and many others. Through these opportunities, CIE encourages students to develop an appreciation of other cultures and of their own, and to maximize their intercultural experience whether here at Loyola or on an education abroad program.

International Students

CIE provides innovative programs and services to the more than 200 international students currently enrolled at Loyola. International students include students with F-1 student, J-1 exchange visitor, or other nonimmigrant visas; students who are not citizens of the United States; students whose first language is not English; and students who do not reside within the continental United States. CIE helps these students adjust to life at Loyola and ensures that they are well integrated into the Loyola community. For non-immigrant F-1 students and J-1 exchange visitors, CIE provides assistance for all immigration issues, particularly those related to SEVIS, the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System.

All non-immigrant F-1 students and J-1exchange visitors are required to have health insurance which includes medical evacuation, repatriation, and other requirements listed on the CIE website. Non-immigrant students will be billed for and enrolled in an international student health insurance plan, administered by The Lewer Agency, unless their insurance company completes an insurance waiver available at www.loyno.edu/cie/internationalstudents/prospectivestudents/ by the deadlines listed on the website.

Education Abroad

For students wanting an education abroad experience, the Center for International Education is the first stop with advising and information on both Loyola and non-Loyola programs, financial aid, and scholarships. A study abroad advisor along with experienced study abroad peer advisers works with students to help them find the right program that will meet their academic and personal goals, financial situation, and interests. Students must also meet with their academic adviser, the associate dean in their college, and the study abroad advisor in the CIE prior to applying to a non-Loyola study abroad program.

Numerous programs are available for Loyola students. There are semester and year-long programs, community service and immersion programs, components to academic courses, and summer study abroad. While the majority of students study abroad for short summer programs, a growing number of students are selecting semester or year-long programs. Students can attend both Loyola and non-Loyola programs, but Loyola financial aid can usually only be applied to Loyola programs. The university has a number of affiliations with study abroad programs that provide limited scholarships or discounts for Loyola students. All the information that a student needs can be found at studyabroad.loyno.edu/

Broadway Activities Center (BAC)

The Broadway Activities Center (BAC), located across the street from the College of Law, houses "Dunbar's",  a full-service cafe, offering three meals a day, Monday through Friday, on a cash/Loyola Express Card, á la carte basis.  The BAC also houses the Broadway Campus mail room, University Ministry office, one law classroom, the SBA office, one office for law journals and one office for student organizations, as well as,  individual storage lockers which are available for rental for a nominal fee. The BAC operates under the supervision of the director of the Joseph A. Danna Student Center and student activities. For more information, please call (504) 865-3622 or the Associate Dean of Students at (504) 861-5761.

The Joseph A. Danna Student Center

The Joseph A. Danna Student Center located on the main campus is the university center for the campus community. This center houses the full-service dining facilities of the university, located in five different locations in the building. The center mall contains a credit union, a hairstylist shop, a convenience store, food service outlet, and three automatic teller machines (ATMs) of local banks. Located outside the mall is a university-operated branch of the U.S. Post Office. The Danna Student Center. also contains lounges, meeting rooms, the Danna Student Center. Art Gallery, student organization offices, and some student affairs administrative offices.

The Danna Student Center., through the University Programming Board, offers a full range of social, cultural, educational, and recreational activities for the entire university community. Contact number: (504) 865-3622.

The Bookstore

The Loyola Bookstore located on the main floor of the Danna Student Center. provides required and recommended textbooks, computer hardware and software, leisure and literary reading material, school supplies, gift items, class rings, clothing, and Loyola memorabilia. It serves as a central unit for the university’s business supplies. Hours of operation are posted. To contact the bookstore, call (504) 865-3262.

Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and Wellness

The Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and Wellness provides opportunities for Loyola students, employees, and alumni to participate in competitive and noncompetitive, organized and informal sports and fitness activities. It is the express purpose of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and Wellness to meet the diverse needs of the university community with a broad-based, comprehensive program including intramural sports, extramural sports, club sports, noncredit instructional programs, open recreation, and special interest programs. Students participating in all sports are responsible for ensuring that they are medically able to withstand the rigors of the physical activity in which they plan to engage. Likewise, all students should have sufficient personal injury insurance in the event of an accident.

The University Sports Complex is a multipurpose sports facility which includes: courts for basketball, tennis, volleyball, badminton, , and floor hockey; racquetball courts; an Olympic-style natatorium for swimming and diving; a whirlpool; a suspended jogging track; a weight-lifting/conditioning area; and the Loyola Athletic Hall of Fame. It also has locker rooms, each with a sauna and steam room. Students are admitted free with their university ID card and may purchase memberships for immediate family members.

The Loyola Wolfpack competes in the N.A.I.A. (National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics), Division I, as a member of the Gulf Coast Athletic Conference (GCAC). Loyola currently fields varsity teams in the following sports: men’s and women’s basketball, tennis, cross-country, men’s baseball, and women’s volleyball. By a student referendum conducted in 1991, the program is financially supported by a student fee dedicated to the intercollegiate athletic program. Loyola offers athletic scholarships in men’s and women’s basketball.

Law Walk Program

During the 2003-2004 academic year, the College of Law instituted the Law Walk Program to make evening students feel more comfortable when they left campus at night after their classes were dismissed. Two law walkers are available to watch students get to their cars from Monday through Thursday evenings during fall and spring semesters.

Loyola University Police Department

Loyola University complies with Louisiana R.S. 17-3351(c) and the Federal Campus Security Act of 1990 by annually publishing crime statistics and other required information. Following is a synopsis of some of the information required under these acts. To contact the university police, call (504) 865-3434.

The Reporting of Criminal Actions
The Loyola University Police Department (LUPD) is a fully-authorized police department open seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year and can be reached at (504) 865-3434. LUPD responds to any and all criminal activity brought to the attention of the department. Such activity is handled in accordance with the guidelines and laws set forth by local, state, and federal criminal justice systems. Crimes or suspicious activity may be reported in person at the department’s headquarters located in Biever Hall on the main campus. LUPD can also be reached through any campus telephone by dialing extension 3434. Emergencies should be reported by dialing 911 from any campus telephone, or from the emergency telephones located on the campus grounds and all floors of the parking garages.

The Loyola University Police Department (LUPD) routinely issues warnings to the campus community of potentially dangerous campus and/or neighborhood situations. In addition, a monthly campus crime statistical report is distributed, and the university annually publishes its campus crime statistics. Copies of the pamphlet outlining the university’s Security Policies and Crime Statistics may be obtained from the Office of Admissions or the Loyola University Police Department headquarters. This information is also published each semester in the course schedule, which can be obtained from the Office of Student Records.

Campus Law Enforcement
All uniformed officers at Loyola University are P.O.S.T. certified and commissioned by the State of Louisiana as university police officers. Under the authority of Louisiana Revised Statute R.S. 17:1805, officers are empowered to enforce all local and state laws and have the power of arrest while executing their duties in connection with campus crime. They are also authorized to obtain and execute search warrants and arrest warrants, both on and off campus, for all crimes committed on campus. All commissioned officers are authorized to carry firearms and must meet the minimum qualifications for firearms training set forth by the Louisiana P.O.S.T. Council.
LUPD has cultivated and benefits from a positive and open working relationship with local and state police agencies, a relationship in which all agencies work very closely together to control campus crime and address specific problem areas, as needed.

The administrative office responsible for university police service is the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.

University Police Personnel

FULL-TIME
1 director 3 corporals
1 investigator captain 16 officers
1 crime prevention lieutenant 3 dispatchers
1 administrative assistant 3 shuttle drivers
3 shift sergeants

PART-TIME
6 student marshals—patrol, clerical, and parking enforcement

Access to Campus Facilities
Students, faculty, and employees at Loyola have access to academic, recreational, and administrative facilities on campus. Access to the residence halls is limited to resident students and their guests and is a controlled access system. Access to residence halls by university employees is on an “as needed” basis, and incorporates strict key and/or card control procedures. The general public may attend cultural and recreational events on campus; however, their access is limited to parking lots and the facilities in which these events are held. LUPD officers patrol these areas on a 24-hour basis, as well as other areas of the campus community.

Firearms
The possession of firearms, chemicals, fireworks, explosives, knives, weapon replicas of any type, or other instruments used as weapons except as explicitly authorized by the university is prohibited upon the land owned by the university. Violation of this regulation is cause for disciplinary action up to and including dismissal from the university. In addition, criminal prosecution and penalties may be applicable under federal, state, and/or city law.

Monitoring Criminal Activities of Off-Campus Student Organizations
The Loyola University Police Department has an excellent working relationship with the Second District of the New Orleans Police Department, and the neighboring Tulane University Police Department. This positive relationship and communications link permits us to keep track of criminal activity off-campus, in areas where some of our students may live or frequent.
Loyola University Police requests annual crime statistics from New Orleans Police regarding off-campus property owned or controlled by student organizations recognized by Loyola. In addition, the chosen officers of these organizations are required to report specific crimes, as mandated by federal law, to the Loyola University Police within 48 hours of occurrence.

Alcohol and Drugs
The possession, consumption, and sale of alcoholic beverages on the Loyola University campus is permitted within the limits prescribed by state and federal laws and in accordance with the specific regulations that have been established by the university. The law of the State of Louisiana prohibits any person younger than 21 years of age to purchase or publicly consume or possess any alcoholic beverage. The law does provide for the possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages by those 18 years of age or older in private residences. Loyola University has declared residence halls as private residences. Members of the university community or visitors to the campus may not carry open containers of alcohol on the university grounds or in campus buildings except in those places so designated for the consumption of alcohol, (e.g., The Underground, the Pine Street Café, an approved event, and the Residential Quad area providing a recreational sports activity or contest is not taking place in that area).
It is contrary to the law of the State of Louisiana and the university for any person under the age of 21 to present or offer to any person having a license or permit to sell alcoholic beverages any written or printed or photostatic evidence of age and identity which is false, fraudulent, or not actually his or her own for the purpose of obtaining or purchasing alcoholic beverages. Persons found in violation on campus or at university events off-campus may be subject to university disciplinary action up to and including a fine of $200, compensatory service hours in the community, and/or prosecution under state law.

There are additional policies regarding the use of alcohol in the residence halls and for university events and student organizational activities, which can be found in the current Student Handbook.

The misuse of marijuana and other drugs (drugs in this context include barbiturates, amphetamines, cocaine, tranquilizers, LSD compounds, and any and all substances so defined by state criminal law) is a violation of federal, state, and municipal laws. Loyola University cannot and will not protect students, faculty, and staff members from prosecution under federal, state, and municipal laws. Because of the close proximity of Loyola and The Most Holy Name of Jesus Elementary School, the distribution (sale or giving) of illicit drugs on the Loyola campus can be prosecuted as a federal crime under federal law, U.S. Code, Title 21, Section 845 A1. Loyola cannot condone the possession, consumption, distribution, or sale of marijuana and other drugs. In order to encourage a drug-free living environment, the university will periodically conduct unannounced canine drug searches in the residence halls to identify the presence of illicit drugs.

The enforcement of these rules and the applicable sanctions can be found in the current Student Handbook, and the Loyola Staff Policies, Procedures, and Benefits Manual, as well as the Loyola publication that is in compliance with the Drug Free Schools Communities Act Amendments of 1989.

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Education Programs
The Loyola University Alcohol and Drug Education Program offers education, information, and assistance for individuals and groups concerned about substance abuse issues. Counseling, assessment, and referral services are available for individuals. An education group is available for students who have been referred to the program because of disciplinary incidents involving alcohol and drugs. A resource library has been created for students, faculty, and staff which contains books, pamphlets, and videotapes addressing a variety of substance abuse issues. This program is available through the Counseling & Career Services Center, which is located in the Danna Student Center., Room 208. For more information about the program, call (504) 865-3835.
Crime Prevention

The Loyola University Police Department has an ongoing Crime Prevention Program designed to inform all students, faculty, and staff members of services and protection offered. These programs include lectures during orientations, residence hall meetings, and special events (spring break, Christmas, Mardi Gras, etc.). There is an ongoing dedication to educating the campus community on personal safety, not only while on campus, but also while living and traveling in the local community. For more information, contact University Police at (504) 865-3434.

Security Lighting and Maintenance
Loyola University maintains a high level of dedication for a safe environment by ensuring proper lighting of the campus at nighttime, along with the trimming of trees and bushes to enhance a safe community. Also, various security measures are evaluated for implementation to reduce risks and add to this safe environment during the construction and maintenance of new or existing buildings.

Other Specialized Services
As support to help provide the Loyola community with a safe and secure campus, Loyola’s University Police Department offers specialized services. These services include 24-hour safety escorts, shuttle runs between the two campuses, security alarm and parking garages closed circuit television (CCTV) monitoring, first aid and CPR, self-defense training for women, free fingerprinting, motorist assistance, lost and found, free bicycle registration, use of property ID engravers, and parking and traffic enforcement.

Student Organizations

Below is a listing of law student organizations which may or may not be active. Students interested in exploring these organizations can do so at the Student Organization Fair which is usually held each year in early fall.

  • Asian Pacific American Law Student Association (APALSA) was founded in 1994 to increase the recruitment of Asian-American students and professors to the law school and to keep students informed about legal issues that affect them and their communities. APALSA maintains contact with related national organizations and law schools that support similar programming.
  • Association of Women Law Students (AWLS), organized in 1972, promotes the full involvement of women students in the College of Law and in the community. The association sponsors speakers whose primary emphasis is on women in various phases of the law and works to establish curriculum courses of interest to women.
  • Black Law Student Association (BLSA), A.P. Tureaud Chapter, established in 1969, is geared to recruiting and maintaining the enrollment of black students in the College of Law. Members of the organization recruit black students from colleges and universities throughout the region. Tutorial services are also offered to help maintain the enrollment level of black students. The society, open to all interested law students, maintains contact with related national organizations and other law schools throughout the country that support similar programs.
  • Cajun-American Law Society was founded in 1992 to stimulate awareness of the Cajun language and culture upon the development of Louisiana. Through speakers, seminars, and school functions, members will gain in-depth knowledge of the historical events that led to the now prevalent Cajun culture.
  • Christian Legal Society (CLS) is a student-led group that works to deepen the spiritual and intellectual lives of its members. CLS works to integrate the profession and skills with the faith and supports each other in legal education. Loyola’s CLS chapter was established in 2003 but CLS is a national organization with chapters at many prestigious law schools encouraging an authentic Christian identity on campus. The mission of CLS is to maintain a vibrant Christian Law Fellowship on Loyola’s campus which enables its members, individually and as a group, to love the Lord with their whole beings—hearts, minds, and souls—and to love their neighbors as themselves. (Mt. 22:37 – 40). CLS explores what it means to be a Christian in law and strives as a community to submit every aspect of one’s calling in the legal profession to the Lordship of Jesus Christ by proclaiming the Gospel in word and deed. CLS does this by sponsoring speakers in politics, law and policy who live a Christian witness in their professions. CLS also facilitates the networking of pro-life, pro-traditional family, and pro-religious liberties attorneys with students who wish to serve in these critical areas.
  • Criminal Law Society
  • Delta Theta Phi national legal fraternity has established a chapter at the College of Law, in which all law students are eligible for membership. The fraternity is devoted to the stimulation of interest in scholarship, organized legal research and writing, participation in appellate court competition, and fellowship on the part of its members.
  • Entrepreneurial Business Law Society’s (EBLS) mission is to empower members with the skills they need to start, promote, and maintain their own businesses. The organization is primarily made up of law students with plans to diversify membership with students from other areas of interest including information technology, undergraduate and graduate business, music business, and graphic arts. The organization hopes to augment the Small Business Development Center at Loyola University by offering legal aid as well as aid from other disciplines. Entrepreneurs will be featured and will give advice on starting businesses.
  • Environmental Law Society (ELS) is to expose the law school community to environmental legal and policy issues.  ELS performs community service activities related to environmental education and protection, sponsors law school events to focus awareness on environmental issues, maintains and information board presenting news articles on current local, state, national, and world environmental issues, and hosts speakers and discussions.
  • Federalist Society is a school chapter of the national organization (http://www.fed-soc.org) which has a background in conservative-libertarian ideas.  The Federalist Society fosters debate on current issues in the law by hosting public forums at the school.
  • Health Care Law Society was founded in 2002, to promote the understanding of legal issues in healthcare today and to foster a greater commitment to those issues within the College of Law by encouraging relate curriculum courses, speakers and activities.
  • Hispanic Law Students Association (HLSA), established in 1986, provides a support mechanism for Hispanic students and actively works to increase the Hispanic presence within the College of Law. Members are encouraged to develop their legal skills by participating in community programs and international academic competitions sponsored by the organization. Further, HLSA promotes the relationship of its members with the Hispanic legal community of Louisiana.
  • Intellectual Property Law Society's mission is to promote awareness and interest in patent, copyright, trademark, and other technology oriented fields such as Internet and other computer-related laws.  The society focuses on assisting students through networking and staying current on pressing issues in the field.  In addition, the society will spotlight issues involved in registering and studying for the patent bar.  All students are welcome and are encouraged to participate.
  • International Law Society is an affiliate chapter of Association of Student International Law Societies, is dedicated to the understanding of various legal systems of the world. A series of seminars featuring international authorities is designed to highlight similarities and differences between United States legal systems and those of other countries. The society is an information source for summer legal study abroad and legal internships with foreign law firms.
  • J.D./M.B.A. Society was established in 1983. Though organized primarily for students participating in the program, all students are welcome to participate and learn about the relationship between the business and law communities. Additionally, Loyola is affiliated with the J.D./M.B.A. association formed specifically for people with both degrees.
  • Justinian Law Society was founded in 1998 to foster unity, fellowship, and support among Italian-American law students who share common educational, professional, and cultural pursuits. The society sponsors distinguished guest speakers, hosts seminars, and networks with other national and regional Italian-American organizations which provide support for mentor programs, job placement, scholarships, and valuable career developing opportunities. The Justinian Law Society is affiliated with the National Italian-American Bar Association.
  • Lambda Law Alliance is a private, non-partisan student organization designed to foster a welcoming environment to all students regardless of their sexual orientation, gender identity, or associational preference.  In accordance with Igantian and Jesuit tradition, the Lambda Law Alliance affirms the goodness, worth and dignity of every person.  Lambda Law Alliance strives to support diversity in the College of Law, to support gay, lesbain, bisexual, transgender, and intersexed law students and prospective law students, to increase knowledge and awareness of legal issues that are unique to the gay, lesbain, bisexual, transgender, and intersexed community, and to serve the greater community as a source of information about gay, lesbain, bisexual, transgender, and intersexed legal issues.  As a corollary, Lambda Law Alliance will create a community of LGBT and LGBT allies at Loyola College of Law through formal and informal social events.
  • Loyola Alternative Dispute Resolution (LADR) is an organization that provides an opportunity for law students to discover more about the allternatives to litigation.  Through writing and practical competitions, panel discussions and forums, students develop their skills in mediation, negotiation and arbitration.
  • Loyola Public Interest Law Group (LPILG) has an interest in providing legal services to those who are traditionally underrepresented. LPILG members are interested in a variety of areas of public interest law including: providing legal services to the poor, civil rights work, working as public prosecutors or public defenders, and/or working for other non-profit public service organizations. LPILG’s activities include: advocacy for loan forgiveness, endowing summer clerkships in the public interest law, increasing career placement opportunities in public interest law, and promoting public interest law within the university and the community. LPILG is also a member of the National Association of Public Interest Law (NAPIL).
  • Maritime Law Society (MLS) was established in the spring of 1994 for the purpose of introducing students to the various legal and factual issues which arise in the field of maritime law. Seminars, speakers, field trips, and panel discussions give students the opportunity to interact with practitioners, judges, and businesses that are actively involved in this area of the law.
  • National Lawyers Guild (NLG) is a national organization that has been in existence since the 1930s with a membership of approximately 8,000 lawyers and students. The Loyola chapter of the guild was formed in 1982. The preamble of the NLG Constitution best summarizes the organization’s orientation: “We place human rights above property rights.”
  • Native American Law Society was organized in 1993 to promote the study of American Indian Law under treaties, laws, and customs within the United States and tribal framework. The Native American Law Society is affiliated with the Native American Law Society N.A.
  • Phi Alpha Delta (PAD) international legal fraternity established a chapter at the College of Law and all law students are eligible for membership. The fraternity’s purpose is to serve law students by stressing a proper blend of professional and social activities in order to prepare them for the practice of law, as well as to serve the College of Law by supplementing formal courses with an orientation program for first-year students, lectures, interschool moot court competitions, and other pre-professional endeavors in order to fulfill its motto, “Service to the Student, the Law School, the Profession, and the Community.”
  • Phi Delta Phi (PDP) international legal fraternity is the oldest legal fraternity in continued existence in the United States today. The fraternity established its 99th Inn, the Black Inn, named after Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black, at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law in 1972. Members are selected from those of the student body who have completed at least one semester of study and have attained a ranking in their respective class of at least the top 50 percent. The intent of this organization is to foster an interest in scholarship and provide services to the student body and within the legal community. Additionally, the inn fosters friendship which has long been the hallmark of the Phi Delta Phi tradition.
  • Real Estate Law Society (RELS) was founded in the fall of 2002 to promote educational opportunities for students, faculty, and staff interested in issues regarding real estate. The society maintains a website complete with an online outline bank, downloadable application for membership, contact information for members, and a schedule of events. 
  • St. Thomas More Law Society was established in 1935 in honor of the English martyr and saint. The club is open to all members of the College of Law community and is dedicated to stimulating an interest in the moral and ethical responsibilities of members of the legal profession. The intent of this organization is to explore of subject matter not always treated in the ordinary curriculum, by way of lectures, debates, seminars, workshops, community action, and legal scholarship.
  • Sports and Entertainment Law Society (SELS) was established in 1988 to provide a forum for students interested in the legal regulation of the sports and entertainment industries. The organization sponsors seminars, workshops, and panel discussions featuring local attorneys and members of the sports and entertainment industries. The group has focused on the representation of professional athletes and musicians.
  • Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (SALDF) is dedicated to providing a forum for education, advocacy and scholarship aimed at protecting the lives and advancing the interests of animals through the legal system, and raising the profile of the field of animal law.   This organization is dedicated to the goals of educating the law school and surrounding community about forms of institutionalized animal abuse, and engagin in projects that comabt abuse.  SALDF is equally dedicated to protecting the lives and advancing the interests of animals through the legal system.
  • Tax Law Society (TLS) was founded in Fall 2008.  TLS's purpose is to promote an interest in the tax profession, to assist with Loyola College of Law's renowned IRS-Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program (VITA), to assist students in their tax law education, to provide opportunities that will advance student career pursuits, and to promote a tax law speaker series at the law school. 

 

Student Spiritual Formation

College of Law Ministry

Jesuit education is a process that involves the whole person. As law students face the challenges and rigors of their education, University Ministry, within the Office of Mission and Ministry at Loyola, helps them maintain a healthy balance. As they strive for academic excellence, seek to integrate their faith, clarify their deepest values, and grow in an awareness of their mission to be men and women with and for others, University Ministry is there for them to be their companion on the journey. By taking advantage of our various programs, retreats, service and justice activities, and opportunities for pastoral counseling, law students easily find the support they need to develop their talents and thus become leaders with a vision, leaders who will struggle for justice in the world.

The College of Law Chaplain is Arlene Wiltz, whose office is located in the Broadway Activities Center, room 102. She can be reached at (504) 861-5494, or awiltz@loyno.edu.

University Ministry Chaplains

Executive Director of Mission and Ministry: Fr. Ted Dziak, SJ
Director of University Ministry, Resident Chaplains: Mr. Kurt Bindewald
Executive Assistant for Mission and Ministry: Mrs. Deborah LaMarca
Associate Chaplain/Community Service and Immersion Programs: Mr. Joshua Daly
Associate Chaplain/Interfaith Ministry: Mr. George Gallien
Associate Chaplain/ Christian Life Communities and Retreats: Ms. Laura Quigley
Associate Chaplain/Liturgy and Music: Mr. Kenneth Weber
Associate Chaplain/College of Law Chaplain: Mrs. Arlene Wiltz
Associate Chaplain Fellowship: Ms. Alexis Yankowski

Loyola University Ministry: 504-865-3226, www.loyno.edu/universityministry 
 

Opportunities for Spiritual Growth and Faith Development

University Ministry supports the spiritual formation and faith development of the entire Loyola community through:

Pastoral Counseling and Spiritual Direction

University chaplains are trained and available to assist others with their spiritual formation and counseling needs. They offer a welcoming and trusting place to find a listening ear, an understanding heart, and a companioning mentor. Contact Arlene Wiltz, the College of Law Chaplain, to inquire about pastoral counseling and spiritual direction.

Worship and Communal Prayer

All faith communities are strengthened and missioned by their worship and prayer. University Ministry is dedicated to providing quality liturgies where community members actively participate in prayer, word, and sacrament. We offer a variety of worship opportunities and encourage students to share their gifts as a liturgical minister or volunteer.

Mass is celebrated on the main campus in Ignatius Chapel, Bobet Hall, Monday through Friday at noon, Monday through Thursday at 9 P.M., and Sunday at 10:30 A.M.. and 9 P.M. On the Broadway campus, Mass is celebrated weekly in the Martha and Mary Chapel in Greenville Hall. Contact Arlene Wiltz, 504-861-5494, for the weekly schedule. During the semester, there are bi-monthly special Law School Masses, followed by lunch. Dates for these Masses are posted in the law school. (All liturgy schedules are subject to change.)

The sacrament of Reconciliation is celebrated on the main campus by appointment with any priest. Contact the University Ministry Office at 504-865-3226 to schedule an appointment.

Interfaith and Ecumenical Opportunities

University Ministry provides many ecumenical and interfaith opportunities for students to celebrate their diverse faith and cultural traditions. We provide training for lay ministry and encourage involvement in a diversity of prayer experiences. We also facilitate relationships with area ministry offices from other faith traditions. Through our shared worship and prayer, we seek enrichment through our differences while working to create community.

Retreats

University Ministry provides a variety of opportunities for retreats, discernment and days of reflection. This can be a time to experience God’s love more profoundly and intimately, to find rest and renewal, and to reflect upon God’s active presence in all the experiences of your life. Contact the College of Law Chaplain for details.

Sacramental Preparation

In addition to administering the sacraments of Eucharist and Reconciliation each week, University Ministry provides instruction and guidance for students who are preparing for Confirmation in the Catholic Church and Marriage. For students considering joining the Catholic Church, the RCIA (Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults) process will help them discern their decision and prepare them for the sacraments of Baptism, Holy Eucharist, and/or Confirmation. We also provide Anointing of the Sick as needed. Contact the College of Law Chaplain for details.

Christian and Spiritual Life Communities

Ignatian spirituality and the Jesuit vision of education include: prayer, community, service, and working for peace and justice in the world. This tradition serves as a model for small groups of women and men who come together in a more intimate community for faith sharing. Christian Life Community (CLC) members meet on a regular basis to break open the word and to support and encourage each other in living out the gospel. Members also form a supportive community that socializes together and engages in works of social justice outreach. For people who would prefer to be involved with an interfaith community, there are opportunities to join a Spiritual Life Community (SLC) that centers their faith sharing on a rich diversity of spiritual resources. Contact the College of Law Chaplain for details.

Faith Doing Justice

From the belief in the power of the Gospel to transform the world, University Ministry provides a variety of opportunities for a student to live a reflective life of action for service, justice, and peace. Along with the Pro Bono program, University Ministry provides other opportunities to serve and advocate for the poor and marginalized, through the Loyola University Community Action Program (LUCAP), The St. Thomas More group, yearly immersion trips to Jamaica, Belize and Mexico, frequent visits to local soup kitchens, and many other programs available for students. The College of Law Chaplain is always available to help a student find a program suitable for his or her needs.

Undergraduate Universities Represented by Student Body 2004-2006
AGNES SCOTT COLLEGE
ALABAMA STATE UNIVERSITY
ALBANY STATE UNIVERSITY
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY
APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERSITY
AUBURN UNIVERSITY
BARRY UNIVERSITY
BAYLOR UNIVERSITY
BELMONT ABBEY COLLEGE
BELMONT UNIVERSITY
BOSTON COLLEGE
BOSTON UNIVERSITY
BOWDOIN COLLEGE
BRADLEY UNIVERSITY
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY– LONG BEACH
CAMPBELL UNIVERSITY
CHRISTOPHER NEWPORT UNIVERSITY
CITY COLLEGE—CITY UNIVERSITY
OF NEW YORK
CLARK ATLANTA UNIVERSITY
CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
COLGATE UNIVERSITY
COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
COLLEGE OF WILLIAM AND MARY
COLLEGE OF WOOSTER
COLORADO CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY
CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY WISCONSIN
CORNELL UNIVERSITY—NEW YORK
DARTMOUTH COLLEGE
DAVIDSON COLLEGE
DENISON UNIVERSITY
DILLARD UNIVERSITY
DRURY UNIVERSITY
DUKE UNIVERSITY
EAST STROUDSBURG UNIVERSITY
OF PENNSYLVANIA
ECKERD COLLEGE
EMORY UNIVERSITY
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY
FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY
FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
GANNON UNIVERSITY
GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY
GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY
GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY
HAMILTON COLLEGE
HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE
HAMPTON UNIVERSITY
HARVARD UNIVERSITY DIVISION OF
CONTINUING EDUCATION
HENDRIX COLLEGE
HOLLINS UNIVERSITY
HOOD COLLEGE
HOWARD UNIVERSITY
HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY
HUNTINGDON COLLEGE
IMMACULATA UNIVERSITY
INDIANA UNIVERSITY—BLOOMINGTON
INTERNATIONAL BIBLE COLLEGE
JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY
JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
LOUISIANA COLLEGE
LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY—MEDICAL CENTER, NEW ORLEANS
LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY—
BATON ROUGE
LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY—SHREVEPORT
LOUISIANA TECH UNIVERSITY
LOYOLA UNIVERSITY
LOYOLA UNIVERSITY—CHICAGO
MANHATTANVILLE COLLEGE NEW YORK
MARSHALL UNIVERSITY
MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE
MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
MILLSAPS COLLEGE
MISSISSIPPI COLLEGE
MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY
MOREHOUSE COLLEGE
MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE
NEW YORK UNIVERSITY—COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
NEWCOMB COLLEGE OF TULANE UNIVERSITY
NICHOLLS STATE UNIVERSITY
NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY
NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY
NORTHWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY—COLUMBUS
OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY
ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY
OUACHITA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY
OUR LADY OF HOLY CROSS COLLEGE
PAUL QUINN COLLEGE
PEABODY COLLEGE OF VANDERBILT
UNIVERSITY
PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY—MALIBU
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY
PURDUE UNIVERSITY—WEST LAFAYETTE
REED COLLEGE
RHODES COLLEGE
ROANOKE COLLEGE
ROCKHURST COLLEGE
ROLLINS COLLEGE
ROSARIO UNIVERSITY
SAINT JOHN’S UNIVERSITY
SAINT LEO UNIVERSITY
SAINT MARY’S UNIVERSITY TEXAS
SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY
SEATTLE UNIVERSITY
SEOUL NATIONAL UNIVERSITY
SIENA COLLEGE—NEW YORK
SOUTHEASTERN LOUISIANA UNIVERSITY
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY—
CARBONDALE
SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY
SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY—BATON ROUGE
SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY—NEW ORLEANS
SPELMAN COLLEGE
SPRING HILL COLLEGE
ST. JOHN’S COLLEGE
ST. JOHN’S UNIVERSITY—JAMAICA
STATE UNIVERSITY OF WEST GEORGIA
SWEET BRIAR COLLEGE
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY
TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY
TEXAS A & M UNIVERSITY—
COLLEGE STATION
TEXAS A & M UNIVERSITY—GALVESTON
TEXAS A & M UNIVERSITY—COMMERCE
TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY
TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY—SAN MARCOS
TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY
TEXAS WOMAN’S UNIVERSITY
THE CITADEL
THE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA AT
MONROE
THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS
THOMAS MORE COLLEGE
TOUGALOO COLLEGE
TRINITY COLLEGE—CONNECTICUT
TRINITY UNIVERSITY
TROY STATE UNIVERSITY—TROY
TUFTS UNIVERSITY OF ARTS & SCIENCES
TULANE UNIVERSITY
UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY
UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA
UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA—BIRMINGHAM
UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA—HUNTSVILLE
UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA
UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS—
FAYETTEVILLE
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA—
LOS ANGELES
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA—SAN DIEGO
UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO—BOULDER
UNIVERSITY OF DALLAS
UNIVERSITY OF DENVER
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA—ATHENS
UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS—URBANA
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS
UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA AT LAFAYETTE
UNIVERSITY OF MAINE—ORONO
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND—COLLEGE
PARK
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND—UNIVERSITY
COLLEGE
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS—AMHERST
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN—ANN ARBOR
UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI
UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI—COLUMBIA
UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI—KANSAS CITY
UNIVERSITY OF MOBILE
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA—LINCOLN
UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA—LAS VEGAS
UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO
UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS
UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA—
CHAPEL HILL
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA—
CHARLOTTE
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS
UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME
UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA
UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX
UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH
UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND
UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND
UNIVERSITY OF SAINT THOMAS—TEXAS
UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH ALABAMA
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA—
COLUMBIA
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
UNIVERSITY OF ST. FRANCIS
UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE—KNOXVILLE
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS—AUSTIN
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS—DALLAS
UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH
UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA
UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN—MADISON
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN—STEVENS POINT
UTAH VALLEY STATE COLLEGE
VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY
WAGNER COLLEGE
WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY
WASHINGTON AND JEFFERSON COLLEGE
WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY
WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY—MORGANTOWN
WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
WHITMAN COLLEGE
WICHITA STATE UNIVERSITY
WILEY COLLEGE
XAVIER UNIVERSITY
XAVIER UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA
Awards
  • The American Bankruptcy Institute Medal of Excellence is given annually to one student who has excelled in bankruptcy studies.
  • The American Bar Association Awards are provided by its Section of State and Local Government Law. One goes to the student who excels in the course in Land Use Law and the other to the student who excels in Municipal Law. Students receive a section publication and a certificate of recognition.
  • The Association of Trial Lawyers–Board of Advocates, J. Skelly Wright Chapter Award is presented by the association to the team members who compete in the ATLA National Student Trial Competition each spring.
  • The Association for Women Law Students Award is given by AWLS to its outstanding member during the past academic year.
  • The Black Law Students Association Award is presented to the team members representing the A.P. Tureaud Chapter in the BLSA Regional Finals of the Frederick Douglas Moot Court Competition.
  • The Blue Williams Award is given annually to the most outstanding student in the Trial Advocacy Program.  The award consists of a $500 cash stipend.
  • The Joseph V. Bologna Prize is given annually in honor of Joseph V. Bologna by First American Title Insurance Company and the New Orleans Notaries’ Association. The award is given in recognition of the high standard of professionalism and craftsmanship exhibited by Joseph V. Bologna. There is one cash award for the highest grade in each section of Civil Law Property I and Civil Law Property II.
  • The Corporate and Business Law Section of the Louisiana State Bar Association will present a cash award each year to a student who has achieved the highest grade in Business Organizations.
  • The Dean’s Award is given annually to the student who has attained the highest average during his or her first year in the College of Law.
  • The Faculty Award, as well as the Lexis Law Publishing Company Award, is given annually to the senior who has maintained the highest average over his or her entire course of study.
  • The Frank Deutschmann Award is given annually to the law student with the highest grade in insurance law. The award consists of a $250 cash stipend.
  • The Ralph H. Fishman Award is given annually by the firm of Sessions & Fishman in honor of the late Ralph H. Fishman, a senior partner in the firm and an alumnus of the College of Law. The award consists of a $150 cash stipend to the student who has earned the highest grade in the course in Sales and Leases.
  • The David L. Herman Award was established by the family of the late David L. Herman to recognize his high professional standards in the law. It is awarded annually to the student who has earned the highest grade in the course in Successions.
  • The International Academy of Trial Lawyers Student Advocacy Award is an honorary scroll given to a student who demonstrates an overall ability in trial advocacy by achievement in trial practice, evidence, and pleading and procedure courses.
  • The Law Clinic Award is given to the student in the Loyola Law Clinic whose participation was the most outstanding in the field of Criminal Justice. The Law Clinic also gives awards to the student who is most outstanding in civil clinical work and to the student who excels in rendering services to the Hispanic Community.
  • The Law Excellence Awards are given annually to those students who achieve the highest grade in a class/seminar.
  • The Law League of Louisiana Merit Award was established by the Law League of Louisiana and is given to a current senior who is graduating in May who has most improved his or her grade point average during the first five semesters of law school.
  • The Louisiana State Bar Association Civil Code Award is to be given to the graduating senior with the highest average in courses based on the Louisiana Civil Code.
  • The Loyola Law Alumni give an award annually to the member of the student editorial board of the Law Review who has made the most significant contribution to the Loyola Law Review in the field of research and writing during the academic year. The award is presented at the annual Law Review banquet in the spring.
  • The Moot Court Board Awards are given to the winners in the Moot Court Class Intramurals by the Moot Court Board.
  • The Warren E. Mouledoux Professional Responsibility Award is given to the students who earn the highest grades in each section of the course in Legal Profession.
  • The Antonio E. Papale Award is given in memory of the late Antonio E. Papale, former dean of the law school, by the Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity to the student in the College of Law who earns the highest grade in the common law course Contracts II.
  • The N. Curtiss Petitjean Memorial Award is given annually to the past year’s president of the Student Bar Association by Miss Irene M. Petitjean in memory of her brother, N. Curtiss Petitjean, a 1934 graduate of the College of Law.
  • The Police Jury Association Award, established in 2004 in honor of Bill Doran, longtime general counsel for the Police Jury Association of Louisiana, is given annually to the student who has attained the highest grade in one of the following courses:
    1. State and Local Government Law
    2. State and Local Taxation
    3. Real Estate Transactions
    The award consists of a $250 cash stipend. The winning student is also invited to attend the Police Jury Association’s Annual Conference.
  • The President’s Award is given annually by the president of the Student Bar Association to a law student who has given freely of his or her time and energy in assisting fellow law students.
  • The Spirit of Ignatius Award Each year the Jesuit Center of Loyola University New Orleans, in conjunction with University Ministry, presents a Spirit of Ignatius Award at the Baccalaureate Mass. This award is presented to a law student who has achieved academic excellence and embodies Christian values in the Ignatian tradition, focused on the development of the whole person. In addition to receiving an award, the student’s name is inscribed on a plaque displayed on the law school campus.
  • The St. Thomas More Award is given annually by The St. Thomas More Catholic Lawyers’ Association to a member of the St. Thomas More Student Association who has distinguished him/herself through leadership and dedication to the principles of St. Thomas More. This award consists of a $250 monetary award and a plaque.
Honor Code

I. STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

The purpose of this honor code is to establish the rules and standards by which the students of the Loyola University New Orleans College of Law shall govern their conduct with respect to all academic matters. The honor board serves in an advisory capacity to the dean of the College of Law, and its purpose is to investigate alleged honor code violations, to conduct hearings when appropriate, and to recommend sanctions when a violation has been committed.

II. SCOPE

Jurisdiction under the honor code is restricted to prohibited conduct pursuant to Section IV, whether occurring on or off campus. The honor code is not intended to limit or replace any other disciplinary procedures that may be applicable. A person is subject to the jurisdiction of the honor code upon enrollment in the Loyola University College of Law. Upon enrollment in the College of Law, all students shall sign a pledge evidencing that they have read the honor code, that they understand the honor code, and that they will comply with the honor code. The honor code pledge shall be in the following form:

HONOR CODE PLEDGE

I, the undersigned, have read the Loyola University College of Law Honor Code and understand what is expected of me as a student, including my obligation to report suspected violations to which I am a witness or of which I am aware. I have also read and understand the potential sanctions for violations of the honor code.

_______________________________ __________
Signature and Date

III. DEFINITIONS

The following words or phrases shall have the meanings ascribed to them unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.

A. Academic matter means any activity which may affect a grade or in any way contribute toward the satisfaction of the requirements for graduation, without reference to the focus of such activity. Academic matters also include classroom instruction and other officially recognized academic programs.

B. Charged party means a student of the Loyola University College of Law who has been charged with a violation of the honor code.

C. Chief justice means the junior or senior class student honor board member selected to preside over the administration and activities of the honor board.

D. Code means the honor code of the Loyola University College of Law.

E. Dean means the dean of the College of Law or the dean’s designee.

F. Examination means any work, written or otherwise, submitted to any instructor for partial credit, extra credit, or full credit in any class.

G. Hearing panel means an assembly of no fewer than four honor board members, the chief justice, and the presenter for the purpose of adjudicating a suspected honor code violation.

H. Instructor means a person who teaches, instructs, directs, supervises, or oversees students regarding academic matters on a full-time, part-time, or visiting basis whether compensated or not. Instructor also includes assistants, student teaching assistants, and guest lecturers.

I. Investigation committee means a committee of three honor board members charged with the responsibility of investigating an alleged honor code violation and making a probable cause determination, headed by the presenter.

J. College of Law means the Loyola University College of Law.

K. Library means any library available for use by Loyola law students.

L. Permanent record means a student’s file, folder, or record maintained by the Office of Student Records or Office of Law Records which contains any record relating to the student.

M. Presenter means the chair of the investigation committee who prepares and presents a case of any suspected honor code violation to the hearing panel.

N. Registrar means the registrar of the Loyola University College of Law or the registrar’s designee, including the director of the Office of Law Records.

O. Regular session means the interval of time between the first day of the fall semester and the last day of the spring semester.

P. Summer session means the interval of time between the last day of the spring semester and the first day of the fall semester.

Q. SBA means the Student Bar Association of the Loyola University College of Law.

R. Staff means any noninstructional employee of the College of Law or of the university.

S. Student means any person admitted, accepted for admission, seeking admission or readmission, or enrolled to the College of Law. Student also includes a student from another law school taking a course or participating in a program at the Loyola University College of Law.

T. Student body means the students of the College of Law.

U. Student defense counselor means a Loyola law student selected by the charged party or appointed by the chief justice to represent the charged party during an honor board investigation and hearing.

IV. PROHIBITED CONDUCT

Except in those cases where an instructor’s express authorization would allow the particular actions or conduct in question, the following actions or conduct shall constitute a violation of the honor code.

A. Examination Misconduct

1. No student shall give, seek, receive, or obtain aid of any nature from any source before, during, or after the initial offering of an examination.

2. No student shall discuss an examination with any other student while the examination is in progress. Nor shall any student who has taken an examination knowingly discuss its contents or format with a student who will later take that same examination or make-up examination.

3. No student shall use any materials during an examination unless expressly authorized by the instructor.

4. No student shall take an examination for another student or permit another person to take an examination for the student.

5. No student shall intentionally identify himself/herself in any manner as the taker of an examination or other graded work where such examination or work is to be graded anonymously.

6. No student shall violate examination policies, procedures, rules, or instructions which have been announced or published. This includes reading the contents of an examination prior to authorization, beginning to write prior to authorization, or failure to discontinue writing when the allotted time has elapsed.

No student shall invade the administrative security maintained for the preparation and storage of examinations.

B. Plagiarism

It shall be a violation of the honor code to plagiarize the work of another. No student shall claim or submit as his or her own original work the research, ideas, or writings of another without acknowledging and clearly identifying such material in an appropriate manner. Paraphrasing without acknowledgment of authorship is a form of plagiarism. Paraphrasing is the close restatement of another’s idea using approximately the language of the original.

C. Misrepresentation

No student shall forge or improperly alter any College of Law or university document, record, or instrument of identification, or misrepresent his/her prior education or employment.

D. Unauthorized Assistance

No student shall give, solicit, or receive assistance in the preparation of work to be submitted for credit, or to be submitted in connection with a College of Law academic activity, from a source not expressly authorized by the instructor or supervisor of the activity. Unless otherwise provided by the instructor, the use of typing assistance, commercially prepared study aids, or computer software to check spelling and grammar does not violate this section. Unless the nature of the course or class indicates otherwise, nothing in this section shall be interpreted to prohibit student study groups or the use of student-prepared and shared outlines.

E. Attendance Falsification

No student shall falsify or participate in the falsification of attendance records. Nor shall any student fail to respond when called upon in class.

F. Misuse of Property or Services

No student shall steal, conceal, damage, deface, destroy, misuse, or in any other manner improperly impede the use of or access to materials, property, or services of the library, College of Law, university, instructors, staff, students, or members of the College of Law community.

G. Unauthorized Use of Written Work

No student shall use or submit the same or essentially the same paper or other work product, or a substantial portion thereof, for credit in more than one course without making full disclosure to the instructors involved and obtaining their prior expressed consent.

H. Refusal to Cooperate

No student shall knowingly give false information, refuse to give information, refuse to testify, or otherwise refuse to cooperate in any investigation, proceeding, or hearing involving a violation of the honor code. Nor shall any student harass, threaten, intimidate, or otherwise interfere with any member of the College of Law community relative to his or her participation or involvement in the honor code process. A charged party, however, shall not be compelled to testify against himself/herself.

I. Failure to Disclose Violations

No student who has reasonable grounds to believe that a violation of the honor code has occurred shall fail to report such violation.

J. False Accusation

No student shall intentionally make a false accusation against another student involving a violation of the honor code.

K. Tape Recording

No student shall tape record a class without the professor’s consent.

L. Prohibited Conduct

No student shall divulge confidential information to uninterested persons in connection with any Honor Board proceeding.

V. HONOR BOARD

A. Membership

The honor board shall be composed of three members of each day division class and one member of each night division class. A student must be in good academic standing and must not have been determined to have violated the honor code to serve or continue to serve on the honor board. The term of office shall be for one year commencing on the last day of the spring semester. The terms of first-year honor board representatives shall commence upon their election which will be held in conjunction with the SBA fall elections. Graduating senior representatives shall continue to serve until March 31 of the regular session. If an honor board member’s term expires during the course of an honor board proceeding, the term shall be extended through the conclusion of such proceeding.

B. Selection

Honor board representatives shall be elected by the student body among their respective divisions and classes. Honor board elections shall be held in conjunction with SBA elections. To qualify as a candidate for election to the honor board, a student must submit his or her name to the chief justice of the honor board by petition signed by at least 10 percent of the students in his or her respective division. The three students receiving the most votes in their respective day division class and the student receiving the most votes in his or her respective night division class shall be elected to the honor board. A runoff election shall be conducted only in the event of a tie.

C. Officers

The honor board shall select a chief justice, co-chair, and secretary at its initial meeting. The chief justice shall be a student who has completed one regular session of College of Law.

D. Vacancy

Any vacancy on the honor board may be filled through appointment by the chief justice.

E. Faculty Representative/Adviser

The dean shall appoint a nonvoting faculty representative and an alternate to represent the faculty on the honor board and to advise or assist the honor board.

F. Recusal

An honor board member shall recuse himself/herself from any honor board proceeding where there is a conflict of interest or an appearance of impropriety. The faculty adviser shall be recused if the alleged violation relates to or arises out of his or her course of instruction, examination, or other College of Law related matter involving such faculty adviser. In the event the chief justice must recuse himself/herself or must absent himself/herself from the hearing for any other reason, the co-chair shall assume the duties of the chief justice and shall be appointed, ad hoc, to fulfill those duties of co-chair. In the event the co-chair must recuse himself/herself or must absent himself/herself from the hearing for any other reason, the chief justice shall appoint a member of the investigation committee, ad hoc, to fulfill the duties of co-chair.

VI. INSTITUTION OF HONOR BOARD PROCEEDINGS

A. Complaint

The honor board shall not institute any proceedings unless a complaint is filed with the honor board.

B. Complainant

Every student, including a member of the honor board, is obligated to file a complaint to report suspected honor code violations. All other members of the College of Law community may file a complaint to report suspected honor code violations.

C. Form

Any complaint alleging a violation of the honor code shall be in writing, shall be signed by the complainant(s), and shall include as much of the following information as possible:

1. The date, time, and place of the alleged violation.

2. The name(s) of the person(s) involved in the alleged violation, including the name(s) of any witness(es).

3. A statement specifying with reasonable particularity the conduct or actions giving rise to a suspected violation of the honor code.

D. Prescription

A complaint must be filed and delivered to the honor board within 10 official class days of the alleged violation or the discovery thereof. No honor board proceedings shall be conducted during the official College of Law examination periods or during the summer session. Prescription is suspended during weekends, school holidays, and the summer session. Prescription for suspected violations occurring during examinations or within 10 days prior to an official examination period is suspended until the first day of the following session. Any suspended violation may, at the discretion of the chief justice, be investigated during the summer session.

E. Submission to Chief Justice and Sufficiency of Complaint

All complaints shall be promptly directed to the chief justice who shall examine the complaint for sufficiency and completeness. A complaint is sufficient if it is signed and is capable of being investigated. An incomplete and insufficient complaint shall be returned to the complainant. If returned, the complainant shall, if possible, supplement the complaint and resubmit it. The complainant shall have 10 days from the return date to resubmit a returned complaint.

F. Investigation Committee

The chief justice shall appoint and refer all complaints to an investigation committee. The investigation committee shall be composed of the co-chair and two additional honor board members. The co-chair shall preside over the investigation committee.

G. Investigation of Alleged Violation

Upon receipt of a complaint, the investigation committee shall promptly notify the charged party of the existence of the complaint and the nature of the alleged violation. Notification will be written, delivered in person, or by certified mail. The identity of the complainant shall not be disclosed at this time. The investigation committee shall conduct its investigation of the complaint as is necessary under the circumstances to substantiate whether probable cause exists. This includes gathering and examining evidence, taking statements, and speaking to any party or with anyone who may possess relevant information. The investigation committee shall conduct its affairs with the utmost discretion and secrecy.

H. Probable Cause

1. At least two members of the investigation committee must concur for a finding of probable cause. Probable cause shall be presumed when the complaint is filed by a member of the faculty. 2. If the investigation committee concludes that probable cause is lacking, the complaint shall be dismissed. The committee shall promptly prepare and file an investigation report with the chief justice. Thereafter, the charged party shall be notified, in writing, of such dismissal and all documents concerning the complaint and investigation shall be destroyed. The complainant shall also be notified of the dismissal. 3. If the investigation committee concludes that probable cause exists, the committee shall promptly prepare and file an investigation report with the chief justice. The investigation report shall detail which provision(s) of the honor code allegedly have been violated and shall describe with reasonable particularity the conduct and circumstances surrounding the alleged violation. The chief justice shall promptly provide the charged party with a copy of the investigation report.

I. Investigation of the Complaint

The investigation of the complaint shall last no longer than 15 days from the filing of the complaint with the chief justice. However, upon unanimous petition to the chief justice by the investigation committee, the chief justice may grant one extension, not to exceed 15 days.

J. Informal Disposition

The investigation committee and the charged party may negotiate a proposed disposition as to merits of the alleged violation and as to the sanction. The proposed disposition is subject to the approval of the hearing panel. If the investigation committee and the charged party agree upon disposition, the co-chair shall prepare a report for the hearing panel outlining the nature of the proposed disposition. The hearing panel may accept, reject, or amend any or all aspects of the proposed disposition. If the proposed disposition is rejected or amended, and the charged party refuses to accept the proposed disposition as amended, the hearing shall proceed.

VII. HONOR BOARD HEARING

A. Composition

The hearing panel shall be composed of the chief justice, the faculty representative, the presenter, and at least four other honor board members. Except for the presenter, members of the investigation committee shall not sit on the hearing panel. The faculty representative and the presenter shall be nonvoting members.

B. Duties

The chief justice shall preside over the hearing, rule on all evidentiary and procedural matters, make all requisite notifications, and prepare or designate someone to prepare the majority opinion. The co-chair shall serve as the presenter. The presenter shall prepare and present the case against the charged party to the hearing panel.

C. Scheduling

Honor board hearings shall be scheduled by the chief justice after consulting with the other members of the hearing panel, the presenter, and the charged party. Hearings shall be held as soon as reasonably practicable following a finding of probable cause. The chief justice shall fix and provide written notice of the time, date, and location of the hearing to all involved parties. If the charged party fails to appear after having received written notice, the hearing may proceed ex parte and a judgment may be rendered.

D. Rights of Charged Party

A student charged with a violation of the honor code has a right to the following:

1. After a determination of probable cause, timely receipt of a copy of the original complaint and the investigation report.

2. Reasonable time to prepare his or her defense.

3. The assistance of a student defense counselor.

4. Timely production for copying and inspection of any tangible evidence that the presenter or hearing panel intends to offer at the hearing.

5. Timely advance notice of the names of all witnesses and of all persons known to have personal knowledge of the events at issue.

6. To present any relevant evidence and to question any witness(es).

7. To waive any right or process provided by the honor code.

8. To the presumption of innocence.

9. To refuse to testify. The hearing panel is entitled to draw reasonable inferences from a charged party’s refusal to testify. Such inferences, however, shall not be the sole basis for a finding of guilt.

10. To admit his or her guilt and waive a formal hearing.

11. The right to a copy of any written rules of procedure promulgated by the honor board.

E. Right to Student Counsel

A charged party has the right to be represented at the hearing by a student defense counselor. The charged party may select his or her own student defense counselor or may have one appointed by the chief justice. A charged party may waive the right to a student defense counselor and act in his or her own behalf.

F. Opening and Closing Statements

The presenter and the charged party shall have the right to make opening and closing statements. The presenter shall open and close first, but has a right of rebuttal after the charged party’s closing.

G. Rules of Evidence

The hearing shall not be subject to statutory or common law rules of evidence, except that irrelevant or unduly repetitious evidence shall be excluded. The hearing panel shall proceed informally and offer a reasonable opportunity for the full presentation of the case against the charged party and the charged party’s defense. Any party giving testimony shall be administered an oath or affirmation by the chief justice to testify truthfully. After the opening statements, the presenter shall offer evidence and testimony of witnesses. The hearing panel and the charged party may question any witness. Once the presenter concludes his/her presentation of the case, the charged party shall have the right to offer evidence, witnesses, and testimony in defense.

H. Witnesses

The presenter and the charged party shall have the right to compel the attendance of witnesses by making a written request to the chief justice at least three days in advance of the scheduled hearing. The chief justice shall notify those witnesses and compel their attendance at the hearing. All witnesses shall be excluded from the hearing when not testifying.

I. Closed Hearing

In order to protect the privacy of the charged party, the hearing shall not be open to the public.

J. Standard of Proof

The standard for determining that a violation of the honor code has been committed shall be clear and convincing evidence.

K. Continuances

The chief justice may grant a continuance or recess for good cause or when essential testimony or evidence is unavailable.

L. Deliberations and Verdict

Following closing arguments, the hearing panel shall deliberate in closed session and shall arrive at a verdict. A majority vote of the voting members present is required for a finding of a violation. A verdict shall be reached by secret ballot. If the charged party is acquitted, the charge shall be dismissed and the entire record, except for the judgment of acquittal, shall be destroyed. If the charged party is found to have committed a violation of the honor code, the hearing panel shall recommend an appropriate sanction to the dean of the College of Law.

M. Notification of Verdict

The charged party and the complainant shall be notified in writing of the verdict of the hearing panel and any sanction recommended to the dean of the College of Law. Such notification shall be issued within 24 hours of the conclusion of the hearing panel meeting.

N. Opinions

If there is a finding of a violation of the honor code, the chief justice or his/her designee shall write the majority opinion supporting the hearing panel’s decision. Any member of the hearing panel may file dissenting or concurring opinions. All opinions are due within 10 days of the conclusion of the hearing and shall be included in the record of the case. The student found in violation of the honor code is entitled to submit a written statement to be included in the record within the same time frame. The entire record shall then be submitted to the dean by the chief justice. Honor board opinions shall not be used as precedent in subsequent honor board hearings.

O. Confidentiality

Except as necessary to implement the honor code, all matters relating to any honor board proceeding are confidential.

P. Recordation

The honor board hearing shall be recorded on video or audio tape. Deliberations of the hearing panel shall not be recorded. Upon written notification of the charged party’s acceptance of the hearing panel’s decision or the exhaustion of appeals, all recordings of the hearing shall be destroyed.

Q. Multiple Violations

Multiple alleged honor code violations arising out of the same transaction or occurrence shall be investigated and, if possible, heard together.

R. Graduating Students

Upon a finding of probable cause by the investigation committee against a student otherwise entitled to graduate, every effort shall be made to dispense with the matter prior to graduation. Prior to the conclusion of the honor board proceedings, a student shall not receive a College of Law degree but may participate in the commencement exercises.

VIII. SANCTIONS

The hearing panel may recommend to the dean the imposition of any of the following sanctions or a combination thereof:

A. Private Reprimand

The student is given a private letter from the honor board or from the dean stating that the student has violated the honor code and that a more severe penalty may be imposed if the student commits a subsequent violation. Although included in the student’s file, this reprimand does not become part of the student’s permanent record and shall be destroyed upon graduation. A private reprimand is a mandatory sanction for any honor code violation.

B. Formal Reprimand

A formal reprimand is identical to a private reprimand except that it is placed in the student’s permanent record and shown on the student’s university transcript and may be disclosed to any or all of the following:

1. Any bar association.

2. Prospective or current employers.

3. Faculty members of the College of Law.

4. Faculty members or College of Law officials of any law school to which the student applies for admission.

C. Disciplinary Probation

Disciplinary probation imposes disabilities on the student for a specified period of time. The terms of the probation may impose any reasonable condition, including but not limited to, restricting, excluding, or suspending the student’s participation in activities such as Moot Court, Law Review, teaching assistant, or holding SBA office.

D. Suspension

Suspension is exclusion from any or all classes, exams, and activities of the College of Law for a specified period of time. The suspension may commence immediately or in the following semester. The effect of immediate suspension is to prevent the student from receiving any course credit for that semester.

E. Expulsion

Expulsion is permanent exclusion from the College of Law.

F. Grade Reduction

Grade reduction is the lowering of a grade or the issuance of a failing grade in connection with a course or graded assignment from which the complaint arose.

G. Credit Cancellation

Credit cancellation is removal or denial of credit for the course or activity associated with the violation.

H. Restitution

Restitution is an order to repair or replace the damaged or destroyed property or to reimburse the owner of the property for any loss.

I. Other/Combination

The hearing panel may recommend any such other sanction or combination of sanctions that it deems appropriate.

IX. APPEALS

A student shall not appeal any hearing panel decision except to the dean of the College of Law.

X. RELATED MATTERS

A. Orientation

Each entering student shall be made aware of the honor code at the College of Law’s annual freshmen orientation program and shall be required to sign the honor code pledge.

B. Adoption/Amendment

A majority vote of the faculty and a majority vote of students voting in an election shall be required to adopt or amend the honor code. The honor code may only be adopted or amended when the College of Law is in regular session.

C. Publication of Honor Board Activities

Upon conclusion of each semester, the chief justice shall publish a report of all honor board activities where any sanction was imposed upon any student. The scope of the report shall be limited to the prohibited conduct of the student and the sanction imposed.

D. Severability

Invalidation of any section of the honor code shall not affect the validity of the remaining parts.

E. Effective Date

This honor code is effective upon adoption or amendment.

F. Contact Information

If you have a question, please contact Honor Board Chief Justice for 2010- 2011, Corey Moll, (504) 289-6964, cdmoll@loyno.edu, or the faculty advisor for 2010- 2011, Professor Dane S. Ciolino, (504) 861-5652, dciolino@loyno.edu.

Scholarly Journals, Oral Advocacy and Honor Board

Honor Board

The Loyola University College of Law Honor Board is an elected body of thirteen students who serve in an advisory capacity to the Dean of the College of Law. The Board is charged with investigating alleged Honor Code violations, holding hearings on alleged violations when appropriate, and recommending sanctions to the Dean of the College of Law when it finds that a violation has been committed. The operations and proceedings of the Honor Board are governed by the provisions of the Loyola University College of Law Honor Code.

The Honor Code is a body of rules and standards which governs students' conduct with respect to all academic matters. It defines prohibited conduct, Honor Board proceedings, and sanctions available in the event of an Honor Code violation.

Scholarly Journals

Loyola Law Review

The Loyola Law Review is a scholarly periodical published four times per year by the editors and members of the Law Review. The Editorial Board extends candidacy for the review based on scholastic achievement at the end of the first year (the top 10 percent of the full-time students and the top 10 percent of the part-time students are invited to candidacy), and based on an annual write-on competition (the top 20 percent of the full-time students and the top 20 percent of the part-time students are invited to participate). Students are not eligible for candidacy unless they have completely fulfilled the course requirements of the first year of the full- or part-time curriculum in which they originally enrolled. The candidates participate in a program of legal research, writing, and editing leading to the publication of the Law Review.

Loyola Journal of Public Interest Law

The Loyola Journal of Public Interest Law (JPIL) is a scholarly journal that is published twice a year by its candidates, members, and editors with the support of the Gillis W. Long Poverty Law Center. The JPIL publishes articles, student comments, and casenotes that provide the legal and academic community with a scholarly perspective on the issues facing the poor, elderly, and children, among others.

Invitations for candidacy are extended by the Editor-in-Chief to students who comprise the top twenty-five percent of the freshman class following the second semester of their first year.

Students may write on to the journal if they are in the top 40 percent of the class as long as they have not begun their senior year of study and have completed 30 semester hours of study. The write on competition will be conducted by the Journal each Spring and is open to students in the top 25 to 40 percent. Candidates must write either a comment or casenote to satisfy membership requirements.

Loyola Maritime Law Journal

The Loyola Maritime Law Journal is a publication which is published annually and provides an avenue for research and writing by students, faculty, and practitioners in the dynamic and exciting field of maritime law. Editorial board members are selected annually from the editorial staff. Students who have completed all requirements of the first year of the full- or part-time curriculums and who are in the top third of their respective programs are invited to apply for candidacy for journal membership. Membership can also be extended to rising second year students who are in the top third of their respective program.

Loyola Law and Technology Annual

The Loyola Law and Technology Annual is a scholarly publication focusing on current legal issues in patents, copyrights, trademarks, and technology law. It is one of the few university publications devoted specifically to these topics. Editorial board members are selected annually among the editorial staff. Staff positions are available to all students in good standing and who are members of the Intellectual Property & High Technology Law Society. The publication is distributed to law schools throughout the United States and to law firms and practitioners specializing in intellectual property law throughout Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. Issues are also sent to various intellectual property firms and institutions overseas.

Articles include materials from faculty, practitioners, and students. Student submissions are typically shorter than those submitted by legal professionals, but are expected to reflect superior writing and legal analysis.

Oral Advocacy

Moot Court

Moot Court, a comprehensive program in which students are given an opportunity to participate in intramural and intercollegiate moot court competition, offers training in the art of oral advocacy and the skills of brief writing.

A moot court board, composed of six senior law students, is responsible for the organization, administration, and selection of members of the national moot court teams who compete with other law schools in the region and nationwide.

Selection for the positions on the teams is made on a competitive basis, with each participant graded individually on each appearance before a bench of judges. Eliminations are made and selections are based on those grades.

Loyola teams have a national reputation for excellence and regularly win or place high in regional and national competitions.

Trial Advocacy

The Trial Advocacy Program, formerly The Board of Advocates/Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA), was organized in the fall of 1982. The purpose of the Trial Advocacy Program is to prepare students for a smooth transition from the study of law to the practice of law.  The objectives of this program are educational and practical. 

Trial Advocacy’s purpose is to develop basic litigation skills that serve any area of legal practice.  Skills are honed in a “controlled clinic” environment using a hands-on teaching style.  The Trial Advocacy Program focuses on learning by doing with practical instruction, demonstrations, feedback and critique used to direct student learning.  Students have the opportunity of representing a “mock” client in a courtroom setting.  The program teaches students the strategy of a trial and how to conduct themselves in a courtroom setting.

Trial Advocacy teaches students how to speak persuasively, how to conduct direct and cross examinations, and how to prepare and present persuasive opening and closing arguments.  Students are also taught how to impeach witnesses, tender experts and introduce evidence.  Students learn to analyze facts and think on their feet while displaying a dynamic courtroom presentation.  Trial Advocacy students have the opportunity to attend and compete in regional, state and national trial advocacy competitions.  Trial Advocacy provides students with the foundation to successfully advocate, in the future, for real clients in the courtroom.

 

Lectures, Special Programs and CLE

The Hon. Robert A. Ainsworth, Jr., Lecture

Friends and admirers of the late Honorable Robert A. Ainsworth, Jr., have endowed a lecture series inviting distinguished speakers to appear annually at the College of Law. Judge Ainsworth served as a judge on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana and as a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. The following distinguished jurists have been guest lecturers: Warren E. Burger, Chief Justice of the United States; William H. Webster, Former Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit and Former Director of the F.B.I.; John R. Brown, Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit; Kenneth F. Ripple, Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit; Charles E. Roemer, III, Former Governor of the State of Louisiana; Lewis F. Powell, Jr., Associate Justice, Retired, of the U.S. Supreme Court; John Minor Wisdom, Senior Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit; Kenneth W. Starr, Former U.S. Solicitor General; Antonin Scalia, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court; Henry A. Kissinger, Former U.S. Secretary of State; Deanell Tacha, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit; Guido Calabresi, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit; Patrick E. Higginbotham, Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit; and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Brendan Brown Natural Law Institute and Lecture

The Brendan Brown Natural Law Institute, established through the generosity of the late Brendan Brown, a faculty member in the College of Law, sponsors a major annual lecture, colloquia, and other scholarly activities in keeping with Professor Brown’s love of the natural law and scholarly discourse.

Bernard J. Ward Jurist in Residence

This program was established through a gift from 1949 Loyola law graduate the Honorable Adrian G. Duplantier in memory of his former classmate, Bernard J. Ward, also a 1949 graduate of the College of Law. Professor Ward served on the faculty at Loyola, Notre Dame, and the University of Texas. He also served for many years as the reporter for the Advisory Committee on Civil Rules for the Judicial Conference of the United States. The program serves to bring an esteemed jurist to the law school to speak to and interact with the students.

Loyola Chapter of American Inns of Court

In 1988, Loyola College of Law organized and sponsored a chapter of the American Inns of Court, which was chartered on June 10, 1988, as the Thomas More Inn of Court. Although sponsored by Loyola, the Inn’s membership consists of prominent judges and lawyers, two Loyola professors, and 12 students. The average membership of the Loyola chapter is 70.

The American Inns of Court movement was chartered in 1985. The founders were seeking to establish in America some of the values of the English Inns of Court. The AIC concept seeks to encourage excellence in the litigation practice, with particular emphasis on the development of litigation skills, ethics, civility, professionalism, and the transfer from one generation to another of the very best traditions of American litigation.

Institute for Continuing Legal Education

The Institute for Continuing Legal Education was founded in 1982. Under the direction of the director and an assistant, the institute provides courses on a wide range of legal topics for the practitioner who desires to keep abreast of the latest legal developments.

The institute sponsors programs during the year and draws registrants from across the country. Practitioners and judges from Louisiana and other parts of the country serve as guest lecturers. The student body and law faculty are invited to attend these courses free of charge.

The Hon. Michaelle Pitard Wynne Distinguished Visiting Professorship Series

The Wynne Visiting Professorships were established in memory of the Hon. Michaelle P. Wynne, a 1970 law graduate. Lead gifts were made by the Hon. Adrian g. Duplantier, L’49, Theodore M. Frois, L’69, the Hon. T. Hartley Kingsmill, L’48, and the Federal Bar Association. The following have served as Wynne visiting professors:

2008 – 2010:  Sanghan Wang
2007 – 2008:  Joel Moneger
2004 – 2005:  Tim O’Brien
2003 – 2004:  Tim O’Brien and Peter Klik
2002 – 2003:  Gabor Hamza and Obrad Stanojevic
2001 – 2002:  Gabor Hamza
2000 – 2001:  Obrad Stanojevic
1999 – 2000:  Gabor Hamza
1998 – 1999:  Saul Litvinoff

College of Law Administrators
College of Law Faculty
  • MARY GARVEY ALGERO, Warren E. Mouledoux Distinguished Professor of Law. B.A., University of New Orleans; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • JOHN F. BLEVINS, Assistant Professor of Law.  B.A., Yale University; J.D., University of Virginia.
  • GEORGE L. BILBE, Professor of Law. B.A., J.D., Louisiana State University.
  • DANE S. CIOLINO, Alvin R. Christovich Distinguished Professor of Law. B.A., Rhodes College; J.D., Tulane University.
  • MITCHELL F. CRUSTO, Professor of Law. B.A., Yale University; M.A., Oxford University; J.D., Yale University.
  • DOMINIQUE M. CUSTOS, Judge John D. Wessel Distinguished Professor of Law. Ph.D., Panthéon-Sorbonne University; Agrégation De Droit Public, Paris.
  • LLOYD L. DRURY, III, Assistant Professor of Law. B.A., University of Virginia; J.D., University of Michigan.
  • ROBERT A. GARDA, JR., Associate Professor of Law. B.A.; J.D., Duke University.
  • DAVID W. GRUNING, William L. Crowe, Sr., Distinguished Professor of Law. B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Middlebury College; J.D., Tulane University.
  • BOBBY M. HARGES, Adams and Reese Distinguished Professor of Law II. B.S., Mississippi State University; J.D., University of Mississippi; LL.M., Harvard University.
  • STEPHEN A. HIGGINSON, Associate Professor of Law. B.A., Harvard University; M.Phil., Cambridge University; J.D., Yale University.
  • PATRICK R. HUGG, John J. McAulay Distinguished Professor of Law. A.B., Spring Hill College; J.D., University of Louisville; LL.M., Tulane University.
  • JOHANNA KALB, Assistant Professor of Law. B.A., Stanford University; M.A., Johns Hopkins University; J.D., Yale University.
  • JAMES M. KLEBBA, Victor H. Schiro Distinguished Professor of Law. B.A., St. John’s University (Minn.); J.D., Harvard University.
  • BLAINE G. LECESNE, Associate Professor of Law. B.A., J.D., Columbia University.
  • CHUNLIN LEONHARD, Associate Professor of Law.  B.A., B.A., Shanghi Foreign Language Institute; M.A., University of Nevada, Reno; J.D., Boston University.
  • CYNTHIA LEPOW, Professor of Law. B.A., Hunter College; J.D., Fordham University; LL.M. in Taxation, New York University.
  • KATHRYN VENTURATOS LORIO, Interim Dean and Leon Sarpy Distinguished Professor of Law. B.A., Tulane University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • JOHN A. LOVETT, Associate Professor of Law. B.A., Haverford College; M.F.A., Indiana University; J.D., Tulane University.
  • LESLIE A. LUNNEY, Associate Professor of Law. B.S.N., University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston; J.D., University of Houston Law Center; LL.M., Tulane University.
  • M. ISABEL MEDINA, Ferris Family Distinguished Professor of Law. B.A., Monash University; M.A., M.F.A., University of New Orleans; J.D., Tulane University.
  • LAWRENCE W. MOORE, S.J., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and ex officio Philip and Eugenie Brooks Distinguished Professor of Law. A.B., M.A., St. Louis University; M.Div., Jesuit School of Theology, Berkeley; J.D., University of Missouri at Kansas City; LL.M., New York University.
  • WILLIAM A. NEILSON, Associate Professor of Law. B.A., University of Pittsburgh; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans; LL.M. in Taxation, New York University.
  • MARKUS G. PUDER, Assistant Professor of Law. J.D., Ludwig-Maximilians University; LL.M., Georgetown University; Ph.D. in Law, Ludwig-Maximilians University.
  • WILLIAM P. QUIGLEY, Director of the Law Clinic and Janet Mary Riley Distinguished Professor of Law. B.A., Purdue University, J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • RAPHAEL J. RABALAIS, JR., Eleanor Legier Sarpy Distinguished Professor of Law. A.B., Princeton University; J.D., Harvard University; M.A., Michigan State University.
  • CRAIG R. SENN, Associate Professor of Law.  B.A., University of Georgia; J.D. , University of North Carolina.
  • KAREN C. SOKOL, Assistant Professor of Law.  B.A., University of Texas; J.D., Yale University.
  • IMRE S. SZALAI, Associate Professor of Law.  B.A., Yale University; J.D., Columbia University.
  • DIAN TOOLEY-KNOBLETT, Jones Walker Distinguished Professor of Law. B.A., Southeastern Louisiana University; J.D., Louisiana State University.
  • SANDI S. VARNADO, Assistant Professor of Law.  B.A., J.D., Louisiana State University.
  • ROBERT R.M. VERCHICK, Wendell H. Gauthier-Michel X. St. Martin Eminent Scholar Chair in Environmental Law And Professor of Law. A.B., Stanford University; J.D., Harvard University.
  • BERNARD KEITH VETTER, Ted and Louana Frois Distinguished Professor of Law for International Studies. B.A., LL.B., Louisiana State University; LL.M., George Washington University.
  • JAMES ETIENNE VIATOR, Adams and Reese Distinguished Professor of Law in Civil Law. B.A., University of New Orleans; J.D., Louisiana State University.
  • MONICA HOF WALLACE, Associate Professor of Law. B.S., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • P. MICHAEL WHIPPLE, Director of Law Library and Professor of Law. B.A., Arizona State University; M.A., Johns Hopkins University; J.D., University of Iowa; M.LL., University of Denver.
  • JEANNE M. WOODS, Henry F. Bonura, Jr., Distinguished Professor of Law. B.A., Antioch College; J.D., Temple University College of Law.

VISITING PROFESSORS

  • EDWARD E. CHASE, Visiting Professor of Law. B.A., Williams College; J.D., Tulane University.

WESTERFIELD FELLOWS

  • CARTER DILLARD, Westerfield Fellow, B.A., Boston College; J.D., Emory University, LL.M. 2010, New York University School of Law.
  • DEREK FINCHAM, Westerfield Fellow, B.A., University of Kansas; J.D., Wake Forest University; Ph.D., University of Aberdeen.
  • J. SHONTAVIA JACKSON, Westerfield Fellow, B.S., Clemson University; J.D., University of Arkansas.
  • ADAM LAMPARELLO, Westerfield Fellow, B.A., University of Southern California; J.D., Ohio State University; LL.M., New York University.
  • CAROL PAULI, Westerfield Fellow, B.A., University of Evansville; M.S., Columbia University; J.D., Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law.  
  • JOANNE SWEENY, Westerfield Fellow, PhD 2009, Queen Mary University of London (expected December 2009); J.D. University of Southern California (Order of the Coif); B.A. 1999, University of California, Irvine.
  • ROBERT F. WEBER, Westerfield Fellow, A.B., Duke University; J.D., University of Michigan.

FACUTLY EMERITI

  • MARCEL GARSAUD, JR., Dean Emeritus of Law. B.B.A., LL.B., Loyola University New Orleans; LL.M., Yale University.
  • JOSEPH H. LAWSON, Professor Emeritus of Law. B.A., Southwestern University, Memphis; J.D., Tulane University.
  • DAVID R. NORMANN, Professor Emeritus of Law. B.A., J.D., Tulane University.
  • GERARD A. RAULT, JR., Professor Emeritus of Law. J.D., Louisiana State University.
  • DENNIS L. ROUSSEAU, Professor Emeritus of Law. A.B., J.D., Loyola University New Orleans; LL.M., B.B.A., Harvard University.  

LAW CLINIC FACULTY

  • CHERYL P. BUCHERT, Assistant Clinical Professor of Law. B.S.; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans; M.Ed., University of New Orleans.
  • RAMONA FERNANDEZ, Assistant Clinical Professor of Law and Associate Director of Clinic.  J.D., 1996, Loyola University New Orleans School of Law; B.A.S., 1988, Loyola University New Orleans; A.A.S., 1979 from Borough of Manhattan Community College, New York City.
  • DAVIDA FINGER, Assistant Clinical Professor of Law.  M.A.,1998, University of Pennsylvania; J.D., 2002, Seattle University Law School. 
  • HIROKO KUSUDA, Assistant Clinical Professor of Law.  B.A., 1985, Tsuda College; J.D., 1993, Tulane University School of Law.
  • R. JUDSON MITCHELL, Assistant Clinical Professor of Law.  B.A., Louisiana State University 1991 (Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa); J.D. 1994, Louisiana State University.
  • LUZ M. MOLINA, Clinical Professor of Law. B.A., University of New Orleans; J.D., Tulane University.
  • WILLIAM P. QUIGLEY, Director of Law Clinic and Janet Mary Riley Distinguished Professor of Law. B.A., Purdue University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • DENISE M. PILIÉ, Visiting Assistant Clinical Professor. B.A., Loyola University New Orleans; J.D., Loyola University College of Law.
  • STEPHEN I. SINGER, Assistant Clinical Professor of Law . B.S., A.B., University of Illinois; J.D., Harvard University.
  • D. MAJEEDA SNEAD, Assistant Clinic Professor. B.A., University of New Orleans; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.

LAW LIBRARY

  • NONA BEISENHERZ, Foreign and International Law Librarian and Associate Professor. B.S., University of Minnesota; M.A. in L.S., University of Washington.
  • BRIAN HUDDLESTON, Senior Reference Librarian and Associate Professor. B.A., University of the State of New York; J.D., University of Alabama; M.Lib., University of Washington.
  • FRANCIS X. NORTON, JR., Reference Librarian and Associate Professor. B.A., University of Notre Dame; J.D., University of Georgia; M.L.I.S., University of South Carolina.
  • MICHELE POPE, Serials/Documents Librarian and Associate Professor. B.F.A., Minnesota College of Art and Design; M.S.L.I.S., Long Island University.
  • ETHELDRA G. SCOGGIN, Reference Librarian and Associate Professor. B.A., Newcomb College/Tulane University; J.D., University of Houston; M.L.I.S., Louisiana State University.
  • CATHERINE WAGAR, Catalog Librarian and Associate Professor. B.F.A., University of Michigan; M.L.I.S., Louisiana State University.
  • P. MICHAEL WHIPPLE, Director of Law Library and Professor of Law. B.A., Arizona State University; M.A., Johns Hopkins University; J.D., University of Iowa; M.LL., University of Denver.

LAW SCHOOL CHAPLAIN

  • ARLENE WILTZ, M.P.S., Loyola University New Orleans; Certified Chaplain, NACC.

ADJUNCT FACULTY 

  • MARGUERITE L. ADAMS, Lecturer in Louisiana Donations and Trusts. B.A., Auburn University; M.C.D., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans. 
  • THOMAS ANZELMO, Lecturer in Trial Practice Seminar. B.A.; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • SCOTT B. ARCENEAUX, Lecturer in Courts in a Federal System. B.A., Washington and Lee University; J.D., Tulane University.
  • RAYMOND G. AREAUX, Lecturer in Trademark, Trade Name, and Unfair Competition Law. B.S., Tulane University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • BARRY W. ASHE, Lecturer in Constitutional Law. B.A., J.D., Tulane University.
  • J. ROBERT ATES, Lecturer in Injured Employee Compensation and Tort Remedies. B.A., Tulane University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • THE HON. CARL J. BARBIER, Lecturer in Trial Practice Seminar. B.A., Southeastern Louisiana University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • CECILIA M. BENNETT, Lecturer in Canon Law. A.A., El Centro Community College (Dallas); B.A., North Texas State University; Master of Church Administration, Licentiate in Canon Law, Catholic University of America.
  • B. KARL BERNARD, Lecturer in Regulation of The Sports Industry Seminar. B.S., University of Southwestern Louisiana; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • The HON. HELEN GINGER BERRIGAN, Lecturer in Law and Religion Seminar and Criminal Law Seminar. B.A., University of Wisconsin; M.A., American University; J.D., Louisiana State University.
  • JOHN BORKOWSKI, Lecturer in Law and Education. B.A., University of Notre Dame; J.D., Northwestern University.
  • KIM M. BOYLE, Lecturer in Evidence/Procedure Seminar. A.B., Princeton; J.D., University of Virginia.
  • TERRENCE L. BRENNAN, Lecturer in Construction Industry Law Seminar. B.Arch., Kansas State University; J.D., University of Kansas.
  • STEPHEN J. BROUSSARD, Lecturer in Title Examination. B.S., University of New Orleans; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • STEPHEN G. BULLOCK, Lecturer in Copyright Law and Mediation and Arbitration. B.S., University of Southwestern Louisiana; J.D., Louisiana State University.
  • JAYE A. CALHOUN, Lecturer in State and Local Taxation. B.S., J.D., Tulane University; LL.M. in Taxation, Georgetown University.
  • ALLEN F. CAMPBELL, Lecturer in Maritime Personal Injury. B.S., Texas A&M University; J.D. University of Houston; M.B.A., Tulane University.
  • TIMOTHY CANOVA, Lecturer in Foreign Studies Program. J.D., Georgetown.
  • MICHAEL D. CARBO, Lecturer in Patent Law. B.S., J.D., Tulane University.
  • JAMES D. CARRIERE, Lecturer in Trial Practice Seminar and Federal Criminal Law. B.A., University of Notre Dame; LL.B., Tulane University; LL.M., University of Notre Dame (London).
  • EDWARD E. CHASE, Lecturer in Trusts and Estates. B.A., Williams College; J.D., Tulane University.
  • RICHARD A. CHOPIN, Lecturer in Trial Practice Seminar. B.B.A., J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • SHAUN G. CLARKE, Lecturer in Administration of Criminal Justice II. B.A., Brown University; J.D., Yale University.
  • WHITNEY L. COLE, Lecturer in Maritime Personal Injury. B.A., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • ANTHONY J. CORRERO, III, Lecturer in Securities Regulation. B.A., Northeast Louisiana State College; J.D., Louisiana State University.
  • ARTHUR A. CRAIS, JR., Lecturer in Marine Insurance.  B.A., J.D., Tulane University.
  • RODI W. CULOTTA, Lecturer in Law and Medicine. B.S., Northeast Louisiana University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • MARK A. CUNNINGHAM, Lecturer in Antitrust Law. B.A., Claremont Colleges; J.D., Tulane University; LL.M., New York University.
  • JAMES G. DALFERES, Lecturer in Estate Planning. B.A., J.D., Tulane University.
  • STEPHEN I. DWYER, Lecturer in Land Development Law. B.A., College of the Holy Cross (Massachusetts); M.A., University of New Orleans; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • BRETT P. FENANSCI, Lecturer in Employee Remedies (Maritime). B.A., University of Georgia; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • THOMAS K. FOUTZ, Lecturer in Mediation and Arbitration. B.S., M.A., Ohio State University; J.D., Tulane University.
  • WILLIAM C. GAMBEL, Lecturer in Contracts/Commercial Law Seminar. B.B.A., J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • The HON. JOSEPH I. GIARRUSSO, JR., Lecturer in Federal Criminal Law. A.B., Georgetown University; M.P.S., Loyola University New Orleans; J.D., Tulane University.
  • SAMUEL A. GIBERGA, Lecturer in Computer Law and Intellectual Property Seminar. B.A., J.D., Tulane University.
  • ANTONIO GIDI, Lecturer in Foreign Studies Program. J.D., Federal University of Bahia, Brazil; LL.M., PUC University of Sao Paulo, Brazil; S.J.D., University of Pennsylvania.
  • JOHN JERRY GLAS, Lecturer in Trial Practice Seminar. B.A., College of the Holy Cross; J.D., Louisiana State University.
  • EILEEN GLEASON, Lecturer in Trial Practice Seminar. B.A., Newcomb College; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • RICHARD GOINS, Lecturer in Law and Medicine and Consumer Law. B.A., Yale University; J.D., Stanford University.
  • REBECCA GANDOLFI GOTTSEGEN, Lecturer in Labor Law. B.A., J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • NEELY SHARP GRIFFITH, Lecturer in Federal Criminal Law.  B.A., Rhodes College; J.D., Tulane University.
  • EDMOND C. HAASÉ, III, Lecturer in Legal Accounting. B.S., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • KEITH B. HALL, Lecturer in Mineral Law. B.S., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • KAREN HALLSTROM, Lecturer in Juvenile Law Seminar. B.S., Augustana College; M.S.W., J.D., Tulane University.
  • GABOR HAMZA, Lecturer in Foreign Studies Program. J.D., Eötvös Lorand University.
  • CHRISTIAN HAUSMANINGER, Lecturer in Foreign Studies Program. LL.M., Harvard Law School, Dr. Jur., University of Vienna Law School, Mag. Iur., University of Vienna Law School.
  • FRANZISKA HAUSMANINGER-TSCHOFEN, Lecturer in Foreign Studies Program. LL.M., Harvard Law School, Dr. Iur., University of Vienna College of Law, Mag. Iur., University of Vienna College of Law.
  • HERBERT HAUSMANINGER, Lecturer in Foreign Studies Program. Dr. Jur., University of Graz.
  • EDWARD T. HAYES, Lecturer in International Law. B.A., University of Colorado at Boulder; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans; LL.M., Georgetown University.
  • C. ELLIS HENICAN, JR., Lecturer in Securities Regulation. A.B., Georgetown; LL.B., Tulane University.
  • STEPHEN J. HERMAN, Lecturer in Advanced Torts Seminar. B.A., Darthmouth College; J.D., Tulane University.
  • LAILA L. HLASS, Lecturer in Immigration Law Seminar. B.A., Rice University; J.D., Columbia University.
  • LILA TRITICO HOGAN, Lecturer in Dialogues in Law and Ethics. B.A., J.D., Louisiana State University.
  • ROBERT E. HOLDEN, Lecturer in Environmental Law Seminar. B.S., Florida State University; J.D., University of Florida.
  • MARGARET M. JOFFE, Lecturer in Trial Practice Seminar. B.A.; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • The HON. CALVIN JOHNSON, Lecturer in Administration of Criminal Justice I and III and Criminal Law Seminar. B.A., Southern University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • DENIS PAUL JUGE, Lecturer in Employee Remedies, Insurance, and Workers’ Compensation. B.A., M.A., University of New Orleans; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • MARTHA J. KEGEL, Lecturer in Constitutional Law. B.A., Drake University; J.D., Stanford University.
  • EDWARD J. KOEHL, Lecturer in Maritime Personal Injury. B.S., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • PETER L. KOERBER, Lecturer in Agency and Partnership and Real Estate Transactions. B.A., Yale College; J.D., University of Chicago.
  • I. HAROLD KORETZKY, Lecturer in Labor Law. B.S., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • URSULA KRIEBAUM, Lecturer in Foreign Studies Program. LL.M., Doctor Jur., University of Vienna.
  • FABRIAN KRINGS, Lecturer in Foreign Studies Program. B.A., London School of Economics; law degree, University Regensburg.
  • MITCHELL J. LANDRIEU, Lecturer in Legislation and Mediation and Arbitration. B.A., Catholic University of America; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • LAMBERT M. LAPEROUSE, Lecturer in Mineral Law. B.S., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • CHARLES E. LECHE, Lecturer in Maritime Personal Injury. J.D., Tulane University.
  • RICHARD K. LEEFE, Lecturer in Evidence and Negotiable Instruments. B.S., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • BRIAN T. LEFTWICH, Lecturer in Legal Accounting and Federal Income Taxation of Corporations. B.B.A., J.D., Loyola University New Orleans; LL.M., Boston University.
  • The HON. IVAN L.R. LEMELLE, Lecturer in Trial Practice Seminar. B.S., Xavier University of Louisiana; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • The HON. HARRY T. LEMMON, Lecturer in Louisiana Code of Civil Procedure. B.S., University of Southwestern Louisiana; LL.B., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • ROBERT T. LEMON, II, Lecturer in Marine Insurance. B.S., United States Merchant Marine Academy; J.D., Tulane University; LL.M., University of London.
  • DAVID J. LUKINOVICH, Lecturer in Income Taxation. B.A., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans; LL.M., New York University.
  • JORGE A. MARTINEZ, M.D., Lecturer in Law and Medicine. B.S., M.D., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • VIKTOR MAYER-SCHONBERGER, Lecturer in Foreign Studies Program. M.Sc., London School of Economics and Political Science; Dr. Iur., University of Salzburg, LL.M. Harvard University, Mag. Iur., University of Salzburg.
  • KEVIN M. MCGLONE, Lecturer in Employee Remedies. B.B.A., University of Notre Dame; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • JEAN MORGAN MEAUX, Lecturer in Community Property. B.A., University of Southwestern Louisiana; M.A., University of Alaska; J.D., Tulane University.
  • ANDREW D. MENDEZ, Lecturer in Trial Practice Seminar.  B.S., University of Maryland; J.D., University of texas.
  • BASSAM Y. MESSAIKE, Lecturer in Immigration and Nationality Law. LL.B., Lebanese University; LL.M., Tulane University.
  • DAVID J. MESSINA, Lecturer in Creditors' Rights and Bankruptcy. B.M., J.D., M.B.A., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • STANLEY A. MILLAN, Lecturer in Environmental Law and Administrative Law. B.A., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans; LL.M., George Washington University; S.J.D., Tulane University.
  • JAMES D. MORGAN, Lecturer in Labor Law. B.A., State University of New York; J.D., Tulane University.
  • NORMAN A. MOTT, III, Lecturer in Labor Law. A.B., Princeton University; J.D., University of Mississippi.
  • The HON. SALVADORE T. MULÉ, Lecturer in Juvenile Law Seminar. B.A., Notre Dame Seminary; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • TIM O’BRIEN, Distinguished Visiting Professor in Constitutional Law Seminar. B.A., Michigan State University; M.A., University of Maryland; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • PAUL G. PASTOREK, Lecturer in International Law Seminar. B.B.A., J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • ELISKA M. PLUNKETT, Lecturer in Employment Discrimination. B.A., University of Cincinnati; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • DIANA L. RACHAL, Lecturer in Creditors’ Rights and Bankruptcy. B.S., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans; LL.M., Tulane University.
  • JEROME J. RESO, JR., Lecturer in Louisiana Probate, Emeritus. B.B.A., LL.B., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • BRYAN C. REUTER, Lecturer in Computer Law and Intellectual Property Law Seminar. M.S., Tulane University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • GAYLE A. REYNOLDS, Lecturer in Louisiana Code of Civil Procedure. B.S., University of Georgia; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • JOHN HENRY ROONEY, JR., Lecturer in Foreign Studies Program. B.A., University of New Orleans; J.D., M.P.A., University of Texas at Austin.
  • STEPHEN ROSE, Lecturer in Labor Law. B.S., University of Texas; J.D., University of Houston.
  • DANIEL ROSEN, International Program Director for Japan. B.A., Trinity University; M.A., University of Texas; J.D., Southern Methodist University; LL.M., S.J.D., Yale University.
  • DIONNE M. ROUSSEAU, Lecturer in Business Organizations. B.A., Georgetown University; J.D. University of Chicago.
  • DOUGLAS L. SALZER, Lecturer in Legal Accounting and Federal Income Taxation of Corporations. B.S., Louisiana State University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans; LL.M. in Taxation, University of Florida.
  • LLOYD N. SHIELDS, Lecturer in Louisiana Code of Civil Procedure. B.A. Arch., J.D., Tulane University.
  • JOHN F. SHREVES, Lecturer in Business Planning Seminar. B.S., University of Notre Dame; M.A.T., Augustana College; J.D., University of South Dakota; LL.M., University of Florida.
  • RANDALL A. SMITH, Lecturer in Criminal Law. B.A., Amherst College; J.D., Yale University.
  • WILLIAM J. SOMMERS, Lecturer in Trial Practice Seminar. B.A., J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • OBRAD STANOJEVIC, Lecturer in Foreign Studies Program. LL.B., Ph.D., University of Belgrade.
  • MARK C. SURPRENANT, Lecturer in Environmental Law Seminar. B.A., Fordham University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • DEAN A. SUTHERLAND, Lecturer in Insurance. B.A., University of New Orleans; J.D., Louisiana State University.
  • ERNEST E. SVENSON, Lecturer in Moot Court. B.A., Tulane University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
  • JAMES R. SWANSON, Lecturer in Trial Practice Seminar. B.A., J.D., Tulane University.
  • CHRISTIAN TEMMEL, Lecturer in Foreign Studies Program. Mag. iur., Dr. iur., University of Vienna; M.B.A., University of Oxford.
  • WILLIAM T. TÊTE, Lecturer in Comparative Law. B.A., J.D., Louisiana State University; LL.M., Yale University.
  • TANIA TETLOW, Lecturer in Constitutional Law. B.A., Tulane University; J.D., Harvard University.
  • RENITA KAUL THUKRAL, Lecturer in Law and Education Seminar. B.A., Stanford University; J.D., Yale University. 
  • CARLA M. TIMMONS, Lecturer in Mediation and Arbitration. B.S., Louisiana State University; J.D., LL.M., Tulane University.
  • NICHOLAS TRENTICOSTA, Lecturer in Capital Punishment and the Constitution. B.A., University of New Orleans; J.D., Louisiana State University.
  • BASILE J. UDDO, Lecturer in the Legal Profession. B.B.A., Loyola University New Orleans; J.D., Tulane University; LL.M., Harvard University.
  • FRANK R. WHITELY, III, Lecturer in Workers' Compensation. B.S., J.D., Louisiana State University.
  • DELCIANNA J. WINDERS, Lecturer in Environmental Law Seminar. B.A., University of California at Santa Cruz; J.D., New York University. 
  • GORDON F. WILSON, JR., Lecturer in Construction Industry Law Seminar. B.A., LL.B, Tulane University. 
  • BRET D. WISE, Lecturer in Admiralty. B.S., United States Naval Academy; J.D., Tulane University.
  • WALTER F. WOLF, III, Lecturer in Regulation of the Entertainment Industries Seminar and International Law Seminar. B.A., Trinity University; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans.
Skills Curriculum Faculty

Ryan Adams, Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein McAlister & Hilbert, L.L.C.
Robert Angelle, Attorney at Law
The Honorable Kerry J. Anzalone, Judge, Social Security Administration
Michael P. Arata, Montgomery, Barnett, Brown, Read, Hammond & Mintz, L.L.P.
James B. Arey, Ph.D., LPC, Special Operations Commander Negotiation Team, NOPD
Stacy Auzenne, The Auzenne Law Firm
Johanna Averill, Gilsbar, Inc.
Wayne M. Babovich, Babovich & Spedale
Paul R. Baier, George W. Armstrong, Jr. Professor of Law, LSU Law Center
Karla M. Baker, Regan & Associates
Glenda M. Barkate, MAPS, Inc.
Nona K. Beisenherz, International Law Librarian, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law
Kevin G. Boitmann, Attorney at Law
Philip J. Borne, Christovich & Kearney, LLC
William Boustead, Attorney at Law
Howard T. Boyd, III, Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, LLC
Alan G. Brackett, Mouledoux, Bland, Legrand & Brackett, L.L.C.
David D. Bravo, Law Offices of Leo J. Palazzo
Andrew I. Brown, Attorney at Law
Edward F. Bukaty, III, Attorney at Law
Elwood F. Cahill, Jr., Sher, Garner, Cahill, Richter, Klein, McAlister & Hilbert L.L.C.
Michael G. Calogero, Attorney at Law
Leon Cannizaro, District Attorney, City of New Orleans
Diana Calhoun Carroll, Attorney at Law
Christopher E. Cenac, MD
Richard A. Chopin, Chopin, Wagar, Cole, Richard, Reboul & Kutcher, L.L.P.
Sandi Cosby, LA State Bar Association
Amanda W. Cox, Peragine & Lorio, LLC
Deborah Daigle Davis, Elkins PLC
Leonard D. D’Angelo, Attorney at Law
Robert J. David, Gainsburg, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer, L.L.C.
Mark J. Davis, Eveline, Davis & Phillips
Joshua A. Decuir, Fishman, haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, L.L.P.
S. Guy Delaup, Delaup & Associates, APLC
Bobby J. Delise, Delise & Hall
Elaine Deloach, Director, Office of Disability Adjudication & Review, Social Security Administration
Donald C. Douglas, Juge Napolitano Guilbeau Ruli Frieman & Whiteley, A PLC
Andrew Duffy, Orleans Public Defenders
Gregory P. Eveline, Eveline, Davis & Phillips
Val P. Exnicios, Liska, Exnicios & Nungesser
Davida Finger, Clinical Professor, Loyola New Orleans College of Law
Marion D. Floyd, Attorney at Law
Thomas F. Gardner, Gardner & Kewley
Kirk Gasperecz, Attorney at Law
Dominic J. Gianna, Middleberg, Riddle & Gianna
The Hon. Joseph Giarrusso, Jr., Magistrate Commissioner (retired) Div. 5
Thomas J. Grace, MAPS, Inc.
Kristian A. Gerrets, KPMG
The Hon. Stephen Gralmann, Administrative Law Judge, Office of Disability & Adjudication & Review, Social Security Administration
Barry Grodsky, Chair of the Committee on the Profession, LA State Bar Association
The Hon. John C. Grout, Jr., Judge, Department of Labor
Linda S. Harang, Law Offices of Linda S. Harang, LLC
Warren Horn, Heller, Draper, Hayden, Patrick & Horn, L.L.C.
D. Douglas Howard, Howard, Reed & Taylor
Brian Huddleston, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law
The Hon. Bernette Joshua Johnson, Associate Justice, Supreme Court, 7th Dist.
The Hon. Calvin Johnson, Judge (retired), Criminal District Court, Div. E
William N. King, Louisiana State Bar Association
Brian M. Klebba, Assistant U.S. Attorney, United States Attorney’s Office, EDLA
Neal J. Kling, Sher, Garner, Cahill, Richter, Klein, McAlister & Hilbert, L.L.C.
The Hon. Nancy Amato Konrad, Chief Judge, Juvenile Court, Div. C
I. Jay Krieger, Krieger & Krieger (deceased)
Robert A. Kutcher, Chopin, Wagar, Richard & Kutcher, L.L.P.
The Hon. Madeleine M Landrieu, Judge, Civil District Court
Roger J. Larue, MAPS
Erica A. Lee, Law Offices of Matt Greenbaum
The Hon. Ivan L.R. Lemelle, Judge, U.S. District Court
The Hon. Harry T. Lemmon, Supreme Court of Louisiana (retired)
Andrea S. Lestelle, Lestelle & Lestelle
Terrence J. Lestelle, Lestelle & Lestelle
Adolph J. Levy, Attorney at Law
Nell I. Lipscomb, The Mediation Center
Kelly L. Lebreton, Attorney at Law
Erin F. Lorio, Peragine & Lorio, LLC
Joseph H. McCusker, III, Attorney at Law
Stacey Williams Marcelle, Attorney at Law
Herbert W. Marks, Jr., MD
Loretta G. Mince, Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson LLP
Kim E. Moore, Irvin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore, L.L.C.
Craig Mordock, Butler Mordock
Edith Henderson Morris, Law Office of Edith Henderson Morris
James R. Morton, Taggert, Morton, Ogden, Staub, Rougelot & O’Brien
David S. Moyer, Attorney at Law
Francis X. Norton, Jr., Loyola University New Orleans College of Law
Eric J. O’Bell, Law Offices of Eric J. O’Bell, LLC
Kurt A. Offner, Law Offices of Robert D. Ford, Hanover Staff Counsel
John W. Redmann, Law Offices of John W. Redmann
Joseph C. Peiffer, Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, L.L.P.
Charles P. Plattsmier, Chief Disciplinary Counsel, LA State Bar Association
Martin E. Regan, Jr., Regan & Associates
Megan C. Riess, Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis, & Swanson, L.L.P.
Al J. Robert, Law Office of Al J. Robert, Jr.
Stephen R. Rue, Attorney at Law
Sherif K. Sakla, M.D., Attorney at Law
Etheldra Scoggin, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law
Steven C. Serio, Correro, Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Walmsley, Willis & Swanson, LLP
Edward P. Sharfenberg, Fishman, Haygood, Phelps, Wa
The Hon. Ronald J. Sholes, Adams and Reese, L.L.P.
The Hon. Ethel Simms Julien, Chief Judge, Civil District Court
The Hon. Rosemary Ledet, Judge, Civil District Court, Section 15, Div. B.
Williams J. Sommers, Jr., Duncan, Courington and Rydberg, L.L.P.
Renee F. Smith, Goins Aaron, A.P.L.C.
Dale Standifer, Executive Director, Metropolitan Center for Women & Children
Mark C. Surprenant, Adams and Reese, L.L.P.
Monica T. Surprenant, Baldwin & Haspel
Ernest E. Svenson, Svenson Law Firm
Sue Tart, Louisiana Fourth Circuit Court of Appeal
Charles O. Taylor, Chehardy, Sherman, Ellis, Murray, Recile, Griffith, Stakelum & Hayes L.L.P.
The Hon. Max N. Tobias, Jr., Louisiana Fourth Circuit Court of Appeal
Evangeline A. Vavrick, Attorney at Law
Eve Vavrick, Attorney at Law
Barbara Malik Weller, Waller & Associates
Lynne W. Wasserman, Attorney at Law
Conrad S.P. Williams, III, St. Martin, Williams & Bourque, Attorneys at Law
Sharonda R. Williams, Sher Garner Cahill Richter Klein & Hilbert, L.L.C.
Stephen L. Williamson, Steen & Williamson, L.L.C.
Scott G. Wolfe, Jr., Wolfe Law Firm

 

College of Law Visiting Committee

Officers

Mary H. Becnel, Chair: Judge, 40th Judicial District Court 2003/2012

Allain F. Hardin,Vice Chair: Fransen & Hardin 2000/2012

Elwood F. Cahill, Secretary: Sher, Garner, Cahill, Richter, Klein, LLC 2006/2012

Members

Morris Bart III, Morris Bart, PLC 2004/2011

Herman L. Bastian, Jr, Bastian & Associates /2012

Allan Berger, Allan Berger & Associates 2000/2012

David F. Bienvenu, Simon, Peragine, Smith & Redfearn, LLP 1994/2012

Philip S. Brooks, Retired 2001/2011

Harold A. Buchler, Jr, Buchler & Buchler 1986/2012

Karl J. Connor, BP America, Inc. 2000/2012

Timothy S. Cragin, Entergy Corporation /2010

Michael G. Crow, Chehardy, Sherman, Ellis, Breslin, Murray & Recile 2004/2011

Robert J. David, Gainsburgh, Benjamin, David, Meunier & Warshauer 2000/2012

Clancy J. DuBos III, Gambit Weekly 2006/2012

Frank C. Dudenhefer, Cummings, Cummings & Dudenhefer 2000/2012

Mary Dumestre, Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC /2012

Brett M. Dupuy, Brett M. Dupuy, APLC /2011

Donna D. Fraiche, Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz 2006/2012

Celeste A. Gauthier, Gauthier, Houghtaling & Williams, LLP 2005/2011

Gary G. Hebert, McGlinchey Stafford, PLLC /2012

Warren Horn, Heller, Draper, Hayden, Patrick & Horn /2011

Morton H. Katz, Herman, Herman, Katz & Cotlar 2006/2012

Nancy Amato Konrad, Judge, Jefferson Parish Juvenile Court 2004/2011

Robert A. Kutcher, Chopin, Wagar, Cole, Richard, Reboul & Kutcher 2001/2011

Madeleine M. Landrieu-Sensenbrenner, Judge, District Court Division E 1994/2012

Kelly McNeil Legier, Director of Member Outreach & Diversity, LSBA 1999/2012

M. Lauren Lemmon, Judge, 29th Judicial District, Division D 2003/2012

Philip D. Lorio III, Deutsch, Kerrigan & Stiles 2000/2012

E. Ralph Lupin, MD, Middleberg, Riddle & Gianna 1995/2011

Thomas J. Lutkewitte, Favret, Demarest, Russo & Lutkewitte 2007/2010

Michael A. McGlone, Kean Miller Hawthorne D'Armond McGowan & Jarman /2012

Kim Moore, Irwin, Fritchie Urquhart & Moore, LLC 2004/2011

Edwin R. Murray, Murray, Darnell & Associates, LLC; Louisiana State Senate 2000/2012

Suzanne Jones Myers, Young, Richaud & Myers, LLC /2012

Kern A. Reese, Judge, Civil District Court, Division “L” – Section 6 /2010

Lee C. Reid, Adams & Reese, LLP 2003/2012

Charles L. Rice, Jr, Barrasso Usdin Kupperman Freeman & Sarver, LLC 2003/2012

Sherif K. Sakla, MD, Sakla Law Firm 2003/2012

John R. Sarpy, Whitewater Gardens (Sunset, SC) 2000/2012

Ronald Sholes, Adams & Reese, LLP 2001/2011

Louis J. St. Martin, Law Office of Louis St. Martin (Houma, LA) 2007/2010

Ernest E. Svenson, Svenson Law 2001/2011

Frank J. Varela, Pan American Insurance Company 2006/2012

P. Donald White, Jr, White Companies (Alexandria, LA) 2006/2012

Conrad S. P. Williams III, St. Martin, Williams & Bourque (Houma, LA) 2000/2012

Active Members: 45
 

Emertius Members

William D. Aaron, Jr, Goins, Aaron 2001

Stephen M. Barbas, Barbas, Koenig, Nunez, Sanders & Butler, PA (Tampa, FL) 2004

Daniel E. Broussard, Jr, Broussard, Bolton, Halcomb & Vizzier (Alexandria, LA) 1998

Patrick J. Browne, Montgomery, Barnett, Brown, Read, Hammond & Mintz 2003

Peter J. Butler, Breazeale, Sachse & Wilson 1997

Pascal F. Calogero, Jr, Retired Chief Justice, Louisiana Supreme Court 1999

Kenneth M. Carter, Attorney at Law 2001

Thomas A. Casey, Jones, Walker, Waechter, Poitevent, Carrère & Denègre 1998

Herbert W. Christenberry, Jr, Attorney at Law 2006

Stephen I. Dwyer, Dwyer & Cambre 1998

Norman C. Francis, President, Xavier University 1995

Theodore M. Frois, General Counsel, ExxonMobil, USA (Houston, TX) 1987

Marcel Garsaud, Jr, Emeritus Professor of Law, Loyola University College of Law; Gordon Arata McCollam Duplantis & Eagan, LLP 1999

Thomas J. Grace, Attorney at Law 1999

Lawrence F. Henneberger, Arent, Fox, Kinter, Plotkin & Kahn (Washington, DC) 1998

Thomas H. Kingsmill, Jr, Retired Judge, U.S. Bankruptcy Court 1998

Jeannette T. Knoll, Associate Justice, Louisiana Supreme Court 1999

Edward J. Koehl, Jr, Jones, Walker, Waechter, Poitevent, Carrère & Denègre 1999

Moon Landrieu, Retired Judge, Louisiana Court of Appeals, Fourth Circuit 1999

Ivan L.R. Lemelle, Judge, U.S. District Court 2003

Harry T. Lemmon, Retired Associate Justice, Louisiana Supreme Court 2000

Mary Ann Vial Lemmon, Judge, U.S. District Court 2003

Michael M. Noonan, McGlinchey Stafford 1998

Jerome J. Reso, Jr, Baldwin, Haspel, Burke & Mayer 1995

Michael X. St. Martin, St. Martin Williams & Bourque (Houma, LA) 1995

Mark C. Surprenant, Partner in Charge, Adams & Reese, LLP 2003

Evangeline M. Vavrick, Vavrick Law Firm 1999

T. Kenneth Watkins, Watkins Walker & Eroche (Houma, LA) 1998

Emeritus Members: 29

 

 

Programs of Study

The Programs of Study of Loyola University New Orleans College of Law have been shaped by Louisiana’s unique role as the only state of the United States having a legal system based on significant elements of both the civil law and common law traditions. The civil law was imported into Louisiana during the eighteenth century, when it was first a colony of France, and later, of Spain. After the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, Louisiana began to adopt a number of common law institutions and concepts, which have endured to the present.

The civil law tradition is derived from classical Roman law, as supplemented by medieval canon law and customary law. In most contemporary civil law jurisdictions, legislatively-enacted codes form the basis of legal study and practice. In the civil law tradition, the role of the academic jurist is at least as important as the role of the judge in defining and interpreting the law. The civil law influence in Louisiana is evident in such areas of private law as property, obligations, persons, successions, and donations.

The common law tradition originated in England in the late twelfth century, when three different common law courts began to evolve. The common law has traditionally emphasized the role of the judge in defining and interpreting the law, while according a significant fact-finding role to juries. In England, the legal profession itself assumed primary responsibility for legal education and training, thus limiting the influence of academic jurists and the universities in the development of the common law. In England, the common law courts and the Court of Equity evolved along parallel, yet separate paths, resulting in distinctly different remedies and concepts. Most contemporary common law jurisdictions have adopted codes on a very limited basis, usually only in the area of commercial law. The common law influence in Louisiana is evident in such areas of private law as torts and trust, and in all areas of public law, including state constitutional law, criminal law and procedure, civil procedure, and evidence.

The commercial law of Louisiana contains significant elements of both the civil law (as in the law of sales) and the common law (resulting from the adoption by Louisiana of most portions of the Uniform Commercial Code, which has been enacted by all of the other states of the United States).

As a result of Louisiana’s unique legal heritage, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law has developed three Programs of Study:

  1. The Civil Law Program for full-time students in the Day Division;
  2. The Civil Law Program for part-time students in the Evening Division; and
  3. The Common Law Program for full-time students in the Day Division.

The two Civil Law Programs are designed to prepare students for the practice of law in Louisiana and to provide a foundation for a legal career in any civil law or mixed law jurisdiction.

The Common Law Program is designed to prepare students for the practice of law in any of the common law states of the United States and in the District of Columbia. It also provides a foundation for a legal career in any of the other common law jurisdictions of the world, such as England, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.

Certificates in Civil Law and Common Law

The College of Law offers a program granting a Certificate in Civil Law and a Certificate in Common Law. This unique certification program is based upon Loyola’s dual common law and civil law curricula and encourages substantial study of the two dominant Western legal systems. A student choosing to complete the requirements for the certificate acquire an understanding of the conceptual framework of each legal system. In an era of increasing recognition of the international marketplace, an individual with this understanding is well-equipped to deal with legal issues from the perspective of the two legal systems that prevail throughout much of the world.

Students who desire to obtain either certificate should notify the assistant dean of admissions no later than May of their first year. For requirements, Academic Requirements and Regulations.

Certificate in International Legal Studies

The certificate program in International Legal Studies is designed to prepare law students for professional careers in the emerging global economy. A student choosing to complete the requirements for this certificate will acquire an understanding of the conceptual framework of the international legal order and will receive a special certificate at graduation. For requirements, view Academic Requirements and Regulations.

Certificate in Environmental Law

This certificate program is designed to recognize students who commit themselves to this fascinating and challenging area of study. But it is also intended to leave room to take other important core courses. We strongly believe that one must first be a good lawyer before one can become an effective environmental lawyer. For requirements, Academic Requirements and Regulations.

Certificate in Taxation

The certificate program in Taxation is designed to assist law students who wish to prepare for a LL.M. in Taxation. The certificate is not in lieu of a Masters in Taxation. For requirements, Academic Requirements and Regulations.

International Programs

Loyola University New Orleans College of Law’s emphasis on comparative and international law has generated curricular innovation and numerous programs offering students and faculty opportunities to study and develop expertise in this growing field.  In addition to its many foreign summer programs, the College of Law now annually sponsors:

  • A traveling seminar in Europe that tours the leading institutions of the European Union;
  • A seminar/tour in Istanbul, Turkey that explores the roots of civil law; 
  • The Annual Visiting Michaelle Pitard Wynne program that brings in a distinguished foreign scholar each year to offer a special seminar in current issues of international law;
  • An International Arbitration Moot competition in Vienna, Austria involving Loyola faculty and a team of Loyola students; and
  • Regular visits of law faculty between Loyola and many foreign institutions.

This burgeoning activity produces many opportunities for the study of international and comparative law, including frequent scholarly events, such as public addresses and faculty colloquia, and many faculty publications in comparative and international law journals. Located in the only Civil Code jurisdiction in the United States, Loyola is one of the few law schools in the world with both Civil Code and Common Law Curriculum. This makes Loyola uniquely qualified to introduce American law students to the Civil Law tradition, prevalent in much of the world.

Foreign Summer Programs

Loyola’s foreign summer programs are an important component of Loyola College of Law’s international focus. Loyola currently sponsors foreign programs in six foreign countries: Austria (in cooperation with the University of Vienna Law School); Hungary (in cooperation with the Eötvös Loránd University College of Law in Budapest); Mexico (a three-week program in Cuernavaca); Brazil (in conjunction with the State University of Rio de Janeiro Faculty of Law); Costa Rica (in conjunction with the University of Costa Rica College of Law); and Russia (in conjunction with Moscow State University). These sessions offer a broad selection of comparative and international law courses, with particular emphasis on those relevant to the host countries’ legal systems and cultures. In summer 2009, more than 150 students throughout the United States participated in these programs. Loyola’s foreign summer programs are open to students in good standing from any accredited law school.

Vienna, Austria

The University of Vienna College of Law is the site of Loyola’s largest foreign summer program. Six one-credit-hour seminars and one three-credit-hour comparative law course are taught by University of Vienna and Loyola College of Law faculty. Seminars vary each year but a typical representation from last summer included these: Introduction to European Union Law, Comparative Mental Helath Law, International Courts & Tribunals, Core Issues in European Corporate Law, Comparative Judicial Process, Comparative Human Rights, and Comparative Health Regulation and Individual Liberties. During 2009, 82 students studied at Loyola’s Vienna program.

In Vienna, visits to government institutions and special lectures complement the law curriculum. German-speaking participants have the opportunity to serve internships in Vienna law firms. Optional after-class walking and streetcar tours highlight the cultural life of Vienna. Side trips to Salzburg, Prague, and Venice enhance the weekends during the program.

Moscow, Russia

Loyola College of Law, in cooperation with Moscow State University, sponsor a three-week summer program in Moscow, Russia. The program affords students the opportunity to study law in a historic country whose legal, economic, social, and cultural institutions are undergoing a dramatic transition. Witnessing the evolution of the new Russian legal system and economy provides firsthand experience in comparative law. Courses, supplemental lectures, and tours allow students not only to study substantive legal issues, but also to compare the emerging Russian legal system with options from the United States and other common law and civil law jurisdictions.

Budapest, Hungary

In conjunction with the Eötvös Loránd University College of Law, the Budapest Summer Legal Studies Program presents a two-week, two-course comparative law offering for those interested in the evolving political and legal landscape of central Europe. Participants have the opportunity to witness firsthand the dramatic evolution of this dynamic Central European country.

The comparative law curriculum is complemented by visits to key legal institutions in Budapest, including the Supreme Court, the Parliament, and an international law firm. Classes are conducted at the distinguished Eötvös Loránd University law facility, conveniently located in the downtown area of the city, and students reside nearby in the university neighborhood.

Programs in Latin America

Loyola College of Law and Louisiana's sister Spanish colony have historically had close legal ties with Latin America. The Civil Code of Louisiana is similar to the Civil Codes of the respective Latin American countries, and in fact, was used as a source in the drafting of many of them. Because of this, Loyola has a greater number of Summer Programs in Latin America than any other American law school, and our programs are the longest running programs in each of the countries where they are offered.

Cuernavaca, Mexico

Loyola offers a three-week summer session in Cuernavaca, Mexico. Famous for its year-round agreeable climate, Cuernavaca is smaller and more manageable than Mexico City, yet is less than an hour away from the capital’s attractions via modern buses. Courses vary from year to year and include such subjects as: Comparative Law, Civil Law Tradition, Immigration Law, Regulation of International Trade, Comparative Administration of Criminal Justice, and Comparative Civil Procedure.

All courses include comparative instruction regarding Mexico’s legal system. Classes are taught by faculty from Loyola and other American and foreign law schools. The Summer Program in Mexico offers interaction with the Mexican legal community, including tours of judicial, legal, and government offices and a conference with the Justices of the Supreme Court of the State of Morelos. In addition, the program offers one of the only credit internships in a foreign court, where students fluent in Spanish work in the trial courts of the State of Morelos, under the supervision of the Supreme Court of the State Supreme Court.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Loyola's program in Brazil, offered in cooperation with the State University of Rio Faculty of Law, features a two-credit-hour course in Latin American Legal Systems. The course focuses on all elements of Brazil’s legal system: the substantive private law, judicial method, the judiciary, the legal profession, legal education, governmental structure, and public law. Classroom instruction is enhanced by visits to one of Brazil's leading law firms, the State University of Rio de Janeiro College of Law (where select classes are held), and various courts in the Brazilian judicial system. These visits allow opportunities for interaction with Brazilian attorneys, law students, and judges, and gives an overview of the entire Latin American legal system, with Brazilian model. We also offer another two-credit course such as Comparative Civil Procedure or Comparative Environmental Law, that focuses on a comparison of the Law of Brazil with that of other jurisdictions. In addition, two one hour courses (such as or Human Rights in the Global Marketplace) International Commercial Arbitration with an emphasis on Latin American practice are offered.

San Jose, Costa Rica

Loyola's program in Costa Rica, offered in cooperation with the University of Costa Rica College of Law, also offers a two-credit-hour course in Latin American Legal Systems. The course focuses on all elements of Costa Rica’s legal system: the substantive private law, judicial method, the judiciary, the legal profession, legal education, governmental structure, and public law. Classroom instruction is enhanced by visits to one of Costa Rica’s leading law firms, the University of Costa Rica College of Law (where classes are held), and various courts in the Costa Rican judicial system. It is designed to give an overview of the entire Latin American Legal System, with Costa Rica as a model. We also offer another two-credit course such as Comparative Civil Procedure or Comparative Environmental Law, that focuses on a comparison of the Law of Brazil with that of other jurisdictions. In addition, a one hour course in International Commercial Arbitration with an emphasis on Latin American practice is offered.

Annual European Union Seminar Tour

Each December since 1998, Loyola has offered a tour of the principal institutions of the European Union (EU) for students studying this developing area of transnational law. Arriving in Brussels, the group participates in lectures and tours at the Council of the European Union and the European Commission, as well as an evening reception hosted by an American law firm. The group then travels by rail to Luxembourg to witness an oral argument at the European Court of Justice (with a preliminary case briefing and instruction in the court’s procedures). The tour then travels to Strasbourg, France, featuring tours and instruction at the European Parliament and the Council of Europe’s Court of Human Rights. The group then travels to Paris for a final weekend and return flights home.

Istanbul Seminar Tour

Each May since 2004, after final examinations and before the Summer Session begins, Loyola has offered a eight-day Seminar/Tour of Istanbul which explores the roots of Civil Law.  The group travels to Istanbul, the former “Constantinople,” which was the capital of the Roman/ Byzantine Empire from 330 AD to 1453 AD. There are guided walking tours of the magnificent church of Hagia Sophia, (built by the Emperor Justinian, whose massive compilation of Roman law, the Corpus Iuris Civilis, has inspired codification efforts up to the present era). The Blue Mosque the Hippodrome, and Basilica cistern.  The Seminar/Tour continues with presentations on the contemporary legal system and legal education in Turkey and a leisurely cruise up the enchanting Bosphorus, the boundary between Europe and Asia Minor.  The groups then travels to the constal city of Kusadasi and vistis the famous archaeological site of Ephesus.  The Seminar/Tour concludes with the ferry trip to the Greek island of Samos, home of Phythagoras.

International Moot Court Team

Since 1995, Loyola’s Commercial Law Arbitration students have been invited to compete in the Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot Court Competition at the University of Vienna College of Law in Austria. The invitational competition features teams from five continents and 28 countries, and more than 500 students. This Moot Court competition brings together 200 lawyers, jurists, and professors from around the world.

 

Certificates in Comparative and International Law

As described further in this bulletin, Loyola law students may also pursue special certification in the area of international law.

Visiting Faculty

In recent years, Loyola has hosted a number of distinguished visiting professors from such countries as Austria, Canada, the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Greece, Hungary, and the United Kingdom. Loyola faculty have served as visiting professors and lecturers in Australia, Austria, Brazil, Costa Rica, the Czech Republic, the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Finland, France, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Morocco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, Slovenia, and the United Kingdom. In addition, Loyola faculty members have published books, articles, and papers with presses and learned journals in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Hungary, Italy, and Malaysia.

International Programs Advisory Board

A special advisory board of foreign law scholars and practitioners has been established to offer guidance to Loyola students and faculty in pursuing studies and research in international and comparative law.

Juris Doctor - Joint Degree Programs

JURIS DOCTOR/MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The J.D./M.B.A. program is designed for those students seeking advanced education in business administration in addition to education in the law.

Applicants for the J.D./M.B.A. program must apply separately to the College of Law and to the College of Business graduate programs and be accepted individually to both. The schools together will determine whether the applicant is eligible for the combined program. The J.D./M.B.A. applicant must present satisfactory evidence of having earned an undergraduate degree as well as satisfactory completion of 30 – 36 credit hours of designated undergraduate business course requirements.

Normal degree requirements of 90 credit hours (juris doctor) and 33 credit hours in 700- and 800-level coursework (master of business administration) are complemented and reduced to 81 credit hours (juris doctor) and 24 credit hours (master of business administration). Each program is reduced by nine semester hours as each program accepts, as part of its requirement, nine semester hours from the other program.

Upon completion of the program, the student will be awarded two separate degrees. The requirements for both must be completed, however, before either degree can be awarded.  Students participating in the joint program must maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.30 (4.0 scale) in the College of Law and 3.0 (4.0 scale) in the College of Business Administration.

Students failing to meet all of the requirements of the program are awarded the juris doctor or master of business administration degree only if they fulfill the requirements for the individual degree as outlined in the College of Law or graduate bulletins, respectively.

JURIS DOCTOR/MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING

The J.D./M.U.R.P. program is designed for those seeking professional training in planning cities and regions with specific emphasis given to their social, economic, environmental, political, and physical aspects, as well as the interaction of these factors. This program is offered in conjunction with the University of New Orleans (UNO) through its College of Urban and Public Affairs. The objective of the program is to prepare students to be planners in city, regional, state, and federal planning agencies; private consulting firms and public service organizations; and other public or private institutions.

Applicants for this joint program must apply separately to the College of Law and to the UNO College of Urban and Public Affairs and be accepted individually to both. The schools together will determine whether the applicant is eligible for the combined program. The applicant must present satisfactory evidence of having earned an undergraduate degree.

Normal degree requirements of 90 semester hours (juris doctor) and 45 credit hours including a three- to six-hour thesis (M.U.R.P.) are complemented and reduced to 81 semester hours (juris doctor) and 36 credit hours (M.U.R.P.) plus the thesis. Each program is thus reduced by nine semester hours as each accepts, as part of its requirements, nine semester hours from the other program.

Upon completion of the program, the student will be awarded two separate degrees. The requirements for both must be completed, however, before either degree can be awarded. A student will not be allowed to enroll in Loyola College of Law courses in Clinical Seminar, Legal Research, or Independent Study. The nine hours of credit earned at UNO in the M.U.R.P. program will count toward the total earned hours at Loyola but will not affect the student’s cumulative Loyola grade point average. No credit will be awarded for a course taken in the UNO/M.U.R.P. program unless the grade is at least equal to a C+ on the Loyola grading scale. No credit will be accepted until a student has successfully completed the first year of study at Loyola with an average of 2.3 or better. The student must maintain an average of 3.0 or better in the M.U.R.P. program.

Students failing to meet all of the requirements of the program are awarded either the juris doctor or master of urban and regional planning degree only if they fulfill the requirements for the individual degree as outlined in the Loyola College of Law or UNO graduate bulletins, respectively. For further information on the M.U.R.P., contact Dr. Marla Nelson,University of New Orleans, mnelson@uno.edu or 580-3110 .

JURIS DOCTOR/MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

The J.D./M.P.A. program is designed for those seeking an advanced degree in the field of governmental administration. This program is offered by the University of New Orleans (UNO) from the UNO College of Urban and Public Affairs. The program is interdisciplinary, with equal participation from the College of Urban and Public Affairs, the College of Business Administration, and the Department of Political Science at UNO.

Applicants for this joint program must apply separately to the College of Law and to the UNO College of Urban and Public Affairs and be accepted individually to both. The schools together will determine whether the applicant is eligible for the combined program. The applicant must present satisfactory evidence of having earned an undergraduate degree.

Normal degree requirements of 90 semester hours (juris doctor) and 42 credit hours including a six-hour thesis (M.P.A.) are complemented and reduced to 81 semester hours (juris doctor) and 33 credit hours (M.P.A.) plus the thesis. Each program is thus reduced by nine semester hours as each accepts, as part of its requirements, nine semester hours from the other program.

Upon completion of the program, the student will be awarded two separate degrees. The requirements for both must be completed, however, before either degree can be awarded. A student will not be allowed to enroll in Loyola College of Law courses in Clinical Seminar, Legal Research, or Independent Study. The nine hours of credit earned at UNO in the M.P.A. program will count toward the total earned hours at Loyola but will not affect the student’s cumulative Loyola grade point average. No credit will be awarded for a course taken in the UNO M.P.A. program unless the grade is at least equal to a C+ on the Loyola grading scale. No credit will be accepted until a student has successfully completed the first year of study at Loyola with an average of 2.3 or better. The student must maintain an average of 3.0 or better in the M.P.A. program.

Students failing to meet all of the requirements of the program are awarded either the juris doctor or master of public administration degree only if they fulfill the requirements for the individual degree as outlined in the Loyola College of Law or UNO graduate bulletins, respectively.

For further information on the M.P.A., please contact Dr. John Kiefer, Unviersity of New Orleans, at jkiefer@uno.edu or 280-3842.

Legal Research (LAW L898) and Independent Study (LAW L899)

Students wishing to register for these courses should obtain a copy of the current rules and regulations governing the courses from the law records coordinator.

Centers, Clinics and Programs

Center for Environmental Law and Land Use

Inaugurated on the anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, Loyola’s Center for Environmental Law and Land Use, seeks to become a leader in legal environmental education and service in the Gulf Region. 

As part of this mission, the Center supports Loyola’s Certificate in Environmental Law Program.  Under this program, law students concentrate their studies in the areas of natural resources, pollution control, and land use, and receive a certificate upon graduation along with their degree.

The Center also organizes and hosts a variety of conferences, workshops, and lectures designed to educate the public and to spark collaborative efforts in research and service among academics and students.  Much of its activity now centers on environmental and land-use issues associated with Hurricane Katrina and the rebuilding of the Gulf Coast. 

Gillis Long Student Pro Bono Program

In accordance with the Jesuit tradition of social justice advocacy and the promotion of Gospel values, students enrolled at the Loyola University College of Law must satisfy the law and poverty requirement by enrolling in the Law and Poverty course, the Law Clinic Program, the Street Law Program, or the Gillis Long Student Pro Bono Program. Each of these programs stresses the professional obligation of each student, as a future lawyer, to work for the common good. The Gillis Long Student Pro Bono Program allows students to provide legal services to indigent clients in the greater metropolitan area. Students enrolled in the program gain practical legal experience and provide legal assistance to those who are unable to afford it. The pro bono program places students in various fields of law, both civil and criminal, where students are asked to complete a minimum of 50 hours of legal work under the supervision of licensed attorneys. No grade is received for the work, nor are credit hours given. However, students successfully completing the pro bono program do fulfill the law and poverty requirement needed for graduation.

Gillis W. Long Poverty Law Center

The Gillis W. Long Poverty Law Center was established in 1985 at Loyola College of Law by Act of the United States Congress in memory of the late Congressman from Louisiana whose career exemplified service to the needs of the disadvantaged. The center provides training, research, and other support to organizations and individuals who are involved in the delivery of legal services to the poor, including paid Summer Internships and the Loan Repayment Assistance Program. The administrative offices of the Center are located in LS 351C and the telephone number is (504) 861-5491.

Stuart H. Smith Law Clinic and Center for Social Justice

The Law Clinic provides senior law students an opportunity to practice law in state, federal and administrative courts pursuant to Rule XX of the Louisiana Supreme Court. Students work under the supervision of faculty attorneys as they investigate and prepare cases and conduct trials in the areas of criminal, employment, family, housing and immigration law. They may also opt to obtain experience in mediation. Students must commit to two semesters of work for which they receive a total of three credits per semester. In addition to providing excellent practical training, the Law Clinic introduces the law student to ways in which to provide and expand the delivery of legals services to those in our community who do not have the financial resources to secure competent legal representation.
 

Extern Programs

Civil, State, Federal and Administrative Courts, as well as a variety of agencies have established extern programs which allow our students to obtain practical experience. Other courts or agencies may qualify for establishing new extern programs if, they meet the same standards for supervision and evaluation as do the existing extern programs.

First-year and second-year law students may apply to participate in the program during their next year of study. Enrollment is limited, and some academic restrictions may apply.

The Loyola Law Clinic supervises the instruction and administration of the extern program. A student who qualifies and is accepted must obtain the consent of the Loyola Law Clinic to participate in an externship. There is a regular classroom component. In addition, the student must submit weekly journals and timesheets.

The extern must be willing to devote at least 12 – 15 hours a week to work assignments over two semesters, except for the examination period and preceding week.

It is anticipated that the extern will engage in the preparation of memoranda in connection with the business of the courts and agencies. The extern will learn basic administration and record keeping procedures of the court or agency. A participant may have an opportunity to sit in on arguments or motions on which he or she has worked or otherwise observe related proceedings.

Students interested in these programs should contact the Loyola Law Clinic for additional information.

United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana:

The Hon. Sarah S. Vance, Chief Judge
The Hon. Lance M. Africk
The Hon. Carl Barbier*
The Hon. Peter Beer
The Hon. Helen G. Berrigan
The Hon. Stanwood R. Duval, Jr.
The Hon. Eldon E. Fallon
The Hon. Kurt D. Engelhart
The Hon. Martin L.C. Feldman
The Hon. Ivan L.R. Lemelle*
The Hon. Mary Ann Lemmon*
The Hon. A.J. McNamara*
The Hon. G. Thomas Porteous, Jr.
The Hon. Jay C. Zainey

Magistrates:

The Hon. Alma L. Chasez
The Hon. Daniel E. Knowles, III
The Hon. Louis Moore, Jr.
The Hon. Karen Wells Roby
The Hon. Sally Shushan*
The Hon. Joseph C. Wilkinson, Jr.

U.S. Bankruptcy Court:

Chief Judge Terry A. Brown
Judge Elizabeth W. Magner

Supreme Court of Louisiana:

Chief Justice Catherine D. Kimball
The Hon. Bernette J. Johnson
The Hon. Jeffrey P. Victory
The Hon. Jeannette Theriot Knoll*
The Hon. Marcus R. Clark
The Hon. John L. Weimer
The Hon. Greg G. Guidry

Orleans Parish Civil District Court

Judge Tiffany G. Chase

United States Department of Labor

Administrative Law Judges:
The Hon. Richard D. Mills, Chief Judge
The Hon. C. Richard Avery
The Hon. Quentin P. McColgin
The Hon. James W. Kerr, Jr.
The Hon. Lee J. Romero, Jr.*

Louisiana Attorney Disciplinary Board:

Rodney B. Hastings, Staff Attorney

United States Coast Guard:

Lt. Demetrius Cheeks, Coordinator

National Labor Relations Board—Region 15:

S.L. Hightower, Field Attorney

Office of the United States Trustee:

R. Michael Bolen, United States Trustee
Mary Langston, Assistant United States Trustee*
(Unavailable 2010-2011)

Office of the Judicial Administrator:

Hugh M. Collins, Ph.D.
Mark Harris, Extern Supervisor

Advocacy Center for the Elderly and Disabled:

Sarah Voigt, Director of Legal Services

Orleans Public Defenders Office

Chris Flood, Extern Supervisor

Federal Public Defender

Cynthia Cimino, Extern Supervisor

United States Attorney

Brian Klebba, Extern Supervisor

The Capital Appeals Project

Elizabeth Cumming, Extern Supervisor

Capital Post-Conviction Project of Louisiana

Gary Clements, Extern Supervisor*

Social Security Administration
Office of Disability Adjudication and Review (ODAR)

Michael S. Hertzig, Chief Administrative Law Judge

Office of the Inspector General and Independent Police Monitor

Holly L. Wiseman, Deputy Independent Police Monitor

*Graduate, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law

 

Required Courses - General Law (LAW)

Law General (Prefix LAW)

  • LAW L705, L710 Torts I, II 3, 2 hrs.
    These courses together cover intentional torts and privileges, negligence and theories of causation in fact and proximate cause, contributory negligence and assumption of risk, owners and occupiers of land, vicarious liability, automobile accident reparation systems, nuisance, misrepresentation, products liability (survey), damages, and immunities.
  • LAW L715 Legal Research and Writing 2 hrs.
    Students receive instruction in legal research, legal analysis, and legal writing. Throughout the semester, students research the law relevant to hypothetical client cases, apply that law to those cases, and draft memoranda setting forth law, analysis, and predictions as to the outcome of the cases. Students are exposed to both library research and computer research.
  • LAW L725, L730 Civil Procedure I, II 3, 3 hrs.
    These courses treat problems related to civil litigation ranging from considerations about the choice of the proper forum through the pretrial, trial, and appellate stages. Specifically the material will include: personal jurisdiction, subject matter jurisdiction, choice of applicable law (exclusive of conflict problems), pleading, joinder of claims and parties, discovery, pretrial conference, adjudication without trial (judgment on the pleadings, summary judgment, and alternative dispute resolution), functions of the judge and jury including judgments as a matter of law, appellate review (principle of finality, timeliness, scope of review, review of factual determination), the binding effect of judgments (res judicata, collateral estoppel, law of the case), and extraordinary devices (interpleader, class actions, intervention).
  • LAW L735 Criminal Law 2 hrs.
    This course deals with the principles underlying the administration of criminal justice as embodied in a modern code including the aims of criminal law, the theory of criminal conduct, and elements of some specific crimes and offenses. The model is the Louisiana Criminal Code or the A.L.I.’s Model Penal Code.
  • LAW L740 Administration of Criminal Justice I 3 hrs.
    This course examines the constitutional limitations on law enforcement in areas such as search and seizure, electronic surveillance, and custodial interrogation.
  • LAW L745 Business Organizations 4 hrs.
    This course is an introduction to the fundamental legal principles governing agency and fiduciary relationships, unincorporated business associations, and corporations. Among the topics covered are: 1) the formation, operation, and dissolution of partnerships, limited liability companies and corporations (both privately-held and publicly-held); 2) the distribution of powers among the owners and managers of such organizations; 3) the relative advantages of various organizational forms; and 4) an introduction to federal securities laws and regulations.
  • LAW L750 Constitutional Law 4 hrs.
    This course is an introduction to problems arising under the Constitution of the United States, including the distribution of powers among the federal branches of government, the distribution of powers between federal and state governments, and the protection of ndividual rights.
  • LAW L760 Evidence 3 hrs.
    This course involves a treatment of the rules of evidence, the qualifications and impeachment of witnesses, the opinion rule, admissions and confessions, rules relating to writings, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, privileged relations, burden of proof, presumptions, and judicial notice.
  • LAW L765 Moot Court 2 hrs.
    This course builds on the research and writing course in teaching legal document drafting skills and problem-solving techniques. A significant portion of the course will be devoted to the preparation of an appellate brief and the oral argument of the case on appeal. Completion of the prescribed brief and participation in oral arguments are mandatory requirements.
    Prerequisite: LAW L715.
  • LAW L770 The Legal Profession 2 hrs.
    This course concerns the professional and ethical activities and duties of the lawyer. The course includes a study of the history and traditions of the legal profession, including the concept of self-discipline and the model rules of professional responsibility. It also examines the impact of ethics and tradition on the practice of the lawyer.
  • LAW L781 Law and Poverty 2 hrs.
    This course provides an introduction to the detrimental effects of poverty on society and poor people. It includes a treatment of the history of institutional response to the needs of the economically disadvantaged in the western world. It involves a critical examination of the legal system’s response to the economic, social, and human problems of poverty, particularly in the fields of social security, welfare, unemployment, and worker’s compensation. Special treatment is given to legislative and judicial initiatives in alleviating poverty as it burdens the family, women, and minorities.
  • LAW L782 Law and Poverty Seminar 2 hrs.
    This is a seminar devoted to an in-depth treatment of one or more topics of concern in the area of law and poverty. The exact subjects to be considered will be chosen by the instructor. This seminar will satisfy the requirement for Law and Poverty (LAW L781).
Required Courses - Civil Law (LCIV)

Civil Law (Prefix LCIV)

  • LCIV L702 Common Law Contracts for Civil Law Students 3 hrs.
    This course provides a comparative introduction to common law contracts. The course will address remedies, consideration, and selected other contract-law issues which may include conditions, third parties (beneficiaries, assignment, and delegation), the effect of writings (the statute of frauds and the parol evidence rule), and multiple obligors.
  • LCIV L706 Civil Law Property I 3 hrs.
    This course introduces the civil law generally and the law of property in particular. It provides an introduction to the philosophy, structure, and methodology of the Louisiana Civil Code, as both a source of substantive law and as an embodiment of civilian legal method in the mixed jurisdiction of Louisiana. The course also serves as the introduction to basic civilian concepts of property, such as common, public, and private things, movables and immovables, ownership, and accession.
  • LCIV L707 Civil Law Property II 3 hrs.
    This course builds on an introduction to the Civil Code in Civil Law Property I and covers more advanced but essential civil law property topics such as personal servitudes (including usufruct, rights of use and habitation), predial servitudes (including legal, natural, and conventional predial servitudes), boundaries, building restrictions, occupancy, possession, acquisitive prescription of movables and immovables, and dedication to public use.
  • LCIV L710 Conventional Obligations 3 hrs.
    This course treats the general provisions of the Louisiana Civil Code applicable to all contracts in Louisiana, the formation and effect of agreements, various categories of obligations and the means of their extinction.
  • LCIV L715 Successions 3 hrs.
    This course deals essentially with intestate successions. Subjects covered include the rules of distribution, the spousal usufruct, rights of children, absent persons, the opening of successions, capacity, acceptance, renunciation, and collation. (The administration of estates is covered in Louisiana Probate Seminar, LCIV L861, and Louisiana Probate, LCIV L862.)
  • LCIV L725 Sales and Leases 3 hrs.
    This course is a continuation of the course in Conventional Obligations as to the particular contracts of sale and lease in respect to movable and immovable property.
Required Courses - Common Law (LCOM)

Common Law (Prefix LCOM)

  • LCOM L700 Contracts I 3 hrs.
    This course provides an introduction to contract law in the United States. Its coverage usually includes contract formation, enforceability of promises, and remedies, among other topics.
  • LCOM L701 Contracts II 3 hrs.
    This course continues the examination of contract law initiated in Contracts I and usually includes a study of remedies, conditions, breach, assignments, and the statute of frauds.
  • LCOM L705 Common Law Property I 3 hrs.
    This course covers estates, landlord and tenant, easements, and promises respecting the use and enjoyment of land.
  • LCOM L710 Common Law Property II 3 hrs.
    This course covers limitations on ownership (nuisance, right of support, etc.) fixtures, adverse possession, personal property, and conveyances of real property.
  • LCOM L715 Trusts and Estates 3 hrs.
    This course considers legal aspects of wealth transmission including intestate succession, wills, trusts, and administration.
Elective Courses - Law General (LAW)

Law General (Prefix LAW)

  • LAW L801 Intellectual Property Law 3 hrs.
    The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive survey and overview of the principal areas of federal and state law governing intellectual property rights, including trademarks, patents, copyrights, unfair competition, trade secrets, idea protection and the right of publicity.
  • LAW L802 Law and Education Seminar 2 hrs.
    This course will examine the law governing education in the United States, with emphasis on elementary and secondary schooling, including the impact of federal and state constitutions and statutes on finance and curriculum, and on the relationship between private and public institutions. Each student will prepare and present a paper to the seminar.
  • LAW L803 Western Legal Tradition 3 hrs.
    This course treats significant aspects and institutions of the Roman law, canon law, common law, and civil law. It also considers the interaction of these traditions in the context of our American legal heritage. Some emphasis is placed upon codification movements in Europe and the United States and particularly in Louisiana.
  • LAW L804 Legal Accounting 2 hrs.
    Legal Accounting provides an introduction to financial statements and bookkeeping, followed by critical examination of selected problems illustrating generally accepted accounting principles. Consideration will be given to the principles governing recognition of revenue, the matching of costs against appropriate revenues (with particular stress on inventory and depreciation accounting), the cost of borrowed capital and of long-term productive assets, and proprietary transactions. Emphasis will lie on the legal contexts in which the lawyer is likely to confront accounting problems. The materials will draw heavily on current corporation reports and the publications of the American Institute of Accountants and the SEC, with supporting and contrasting illustrations from judicial decisions and administrative practice.
  • LAW L805 Law of the European Union I 3 hrs.
    This course introduces the basic principles of the European Community Law and the institutional structure of the communities with particular reference to the case law of the Court of Justice of the European Community.
  • LAW L806 Corporate Finance 3 hrs.
    This course considers the legal problems arising in connection with financing decisions of publicly held corporations, including valuation of the enterprise and its securities, determination of securities structure and dividend policy, and decisions on investment opportunities, whether by internal expansion or by merger or takeover. Consideration will be given to the application of federal securities regulation, as well as state law, to the corporate decisions and to the import of the legal requirements for investors.
    Prerequisite: LAW L745.
  • LAW L807 Federal Appellate Advocacy 3 hrs.
    This course gives students experience in the appellate process by working on pending cases in the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. Students assist in the drafting of briefs and the preparation and presentation of oral arguments. Permission of instructor is required.
  • LAW L808 Securities Regulation 3 hrs.
    This course covers federal regulation of selling, trading, and dealing in securities in accordance with the provisions of the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Subject matter includes public offerings, secondary distributions, insider trading, applications of Rule 10 (b) 5, sale of corporate control, market manipulation, broker-dealer regulation, state “blue sky” laws, and attendant civil liabilities under federal and state laws.
  • LAW L809 American Legal History Seminar 3 hrs.
    This is a seminar devoted to an in-depth treatment of one or more topics in the area of American Legal History. The exact subject(s) to be covered will be chosen by the instructor and posted in advance of registration. This course satisfies the perspective course requirement.
  • LAW L810 Negotiable Instruments 3 hrs.
    This course involves commercial paper and bank collection as regulated under Articles 3 and 4 of the Uniform Commercial Code.
  • LAW L811 Law of the European Union II 3 hrs.
    This course builds on the basic instruction of the European Union’s structures and institutions offered in Law of the European Union I and provides specific, detailed coverage in the substantive competencies of European Union law, including such topics as free movement of goods, services, workers, and capital in the common market, anti-trust (competition) law, company law harmonization, environmental law, external relations and the common commercial policy, social policy, and fundamental rights.
    Prerequisite: LAW L805.
  • LAW L812 Creditors’ Rights and Bankruptcy 3 hrs.
    This course examines the problems of the debtor who does not pay his debts. The study includes processes available to the creditor for collection, competition among multiple creditors for the assets of the debtor, means of affecting a distribution of the debtor’s assets among his creditors, means of rehabilitating the debtor, and the debtor’s right to some measure of protection. More than half of the course is devoted to a study of the Bankruptcy Act since all aspects of the creditor/debtor problem are colored by the interaction of state created rights and the federal bankruptcy provisions.
  • LAW L813 Evidence/Procedure Seminar 2 hrs.
    This is a seminar devoted to an in-depth treatment of one or more topics in the area of evidence or civil procedure. The seminar’s more specific topic will be listed in advance of registration. Successful completion of the required course in Evidence or Civil Procedure I and II (depending on the content of the seminar) is a prerequisite.
  • LAW L814 Law Review Practicum 1 hr.
    This practicum is open to candidates of the Loyola Law Review. Students enrolled in this practicum will study the fundamentals of editing scholarly writing, the editorial process, and advanced legal citation skills. Students will meet in a workshop forum at least one hour per week and will receive pass/fail grades based on the quality of their work.
    • Under no circumstances can a student elect any combination of course numbers LAW L814, L846, L891, L892, L893, L894, L898, or L901 that would result in more than six hours. Also, under no circumstances may a student elect any combination of course numbers L898, L899, and L900 that would result in more than six hours.
  • LAW L815 Federal Criminal Law 2 hrs.
    This course surveys federal criminal law with emphasis on white collar crime, political corruption, and offenses affecting the administration of justice. Selected statutes such as the mail and wire fraud statutes, banking laws, RICO and Hobbs, as well as perjury and obstruction of justice laws will be examined.
  • LAW L816 Comparative Law Seminar 1, 2, or 3 hrs.
    This seminar is devoted to in-depth treatment of one or more topics of concern in comparative law. The exact subjects to be considered will be chosen by the instructor.
  • LAW L817 Mediation and Arbitration 3 hrs.
    This course is a survey of the various dispute resolution processes including mediation, arbitration, the mini-trial, and the summary jury trial. The overall objectives are to give students familiarity with these processes, basic skills in using them, and experience in how to help a client choose the most appropriate dispute resolution process. The class will include lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and simulations. In some years, the course may be taught as a seminar, where written work satisfying the writing requirement will replace a final examination.
  • LAW L818 Labor Law 3 hrs.
    This course deals with the legal problems of concerted action by employees, including the common law obstacles to the objects of labor combinations, picketing and the boycott, the construction and administration of the National Labor Relations Act, the collective bargaining agreement, and the union-member relationship.
  • LAW L819 Construction Industry Law Seminar 2 hrs.
    This is a seminar course covering construction industry law in all phases. A review will be made of pertinent statutes affecting all branches of the industry from design through construction. Litigation and tribunals, both state and federal, will be discussed. There will be complete coverage of the contracts issued by the American Institute of Architects, the National Society of Professional Engineers, and Associated General Contractors. Documents covering the financing of construction will be examined. Finally, there will be a discussion of trial practice in this type of litigation.
  • LAW L820 Employment Discrimination 3 hrs.
    This course surveys the various kinds of employment discrimination and the statutes, constitutional provisions, and Executive Orders which govern the rights and remedies available to employees who are subjected to discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age and disability. 
  • LAW L821 Computer Law 2 hrs.
    This course focuses primarily on intellectual property issues relating to the creation, sale, use, and misappropriation of computer hardware and software. Patent law, copyright law, trademark law, and related state-law doctrines affecting computer technology will be considered. The course will also address selected criminal law, antitrust, and personal privacy issues. No knowledge of computers, programming, or intellectual property law is required.
  • LAW L822 Capital Punishment and the Constitution 2 hrs.
    This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic constitutional framework of death penalty law. The course is a seminar and requires the completion of a paper on a topic related to the subject matter.
  • Law L823 First Amendment 2 – 3 hrs.
    Students will examine the theoretical basis for constitutional protection of speech and religion and the analytical structure developed by the United States Supreme Court to determine the extent to which government may regulate or interfere with activities protected by the First Amendment.
  • LAW L824 Products Liability 3 hrs.
    This course deals with the consumer vis-a-vis the dangerous and/or defective product. It covers the role, mechanics, and effect of the federal, state, and local governments in this area. It also covers the theories of recovery and defenses to those theories as well as the continuing evolution of theories and defenses.
  • LAW L825 Law and Medicine 2 hrs.
    This course provides an introduction to forensic medicine, forensic sciences, and the use of medical proof in litigation. Attention will be given to such topics as professional liability insurance, informed consent, and statutory limitations of liability. A portion of the course will examine the basic principles of legal regulation of the medical profession and hospitals and other facilities. In this regard, the course will survey the problems emerging with respect to the major interventions of the government in the health care area in recent years: Medicare, Medicaid, and national health insurance, generally.
  • LAW L826 Advanced Torts Seminar 2 hrs.
    This is a seminar devoted to an in-depth treatment of one or more topics in the area of torts, products liability, or relational interests. The exact subjects to be considered will be chosen by the instructor.
    Prerequisites: LAW L705 and L710.
  • LAW L827 Contracts/Commercial Law Seminar 2 hrs.
    This is a seminar devoted to an in-depth treatment of one or more topics in the areas of contracts and commercial law. The exact subjects to be considered will be chosen by the instructor.
    Prerequisites: Either LCOM L700 or LCIV L702 and either LCIV L710 or LCOM L701.
  • LAW L828 Trademark, Trade Name, and Unfair Competition Law 3 hrs.
    This course deals with unfair competition in the marketplace and considers the remedies competitors may have against one another. Topics include trademarks, trade names, trade identity, unfair competition doctrines of passing off false advertising, misrepresentation, trade libel or disparagement and misappropriation, protection of trade secrets, the right to publicize, and interference with contractual and business relations. Emphasis is placed upon the interrelationship of federal and state regulation with some necessary reference to copyright and patent laws.
  • LAW L829 Financial Institutions Law 3 hrs.
    The course covers principally the areas of bank formation and bank regulation. Additional topics include antitrust aspects of banking, the role of the F.D.I.C. and the Federal Reserve, and international banking.
  • LAW L831 European Union Law Seminar 2 hrs.
    This seminar is devoted to in-depth treatment of one or more topics of concern in European Union Law. The specific topics to be studied will be chosen by the instructor. Each student will be responsible for a class presentation and a written paper.
  • LAW L832 Immigration and Nationality Law 3 hrs.
    This course surveys United States constitutional and statutory law regulating naturalization and immigration. Students explore the historical development of that law and the role that racial, national origin, and gender classifications have played in that development. Students are expected to develop an understanding of immigration that reflects awareness of global migration forces and broader policy choices that may be affected by international treaties and conventions. Students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and a written appellate brief. 
  • LAW L833 Street Law 3 hrs.
    This course is designed for law students who are interested in teaching inner-city middle school and high school students about law related issues. Twice a week pairs of law students will enter local public school classrooms to discuss legal rights, responsibilities, and practical legal problems. The course also includes a two-hour seminar component and a paper requirement at the end of the semester.
    Prerequisite: Only seniors or permission of instructor.
  • LAW L834 Environmental Justice Seminar 2 hrs.
    This seminar examines the distribution of benefits and burdens in environmental protection, particularly as related to race and poverty. We will discuss facility permitting, risk assessment, community lawyering, civil rights law, as well as environmental issues of concern to Native Americans. Readings will include judicial opinions, law review articles, interdisciplinary materials, and situational case studies. Because southern Louisiana is a national center of environmental justice activity, the seminar will also highlight local issues and encourage students to research those issues as part of their studies.
  • LAW L835 Natural Resources Law 3 hrs.
    Natural resource management presents extremely difficult and contentious issues of law and public policy. Major debates continue to rage over offshore drilling, the protection for biodiversity, and the management of commercial fisheries. This course provides an overview of the way in which our society allocates and regulates the use of several natural resources, including fisheries, wildlife, wetlands, petroleum, and lands of aesthetic beauty such as Yellowstone or Louisiana’s fabled swamps. We will examine the major federal environmental statutes directed toward conserving natural resources, including the Endangered Species Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. The historical, constitutional, and economic underpinnings of natural resource law will also be addressed.
  • LAW L836 Real Estate Transactions 3 hrs.
    In this course, we will examine fundamental issues in real estate transactions, including financing, contracting, and conveyancing, with a primary focus on commercial transactions. Topics to be covered include: the structure of mortgage markets and the regulation of loan transactions; the law governing mortgages and related financing structures (such as installment land contracts and ground leases), including foreclosure and borrower protections; construction finance; suretyship (guaranties and related contracts); recording and lien priorities; contracts for the purchase and sale of real estate; conveyancing issues; and title insurance.
  • LAW L837 Land Use 3 hrs.
    This course explores the variety of ways in which the law attempts to resolve conflicts among land uses, as well as plan and regulate the impacts of different land use patterns. Topics include common law; state, regional, and local planning; zoning; environmental controls; growth management; historic preservation; restrictions relating to residential development; and constitutional limits on land use regulation. Throughout the course, we will explore how land-use decisions affect environmental quality and how land-use decision making addresses environmental concerns.
  • LAW L838 Mineral Law 3 hrs.
    This course involves a specialized study of the nature of interests in oil, gas, and other minerals, including the remedies of the owner against the adjoining landowner and the trespasser, the nature of the mineral contract, sale and reservation of mineral rights, prescription of mineral rights, and the mineral lease. The course also may include a study of the conservation laws pertaining to minerals and the regulations of the Louisiana Conservation Commissioner and of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the leasing of state and federal public lands, operating and production agreements, special contractual agreements relative to mineral exploration and development, deviations from standard provisions in mineral leases and instruments creating or conveying mineral servitudes and royalties, and an introduction to some of the special tax problems of owners and producers of minerals. The Louisiana Mineral Code is given coverage in all areas.
  • LAW L839 Civil Rights Actions Under Section 1983 2 – 3 hrs.
    This course covers the history of the interpretations of § 1983, immunities, governmental liability, nature of wrongs redressed, relationship to state law (e.g., res judicata, borrowing state law, exhaustion), attorney’s fees, abstention, and sovereign immunity.
  • LAW L840 Employment Law 3 hrs.
    This course examines the laws and doctrines (federal and state) that regulate and impact the employer-employee relationship. Among the topics typically explored in this course are: employment at will; employment contracts (express and implied); whistleblower and mass layoff protections; restrictive covenants and trade secrets; an introduction to federal labor law and anti-discrimination law, wage and hour laws; the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA); and applicable claim procedures, defenses, remedies, and litigation strategies.
     
  • LAW L841 Legislative and Administrative Advocacy 3 hrs.
    This course covers the processes by which bills become law and rules are promulgated. Students will study research methodologies, drafting techniques, constitutional restrictions, and public access to information. Each student will research and draft a bill or regulation, present it in a mock hearing, and write a research paper. 
    • Law L841 - Legislative and Administrative Advocacy and Law L879 – Advanced Legislative and Administrative Advocacy are considered clinical courses as is Law L897 – Clinical Seminar. A student may take a maximum of nine clinical credits. For example, a student may take one of the three courses in the junior year and two semesters of the Clinical Seminar in the senior year. Any clinical hours in excess of nine will not count toward the 90 credit hours required for graduation.
  • LAW L842 Courts in a Federal System 3 hrs.
    This course deals with requirements of Article III of the United States Constitution such as standing, ripeness, and mootness. A major portion of the course is devoted to problems relating to concepts of federalism and comity between the state and federal systems. The class also analyzes the relationship between the branches of the federal government. For example, the extent to which Congress may withdraw jurisdiction from those courts and the power of the court to review actions of coequal branches are issues receiving attention. The course also offers a review of jurisdiction based on the existence of diversity and a federal question. The course also covers some of the following subjects: the Erie problem, suits against state officials and the state, abstention, injunctions against state proceedings, and review of state court judgments.
    Prerequisite: LAW L725. LAW L750 recommended.
  • LAW L844 Administrative Law 3 hrs.
    This course deals with the creation and functions of administrative tribunals, the procedure before such tribunals, and judicial relief from administrative action.
  • LAW L845 Communications Law 3 hrs.
    This course examines the regulation of electronic communications. It focuses on the legal framework, including First Amendment rights and limitations, for both wireless and wired electronic communications, such as communications via broadcast, satellite, telephone, cable, and computer networks (e.g., the Internet). 
  • LAW L846 Seminar in Scholarly Writing 3 hrs.
    This seminar is open to candidates of the Loyola Law Review who are currently writing a law review comment. Others may enroll with instructor’s approval. Students enrolled in this seminar will write and edit one substantial Law Review comment and, in addition, evaluate and edit the writing of other students. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their research, writing, and editing skills.
    • Under no circumstances can a student elect any combination of course numbers LAW L814, L846, L891, L892, L893, L894, L898, or L901 that would result in more than six hours. Also, under no circumstances may a student elect any combination of course numbers L898, L899, and L900 that would result in more than six hours.
  • LAW L847 Legislation 3 hrs.
    This course examines the theory of legislation and the practice of legislative bodies—federal, state, and local—including their relationship to the executive and judicial branches of government. Topics surveyed include issues as to sovereignty and legislative jurisdiction, the legislative process, the relationship between statutory law and the common law, statutory law and the codal tradition, statutory drafting and interpretation, lobbying and the media, and law reform and social change. A portion of the course will involve clinical education, consisting of field work by students with legislators involving legislative research and drafting. Students will present their bills in a mock committee hearing that will be videotaped. Enrollment will be limited to a total of 20 students and will be open to students from Loyola and Tulane. Classes are taught at the Tulane Law campus.
  • LAW L848 Antitrust Law 3 hrs.
    This course analyzes federal regulation of private economic power and practices in the United States through consideration of the Sherman Act, the Clayton Act, the Robinson-Patman Act, and the Federal Trade Commission Act. Topics include the development and current trends involving the application of the rule of reason and per se rules to various restraints of trade including price fixing, group boycotts, and tying arrangements. Other topics include the nature of agreements, activities influencing governmental action, the offense of monopolization, and the regulation of mergers.
  • LAW L849 Patent Law 2 hrs.
    This course focuses on the means for obtaining legal protection for patentable and unpatentable inventions and for technical knowledge. Licensing and aspects of litigation affecting these rights also will be discussed.
  • LAW L850 Copyright Law 3 hrs.
    This course consists of a detailed exploration of the protection of creative expression—literature, music, visual art, and motion pictures. While focusing primarily on the copyright act, the course also will consider those areas of patent and trademark law that overlap with copyright or form the boundaries. The challenges created by new technology, such as computers, home video recorders, and cable television will receive particular attention. Additionally, some attention will be given to related doctrines in other countries.
  • LAW L853 Family Law Seminar 2 hrs.
    This seminar permits students to conduct an intensive study of one or more issues in family law. The students will investigate marriage, the parent-child relationship, and other contemporary family topics in a comparative format. Each student will be responsible for a class presentation and a written paper on a specific topic in the area.
    Prerequisite: LCOM L700 or LCOM L800.
  • LAW L854 Insurance 3 hrs.
    This course concerns personal and property insurance, together with the rights and powers of the insurer, the insured, the beneficiary, the assignees, and creditors.
  • LAW L855 Child Advocacy Seminar 2 hrs.
    This seminar examines some problems concerning the relation of the child to the family and to the state. Examples are parental rights and duties and their termination, neglect and abuse, judicial supervision of custody in foster homes or institutions, medical and psychological treatment, statutory limitations on children’s freedoms, and statutory guarantees of children’s rights including rights of handicapped children.
  • LAW L856 State and Local Government Law 3 hrs.
    This course studies the legal aspects of intergovernmental relationships including the distribution of power among the federal, state, and local governments. Organization and reorganization of local governmental entities, home rule, metropolitan government, and financing of the local government are among the subjects covered. The legal issues are related to the greatest extent possible to contemporary American urban developments.
  • LAW L857 Employee Remedies (Maritime) 3 hrs.
    This course is essentially maritime, examining remedies available to an injured employee (and heirs of deceased employees) in the context of The Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act (LHWCA), The Jones Act (seamen), and The General Maritime Law. Pertinent provisions of the LHWCA are studied in depth, as are claims for injuries to and death of seamen/members of the crew of vessels. Also included are claims for personal injuries and deaths which occur on the outer continental shelf and injuries to non-seamen on vessels.
  • LAW L858 Environmental Law 3 hrs.
    This is a survey course in environmental law and regulatory policy. The course considers the special character of environmental disputes and the problems that arise in developing legal rules for their resolution. The course covers several different federal environmental statutes, including laws relating to hazardous wastes, toxic substances, and air pollution. Our goal in studying these issues will be to gain a better understanding not only of particular environmental laws and policies, but also of the processes by which the government can regulate potentially harmful activities. We will look not only at traditional regulatory mechanisms, but also at the opportunities for market and consensus solutions. The course will make frequent use of situational case studies, which will require you to think strategically about how you would solve real world problems that have confronted lawyers and policymakers.
  • LAW L859 Regulation of the Sports Industry Seminar 3 hrs.
    This course will consider the response of the legal system to the particular problems of the sports industry. Coverage includes contractual obligations in professional sports, antitrust laws, regulation of agents, sports violence, labor relations and collective bargaining in professional sports, arbitration, professional sports franchise relocation, the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the regulation of intercollegiate sports, regulation of amateur sports, gender and racial discrimination in athletics, and drug testing.
  • LAW L860 Administration of Criminal Justice II 3 hrs.
    This course considers common problems in criminal prosecution from the initiation of charges through the trial process to the handling of post conviction remedies. The Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure will be employed as a model. The course is open to both civil law and common law students.
  • LAW L861 Trial Practice Seminar 2 or 3 hrs.
    This seminar examines the functions of the advocate in the preparation and trial of lawsuits with special emphasis upon the methods of preparation and development of facts into evidence, strategic use of discovery devices such as interrogatories, depositions, admissions and motions to produce, typical use of rules of procedure and substantive law in trial proceedings, tactical and ethical aspects of problems confronting the trial lawyer, and practical applications of principles in trial moot court exercises.
    Prerequisite: LAW L760.
  • LAW L862 Criminal Law Seminar 2 hrs.
    This seminar is devoted to in-depth treatment of one or more topics of concern in criminal law or procedure. The exact subjects to be considered will be chosen by the instructor.
  • LAW L863 Marine Insurance 2 hrs.
    The law of marine insurance presents a fairly comprehensive study of the hull policies and protection and indemnity policies typically used in the marine market. Although the emphasis will be on American form policies and United States law, attention will also be given to the London insurance market and British law where appropriate. The course’s study is divided into three parts: 1) general principles regarding marine insurance, 2) Hull policy, and 3) P&I policy. If time permits, some attention will be directed to the coverages currently contained in marine pollution liability policies. It is recommended, but not required, that the basic course in admiralty law be taken before taking this course.
  • LAW L864 Admiralty 3 hrs.
    This course reviews the principles of admiralty and maritime law, including statutory modifications, in the following areas: jurisdiction, the nature of in rem and in personal jurisdiction, maritime liens, the contract of affreightment and COGSA, limitation of liability, general average, the law of collision, the tug and tow relationship, and salvage.
  • LAW L865 Juvenile Law Seminar 2 hrs.
    This seminar requires a paper relating to merits, faults, and recommendations for improvement of a segment of the juvenile justice system. These conclusions must result from individual and group visits to court and to facilities to which the child in trouble is exposed, and from lectures and interviews, all as compared with ideals and trends learned from casebook reading, classroom discussion, and library research.
  • LAW L866 Maritime Personal Injury 3 hrs.
    This course examines the law governing personal injury and wrongful death claims under the general maritime law and federal and state statutory law. Both jurisdictional and substantive law issues are considered. There is a detailed treatment of the law relative to seamen, including “status seamen,” the warranty of seaworthiness, maintenance and cure, indemnity and contribution, and persons employed in marsh lands and on platforms and special purpose vessels located on the Outer Continental Shelf.
  • LAW L867 Business Planning Seminar 2 hrs.
    This seminar combines advanced work in corporations, corporate financing, and federaltaxation in the context of business planning and counseling. The seminar will be based upon a series of problems involving common business transactions, which present corporate and tax issues for analysis and resolution. The problems will cover such topics as the formation and financing of corporations, both closely held and publicly owned, stock redemption, the sale and purchase of businesses, mergers and other forms of acquisition and recapitalization, division and dissolution of corporations.
    Prerequisites: LAW L745, LAW L804, and LAW L980.
  • LAW L868 Workers’ Compensation 2 hrs.
    This course considers the Louisiana law relative to tort liability of master and servant and the Louisiana workers’ compensation law.
  • LAW L869 Taxation of the Family: Structuring the Tax Consequences of Marriage, Divorce, and Death 2 hrs.
    This course presents both tax planning opportunities and problems raised by marriage, domestic partnerships, support of dependents, divorce, and property transfers during life and at death. The course introduces the fundamental tax principles in the context of tax planning for the beginning, the span, and the end of a committed relationship.
    Prerequisite: LAW L980.
  • LAW L870 Federal Taxation of Wealth Transmission 3 hrs.
    This course considers the impact of federal taxation on the transmission of wealth. Primary emphasis is placed on the gift and estate tax systems. The generation-skipping transfer tax system and related income tax problems are also considered.
    Prerequisite: LAW L980.
  • LAW L871 Advanced Federal Income Taxation 2 hrs.
    This course consists of an advanced study of federal income taxation emphasizing planning considerations affecting the personal and commercial transactions of individual taxpayers. Prerequisite: LAW L980.
  • LAW L872 Federal Income Taxation of Corporations 2 hrs.
    This course deals with the tax problems of corporations and shareholders faced in practice with discussion and analysis of the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations, cases, and rulings.
    Prerequisite: LAW L980.
  • LAW L873 Taxation of Partnerships and Other Pass-through Entities 3 hrs.
    This course involves a study of the tax treatment of the formation, operation, and termination of pass-through entities including partnerships, limited liability companies, and subchapter S corporations. Class discussion will focus on the study of the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations and solving problems a taxpayer must deal with in practice.
    Prerequisite: LAW L980.
  • LAW L874 Federal Tax Procedure 2 hrs.
    This course deals with numerous aspects of federal tax procedure. Specifically, the course will cover administrative procedures before the Internal Revenue Service, an analysis of the statutory notice procedures, the entire spectrum of litigating a case before the United States Tax Court and the District Court, extended periods of limitations, and additions to tax and other problems that a practitioner might encounter while handling a tax case.
    Prerequisite: LAW L980.
  • LAW L875 State and Local Taxation 2 hrs.
    This course considers the varieties of taxation imposed by state and local governments including: property taxes, business taxes, sales and use taxes, and the various exemptions.
    Prerequisite: LAW L980.
  • LAW L876 Conflict of Laws 3 hrs.
    This course deals with the law relating to transactions with elements in more than one state. Emphasis is placed upon the problems of choice of laws to be applied in a given situation where the laws of the states involved differ. This problem is examined with respect to actions in tort, worker’s compensation, contract, family law, and decedents’ estates. Consideration is given to constitutional issues, the theoretical bases for the choice of laws, and questions relating to the jurisdiction of courts and the enforcement of foreign judgments.
  • LAW L877 Constitutional Law Seminar 2 hrs.
    This seminar is devoted to in-depth treatment of one or more topics of current controversy in constitutional law. The exact subjects to be considered will be chosen by the instructor. Seminar members will submit term papers in completion of course requirements.
  • LAW L878 International Law 3 hrs.
    This introductory course acquaints students with the theory and practice of a distinct legal system. The sources and mode of discourse of the international legal system are studied in sufficient detail to allow the student to undertake further work in the discipline. Detailed examination will be undertaken of several substantive areas of international law. These areas will be selected from topics such as jurisdiction of states, international criminal law, law of the sea, international protection of human rights, law of war, and regulation of resort to force by states.
  • LAW L879 Advanced Legislative and Administrative Advocacy 3 hrs.
    Students will work on various legislative and administrative initiates drawn from projects drafted during the previous semester and from additional client-related initiatives. Students will conduct interviews with clients and resource personnel, inquire into how other jurisdictions have dealt with similar issues, and research any additional legal questions that may arise. Students will prepare written memoranda detailing the research and conclusions. They will prepare additional drafts of bills or rules and amendments to existing instruments. They will also prepare one-page information sheets for public dissemination that synthesize the main issues and arguments regarding their project and will produce fiscal notes or fiscal and economic impact statements on bills and proposed rules.
    Prerequisite: LAW L841.
    • Law L841 - Legislative and Administrative Advocacy and Law L879 – Advanced Legislative and Administrative Advocacy are considered clinical courses as is Law L897 – Clinical Seminar. A student may take a maximum of nine clinical credits. For example, a student may take one of the three courses in the junior year and two semesters of the Clinical Seminar in the senior year. Any clinical hours in excess of nine will not count toward the 90 credit hours required for graduation.
  • LAW L880 Seminar in Legal French 1hr.
    This seminar is designed to provide students who already have basic proficiency in the French language with a practical understanding of French legal terminology, concepts and materials, so that they may be prepared to engage in a meaningful interaction with French-speaking legal professions within the context of a global legal market.
  • LAW L881 Comparative Law 3 hrs.
    This course presents an overview of the Civil Law and Common Law, the two great legal systems of Western civilization. It highlights their different historical development and how this divergence contributes to the differences in the two systems. The course also notes contemporary legal systems outside the Civil Law and Common Law traditions.
  • LAW L882 Jurisprudence 3 hrs.
    This course considers the history of the natural law. It also appraises such schools of jurisprudence as the analytical, historical, philosophical, sociological, and realist in the light of the natural law. The natural law basis of the principal juridical institutions in the Roman and Anglo-American legal systems is considered, as well as the creative role of the natural law in contemporary law-making.
  • LAW L883 Dialogues in Law and Ethics 2 hrs.
    This course attempts to sharpen the student’s critical awareness of the sensitive moral and ethical problems inherent in the legal enterprise. The goal is to sensitize the prospective counselor, advocate, legislator, and judge to these problems while helping him or her develop the ability to resolve them in a fashion most respectful of the personal human values affected. The course draws on a variety of interdisciplinary readings and will involve persons experienced in some facet of the problems discussed.
  • LAW L884 International Law Seminar 2 hrs.
    Students with a background in the subject will conduct an intensive study of one or more issues in international law. These issues will be identified by the instructor prior to registration. Limited enrollment.
    Prerequisites: LAW L878 and stipulated requirements.
  • LAW L885 Sex Discrimination Law Seminar 2 hrs.
    This seminar deals with the law in the areas of sex-based discrimination. Emphasis on discrimination in family law, constitutional law, criminal law, education and employment opportunities. Consideration will be given to the legal status of both sexes and the changing emphasis toward equalization of the status of the sexes.
  • LAW L886 Environmental Law Seminar 2 hrs.
    This seminar is devoted to an in-depth treatment of one or more topics of current interest in the field, e.g., Superfund, Toxic Torts, Wetlands, or Clean Air. The exact subjects will be chosen by the instructor(s).
    Prerequisite: LAW L858.
  • LAW L887 Federal Taxation Seminar 2 hrs.
    This seminar considers selected problems in taxation under the Internal Revenue Code. Enrollment is limited to 20 students. Prerequisite: LAW L980.
  • LAW L888 Gender, Race and Law in Film and Literature 2 hrs.
    This seminar explores the intersection of gender, race and law by examining legal writings, statutes, cases, films, novels, short stories and plays. Students are introduced to feminist legal theory and consider a variety of issues that impact particularly on gender including intimate violence, rape, reproduction and harassment. Students are also introduced to the law and literature movement. Students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and a written paper or project. 
  • LAW L890 Regulation of the Entertainment Industries Seminar 2 hrs.
    This seminar considers the response of the legal system to the particular problems of the entertainment industries. Coverage includes antitrust law and the entertainment industries, the protection of ideas, the right of publicity, legal issues in the music industry, regulation of agents and managers, motion picture ratings, record labeling and censorship, film colorization and moral rights, and selected issues in trademarks and unfair competition.
  • LAW L891 Law Review Honors Tutorial 2 hrs.
    This tutorial is open to candidates for Law Review who successfully have completed the junior Law Review requirements as determined by the Student Editorial Board and who complete service on the Executive Board. This tutorial is graded on a pass/fail basis only.
    • Under no circumstances can a student elect any combination of course numbers LAW L814, L846, L891, L892, L893, L894, L898, or L901 that would result in more than six hours. Also, under no circumstances may a student elect any combination of course numbers L898, L899, and L900 that would result in more than six hours.
  • LAW L892 Law Review Seminar 1 hr.
    Should the candidate for Law Review Honors Tutorial develop the publishable comment as a part of a regular seminar, the seminar course description on the record of the student will have the addition of Law Review added to the seminar description, and an added hour of credit will be assigned to the seminar.
    • Under no circumstances can a student elect any combination of course numbers LAW L814, L846, L891, L892, L893, L894, L898, or L901 that would result in more than six hours. Also, under no circumstances may a student elect any combination of course numbers L898, L899, and L900 that would result in more than six hours.
  • LAW L893 The Journal of Public Interest Law Honors Tutorial 2 hrs.
    This tutorial is open to candidates for the Journal of Public Interest Law who successfully have completed the junior journal requirements as determined by the Student Editorial Board and 1) complete service on the Editorial Board, or 2) complete a publishable comment under the tutorship of a member of the faculty. This tutorial will be graded on a pass/fail basis for board service, but a letter grade for comments.
    • Under no circumstances can a student elect any combination of course numbers LAW L814, L846, L891, L892, L893, L894, L898, or L901 that would result in more than six hours. Also, under no circumstances may a student elect any combination of course numbers L898, L899, and L900 that would result in more than six hours.
  • LAW L894 The Journal of Public Interest Law Seminar 1 hr.
    Should the candidate for the Journal of Public Interest Law Honors Tutorial develop a publishable comment as a part of a regular seminar, the seminar course description on the record of the student will include the addition of Journal of Public Interest Law, and an added hour of credit will be assigned to the seminar.
    • Under no circumstances can a student elect any combination of course numbers LAW L814, L846, L891, L892, L893, L894, L898, or L901 that would result in more than six hours. Also, under no circumstances may a student elect any combination of course numbers L898, L899, and L900 that would result in more than six hours.
  • LAW L895 Law Workshop 1 or 2 hrs.
    This workshop with limited enrollment gives students practical experience. Subtitles for this workshop have included Evidence and Immigration.
  • LAW L896 Professional Seminar 2 or 3 hrs.
    This seminar surveys historical and contemporary responses of the legal system of the United States.
  • LAW L897 Clinical Seminar 6 or 9 hrs.
    During the first semester, after a period of orientation, students will be assigned cases, civil or criminal, and will be expected to prepare these cases for trial. Such preparation will include client interviews, investigation, discovery, pleading, research, and writing of memoranda. Thereafter, students will actually participate in the trial process. Clinic students must be willing to devote at least 12 to 15 hours a week to clinic classes and class work over two semesters. A maximum of six credit hours of graded credit may be obtained for this course. Any hours in excess of six will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
    • Students may register for a maximum of nine hours in Law L897, which must be taken in consecutive sessions. The summer session will be graded pass/fail and will earn no quality points. During the fall and spring sessions, students will receive letter grades and will be eligible for quality points. Students who register for only the summer and fall sessions will receive only three hours of graded credit and will earn quality points for those hours only. In no event may a student receive more than six hours of quality hours for this course. Legislative and Administrative Advocacy – Law L841 and Advanced Legislative and Administrative Advocacy – Law L879 are considered clinical courses and count toward the maximum of nine clinical credits.
  • LAW L898 Legal Research 1 or 2 or 3 hrs.
    This course is designed to develop skills in legal research, analysis, and writing, and to allow the student the opportunity to study a narrow subject in depth under the supervision of a full-time faculty member with expertise in the area. A written paper is required for satisfactory completion of this course, whether it is taken for one or two hours of credit. A letter grade is given for completion of the course. The course may be taken for two hours of credit to satisfy the writing requirement. A student must be in good academic standing and receive the permission of the associate dean for academic affairs to register for this course. 
    Prerequisite for Mediation Section only: LAW L817
    • Under no circumstances can a student elect any combination of course numbers LAW L814, L846, L891, L892, L893, L894, L898, or L901 that would result in more than six hours. Also, under no circumstances may a student elect any combination of course numbers L898, L899, and L900 that would result in more than six hours.
  • LAW L899 Independent Study 1 or 2 or 3 hrs.
    This course is designed to allow the student an opportunity to study a narrow subject in depth under the supervision of a full-time faculty member with expertise in the subject area. Appropriate written documentation pertinent to the study is required, but the course does not necessarily entail a single research paper as is the case with Legal Research (LAW L898). This course is only graded on a pass/fail basis and may sometimes involve working for an outside agency (i.e., an “extern” program), with general supervision and evaluation by the designated faculty member. A student must be in good academic standing and receive the permission of the associate dean for academic affairs to register for this course. This course cannot be used to satisfy the writing requirement.
    • Under no circumstances can a student elect any combination of course numbers LAW L814, L846, L891, L892, L893, L894, L898, or L901 that would result in more than six hours. Also, under no circumstances may a student elect any combination of course numbers L898, L899, and L900 that would result in more than six hours.
  • LAW L900 Clinical Externship 1 or 2 hrs.
    This course allows students to learn by participating in legal work with an outside agency or court. Second- and third-year law students in the upper half of their class may apply to participate in this program. The student must be in good academic standing and receive the permission of the associate dean for academic affairs and the Loyola Law Clinic to register. This course cannot be used to satisfy the writing requirement. There is a regular classroom component. This is a pass/fail course. There is a two-semester commitment, and the extern must be willing to devote at least 12 – 15 hours a week to this course.
    • Under no circumstances can a student elect any combination of course numbers LAW L814, L846, L891, L892, L893, L894, L898, or L901 that would result in more than six hours. Also, under no circumstances may a student elect any combination of course numbers L898, L899, and L900 that would result in more than six hours.
  • LAW L901 Loyola Maritime Law Journal Honors Tutorial 2 hrs.
    This tutorial is open to candidates for the Loyola Maritime Law Journal who successfully have completed the junior journal requirements as determined by the Student Editorial Board and 1) complete service on the Editorial Board, or 2) complete a publishable comment under the tutorship of a member of the faculty. This tutorial will be graded on a pass/fail basis for board service, but a letter grade for comments.
    • Under no circumstances can a student elect any combination of course numbers LAW L814, L846, L891, L892, L893, L894, L898, or L901 that would result in more than six hours. Also, under no circumstances may a student elect any combination of course numbers L898, L899, and L900 that would result in more than six hours.
  • LAW L905 Advanced Legal Writing 3 hrs.
    This course will build on the analytical and writing skills developed by students in the Legal Research and Writing and Federal Appellate Advocacy courses and will provide students with opportunities to sharpen their legal analysis through various types of documents, including a trial memorandum, a judicial opinion, a client opinion letter, and a short scholarly piece. Students will examine the types of legal arguments and will study the conventions and expectations unique to each of the documents they create. They will be expected to use this knowledge as they analyze hypothetical cases. Additionally, students will conduct legal research for their assignments, which will serve to reinforce their researching skills.
  • LAW L910 Law and Religion Seminar 2 or 3 hrs.
    This seminar is devoted to an in-depth study of the interrelations between law and religion. The exact subjects will be selected by the instructor and posted prior to registration.
  • LAW L924 Human Rights and Global Marketplace 2hrs
    This course examines economic, social and cultural entitlement in international and comparative human rights law. Students discuss the theoretical paradigms that have developed historically embracing the notion of moral and legal responsibility for the satisfaction of basic human needs; international and regional legal instruments embodying socio-economic rights and duties; special problems related to race, the status of women, children and indigenous peoples; the impact of globalization, trade, and international financial institutions on poverty and development; and the comparative approaches to socio-economic rights applied in India, South Africa, the Council of Europe, and the United States.
     
  • LAW L925 International Trade Law 2 or 3 hrs.
    This course presents the regulatory context of the international sale of goods, including the role of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and other supranational or international organizations, as well as the effect of bilateral treaties and similar arrangements. This course also presents and analyzes the law governing the import and export of goods, such as the Convention on the International Sale of Goods (CISG), the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts, the proposed European Code of Contracts, the Incoterms of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), as well as national laws that have been applied in the international context. Conventions and model laws on financing of international sales (e.g., on letters of credit, factoring, and receivables) may also be addressed.
  • LAW L926 International Investment Law 2 or 3 hrs.
    This course presents an overview of the law applicable to foreign direct investments. Special attention is given to such issues as political risk management, privatization, transfer pricing, project finance, currency risk and foreign exchange controls, asset freezes, the OECD Declaration on International Investment and Multinational Enterprises, NAFTA, bilateral investment treaties, and national security issues. The regulation of multinational corporate conduct is also explored, including such areas as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, antitrust regulations, and the protection of human rights and the environment.
  • LAW L927 International Financial Services Law 2 or 3 hrs.
    This course presents an overview of the law applicable to international financial services such as banking, securities, insurance, and accounting. Special attention is given to the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) and NAFTA, as well as the role of the Basle Committee on Banking Supervision, the European Union, the International Organization of Securities Commissioners (IOSCO), and the International Accounting Standards Committee (IASC). Topics covered may include such issues as risk management, asset securitization, the payment system, clearance and settlement, capital adequacy, and foreign exchange.
  • LAW L928 International Dispute Resolution 2 or 3 hrs.
    This course deals with the resolution of disputes in the international context. It addresses both litigation and alternative dispute resolution, including arbitration. The course focuses on commercial disputes between private actors, but may also analyze the special problems of disputes between private actors and states or state-owned entities.
  • LAW L929 Selected Topics in International Environmental Law 2 hrs.
    This course examines selected topics in international environmental law. The course offers an overview of how international regimes address environmental problems and examines a selection of current global environmental topics, such as climate change, biodiversity, international trade, or human rights. Because the underlying basis for international environmental law is very different from that of traditional American law, students must be prepared to leave their pre-conceptions about law behind and “think outside of the box.”
  • LAW L930 Introduction to United States Law 3 hrs.
    This course is designed exclusively for students who are enrolled in the Loyola LL.M. degree program in United States Law and who have already been awarded a first degree in law (LL.B. or equivalent) from a law school outside of the United States or Canada. This course gives an overview of U.S. legal history, legal education, the legal profession, the judicial system, case law, the legislative system and statutes, secondary authority and the Restatements, civil and criminal procedure (including evidence) conflict of laws, contracts, torts, property, family law, commercial law, business enterprises, constitutional law, administrative law, trade regulation, labor law, tax law and substantive criminal law.
  • LAW L931 Legal Research and Writing for International Lawyers 2 hrs.
    This course parallels LAW L715 Legal Research and Writing and adapts and supplements it for the needs of international law students.
  • LAW L932 Immigration Law Seminar 2 hrs.
    Students will explore problems posed by immigration and the regulation of aliens in the United States through selected readings, class discussion, and class presentations.
  • LAW L946 Agency and Partnership 2 hrs.
    This course is an introduction to the fundamental legal principles governing agency and fiduciary relationships and unincorporated business associations. Among the topics covered include: 1) the creation and legal effects of agency and fiduciary relationships; 2) the formation, operation, and dissolution of general partnerships and limited liability companies; 3) the distribution of powers among the owners and managers of such organizations; and 4) the relative advantages and disadvantages of various organizational forms.
  • LAW L955 Advanced Constitutional Law—14th Amendment 3 hrs.
    This course focuses on the protection afforded individuals by the 14th amendment due process and equal protection clauses, state action, and Congress’ power to enforce the 14th amendment. Students are strongly encouraged to take this course, as well as the first amendment course.
  • LAW L957 Injured Employee Compensation and Tort Remedies 2 hrs.
    This course is a study and comparison of the various remedies available to an employee or his or her dependents resulting from work-related injury or death. We will compare state worker’s compensation principles with those of the Longshore and Harbor Worker’s Compensation Act. The tort remedies available to the employee and the compensation carrier’s right of intervention in a third-party action are studied. The remedies available to maritime workers pursuant to the Jones Act, general maritime law, and the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act are also considered.
  • LAW L974 Canon Law 1 or 2 hrs.
    This course will examine the 1983 code of Canon Law in light of the historical developments of church law and the reforms of Vatican II. Special emphasis will be placed on Book Two of the Code, “The People of God.” This course is cross-listed as LIM G874 and is offered by the Loyola Institute for Ministry in City College.
  • LAW L980 Income Taxation 3 hrs.
    This course is an introduction to the principles of the federal taxation of income as it relates to individuals. It will focus on a number of concepts usually involving tax policy, gross income, property transactions, including gains, losses, non-recognition transactions, tax status, timing issues, deductions, credits, exemptions, and tax procedure. This subject is a bar requirement in many common law jurisdictions.
  • LAW L981 International Taxation 3 hrs.
    This course covers the taxation of foreign nationals doing business in the United States and United States citizens doing business outside of the States. The course will examine the taxation rules regarding foreign income of United States corporations and individuals, United States taxation of nonresident aliens and foreign corporations, domestic international sales corporations, and international boycott determinations.
    Prerequisite: LAW L980.
  • LAW L985 Intellectual Property Law Seminar on Digital Delivery of Entertainment Products 1 hr.
    The course will cover the following topics: 1) the legal and legislative responses, especially under copyright law, to emerging digital technologies, including compression formats, increased bandwidth, and CMI (copyright management information) applications; 2) the emerging business models viewed against the background of the so-called “traditional” model; 3) the social, political, and policy underpinnings of the “safe-harbor” provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act viewed as an unprecedented entrance of technology into the Copyright Act; 4) the increasing relevance of global treaties regarding foreign distribution of entertainment products for intellectual property rights holders in the United States; 5) the future of the entertainment industries in a limited-encryption copyright protection environment of instantaneous global access. Class meets once a week.
    Prerequisite: LAW L890 or permission of instructor.

 

Elective Courses - Law Civil (LCIV)

Law Civil (Prefix LCIV)

  • LCIV L805 Administration of Criminal Justice III 3 hrs.
    This course involves a detailed study of the actual process of criminal prosecution from the bringing of charges to final conviction, appeal, and post-conviction remedies. The Louisiana Codes of Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure are studied as models of modern systems of criminal law and procedure.
  • LCIV L810 Title Examination 1 hr.
    This course covers the substantive law and the technique used in the examination of titles to Louisiana immovable property. Practical problems will be presented in the description of property, the derivation of titles, and the drafting of documents conveying or encumbering immovable property.
  • LCIV L861 Louisiana Probate Seminar 2 hrs.
    Knowledge of the substantive law of inheritance is a prerequisite. This seminar features the handling of decedents’ estates pursuant to the Louisiana Code of Civil Procedure and other applicable law. Particular attention is given to the prompt settlement of creditors’ claims and legacies at the lowest costs. The administration of minors’ estates and estates of interdicted persons also are considered.
  • LCIV L862 Louisiana Probate 3 hrs.
    This course covers substantially the same range of material as LCIV L861 in a course format.
  • LCIV L900 Civil Law of Persons 3 hrs.
    This course covers the Louisiana law of domicile, marriage, divorce, annulment, custody and alimony, legitimacy of children, parental authority over children, adoption proceedings, minority, tutorship, emancipation, and interdiction.
  • LCIV L920 Louisiana Donations and Trusts 3 hrs.
    This course deals with the capacity of persons to dispose and receive property by inter vivos and mortis causa donations, the legitime of forced heirs, and the formalities of testamentary dispositions. Students are introduced to the basic principles of trust law, as adopted by statute in Louisiana. Topics covered include the nature, creation, and elements of a trust, as well as its administration, termination, and modification.
  • LCIV L930 Community Property 3 hrs.
    This course concerns matrimonial regimes governing ownership and management of property of married persons in Louisiana. Characterization of property, creditors’ rights, and rights between the spouses are considered in relation to the nature and background of community property systems.
  • LCIV L935 Louisiana Code of Civil Procedure 3 hrs.
    This course examines the Louisiana Code of Civil Procedure: Book I—Courts, Actions, and Parties; Book II—Ordinary Proceedings; Book III—Proceedings in Appellate Courts; Book IV—Execution of Judgments; Book V—Summary and Executory Proceedings; Book VI—Probate Procedure; Book VII—Special Proceedings (e.g., Attachment, Sequestration, and Injunction); Book VIII—Trial Courts of Limited Jurisdiction; and Book IX—Miscellaneous Provision and Definitions.
  • LCIV L940 Security Rights 3 hrs.
    This course includes those sections of the Civil Code dedicated to security rights, including the contracts of suretyship, pledge, mortgages on immovables, privileges, deposit, and sequestration. Chapter 9 of Title 10 of the Revised Statutes also is given attention.
Elective Courses - Law Common (LCOM)

Law Common (Prefix LCOM)

  • LCOM L800 Family Law 3 hrs.
    This course surveys the law regulating marriage and other interpersonal relationships. Topics considered include marriage, alternate forms of social organization, rights concerning procreation, divorce, child custody, financial aspects of family dissolution, the legal regulation of the parent/child relationship, children’s rights and the state’s role in protecting children from neglect and abuse, and adoption.
  • LCOM L805 Estate Planning 2 hrs.
    This course examines the various methods of preserving, increasing, and disposing of wealth. Emphasis is placed on the tax implications of transfers within the family group as well as transfers for the benefit of charitable organizations. Attention is given to the use of generation skipping transfers, class gifts, and the creation of future interests by trust instruments.
    Prerequisites: LAW L980, LCOM L715.
  • LCOM L920 Commercial Transactions 3 hrs.
    This course investigates the laws that affect the rights and obligations of parties engaged in the sale and distribution of goods. The sales contract, its formation, interpretation and performance, the risk of loss, and the remedies of the parties are emphasized. Uniform Commercial Code Article 2 receives intense scrutiny.
  • LCOM L921 Secured Transactions 2 hrs.
    This course is concerned with all aspects of security in personal property. Covered are problems and legal principles relevant to the creation of the security interest, to its perfection, to priorities between competing security interests and between a security interest and other kinds of property interest, to payment and redemption, and to realization procedures. The emphasis will be on Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code.
Skills Curriculum Courses
Category I—Factual Investigation and Counseling
Pretrial Practice Skills
Developing Deposition Skills
Advanced Legal Research Skills
Creative Problem Solving
Documents Drafting
Foreign and International Legal Research
Advocacy and Strategy in Government Regulatory Affairs
Construction Law: Handling Cases Under the LA Private Works Act
Drafting Corporate Documents
Using the Internet for Legal Research
Pleadings Drafting
Computer Fundamentals for Computer Assisted Legal Research
How to Write a Will
Drafting Corporate Documents
Basics of Mergers & Acquisitions
Creditors' Rights
Statutory & Regulatory Legal Research
The Last Transaction Hero - LA Sales Tax

Dual Skills and Academic Credit
Law Clinic
Volunteer Income Tax Assistance—VITA

 
Category II—Trial Practice Skills

Quantum Theory—Valuing the Case
Developing the Theory of the Case
Handling the Criminal Case
The Expert Witness in Court
Demonstrative Evidence
Demonstrative Evidence II
Using Evidence at Trial
Motion Practice
Appellate Practice
Louisiana Class Action Litigation
Representing a Defendant in Federal Court
Winning in the Beginning - Power, Passion, &
Persuasion in the Opening Statement
Advocacy for the Ages - Talk to the Generations
Opening Statements - Winning in the Beginning

Lawyers in the Great Tradition
The Argument of an Appeal
Courts in Action
Intensive Trial Training Workshop
Family Law
Louisiana Class Action Litigation
Personal Injury – Plaintiff vs Defense – 2 Views
Trial Tactics
Domestic Violence – Judicial Responsibilities & Perspectives

Dual Skills and Academic Credit
Trial Advocacy I—same as LAW L861
Law Clinic

 
Category III—Communication and Negotiation
Courtroom Communication Skills
Courtroom Performance Workshop
Negotiation Techniques Workshop
Entertainment Law Negotiation
Arbitration Skills Workshop
Mediation Skills Workshop
Mock Mediation Workshop
Real Estate Licensing Workshop
Closing the Real Estate Transaction
Legal Letters – Communication for Lawyers
The Art of Persuasion
Alternative Dispute Resolution
Fundamentals of Arbitration
Ethical Dilemmas to On-Line Marketing-from blogs to Twitter
First Amendment Issues Facing the Media
Handling Employee Benefits Claims
Real Estate Transaction Workshop

Dual Skills and Academic Credit
Mediation and Arbitration—LAW 817
Law Clinic

 
Category IV—Administrative Board and Office Management
Handling Bankruptcy Claims
Handling the Social Security Case
Handling the Title VII Case
Handling Claims Under the ADA
Handling the Medical Malpractice Case
Handling the Longshore Case - Making Sense of Administrative Soup
Practice and Procedures Before Administrative Boards
5300 Reasons for Handling the Social Security Case
The Professional in Practice (Required Skills Course)
Law Office Management
Technology and the Law Office: Beyond Word Processing
Screening the Medical Malpractice Case
Scientific Meets Socratic Method
How to Go Solo form Scratch
Digital Lawyering - How to Become Paperless

Dual Skills and Academic Credit
Law Clinic

 
Category V—Skills Electives
How to Write for the Bar Exam Duty Risk in Louisiana Tort Law