Bachelor of Accountancy Degree Program

Program Objective

The primary purpose of the Bachelor of Accountancy (B.Acc.) program is to provide students with a relevant and value-added technical and ethical educational background that will allow them to succeed in the public, private, and not-for-profit economic sectors and to provide faculty with the resources that will allow them to engage in high quality teaching, intellectual contributions, and service activities. This program is designed to attract students nationwide.

Learning Goals

The B.Acc. program has the following learning goals:

  • Graduates will be proficient in the use of information technology and able to provide accounting information that meets user needs.
  • Graduates will have the accounting background necessary to meet the education requirements for various professional examinations.
  • Graduates will be able to critically analyze business and accounting problems to make informed and technically appropriate decisions.
  • Graduates will be able to communicate business information clearly in order to assume leadership roles in their chosen professions.
  • Graduates will exhibit ethical conduct in all their activities and be able to apply a values-laden method for making ethical decisions.

Available Majors

All B.Acc. program students will graduate with a major in Accounting.

Required Courses

The B.Acc. curriculum consists of 120 credit hours and has four parts:

  1. Common curriculum + non-business electives
  2. Business adjunct courses sequence
  3. Business core courses sequence
  4. Major requirements + business electives 

Curriculum Design

Common Curriculum

Course
Title
Credits
ENGL T122 Critical Reading + Writing 3
ENGL T125 Writing About Literature 3
HIST T122 World Civilization to 1650 3
HIST T124 World Civilization from 1650 3
PHIL T122 Introduction to Philosophy 3
PHIL V252 Making Moral Decisions 3
RELS T122 Introduction to World Religions 3
RELS U### or V### Religious Studies Electives 6
BIOL / CHEM / PHYS Natural Science Elective 3
MUGN / VISA / DRAM Fine Arts Elective 3
  Non-Business Electives 3

Business Adjunct Courses

Course
Title
Credits
BA B415 Business Ethics 3
DECS B205 Business Statistics 3
ECON B200 Principles of Microeconomics 3
ECON B201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
LGST B200 Business Law I 3
MATH A115 Finite Mathematics 3
MATH A116 Survey of Calculus 3
PHIL A201 Practical Logic 3
SPCH A100 Fundamentals of Speech 3

Business Core Courses

Course
Title
Credits
PFOL 100-400 Business Profession Program 0
ACCT B202 Financial Accounting for Decision Making 3
BA B100 Introduction to Business 3
BA B101 Business Communications 3
BA B445 Business Policy 3
FIN B300 Financial Management 3
MGT B245 Management + Organizational Behavior 3
MKT B280 Basic Marketing 3

Major Requirements

Course
Title
Credits
ACCT B205 Corporate Accounting + Reporting I 3
ACCT B206 Corporate Accounting + Reporting II 3
ACCT B300 Tax Accounting I 3
ACCT B307 Accounting for Public Sector Entities 3
ACCT B340 Accounting Information Systems 3
ACCT B400 Advanced Accounting 3
ACCT B403 Auditing + Assurance Services 3
ACCT B410 Strategic Cost Management 3
ACCT B460 International Accounting 3
ACCT B### Accounting Elective 3
  Business Electives 3
BA B497 Business Internship 3

Total Credits

120

 

Bachelor of Business Administration

Program Objective

The primary purpose of the Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) program is to provide students with a well-rounded education that includes a foundation in the liberal arts and sciences and a study of the art and science of management and administration. The curriculum is designed to prepare graduates for responsible citizenship and leadership roles in business and society. This program is designed to attract students nationally and internationally.

Learning Goals

All B.B.A. programs have the following learning goals:

  • Graduates will demonstrate competency as business professionals.
  • Graduates will be able to apply critical thinking skills to business issues.
  • Graduates will be able to communicate effectively in the business world.
  • Graduates will be able to apply a values-laden method for making ethical decisions.
  • Graduates will posses the knowledge, skills, + abilities needed to succeed in the global economy.

Available Majors

Majors available to students in the B.B.A. program include:

Required Courses

The B.B.A. curriculum consists of 120 credit hours and has four parts:

  1. Common curriculum + non-business electives
  2. Business adjunct courses sequence
  3. Business core courses sequence
  4. Major requirements + business electives 

Curriculum Design

Common Curriculum

Course
Title
Credits
ENGL T122 Critical Reading + Writing 3
ENGL T125 Writing About Literature 3
HIST T122 World Civilization to 1650 3
HIST T124 World Civilization from 1650 3
PHIL T122 Introduction to Philosophy 3
PHIL V252 Making Moral Decisions 3
RELS T122 Introduction to World Religions 3
RELS U### or V### Religious Studies Electives 6
BIOL / CHEM / PHYS Natural Science Elective 3
MUGN / VISA / DRAM Fine Arts Elective 3
  Non-Business Electives (except INTB major) 6

Business Adjunct Courses

Course
Title
Credits
BA B415 Business Ethics 3
DECS B205 Business Statistics 3
ECON B200 + B201 Principles of Microeconomics 3
ECON B201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
LGST B205 Legal Environment of Business 3
MATH A115 Finite Mathematics 3
MATH A116 Survey of Calculus 3
PHIL A201 Practical Logic 3

Business Core Courses

Course
Title
Credits
PFOL 100-400 Business Profession Program 0
ACCT B202 Financial Accounting for Decision Making 3
ACCT B203 Managerial Accounting  for Decision Making 3
BA B100 Introduction to Business 3
BA B101 Business Communications 3
BA B445 Business Policy 3
FIN B300 Financial Management 3
MGT B245 Management + Organizational Behavior 3
MGT B250 Management Information Systems 3
MGT B325 Production + Operations Management 3
MKT B280 Basic Marketing 3

Major Requirements

Major
Courses
Credits
Economics ECON B300, B301, B305 + 3 ECON Electives 18
Finance FIN B305, B310, B315, B325, B400 + 1 FIN Electives 18
International Business INTB B200, B325, B330, B435 + 2 INTB Electives + 2 POLI / HIST / SOCI Electives + 2 Foreign Language 30
Management MGT B310, B315, B375, B430 + 2 MGT Electives 18
Marketing MKT B330, B340, B390, B450 + 2 MKT Electives 18
Business of Music MUSB B110, B205, B250, B310, B350, B400, B450 + 1 INTB elective 24
All majors Business Internship (BA B497) 3
All but INTB and MUSB Business Electives 6

Total Credits

120
Summer Session

PROGRAM COORDINATOR: Teri Berthelot, Office: 562 Monroe Hall
GENERAL INFORMATION: (504) 865-3530
WEB PAGE: www.loyno.edu/summer/ E-MAIL: summer@loyno.edu

Loyola's Summer Session offers students a chance to acquire additional coursework in a variety of time schedules. Two five-week sessions along with two six-week M.B.A. sessions are available. The courses offered are, in most instances, standard offerings which usually transfer to other colleges and universities. It is always advisable, however, for the guest student to check with his or her home institution about transferring coursework.

Our summer programs offer study in numerous areas; at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels. Travel programs and special programs are also available.

Loyola's Summer Session allows students the opportunity to complete an intended area of study in a shorter period of time. Students pursuing degrees at Loyola are encouraged to advance their progress toward degree completion by attending Loyola's Summer Session. The summer schedule containing course information and their times is published in March. Contact the Office of Student Records at (504) 865-3530 or visit the web at www.loyno.edu/records/ for a copy.

Admission

All Loyola students, any student in good standing at another university, and all entering freshmen are eligible to attend the summer sessions. Undergraduate students not currently enrolled at Loyola should log on to the summer session home page at www.loyno.edu/summer to apply online and for information regarding summer session. Students who are interested in summer law classes should contact the Office of Law Records at (504) 861-5575 for information on summer school.

Regulations

All the general rules of the university apply, as described in this bulletin, with the following exception: a student may schedule no more than six hours per session (or seven, if one course is a laboratory science course) without the written permission of his or her dean, and only then if the student has a cumulative average of 3.0 or better. Loyola students desiring to attend summer sessions elsewhere must have prior, written permission from their dean if they want such credits to apply toward a Loyola degree. Students are hereby cautioned that deans will only grant permission to take courses elsewhere when the student can demonstrate compelling reasons to do so.

Housing

Campus housing is available during the summer. For further information, refer to the section titled Student Life.

Centers And Institutes

CENTER FOR ARTS AND MUSIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP

WEBSITE: cmfa.loyno.edu/center-arts-and-music-entrepreneurship

The Center for Arts and Music Entrepreneurship produces events involving industry professionals from the entertainment centers of the country, clinics and "how-to" tutorials for artists and musicians, video tapes and broadcast events produced by the member schools and by other arts and educational institutions in the region, and aggregates content produced by others.

CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATIONS

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/lucec/

The mission of the Center for Environmental Communications is to educate students in the field of environmental communications, to stimulate communications among environmental stakeholders, to provide the public with unbiased discussion of environmental issues, and to be a resource to the media for environmental information. Instead of focusing only on journalism, the Loyola program includes the following sequences: print journalism, broadcast journalism, broadcast production, public relations, advertising, photojournalism, and film studies. This diversity allows students to interact with faculty and students who approach communications issues with different perspectives. A hallmark of Loyola’s program is the Institute of Environmental Communications (IEC). Citizens from business, the scientific and environmental communities, government, and the rest of the Greater New Orleans community are encouraged to participate. The IEC consists of a semester’s worth of meetings during which participants will be exposed to a variety of environmental concerns and issues with discussion led by the region’s environmental leaders. Additionally, Loyola faculty and students are actively working on several projects that are increasing the communication among industry and its many stake-holders. This environmental intervention is intended to enhance the potential for win-win solutions to environmental issues. Loyola’s Center for Environmental Communications will focus on those issues unique to the Louisiana region, as well as those traditionally targeted by environmental programs (population, global warming, ozone depletion, etc.).

CENTER FOR FACULTY INNOVATION

WEBSITE: UNDER CONSTRUCTION

The Center for Faculty Innovation was established in 2008 to promote new modes of teaching and scholarship that foster an integrated curriculum and learner-centered pedagogies. The Center is dedicated to nurturing connections among faculty as learners, teachers and scholars and supporting the intellectual life of the Loyola community within the context of our unique Jesuit mission and identity.

The Center now supports faculty development through workshops, a new faculty seminar, support for teaching with technology, instructional design for online and hybrid courses, summer faculty academies on teaching and learning, a resource library, one-on-one consulting and support for faculty research and publishing.

CENTER FOR INTERCULTURAL UNDERSTANDING

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/ciu/

In the Jesuit and Catholic tradition, the Center for Intercultural Understanding was established to create and maintain a campus environment where students, faculty, and staff will be able to recognize, respect, and celebrate our differences and commonalities. These differences include, but are not limited to, age, social and economic status, sexual orientation, educational background, marital status, ethnicity, gender, individual traits, ability, race, cultural heritage, and religious beliefs.

The center will provide proactive leadership in fostering respect for the rights of others, including the right to be different. It strives to create a supportive and inclusive campus environment through programming, services, advocacy, research, and curriculum transformation, responding to the needs of students, faculty, and staff for the common good.

CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/cie/

The Center for International Education (CIE) at Loyola University New Orleans promotes the internationalization of the university by initiating, developing and supporting a wide range of international and intercultural educational opportunities for members of the Loyola community. CIE sponsors numerous cultural programs including International Education Week, the Country Fair, the Education Abroad Fair, and many others. Through these opportunities, CIE encourages students to develop an appreciation of other cultures and of their own, and to maximize their intercultural experience whether here at Loyola or on an education abroad program.

International Students

CIE provides innovative programs and services to the more than 100 international students currently enrolled at Loyola. International students include students with F-1 student, J-1 exchange visitor, or other nonimmigrant visas; students who are not citizens of the United States; students whose first language is not English; and students who do not reside within the continental United States. CIE helps these students adjust to life at Loyola and ensures that they are well integrated into the Loyola community. For non-immigrant F-1 students and J-1 exchange visitors, CIE provides assistance for all immigration issues, particularly those related to SEVIS, the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System.

All non-immigrant F-1 students and J-1exchange visitors are required to have health insurance which includes medical evacuation, repatriation, and other requirements listed on the CIE website. Non-immigrant students will be billed for and enrolled in an international student health insurance plan, administered by The Lewer Agency, unless their insurance company completes an insurance waiver available at www.loyno.edu/cie/healthcare-medical-insurance/ by the deadlines listed on the website.

Education Abroad

For students wanting an education abroad experience, the Center for International Education is the first stop with advising and information on both Loyola and non-Loyola programs, financial aid, and scholarships. A study abroad advisor along with experienced study abroad peer advisers works with students to help them find the right program that will meet their academic and personal goals, financial situation, and interests. Students must also meet with their academic adviser, the associate dean in their college, and the study abroad advisor in the CIE prior to applying to a non-Loyola study abroad program.

Numerous programs are available for Loyola students. There are semester and year-long programs, community service and immersion programs, components to academic courses, and summer study abroad. While the majority of students study abroad for short summer programs, a growing number of students are selecting semester or year-long programs. Students can attend both Loyola and non-Loyola programs, but Loyola financial aid can usually only be applied to Loyola programs. The university has a number of affiliations with study abroad programs that provide limited scholarships or discounts for Loyola students. All the information that a student needs can be found at studyabroad.loyno.edu

CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL CAPITAL

WEBSITE: www.business.loyno.edu/spiritual-capital

The Center for Spiritual Capital at Loyola University New Orleans is a new research, education, and outreach organization that works with scholars, policy experts, and business leaders to connect academic learning and real-world practice. The mission of the center is to promote sound interdisciplinary research to produce innovative ideas that advance in a sustainable way a free, prosperous, and responsible civil society.

The center seeks to establish a home for, and a new network of, business leaders, academic leaders, religious leaders, and community and political leaders in general, to focus on the search for new ethical norms to guide the evolving economic relationships of the post-modem era. Special efforts will be made to bring a variety of religious traditions to bear on the traditional functions and roles of today's corporations.

CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF NEW ORLEANS

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/csno

Building on the scholarly resources of Loyola University, the Center for the Study of New Orleans promotes research into the city's history, culture, and society. By integrating social justice and analytical thinking into courses, internships, research, and public programming, the Center fosters a critical understanding of New Orleans and an opportunity to aid its renewal.

GILLIS LONG POVERTY LAW CENTER

WEBSITE: law.loyno.edu/gillislong/

The Gillis W. Long Poverty Law Center was established in 1985 at Loyola School of Law by act of the United States Congress in memory of the late Congressman from Louisiana whose career exemplified service to the needs of the disadvantaged. The center provides training and financial summer internships in law offices that provide legal services to the poor; opportunities for law students to do pro bono work while in law school; loan forgiveness assistance to graduates providing legal assistance to the poor; sponsor lectures and other public interest events; and, provide support to organizations who are involved in the delivery of legal services to the poor. The Gillis Long Poverty Law Center is a vital part of the overall commitment of Loyola University to excellence in scholarship and the pursuit of social justice.

INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF CATHOLIC CULTURE AND TRADITION

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/iscct/

The mission of the Loyola Institute for the Study of Catholic Culture and Tradition is to foster and promote the distinctive Catholic identity of Loyola University New Orleans across the curriculum and throughout the university community. With a sense of special responsibility for the intellectual and moral education of the young, the institute seeks to foster the formation of students who are familiar not only with the content of the liberal arts tradition, but also with the extent to which that tradition both illuminates and is illuminated by the Catholic faith. While the institute affirms the varieties of ways in which this may be accomplished in all aspects of the university’s life, it commits itself to the specific task of developing an interdisciplinary approach, which seeks to foster the growth and understanding proper to a mature and reflective Christian mind. Specifically, the institute will administer resources to promote the interdisciplinary study of Catholic intellectual, cultural, and moral traditions. To this end, the institute will draw upon the talents and intellectual commitment of the university faculty through sustained dialogue and by supporting those faculty initiatives which further the goals of the institute. The institute will sponsor the development of curricular offerings, extracurricular faculty-student seminars, lectures, research projects, and other initiatives including the development of appropriate library collections. When possible, these courses and other programs sponsored by the institute will be structured so as to be of interest and benefit to a larger audience including, among others, students from Notre Dame Seminary, members of religious congregations, and religious education teachers.

INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATIONS

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/lucec/IEC.html

The Institute of Environmental Communications (IEC) brings together a diverse group of citizens (environmentalists, scientists, journalists, industrialists, Brown Field community people, politicians, government employees, teachers, and business persons) for 14 — 20 evening sessions to discuss issues of vital environmental importance to the region and nation. The Fellows Program is modeled after the highly regarded Institute of Politics that has been offered by Loyola University since 1968. The IEC’s first sessions began in fall 1999.

INSTITUTE OF POLITICS

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/poli.sci/iop.html

The Institute of Politics (IOP), an independent foundation that is housed on the Loyola campus, trains community leaders in practical politics. Its program is geared to the development of new political leadership in the area. The IOP educates selected young men and women in the practice and practicalities of politics, through a recognition of the professional character of politics and the need for broader understanding and training in politics. Meeting weekly at night, participants represent a broad cross-section of the metro area, geographically and professionally. Approximately 30 participants per course study voting patterns, issues and problems, organizing and conducting political campaigns, the uses of television and advertising, and political polling. Speakers represent local, state, and national levels of politics.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CENTER

WEBSITE: www.business.loyno.edu/international-business-center

The primary purpose of the International Business Center (IBC) is to support and strengthen the international business (IB) programs of the College of Business (CoB) at Loyola University New Orleans. Since its inception in 1992, the IBC has carried out 10 externally funded projects that have included applied IB research studies, community outreach services, the enhancement of the CoB’s IB curricula, and several publications. The center supports the CoB's international internship, summer study abroad, and international student exchange programs. Also, the IBC houses a mini-library with a specialized collection of IB journals and studies. The IBC coordinates and supports the activities of the CoB's International Business Advisory Board (IBAB) and Loyola’s International Business Organization (LIBO), the latter being open to all students at Loyola. The IBAB’s more than 40 community leaders in the IB field meet twice per year to review the CoB’s IB strategy and give advice to the CoB’s IB faculty and administration. IBAB members come regularly as guest speakers or panelists to events sponsored jointly by LIBO and the CoB, offer internships and jobs (after graduation) to students from the CoB, and support financially the CoB’s IB programs. Finally, the IBC maintains relations with external organizations, such as the World Trade Center, the Port of New Orleans, GNO, Inc., the Asian Chamber of Commerce of Louisiana, the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Greater New Orleans, the U.S. Department of Education, the Inter-American Development Bank, and the Institute of International Education.

JESUIT CENTER

WEBSITE: http://www.loyno.edu/jesuitcenter/

The Jesuit Center works to enhance the Jesuit mission and identity of Loyola University New Orleans.  It seeks to share the Jesuit traditions with the larger Loyola community.   It seeks to promote teaching and research integrated with Jesuit Educational pedagogy and Ignatian spirituality.   It invites Loyola community members -- faculty, staff, students, alumni, and families -- to deepen their faith commitment in light of the faith does justice and service.

Included among its many and varied activities are:  activities in spirituality that range from day-long retreats to offering Ignatius Loyola’s Spiritual Exercises; activities in service that offer international immersion trips to Jamaica, Belize and Mexico for students, faculty, staff & alumni. 

The Center also provided orientation and on-going development on the Jesuit heritage and vision of the university for faculty/ staff and students.  It also sponsors lectures, seminars and forums on issues relating to Loyola’s Jesuit mission and identity.   Among its activities is Loyola Week, a week-long university-wide celebration of Loyola’s Jesuit character held each fall. 

It’s office is located on the first floor of Bobet Hall, and its door is always open to all.

JESUIT SOCIAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/jsri

From a tradition based upon the principles of Catholic social thought, the Institute offers participatory research, social analysis, theological reflection and practical strategies for improving the social and economic conditions in the Gulf South states and in select countries of the Caribbean and Latin America, with a particular focus on issues of migration, poverty, and racism. Through fostering close collaboration with faculty, staff, and students of Loyola University -- within a network of Jesuit social centers in the United States, partnering countries, and links with other universities -- the Jesuit Social Research Institute combines academic research, education, and social action in a new paradigm based on the union of faith and justice, the integrating factors of all Jesuit ministries.

LINDY BOGGS NATIONAL CENTER FOR COMMUNITY LITERACY

WEBSITE: www.boggslit.org/

Located in the J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library, the Lindy Boggs National Center for Community Literacy is dedicated to promoting adult literacy as a vehicle for personal, economic, and community empowerment. The Boggs Center seeks to nurture collaborative partnerships between Loyola and its surrounding metropolitan community. Through its collaboration with local literacy providers, faith-based, social, and community service organizations, business, government, civic and philanthropic leaders, the center serves as the intermediary to ensure that adult literacy programs and other institutions that impact the lives of adult learners and their families have access to national research and best practices and technical support.   Solutions are within reach, if we take these steps:

Form Links
An effective response to the challenge of adult literacy in this region requires new partnerships between literacy providers and community institutions.

Train Teachers
Based on the latest reading research, we must shift from relying on volunteer tutors to trained teachers.

Create Opportunity
Effective literacy instruction must be tailored to the needs of the region.  We must link literacy instruction to local employers.

Start Strong
New Orleans’ adult literacy numbers will never change significantly until K-12 public education reform succeeds.  Our children must get a solid foundation allowing them to learn at and beyond high-school literacy.

LOYOLA INSTITUTE FOR MINISTRY (LIM)

WEBSITE: lim.loyno.edu/

The Loyola Institute for Ministry offers a master’s degree in religious education (M.R.E.), a master’s degree in pastoral studies (M.P.S.), and a post-master’s certificate in pastoral studies both on campus and through distance education. On-campus (LIMOC) M.P.S. focus areas include small Christian community formation, pastoral care and counseling, pastoral life and administration, religion and ecology, African-American ministries (on-campus only), Christian spirituality for pastoral ministry, marketplace ministry, Hispanic ministry, youth ministry, and the opportunity for an individualized program of study. The institute also serves the continuing education needs of adults on campus and in extension by offering a certificate in religious education (C.R.E.), a certificate in pastoral studies (C.P.S.), and a post-master’s and an advanced continuing education certificate in pastoral studies. The students, faculty, and staff of the Loyola Institute for Ministry form a learning community gathered to enhance the quality of pastoral ministry in the Church. The institute serves as an educational resource for professionals and paraprofessionals engaged in, or preparing for, ministry and religious education, as well as laity who want to address themselves intentionally to their ministry in the world. The institute seeks an integration of Christian theology with skills in pastoral leadership, a facility in social and cultural analysis, and an awareness of one’s self and one’s abilities and limitations.

LOYOLA PASTORAL LIFE CENTER

WEBSITE: lim.loyno.edu/lplc/

The Loyola Pastoral Life Center (LPLC) is a continuing education division within the Institute for Ministry (LIM). The mission and programs of the Loyola Pastoral Life Center flow directly from the mission and work of LIM. The mission of the LPLC is to provide continuing education opportunities, ministry studies programs, and spiritual enrichment for women and men involved in various aspects of the church’s life and ministries. The LPLC thus furthers the mission of the church community to promote the reign of God and the primary purpose of LIM: to educate persons for leadership in Christian ministries. In pursuing its important mission, the Loyola Pastoral Life Center is particularly dedicated to helping the national church, diocesan pastoral offices, and ministry leaders in local churches improve the quality of grass-roots level Christian life and ministry. The LPLC does so by providing seminars, training programs, resources, and networking opportunities, around emerging ministry issues, for these parties. In doing its work, the LPLC remains particularly attentive to the multicultural and ecumenical dimensions of the church in the United States, to smaller dioceses and Christian home missions, and to local church communities with new and emerging forms of lay pastoral leadership.

LOYOLA SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER

WEBSITE: www.business.loyno.edu/small-business-development-center

Loyola University New Orleans is a collaborative partner of the Louisiana Small Business Development Center Greater New Orleans Region (LSBDC GNOR). LSBDC GNOR provides business counseling, technical assistance, and business training for owners, operators, or managers of existing and new small businesses in the Greater New Orleans area. Business counseling services are no charge to the business owner. Assistance is provided in many areas such as business planning, loan package preparation, website development, logo design, marketing, management, research, finding sources of funding, accounting, and legal issues. Student internships are available through the LSBDC GNOR.

MATHEMATICS CENTER

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/mathlab/

The Loyola Mathematics Center was established in 1981 with the original purpose of providing assistance to students in basic skills (developmental) mathematics courses. It has since evolved into a multimedia resource center for virtually all Loyola  students taking mathematics courses. The Math Center is commonly referred to as the Math Lab, where economics, chemistry, biology, and physics students frequently use it as  a working center. Well-qualified students provide one-on-one tutoring for students taking mathematics courses. Interactive computer software as well as video tapes are available to those who prefer these methods of assistance. Scientific Notebook, Matlab, SPSS, Visual Basic, Java, and other programs are available on our computers for the use of our students and staff. Textbooks, instructor's manuals, and other reference materials are available for almost all undergraduate math courses taught at Loyola. Instruction and assistance using various types of graphing calculators are also provided.

SHAWN M. DONNELLEY CENTER FOR NONPROFIT COMMUNICATIONS

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/~dcenter/

Housed in the Department of Communications, the Shawn M. Donnelley Center for Nonprofit Communications was established in 1997 to allow students to work on real projects under the direction of a faculty supervisor for nonprofit clients who have advertising and public relations projects. Not only is this work used by the organizations, but the work by advertising students for nonprofit clients consistently wins Addy Awards from the Advertising Club of New Orleans. The center’s facilities consist of 16 PowerMac G4 computers, six flatbed scanners, one black and white laser printer, two color laser printers, two film/slide scanners, and a vast array of graphic and multimedia design software. Student assistants supervise the center about 60 hours per week to assist students with their work. The diverse clientele includes New Orleans Area United Cerebral Palsy, Greater New Orleans Youth Orchestra, YMCA of Greater New Orleans, American Red Cross, Bishop Perry Middle School, Each One Save One, U.S. Pirg, Habitat for Humanity, Cafe Reconcile, and many others. The work has been as simple as a flyer or as complex as a full-scale integrated communications campaign. To learn more about the Donnelley Center and to view a portfolio of works visit the website at www.loyno.edu/~dcenter

TWOMEY CENTER FOR PEACE THROUGH JUSTICE

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/twomey/

The goal of the Twomey Center for Peace Through Justice is to shape social justice consciousness through education and to take action on critical social issues confronting society. Thus, the center seeks to put into practice the principles enunciated in Goals of Loyola: Loyola is committed to a serious examination of those conscious and unconscious assumptions of contemporary American civilization that tend to perpetuate societal inequities and institutional injustices. These goals are achieved through programs including Blueprint for Social Justice, Bread for the World, the Global Network for Justice, Resolving Conflict Creatively Program (RCCP), the Twomey Training Center. The accomplishments of the center are reflected in the successes of these programs in addressing the critical issues of poverty, racism, violence, and education. Several of the programs have become model programs in the community. The Twomey Center also manages the Twomey Print Shop, which provides low cost printing to the university and does limited publishing.

WALKER PERCY CENTER FOR WRITING AND PUBLISHING

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/wpc

The goal of the Walker Percy Center for Writing and Publishing is to foster literary talent and achievement to highlight the art of writing as essential to a good education, and to serve the makers, teachers, students, and readers of contemporary writing by providing educational and vocational opportunities in writing and publishing. We envision the Center as a vital part of the University's commitment to the educational needs of its students and of the citizens of New Orleans, as specified in Loyola's Statement of Educational Purpose.

By naming the center for Walker Percy, we honor the memory and contributions of this prominent American author, Catholic, and former Loyola faculty member. By establishing such a center and encouraging publication, we can draw on and further the strengths of several arts departments on campus, including English, mass communication, music, theatre arts and dance, and visual arts.

WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/womenscenter/

The educational mission of the women’s studies program and of the university as a whole is supported by the programs and services offered by the Women’s Resource Center. The Women’s Center, located in Mercy Hall room 103, aims to provide Loyola women and men with a positive college experience by responding to their needs as gendered human beings and by fostering an environment that is free of sexism and other forms of institutional and individual forms of oppression. It strives to create a supportive and inclusive campus environment through programming, services, and advocacy. The Women’s Center encourages and promotes the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge about women amongst faculty by supporting research and course development in those areas. In all its endeavors, the center seeks to include and respond to the needs of staff members. To ensure that the community be involved in activities of the center and so that students can also find feminist role models and mentors outside of the university, the center maintains and encourages contact with alumni and the local community and links to other women’s centers, especially at Jesuit institutions. The center’s mission is to create a campus environment that addresses and responds to issues of concern relevant to the lives of women on campus, in the metro area, and beyond. In doing so, women’s services at Loyola form an integral part of the Jesuit mission in higher education.

The following resources are available at the Women’s Resource Center:

  • information about women’s studies courses;
  • information on Women’s Center programs and events;
  • information on graduate programs in women’s studies;
  • information about resources for women in the New Orleans metro area;
  • programming in support of the Women’s Studies minor and about issues relevant to women;
  • leadership initiative;
  • a comfortable conference and meeting room;
  • student-run support and consciousness raising groups;
  • support for the Women's Initiative for Learning and Leading Learning Community
  • support and resources for persons affected by sexual assault;
  • a library of feminist-friendly magazines and women's studies books
Admissions

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT:  Salvadore A. Liberto
OFFICE: 315 Marquette Hall

APPLICATION PROCESS AND DEADLINES

Decisions regarding admissions are made under a policy of rolling admissions. Notification of admission under this plan will be mailed as soon as possible after receipt of all necessary materials. If admission is deferred, the applicant will be considered again.

Qualified applicants may enroll at the beginning of the fall, spring, or summer term. December 1 for the fall term and November 1 for the spring term are the suggested deadlines for admission as a degree-seeking student; however, applicants may be admitted as degree, non-degree, or transient students after these dates. Non-degree and transient students are ineligible for certain types of state and federal aid.

ADMISSION POLICY

Admission to the university represents a selection based on the personal and academic records of the applicant. Evaluation by the Admissions Review Committee is devised to select a student body with high standards of scholarship, personal character, and serious educational aims, without regard to age, color, creed, disability, national origin, race, sex, or sexual orientation.

Freshman admission is based on the credentials submitted by a student for the admissions portfolio. National test scores, high school transcripts, the counselor or teacher evaluation, the résumé, and the essay are evaluated by the committee. For applicants to the freshman class, a six-semester high school transcript will be used in consideration for admission. Acceptance to Loyola is contingent upon continued successful academic performance and graduation from high school. The objective of the admissions process is to select the students who may profit from the courses of study and services offered by Loyola University and to maintain the academic standards that have brought recognition to Loyola as a Catholic, Jesuit university. Loyola encourages any student to apply for admission and accepts those students whose credentials indicate a high probability of success. Because of the diversity of high school curricula, cultural influences on test results, the various abilities required in collegiate programs, and the unique background of applicants, each applicant’s admissions portfolio is reviewed individually.

Transfer student admission is based on an evaluation of official transcripts from each previous college or university, the grade point average, the transfer recommendation form, and the essay.

Although a personal interview is not required, a visit to the campus by the applicant is strongly encouraged. Appointments for interviews should be made in advance with the Office of Admissions.

DEFINITIONS FOR APPLICANTS

Educational Levels

  • UNDERGRADUATE–Students who have not received a bachelor’s degree or who wish to pursue a different bachelor’s degree than already earned.

  • GRADUATE–Students who have received a bachelor’s degree and wish to enroll in either graduate or undergraduate coursework.

Categories

DEGREE SEEKING–Degree-seeking students are those students who wish to pursue a degree at Loyola University.

NON-DEGREE SEEKING–Non-degree-seeking students are those students who wish to enroll at Loyola on a continuing basis but not pursue a degree program.Non-degree-seeking freshmen, transfer, and graduate students are required to meet the minimum standards set for degree-seeking students in those categories.

TRANSIENTS–Transient students may be admitted for any one semester. In order to continue their enrollment in the next semester, transient students must apply as non-degree-seeking students and submit those credentials required by the admissions committee.A student who is a one-semester visiting, non-degree-seeking student at Loyola can be categorized as a Freshman or Transfer Transient I. A Freshman Transient I must submit an unofficial high school transcript or GED scores and unofficial ACT or SAT scores. Transfer Transients I must submit either a letter of good standing from their present institution (cannot be classified as on probation, suspension, or dismissal) or a final grade report from their present institution.

A student who is seeking regular admission to Loyola University as a continuing full-time or part-time degree- or non-degree-seeking student but has not been able to supply all official credentials to the Office of Admissions by the last day of late registration can be categorized as a Freshman or Transfer Transient II. A Freshman Transient II must submit an unofficial high school transcript or GED scores, unofficial ACT or SAT scores, a completed essay, and a counselor or teacher recommendation. A Transfer Transient II can be admitted with unofficial copies of transcripts from all institutions attended. If the Freshman or Transfer Transient II wishes to continue in a subsequent semester, all official credentials must be received by the Office of Admissions by registration deadlines.

Admit Types

UNDERGRADUATE FRESHMEN–Students who have not enrolled on a college campus as matriculated students. All freshmen are required to submit the application, the essay, the résumé, the counselor or teacher evaluation, the high school transcript or GED, and the results of either the American College Testing Program (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), waived for GED students. In certain cases, the PAA with ESLAT, TOEFL or IELTS may take the place of the SAT or ACT. Students who have received college credit while still in high school should apply as freshmen indicating some college work and having two official transcripts sent as soon as final grades are posted whether or not credit was earned. The ACT/SAT is not required of students who are entering college for the first time and are 22 years or older.

UNDERGRADUATE TRANSFER APPLICANTS–Students who have attended another college or university after graduating from high school. Transfer applicants must submit the application for admission, the essay, a letter of recommendation, a résumé, and two official transcripts from each institution previously attended, whether or not credit was earned. Students who have attempted less than 12 semester hours of credit should also submit the high school transcript or GED, and the results of either the American College Testing Program (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), waived for students over 22 years old and GED students.

READMITS–Students who have previously enrolled at Loyola in an academic program (does not include continuing education and noncredit courses). Readmits originally admitted in fall 1989 or in later semesters need only complete the application form if they have not attended another institution since their last enrollment at Loyola. Readmits who have attended another institution since their last enrollment at Loyola and have attempted more than 12 semester hours at the other institution are required to follow the same procedures as transfer students. Readmits with 12 or fewer transfer hours are required to submit official transcripts and will be evaluated for readmission based on their Loyola GPA and their transfer work. Rules for evaluation of transfer credit and courses which may be applied toward a degree program may have changed while students were not in attendance at Loyola. If such changes have occurred, previously evaluated credit will be reevaluated.

Readmits who were originally admitted to Loyola prior to fall 1989 must submit official transcripts for all institutions attended other than Loyola.

Admission Actions

ADMITTED–The candidate is admitted to the undergraduate program for the term designated on the application.

CONDITIONAL ADMISSION–Prospective freshman students whose credentials indicate deficiencies in specific disciplines may be admitted by the Admissions Review Committee with a restricted registration. Conditions will be set by the dean of the college.

PROBATION FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS–Transfer students whose under-graduate records reflect deficiencies in specific disciplines and who are eligible to return to the institution previously attended may in some instances be admitted on probation by the Admissions Review Committee. Conditions will be set by the committee.

DEFERRED DECISION–The decision is deferred until additional information is submitted by the student. The student will be informed by the Office of Admissions of the information the committee needs to complete the credentials.

DENIED–The candidate is not accepted into the undergraduate program. This action is taken after the candidate is considered for all other admission actions.

STUDENTS RETURNING FROM EXCLUSION–Students who fail to remove probation in the specified time may be excluded from the university for a minimum of one semester or for a minimum of one year. If such students wish to return to the university after their exclusion period, they must apply for readmission. Readmission in such cases is not automatic and is decided by the dean who initiated the academic action as well as the dean of the college to which the student is applying. A mandatory part of the readmission process is an interview with the assistant/associate dean, who will, if the student is readmitted, develop a contract with the student for the appropriate curriculum and required progress. Students who reside out of state may substitute a letter to the assistant/associate dean in lieu of the interview.

POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR THE AWARDING OF COLLEGE CREDIT FOR FRESHMEN

  1. Freshmen entering Loyola with transfer credits from an accredited college located within the United States must submit official transcripts for evaluation of credits within 60 days from the date of registration. Freshmen entering Loyola with transfer credits from an accredited college located outside the United States must submit official transcripts for evaluation of credits within 90 days from the date of registration. Failure to meet these requirements will result in the credits not being applied to the Loyola degree.

  2. Freshmen entering Loyola who wish to be awarded college credit on the basis of acceptable credit by examination instruments must submit official results from the testing agencies for evaluation of credits within 60 days from the date of registration. International students must submit official results from the testing agencies for evaluation of credits within 90 days from the date of registration. Failure to meet these requirements will result in the credits not being applied to the Loyola degree.

EXCLUSIONS

Students on suspension, exclusion, or dismissal by another university are ineligible to be considered for admission to Loyola until the period of suspension, exclusion, or dismissal is met.

FOR ALL ADMITTED STUDENTS

TUITION AND RESIDENCE HALL DEPOSITS–Following acceptance, all first-time full-time undergraduate and graduate students must submit a non-refundable deposit of $300 ($200 for those not planning to live on campus) on or before May 1 in order to reserve a place in the class and/or residence halls. Deposits received after May 1 are accepted on a space available basis. Checks should be payable to Loyola University and sent to the Office of Admissions. Deposits are applicable to tuition and/or room charges.

CAMPUS RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS AND RESIDENCE HALL CONTRACTS–All freshman and sophomore undergraduate students less than 21 years of age not from the New Orleans metropolitan area are required, as a condition of enrollment, to reside in university housing and to participate in a meal plan program. Advanced placement or transfer credits do not negate this requirement. New Orleans undergraduate freshmen under 21 years of age must either reside in university housing, if space permits, or with a parent or legal guardian. Residence hall information is sent with the official notification of a student’s acceptance. Reservations for all students are confirmed only after receipt of a signed contract, a $100 housing deposit, and verification of adequate accident/sickness insurance coverage. Residence hall contracts and accident/sickness insurance cards should be sent to the Office of Admissions. For further information about housing and health insurance, refer to the Student Life section of this bulletin.

MEDICAL REQUIREMENTS–Loyola University New Orleans and Louisiana law requires all incoming students and students residing on campus to submit vaccination documentation. This requirement includes proof of immunization for tetanus/diphtheria (within the past 10 years), meningococcal disease, and for students born after 1956, measles, mumps, and rubella (two doses).

Registration for any course will be “temporary” until the completed proof of immunization compliance form has been submitted to Student Health Services by the student and reviewed by Student Health Services staff. Failure to submit the completed form will result in a cancellation of classes. This requirement can be met by providing evidence of prior vaccinations or being vaccinated at Student Health Services. All vaccination forms can be found on the Student Health Services website.

FINAL TRANSCRIPTS–Immediately after high school graduation, accepted freshman applicants must have sent to the Office of Admissions an official transcript with the date of graduation or an official letter verifying graduation. Transfer students who were enrolled and taking classes at another institution at the time of their application and acceptance to Loyola must have an official transcript sent to the Office of Admissions as soon as the coursework is completed.

POLICIES AND REGULATIONS

Students are enrolled at Loyola in accordance with the policies defined in the university Undergraduate Bulletin, Student Handbook, and the traditions of the college in effect at that time. Readmitted students are subject to the policies in effect at the time of readmission. The university reserves the right to clarify and change policy in the course of the student’s enrollment.

All applicants and Loyola students are required to provide complete, correct, and truthful information on all university applications, forms, and correspondences. Falsification of a record discovered between the time of his or her application for admission and the beginning of classes may be considered cause for cancellation of registration. Falsification discovered after the student has begun classes may be considered cause for dismissal.

TRANSFER OF COURSEWORK

Official transcripts from other accredited colleges and universities should be sent to the Office of Admissions. After having been evaluated by admissions, they will be forwarded to each dean’s office for review and application of credit toward Loyola degree requirements in the student’s chosen major. No more than 64 hours of coursework from an accredited two-year school may be applied to a Loyola degree program. The dean’s office will notify the student of the evaluation of transfer coursework. The transfer GPA will be computed and used for admission purposes only. Transfer credit will be awarded only as earned hours for approved courses in which grades of C or above have been earned. Transfer quarter hours will be converted to semester hours. Regardless of the number of hours accepted in transfer, students are required to meet the residency and degree requirements of their program of study. At least 25 percent of credit hours required for the degree must be completed at Loyola.

Earned hours from another college in remedial, technical, and/or courses not considered to be "college level" will not be accepted for transfer. Credit for proprietary and vocational programs is not transferable. Experiential learning programs and correspondence credit taken at an accredited university may be counted only if approved by the dean’s office of the college to which the student applies and the student attends. Military and other extra-institutional credits evaluated by the American Council on Education may be accepted when approved by the dean’s office of the college to which the student applies.No student on an exclusion from another institution will be considered before the term of exclusion is met. Students from Loyola who have been excluded are not allowed to take coursework elsewhere. If they violate this restriction, the transcript may be requested, but credit will not be given for the coursework nor will the GPA be used to accept or reject a student who wishes to reenter Loyola. coursework taken after the period of exclusion will be evaluated. It is the student’s responsibility to report discrepancies or question evaluations. If the student later changes colleges within the university, such work will be evaluated by the dean of the new college.

Transfer students will be informed of the amount of credit which will transfer prior to their enrollment, if possible, but at the latest, prior to the end of the first academic term in which they are enrolled.

SPECIAL EVALUATION

Applicants who have a grade point average lower than that required for presentation to the Admissions Review Committee and who have not been enrolled at any college or university for at least two calendar years may petition for a special evaluation. In effect, the special evaluation eliminates all courses in which grades of D or F were received. Courses in which the student received a C or better are calculated into hours earned. It is necessary that students receive the written permission of the dean of the college they wish to enter as well as the approval of the director of admissions. Students receiving a special evaluation may not qualify for certain kinds of financial aid.

ORIENTATION

The university sponsors a fall and spring orientation for new students prior to the beginning of classes for each fall and spring term.

Orientation sessions are held during the summer for students admitted for the fall semester. All new first-year and transfer students are required to attend one of these sessions. Students who begin in the summer are required to attend fall orientation. For more information on orientation, contact the Office of Co-Curricular Programs, (504) 865-3623.

EARLY SCHOLARS PROGRAM

The Loyola Early Scholars Program is a viable educational alternative for gifted and talented high school students (grades 10 — 12) to earn college credit while still in high school. Students are initially admitted to the program for one semester only. They may continue in subsequent semesters (until graduation from high school) upon successful completion of each course (a grade of C or better). Academically challenging college-level courses are available during the fall, spring, and summer terms.

Eligibility Criteria and Additional Requirements

  1. High school students entering grades 10, 11, or 12. (Not available to high school graduates.)

  2. An official school transcript (current year plus two preceding years) with minimum GPA of 3.30 in selected subjects.

  3. Official ACT or SAT score reports with an ACT score of 25 or SAT score of 1100 or other evidence of outstanding achievement.

  4. Two recommendations from the secondary school administration (from counselor, teacher, and/or the principal).

  5. An essay.

  6. An interview with a designated university official, if necessary.

  7. A completed application for the Loyola Early Scholars Program.

  8. Signature of approval from a parent or guardian.

Completed applications for the Early Scholars Program are due one month prior to the beginning of classes for the fall, spring, or summer terms. Availability of classes may vary from semester to semester.

EARLY ARTISTS PROGRAM

The Loyola Early Artists Program offers the opportunity for gifted and talented high school students (grades 10 — 12) to enroll in approved drama, music, or visual arts courses. Students are initially admitted to the program for one semester only. They may continue in subsequent semesters (until graduation from high school) upon successful completion of each course (a grade of C or better). Select courses are available to early artists in the fall and spring semesters. The Early Artists Program is not available during the summer sessions.

Eligibility Criteria and Additional Requirements

  1. High school students entering grades 10, 11, or 12. (Not available to high school graduates.)

  2. An official school transcript (current year plus two preceding years) with a minimum GPA of 2.75 in selected subjects.

  3. Two recommendations from the secondary school administration (from counselors, teachers, and/or the principal).

  4. An essay.

  5. An audition (for drama and music students only).

  6. Submission of a portfolio (for visual arts students only).

  7. A completed application for the Loyola Early Artists Program.

  8. Signature of approval from a parent or guardian.

Completed applications for the Early Artists Program are due one month prior to the beginning of classes for the fall or spring terms. Availability of classes may vary from semester to semester.

EARLY ENTRANCE

Certain students who are recommended by their high school principals and are considered by the Admissions Review Committee to be ready for college work may be admitted immediately following the completion of the junior year in high school. This program of admission without high school diploma is intended to serve applicants of unusual promise who will benefit from beginning their college careers a year early. The committee may require additional examinations over and above those normally required for entrance and may make use of any other criteria, such as maturity and motivation, which may seem desirable.

REFLECTIVE AGE PROGRAM

Participants in the Reflective Age Program are individuals 65 years of age or older who desire to enroll in the undergraduate academic courses on an "open seat" basis. They may register in audit status (credit will not be awarded) for courses during the late registration period with the permission of the instructor as indicated on the New Seat Card. Students in this program are not charged tuition. However, they are responsible for all university fees. For further information, contact the Office of Admissions, (504) 865-3240.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

International students must submit the same credentials required for freshman and transfer students. In addition, these applicants must satisfy all provisions of the U.S. Immigration Act. All documents relative to an application for admission must be submitted in English and authenticated by a school official or consulate officer. In addition to academic records, international applicants must submit an affidavit of financial support, endorsed by a bank official.Applicants whose primary language is not English must show a proficiency in English adequate for university level as evidenced by their performance on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or IELTS. Additional testing options may be requested through the Office of Admissions.Applicants who are otherwise qualified but whose TOEFL score is below the required level should plan on further English study before entering Loyola.

Transfer students from U.S. institutions may substitute at least 24 hours of academic credit at 2.5 or better in lieu of the TOEFL or IELTS. Graduates of U.S. institutions may substitute the obtained degree for the TOEFL. TOEFL scores are valid for two years from the test date.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE POLICY

Students' whose first language is English must submit the same credentials required for freshman and transfer students.

Freshman applicants whose first language is Spanish are required to submit PAA (College Board Prueba de Aptitud Academica) which includes the ESLAT (English as a Second Language Achievement Test, a subtest of the PAA), TOEFL or IELTS. Transfer applicants who are transferring from a college or university where the language of instruction is not English must provide a TOEFL, ESLAT or IELTS score. If the language of instruction is English, the regular application requirements apply.

POLICY ON NONDISCRIMINATION

Loyola University New Orleans has fully supported and fostered in its educational programs, admissions, employment practices, and in the activities it operates the policy of not discriminating on the basis of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion, sex/gender, or sexual orientation. This policy is in compliance with all applicable federal regulations and guidelines.

POLICY ON SEXUAL AND OTHER FORMS OF HARASSMENT

Loyola University New Orleans, consistent with its Goals Statement and the Character and Commitment Statement, fosters dignity and worth of all members of the Loyola community, and is committed to maintaining an educational and working environment free of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment is immoral and illegal, and will not be tolerated.

Sexual harassment may occur within a variety of relationships. Some such relationships involve unequal authority, while others occur between individuals who are of equal status. All allegations of sexual harassment will be scrutinized.

The university’s full policy and procedures governing sexual harassment and other forms of harassment can be found on the university web page for Human Resources Policies, Procedures, and Benefits. Appeal and grievance procedures can also be found in the text of the policy and in the university's Student Code of Conduct, Section 5: Sexual Misconduct, Discrimination, and Harassment Policies and Guidelines.

Loyola University New Orleans strongly supports equal opportunity in all aspects of university services and employment as provided in Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. Inquiries, concerns, and questions regarding the application of Title IX to university programs, services, employment, and policies should be addressed to the Title IX coordinator. The Title IX coordinator for Loyola University is the director of Human Resources. The Title IX coordinator may be contacted at: Campus Box 16, (504) 864-7914.

DISABILITY SERVICES

Disability Services helps students with disabilities meet the academic demands of university life. Academic counseling, assessment, and advocacy services are provided by the Academic Resource Center’s professional staff. Academic accommodations are offered to students with documented disabilities, including physical and learning disabilities. Such accommodations may include, but are not limited to, alternative test administration and academic support services including peer tutors, transcribers, note takers, readers, and computers with adaptive programs.Disability Services assists students in developing self-advocacy skills and advocates for the students with faculty and/or administrators when needed. Since it is the policy and practice of Loyola University to make its programs and facilities accessible to students with disabilities in an integrated manner, the professional staff from the Counseling & Career Services Center; Student Health Service; Physical Plant; library; and Residential Life work in conjunction with Disability Services to provide a comprehensive support service.

The Office of Disability Services is located on the main campus in the Academic Resource Center, Monroe 405. For more information, contact Sarah Smith, director of disability services, or Kacey McNally, special needs counselor, at (504) 865-2990 or by e-mail at ssmith@loyno.edu or kamcnall@loyno.edu.

UNIVERSITY POLICY ON STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Loyola University is committed to providing equal access and reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities under Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Action and the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and to providing support services which assist qualified students with disabilities in all areas of the university. Disability Services was created to help ensure the careful implementation of this policy by faculty and staff and to assist students with disabilities in meeting the demands of university policy.

Academic Regulations

KNOWLEDGE OF REGULATIONS

Students are responsible for compliance with the regulations of the university and should familiarize themselves with the provisions of this bulletin distributed by the Office of Admissions, the Registration Schedules distributed by the Office of Student Records, the Student Handbook distributed by the Division of Student Affairs, and posted official notices and official instructions given to students.

The university reserves the right to clarify and change its regulations in the course of the student’s enrollment. Faculty advisers, deans, and associate deans are available to assist students regarding compliance with current regulations. However, it is ultimately the student’s responsibility to comply with the regulations and completion of requirements for his or her chosen program of study.

Upon enrollment, the student and the parents or guardians of a dependent student agree that the student will be governed by the university regulations and will abide by decisions made by proper authorities of the university regarding the individual student.

FACULTY ADVISING

All students are assigned a faculty adviser. Faculty members are usually assigned to advise students who have indicated an interest in their particular field of specialization. Students may obtain the names of assigned faculty advisers from the office of the dean of their college, from the chair of their department, or from Loyola’s Online Records Access (LORA).Faculty advisers are available to students throughout the academic year, but their role is especially important during the orientation and registration periods. Advisers will help students plan their program, explore career alternatives, and aid in any academic problems. Faculty advisers will also ensure that the undergraduate academic experience is as valuable as possible by assisting students in the sequencing of their coursework. Students should be aware, however, that knowledge of and adherence to regulations of Loyola, both academic and otherwise, are the ultimate responsibility of the student.

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REGISTRATION

Currently enrolled students are encouraged to early register for the subsequent terms. Graduating seniors and transient students are not eligible to participate in early registration. Those admitted as transient students must complete their credentials during the term of their first admission and must be readmitted for the next term as a non-degree- seeking student or degree-seeking student in order to continue their enrollment. Students with a financial block will not be allowed to register until they have substantially satisfied their financial obligations to the university.  If you have an oustanding balance, you should contact Student Finance to discuss payment.  Students with a health hold due to remaining immunizations will also not be allowed to register. Loyola has continual registration for the upcoming semester. Registration continues through the last day of late registration for the term. Late registration is normally held for several days, beginning on the first day of class. A late registration fee is assessed. If a student decides not to return to the university in the term for which he or she has registered, the student must officially withdraw before the term begins to avoid financial penalties. (See Withdrawal from the University). Please refer to the calendar in the course reference guide for additional information.

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LORA

Loyola’s Online Records Access (LORA) is available to all students, current as well as alumni (1979 to present year). Students can check their grades, account balances, financial aid, transcripts, and class schedules, and some students, with approval of their adviser, may register online. Access to the system requires the use of a personal identification number (PIN). The PIN is set as the student’s first two letters of their first name and the last four digits of their social security number. After the initial sign-on, the student is required to reset the PIN to another six character pin.

Loyola University will provide access to LORA for Parents for currently enrolled dependent undergraduate students.  LORA for Parents will provide non-directory information on the student including grades and financial aid information.

 

DROP/ADD PERIOD

Deadlines for drop/add activity are strictly enforced. A dropped course is removed from the student’s record. Registration for the audit grading option may be selected by students during any registration activity or the drop/add period and may not be changed at a later date. Please refer to the calendar in the course reference guide for additional information.

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AUDITING

Students who do not want to earn university credit for a course may elect to audit the course. Such courses are considered part of the student's term course load and are recorded on the transcript. Regular tuition and fees apply for audited courses. To audit a course, an audit request card signed by the student, his or her adviser, and the instructor must be filed in the Office of Student Records before the last day to add classes. The instructor of the course will advise the student what is expected as an auditor in the class. A course previously audited may be taken for credit by enrolling in the course in a subsequent term. A student may not change his or her status from audit to credit or from credit to audit without permission from his or her adviser and the student's dean's office. Such approval must be filed in the Office of Student Records before the last day to add classes as indicated in the academic calendar for the term. Upon completion of the semester, the audited course will receive a final grade of (AU) Audit, (AI) Audit Incomplete, or (FA) Failed Audit.

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES

After the drop/add period and up to one week following the mailing of the fall or spring midterm grade reports, students may receive an administrative withdrawal from a course. A grade of W for the course is placed on the transcript, and the transaction requires the adviser’s and instructor’s signatures. Course withdrawal is not complete or official until all signatures have been obtained and a copy is filed in the Office of Student Records. Students who stop attending but do not officially withdraw from the course will receive a grade of F. Please refer to the calendar in the course reference guide for additional information.

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REPETITION OF COURSES

Loyola’s policy is to show all grades in repeated courses, and the student receives no additional credit hours towards graduation. To determine academic standing, all grades and quality hours are included. Courses that may not be taken more than once as opposed to “repeated” courses (Independent Study, Play Production, etc.) will carry a transcript notation identifying all repeated courses.

GRADUATE COURSES

Subject to the rules of the respective colleges, undergraduates may take one graduate course in each of their last two semesters. The graduate course’s earned hours and quality points will be applied to the graduate career only. If students wish to have the graduate credit applied to the undergraduate career, they should petition their dean’s office within the first month of class. Under no circumstances will the course’s hours and quality points apply to both the graduate and the undergraduate careers.

ATTENDANCE

Each instructor must announce at the beginning of the semester how attendance in class will affect grading. For example, the instructor may judge that attendance in class is imperative and demand adherence to a policy that a student is liable to receive an F at the discretion of the instructor if he or she misses a specified number of the classes. Attendance will not be required on the major religious holidays of any faith. Failure to attend any term without applying for a leave of absence requires reapplication and readmission to the university.

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CLASSIFICATION

DEGREE-SEEKING STUDENTS are formally admitted to pursue a degree program. Degree-seeking students are classified as follows:
Freshmen—0 – 24 total earned hours
Sophomores—25 – 55 total earned hours
Juniors—56 – 89 total earned hours
Seniors—90 or more total earned hours

Initial classifications are determined by the Office of Admissions based upon the credentials and application submitted by the student. Classifications may be changed in a student’s first term by the Office of Admissions up to November 1 in the fall semester, March 1 in the spring semester, and two weeks after the summer session registration.NON-DEGREE-SEEKING STUDENTS are admitted with official credentials but do not wish to pursue a particular degree program. Students admitted as non-degree-seeking must enroll in consecutive terms or apply for a leave of absence in order to maintain their status. Failure to follow these procedures will require an application for readmission. coursework taken while a non-degree-seeking student is subject to evaluation in terms of applicability toward a degree. There are limitations on financial aid available to non-degree-seeking students. TRANSIENT STUDENTS are admitted for one semester. If they wish to continue their enrollment, those who enroll as transient students must apply for admission as non-degree-seeking students or as degree-seeking students by submitting official credentials. Transient students are not eligible to early register. coursework taken while a transient student is subject to evaluation in terms of applicability to a degree. There are limitations on the financial aid available to transient students.

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ACADEMIC ENROLLMENT STATUS

Academic Full-time—any undergraduate student enrolled for 12 or more credit hours.  Undergraduate students must have their dean's permission to register for more than 20 credit hours (12 hours for evening students) in the fall and spring semesters.

Academic Full-time Per Summer Session—any undergraduate student enrolled for six or more credit hours. Any undergraduate student not enrolled full-time is considered part-time. Undergraduate students must have their dean’s permission to register for more than six credit hours per summer session.

CLASSROOM DISCIPLINE

In the classroom, a student does not have the right to engage in conduct which is disruptive to the educational process. Such conduct (e.g., abusive language, threats, disruptive talking and laughing, violent actions, etc.) may cause removal from that class meeting and can result in removal from the course with a grade of W. A second such disruption may result in exclusion for one or two terms or dismissal from the university.

Appeals Procedure
It is hoped that discipline problems will be resolved either through the mutual agreement of the student and instructor or through the mediation of the department chairperson or the dean of the college.In the case of an appeal, the dean of the college in which the course is offered will decide whether the matter requires consideration. If he or she thinks it does, he or she shall appoint a committee composed of the dean (or a representative), two faculty members, and a representative from student affairs. Both the instructor and the student should be apprised of the composition of this committee, and the dean should honor any reasonable objection which either might have to the appointed members. After reviewing the evidence, the committee shall render a decision concerning guilt to the student’s dean. This decision will be final.If the dean should refuse to grant a committee hearing, the student has a right to appeal to the provost. The provost may convene a committee composed of the provost or a representative, two faculty members, and a representative from student affairs. Both the instructor and the student should be apprised of the composition of this committee, and the provost should honor any reasonable objection which either might have to the appointed members. After reviewing the evidence, the committee shall give a decision which will be final.

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INTEGRITY OF SCHOLARSHIP AND GRADES

The principles of truth and honesty are recognized as fundamental to a community of teachers and scholars. The university expects that both faculty and students will follow these principles and, in so doing, protect the validity of the university grades. Instructors will exercise care in the planning and supervision of academic work so that honest effort will be positively encouraged.

Academic Work

All academic work will be done by the student to whom it is assigned without unauthorized data or help of any kind. A student who supplies another with such data or help is considered deserving of the same sanctions as the recipient. Specifically, cheating, plagiarism, and misrepresentation are prohibited. Plagiarism is defined by Alexander Lindley as “the false assumption of authorship: the wrongful act of taking the product of another person’s mind, and presenting it as one’s own” (Plagiarism and Originality). “Plagiarism may take the form of repeating another’s sentences as your own, adopting a particularly apt phrase as your own, paraphrasing someone else’s argument as your own, or even presenting someone else’s line of thinking in the development of a thesis as though it were your own.” (MLA Handbook, 1985).A student who is found to have cheated on any examination may be given a failing grade in the course. In case of a second violation, the student may be excluded for one or two terms or dismissed from the university.

A student who engages in cheating, plagiarism, or misrepresentation on term papers, seminar papers, quizzes, laboratory reports, and such, may receive a failing grade in the course. In such case, the student will not be permitted to withdraw from the course (even if the withdrawal request is prior to the final date to withdraw). A second offense may be cause for exclusion or dismissal from the university. Faculty members are required to report immediately to the dean of the student’s college any case of cheating, plagiarism, or misrepresentation which he or she has encountered and, later, the manner in which it was resolved.

The dean of the student’s college should apprise the student of the serious consequences of cheating, plagiarism, and misrepresentation as well as of the appeals procedure open to the student in such cases.

Appeals Procedure

If the matter cannot be amicably resolved in consultation with the instructor and chairperson up to 30 days after the beginning of the subsequent semester, excluding summers, the student has the right to appeal to the dean of the college in which the course was offered a decision of the instructor indicating that the student is guilty of cheating, plagiarism, or misrepresentation. The burden of proof will be upon the student.The dean will decide whether the matter requires consideration. If he or she thinks it does, he or she shall appoint a committee consisting of the dean (or the dean’s designated representative), two faculty members, and a student to render a decision. The dean or the dean’s designated representative will serve as the non-voting chairperson of the committee. The student and instructor involved should be informed of the membership of the committee, and the dean should honor any reasonable objection either might have regarding the composition of the committee. The decision of this committee is final.If the dean should refuse a committee hearing to the student, he or she may appeal to the provost. The provost may convene a committee composed of the provost or a representative, two faculty members, and one student from the college in which the appellant is enrolled. The decision of this committee is final.

PROCEDURES FOR EXCLUSION OR DISMISSAL FOR CAUSE

The dean of a college or his or her representative may initiate proceedings for exclusion or dismissal when he or she has reasonable cause to believe that a student has violated a university academic policy, has committed an offense which warrants such action, or notified of a decision of guilt. Grounds for exclusion or dismissal include, but are not limited to, the following: cheating, plagiarism, fraud, misrepresentation, and conduct which is disruptive to the educational process (e.g., abusive language, threats, disruptive talking, etc.).The dean or associate dean will form a committee to hold an exclusion or dismissal hearing. The purpose of the committee is to recommend to the dean any sanctions that should be taken against the student. In the case of fraud, cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation, or similar offenses, the committee will consist of the dean (or associate dean), two faculty members, and a student from the college in question. In the case of disruptive conduct or other offenses related to the academic environment, the committee will consist of the dean (or associate dean), two faculty members, and a representative from student affairs. In the event a committee had been formed to hear an appeal of a second offense, said committee may be convened to act as the hearing committee on exclusion or dismissal. The dean or associate dean of the student’s college shall provide the student with a written statement outlining the reasons for the exclusion or dismissal hearing, which is held to consider what action should be taken with regard to the student’s future at the university in light of the findings against the student and not to reconsider the student’s guilt or innocence in cases of cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation, disruptive conduct, etc. The statement shall contain sufficient detail to inform adequately the accused of the time, date, place, and conduct serving as the basis for the complaint. The student shall also be advised that he or she has a right to appear before the committee and to present information and witnesses in support of his or her position concerning exclusion or dismissal. Alternatively, the student may present such information in writing. The accused student may make his or her presentation with the assistance of a faculty member, staff member, or another student, but legal representation will not be permitted at the hearing.The hearing on the matter shall be held within a reasonable period of time (normally within 15 days), but at least 10 days after the student has received notice of the charges. Until final determination of the matter, the student shall be allowed to continue classes unless, in the opinion of the dean, the violation warrants immediate departure from the university. Within five days after the hearing, the committee shall make its recommendations to the dean of the student’s college. Included in the committee’s recommendation shall be a record of the deliberations (a full transcript is not required) and a justification for the committee’s decision. A copy of these records shall be immediately forwarded to the provost. Should the dean of the college decide that the student shall be excluded for one or two semesters or be dismissed from the university, the student may appeal the decision to the provost within 10 days following receipt of the dean’s decision. After receiving the written appeal from the student, the provost may affirm, modify, or reverse the action previously taken by the dean.The decision of the provost is final. Students from Loyola who have been excluded are not allowed to take coursework elsewhere. If they violate this restriction, the transcript may be requested but credit will not be given for the coursework nor will the grade point average be used to accept or reject a student who wishes to reenter Loyola. coursework taken after the period of the exclusion will be evaluated. However, the student is advised to follow the procedures for taking courses elsewhere as stated in this bulletin.

GRADING

Each instructor has the option of using a grading method within each course that best meets the needs of students and the subject. However, all grades are translated by instructors into the following grades:

A Excellent This grade is assigned 4.0 quality points per semester
A- Excellent This grade is assignd 3.7 quality  points per semester hour.
B+ Above Average This grade is assigned 3.3 quality points per semester hour.
B Above Average This grade is assigned 3 quality points per semester hour.
B- Average This grade is assigned 2.70 quality points per semester hour.
C+ Average. This grade is assigned 2.3 quality points per semester hour.
C Average. This grade is assigned 2 quality points per semester hour.
C- Below Average This grade is assigned 1.7 quality points per semester hour.
D+ Minimally Passing. This grade is assigned 1.3 quality points per semester hour.
D Minimally Passing. This grade is assigned 1 quality point per semester hour.
F Failure or failure to withdraw. No quality points are assigned.
I Incomplete. This grade is to be assigned only when the instructor has been presented with serious and compelling reasons why the student should be allowed to complete the course at a later date. These reasons are customarily medical. The I grade is not an automatic extension. An I grade which has not been made up by the sixth week of the subsequent term, excluding summer terms, will be changed automatically to F.
P Pass. Pass/fail grades are available only in courses designated as pass/fail. Grades of P are not counted toward quality point averages.
X No Grade Submitted.  
W Withdrawal. Indicates that the student withdrew by the tenth week of class in the Office of Student Records. No credit is awarded.
AU Audit Complete.  
AI Audit Incomplete.  
AP Advanced Placement.  
EX Exempt from course requirement.  
FA Audit Failed.  
IP In Progress. An IP grade may be granted for certain courses that typically are longer than a normal semester.

GRADE POINT AVERAGES

A student’s grade point average is based on credit hours, grading method (pass/fail, etc.), grade awarded, and quality points. The following definitions apply. QUALITY HOURS are the units upon which a student’s grade point average is calculated. They differ from earned hours because quality hours do not include the pass grade and do include failed courses. LOYOLA EARNED HOURS are the credit hours earned while taking courses at Loyola. TOTAL EARNED HOURS are the credit hours earned while taking courses at Loyola as well as the hours awarded for transfer work toward a student’s degree. QUALITY POINTS are calculated by multiplying the quality points associated with a grade (A=4, etc.) by the quality hours. (A three-credit-hour course with a grade of A will result in 12 quality points.)LOYOLA GRADE POINT AVERAGES are calculated by dividing the Loyola quality points by the Loyola quality hours. LOYOLA CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGES include only the coursework taken at Loyola. ATTEMPTED HOURS are all courses registered beyond the drop/add period including W grades.

GRADE REPORTS

A report of the grades made by a student in his or her scheduled courses is available through LORA. Students requiring a “paper copy” may also request this through LORA.
Loyola’s grade reports list the courses, grades, Loyola grade point averages (both cumulative and semester) and the total earned hours. Discrepancies must be appealed within 30 days of the last examination.

CHANGE OF GRADE

An instructor may change a grade previously assigned by processing an official change of grade form. This form may be obtained in the Office of Student Records or in the dean’s office. The instructor must request the grade change and cite the reason for changing the grade. The form must be approved by the instructor, the department chair (Humanities and Social Sciences only), and the dean under whose jurisdiction the course was offered.

GRADE APPEALS

The student has a right to the grade he or she has earned, the right to know the grading system of the instructor, and the right to know grades as they are given during the semester. The grading system should be included in the course syllabus.If the student feels that he or she is not being graded justly, the student should first consult the instructor. If this consultation proves unsatisfactory, the student should then consult the department chairperson. If the student still feels that the problem has not been resolved, he or she should consult the dean of the college in which the course is offered to request a committee hearing.The student has the right to appeal a given grade to the dean up to 30 days after the beginning of the subsequent semester, excluding summers. It may happen, however, that a hearing may not be able to be scheduled until after that time. Until the grade is finally determined, the student’s academic standing and all related rights and privileges are based on the grade as originally assigned.The student shall collect and present any evidence (tests, papers, laboratory reports, etc.) to the dean. The dean may appoint a committee composed of the dean or the dean’s designated representative, two faculty members, who, if possible, should be familiar with the course, and one student who has taken the course, if possible. The dean or the dean’s designated representative will serve as the non-voting chairperson of the committee.The student and instructor are to be apprised of the composition of the committee, and the dean should honor any reasonable objection either might have to appointed members. Both the student and the instructor have the right to present their position in person to the committee. The burden of proof will be on the student. The decision of the committee is final, and the grade it decides upon becomes the official grade for the course.If the dean denies a student a committee hearing, the student may appeal to the provost. The provost may convene a committee composed of himself or herself or a representative, two faculty members (who should, if possible, be familiar with the course), and one student from the college in which the course is offered and who has taken the course. Both the student and the instructor are to be apprised of the composition of the committee, and the provost should honor any reasonable objection which either might have to appointed members. Both the student and the instructor have the right to present their position in person to the committee. The decision of the committee is final, and the grade it decides upon becomes the official grade for the course. Loyola students enrolled in courses at other institutions are subject to the grade appeal policy at those institutions.

ACADEMIC ACTIONS

Probation, Exclusion, and Dismissal

An undergraduate student whose Loyola cumulative grade point average falls below 2.0 will be placed on academic probation. In the subsequent semester, the student will be required to make substantial progress toward a Loyola cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0. Under normal circumstances, substantial progress is defined as removal of at least one-half of the existing quality point deficiency, with the remainder of the deficiency to be removed in the following term. Failure to make substantial progress during the probationary period may result in the student’s exclusion from the university for a minimum of one or two semesters. A student is removed from probation upon achieving a Loyola cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 and upon fulfilling any other probation conditions required by the college.An undergraduate transfer student who is admitted on probation will be required to make substantial academic progress and to meet specific minimum/maximum credit hour requirements established by the college. Failure to do so during the first semester at Loyola may result in academic dismissal or exclusion from the university for a minimum of one or two semesters. A transfer student is removed from probation upon fulfilling probation conditions required by the student’s college. Students wishing to return to the university after the period of exclusion must apply for readmission. Readmission in such cases is not automatic and is decided by the dean of the student’s college. A mandatory part of the readmission process is an interview with the associate dean, who will, if the student is readmitted, develop a contract with the student for the appropriate curriculum and required progress. Students who reside out of state may substitute a letter to the associate dean in lieu of the interview. Students from Loyola who have been excluded are not allowed to take coursework elsewhere. If they violate this restriction, the transcript may be requested but credit will not be given for the coursework nor will the grade point average be used to accept or reject a student who wishes to reenter Loyola. coursework taken after the period of the exclusion will be evaluated. However, the student is advised to follow the procedures for taking courses elsewhere as stated in this bulletin. See Transfer of Coursework.All students who have previously been excluded from the university and have been readmitted on probation will be required to make progress as established upon reentry by the associate dean of the student’s college. Failure to do so may result in the student being dismissed indefinitely from the university. For readmission after dismissal, refer to the Special Evaluation section of the Admissions chapter of this bulletin. See Transfer of Coursework.At the end of each semester, students will be notified by mail by their deans of any academic actions. Academic probation is determined solely by the student’s grade point average. Academic actions which result from the student’s inability to remove himself or herself from academic probation are made on an individual basis. Academic actions may be appealed in writing to the dean of the student’s college. This appeal must be received in writing with supporting documentation within 14 days from the date of the exclusion/dismissal letter. A decision will be made within 7 days. In the spring of 1979, the university ceased indicating a probationary status on a student’s transcript; however, the following academic actions do appear on the student’s transcript: “academic exclusion for a minimum of one semester,” “academic exclusion for a minimum of one year,” or “academic dismissal indefinitely.” Students may not graduate while on academic probation.

DEAN'S LIST

An undergraduate degree-seeking day division student enrolled in the College of Humanities and Natural Sciences, College of Social Sciences, College of Business, or College of Music and Fine Arts, who completes 12 quality hours or an undergraduate evening division student who completes 9 quality hours may be placed on the Dean’s List. To be eligible for this distinction, the student must have earned a 3.5 grade point average with no I, X or blank grades. Students who are placed on the Dean’s List will have this distinction indicated on their transcript at the end of each semester.

CAREERS

Students may have an undergraduate, graduate, professional, and continuing education career at Loyola University. Each career has its own grade point average, which will not reflect courses taken that are at a level different from a student’s career at that time. Therefore, for students who receive a bachelor’s degree and return to take undergraduate courses as a graduate student, their grade point average at the time of the awarding of the undergraduate degree will not be affected by this later coursework. In addition, the graduate grade point average will not include quality points for undergraduate courses.

MAJOR

Students indicate an interest in a program of study during the initial admission process which enables the student to be advised properly concerning a course of study. Should the university in the orderly review of its curriculum decide to discontinue a major, the courses necessary for the completion of the major will be offered in a two-year period.  General Study majors are required to declare a major prior to the start of their junior year.

CHANGE OF COLLEGE OR MAJOR

Students may change colleges or majors by filing the appropriate change of major form through the Office of Student Records’ website www.loyno.edu/records/ changecollegemajor.php or through their LORA account. Students must have a minimum 2.0 to change colleges. Students who change their majors must follow the academic program in effect at the time of the change.  Students must allow 5 working days for the dean of their new college or majors to process all of the paperwork.

DOUBLE MAJOR AND MINOR

Students are allowed to pursue two majors simultaneously by submitting their request through their Dean's Office. Students in the College of Humanities and Natural Sciences and Social Sciences must have a minimum 3.0 to pursue two majors. The dean and adviser will establish requirements based on the current bulletin.

SECOND BACHELOR’S DEGREE

A student who has already been awarded a bachelor’s degree may apply for a second degree only if the second degree is different from the first degree. Ordinarily, a second degree at the undergraduate level is discouraged, and a graduate degree is encouraged. However, in rare instances, two baccalaureate degrees may be appropriate to a student’s educational goals. Students who hold a baccalaureate degree from Loyola University or any other accredited institution may earn a second bachelor’s degree from Loyola if they meet the following conditions:

  1. Have the approval of and work out program details with the dean of the
    college involved;

    Complete at Loyola a minimum of 30 additional semester hours beyond the first
    degree, at least 15 hours of which must be in the second degree’s major;

    Complete all requirements for the second degree not covered by the first
    degree program;

  2. Meet all quality point and grade requirements set by the college, including the
    college’s Common Curriculum requirements.
    Students should be aware that financial aid opportunities for those seeking a second baccalaureate degree are limited.

COMPOSITION REQUIREMENTS

All entering day division freshmen receive placement based upon their ACT Writing or SAT Writing test scores. Depending on the score, students are either placed in ENGL T122 (Critical Reading/Writing), receive exemption from ENGL T122, or take a placement examination. Students required to take the placement exam may not schedule a composition course without having taken the exam. Based on the results of the exam, students are placed in ENGL A100 (Expository Writing), ENGL A105 (English Composition—International Students), or ENGL T12. Please note that exemption will require three hours of general electives. Students transferring to Loyola University from a community college must successfully complete six hours of English composition in order to receive credit for ENGL T122. For information on the testing and placement sequence, please refer to the paragraphs dealing with composition in the Evening Division section of this bulletin.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS

All students (freshmen and transfers) who enter the B.A., B.S., or B.F.A. degree programs will be required to pass a second-semester course in first-year foreign language (i.e., French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish, Latin, or Greek A101) or demonstrate equivalent knowledge by placing into a higher level on a departmental examination. Students who must take A100 of the language in preparation for the required A101 will use the A100 credit as general elective hours. Students enrolling in business administration (with the exception of international business) or music have no foreign language requirement but may elect to take foreign language if they so desire. Loyola offers placement tests in the following languages: Spanish, French, Italian, German, Russian, Latin, and Greek. No credit is given as a result of these tests; their purpose is placement into the appropriate level.

Freshmen: All incoming first-year students are required to take the foreign language placement test to determine if they can “place out” of the entire requirement or to determine the level at which they should begin if they wish to continue with the language beyond the requirement. Students who “place out” of the requirement will need to take three additional hours of general electives to fulfill graduation requirements.

Transfer Students: Students who are transferring from an accredited institution, with six semester hours with a minimum grade of C for the equivalent of Loyola’s A101 language course, will have met the foreign language requirement and NEED NOT take the placement test. Transfer students with no foreign language transfer credit may take the exam to determine if they have sufficient knowledge to “place out” of the requirement or to determine the level at which they should begin if they wish to continue the language beyond the requirement. This later group will need to take additional general elective hours as explained above.

Exemptions: Students who have graduated from a high school outside of the United States in which the language of instruction is not English are considered “native speakers” of another language and are thus exempt from the foreign language requirement. Also exempt from the foreign language requirement are students who place into ENGL A105. No credit will be awarded for students exempt from the requirement; they will need to complete three additional hours of general electives to fulfill graduation requirements. Students who seek exemption from the requirement who do not meet the guidelines above need to take the placement exam to determine eligibility for exemption. Falling into this category are students who attended high school in the United States but who speak a foreign language at home. Please note that in this category we can offer exemptions only in languages Loyola teaches. Students exempt from the requirement will need to complete three additional hours of general electives to fulfill graduation requirements.

MATH PLACEMENT

All entering day division freshmen are placed in math courses based upon the math scores of the ACT or SAT tests. These scores determine if any remedial work is required before the student may schedule the math course specified by his/her program. Entering students who score at or above the Loyola-established score on the math portion of the ACT or SAT may receive exemption, depending on their degree program, for the required math. Please note that exemption is for the course only. Three hours will be added to the general elective requirement. Transfer students are also required to take the math placement examination unless they transfer a college-level (i.e., not remedial) math course with a minimum grade of C. Currently, Loyola offers two remedial math courses. MATH A092, Fundamentals of Algebra, is the remedial course for students who major in biology, chemistry, psychology, sociology, or business. MATH A095, Introduction to Linear Mathematics, is the remedial course for all other majors in College of Humanities and Natural Sciences, the College of Social Sciences, the College of Music and Fine Arts, and the College of Business. If a student is placed in remedial math, the student must complete the remediation before registering for the college-level math course required by the major. Credit earned in MATH A092 and MATH A095 is not applicable toward a degree, but grades earned in these courses enter into the grade point average.

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION

Loyola recognizes that students, as a result of study or experience, may possess a mastery of the content of certain college courses. To enable students to profit from their knowledge, Loyola allows students to receive credit or a waiver of a requirement through departmental or external examination. The availability of departmental examinations is left to the discretion of the individual departments. Credit by examination is governed by the following regulations:

  1. Only registered non-transient students are eligible to receive credits. Credits
    earned by examination may be posted on the Loyola transcript only during a
    term in which the student earns credit for completing coursework.

    The maximum number of credit hours a student may earn by examination is 30.

    A student may not receive credit in or a waiver of a requirement in a course in
    which the student has attended or enrolled, except during the first semester when
    a student is allowed to drop a course because of inaccurate placement. Students
    who have enrolled in a course as auditing may petition for credit by examination.

    A student may not receive credit by examination for a course that is at a level
    more elementary than one in which he or she is currently or previously enrolled.

    Credits earned by examination do not qualify students for veterans’ benefits nor
    are they used in determining registered hours.

  2. Credits earned at another university based on that institution’s internal placement
    exams will not transfer to Loyola.

Departmental Examinations: Students may petition the dean in charge of the subject area to be examined on the content of a specific course or to have an examination or evaluation of an academic experience related to a specific area. Upon completion of the examination or evaluation, the dean will notify the Office of Student Records who shall, if the student has been successful, post the credit. There is a per course equivalent fee charged. Students should consult their dean for this fee information.

Optional Placement Tests: Placement tests in modern foreign languages, Greek, Latin, and history are available to entering students. Their scores on the test may enable them to “place out” of certain courses. Based on their scores on the history test, students may receive Loyola credit for specific courses upon registration. Additionally, placement and proficiency tests and auditions are given in the area of music for the purpose of assigning students to private applied music study and to ensure homogeneity in some classes. Extraordinarily able music students may receive advanced placement in some music study on an individual basis.

External Examinations: Students may petition the university for credit by external examination by having the scores sent to the student’s dean’s office. The dean’s office will evaluate all scores based on the approved external examination. There is a $20 posting fee on external examinations.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT BY EXAM SCALE

 

TEST NAME

 

LOYOLA EQUIVALENT

MIN. AP SCORE REQUIRED
Biology BIOL T122 Cultural Biology 4
Chemistry CHEM T122 Intro to Chemistry 4
Chinese Language & Culture CHIN A100 First Year Chinese I 4
Composition ENGL T122 Critical Reading/Writing 4
Environmental Science BIOL Z230 Human Ecology 4
Microeconomics ECON B200 Microeconomics 4
Macroeconomics ECON B201 Macroeconomics 4
French Lang. Level III FREN A201 Second Year French II 4
French Lit. Level III FREN A201 Second Year French II 4
German Level III GERM A201 Second Year German II 4
Human Geography GEOG A100 General Geography I 4
World History HIST T124 World Civilization  from 1650 4
U.S. History HIST A201 U.S. History from 1865 4-5*
Italian Language & Culture ITAL A100 First Year Italian I 4
Japanese Language & Culture JPNS A100 Modern Japanese I 4
Latin Lyric LATN A300-level 4
Virgil LATN A300-level 4
Composition and Lit. ENGL T125 Writing About Literature 4
Computer Science A or AB Math A211 Intro to Programming I 4
Statistics MATH A241 Prob. & Stat. 4
Calculus AB MATH A257 Calculus I 4
Calculus BC MATH A258 Calculus II 4
Calculus BC MATH A257 Calculus I & Math A258 Calculus II 5
Music Theory MUTH M102  Music Theory 4
Physics B PHYS A115  Physics for Life Sciences I (3 hrs) & PHYS A 112 Phys I Lab (1hr) 4
Physics B PHYS A101  Intro to Mechanics  (4 hrs) & PHYS A112 Phys I Lab (1 hr)  5
Physics C PHYS A116  Physics for Life Sciences II Lec (3 hrs) & PHYS A113 Phys II Lab (1 hr)  4
Physics C PHYS A102  Intro to Electramag & Relativity (4 hrs) & PHYS A113 Phys II Lab (1 hr)  5
U.S. Govt & Politics POLS A100 Intro to American Govt.  4
Psychology PSYC A100 Intro. to Psychology  4
Spanish Lang. SPAN A201 Second Year Spanish II  4
Spanish Lit. SPAN A201 Second Year Spanish II  4
Art: History VISA A210 Survey of World Art I  4

* If a score of 5 is reported for American History II, it is possible to receive 6 credit hours (both 200 and 201), pending a writing sample. Contact the department chair for additional information.

1 In accordance with the guidelines of the American Council on Education, formal coursework taken while in the military and non-collegiate courses may be substituted for one of the exams listed in the External Examination Chart. Students should petition their dean for consideration by submitting the results of those examinations. Registered nurses enrolled in Loyola’s nursing program may receive 24 hours in nursing in addition to the 30 hours of credit by examination.* Scores will be based on ACE recommendations.

IB—International Baccalaureate—Credit by Exam Scale
Credit given for: Higher Level Test with scores of 5, 6, 7

Biology 3 hrs BIOL T122 Cultural Biology
Chemistry 3 hrs CHEM T122 Introduction to Chemistry
Computing 3 hrs COSC A106 Microcomp. and Productivity
Economics 3 hrs ECON X130 Economics and Society
English AI 3 hrs ENGL T125 Writing About Literature
History—Americas 3 hrs HIST A200 U.S. History
History—European 3 hrs HiST A499 Modern Europe

Languages:A2 &  B

Fren/Germ/Span/Ital/Russ

 

3 hrs

 

Lang 201

 

Second Year II

Mathematics HL 3 hrs Math T122 Math Models
Music 3 hrs MUGN U168 Intro to Western Art Music
Philosophy 3 hrs PHIL T122 Introduction to Philosophy
Physics 3 hrs PHYS T122 Introduction to Physics
Psychology 3 hrs PSYC A100 Introduction to Psychology

 

RESIDENCY

At least 25 percent of the semester credit hours required for the degree must be earned through instruction offered by Loyola. Unless special permission is granted by the dean for the student to pursue coursework elsewhere, the last 30 credit hours must be completed at Loyola. Although transfer students are required to complete at least 15 credit hours in their major while at Loyola, additional hours are normally required. Transfer students in Loyola's Evening Division are required to complete at least 50 percent of the credit hours in the major at Loyola.

ELIGIBILITY FOR GRADUATION

Students must meet the specific requirements of their degree programs as set forth in this bulletin. The university, through the deans, may authorize changes and exceptions when it finds them desirable and consistent with the continuous and orderly review of its policies.To be eligible for graduation, students must have fulfilled their specific degree program and college requirements, must have at least a 2.0 Loyola cumulative grade point average, major average, and minor average if a minor is pursued, must have completed their last 30 hours of coursework at Loyola, and must have been certified to graduate by their dean. Those departments with different requirements will so inform students. Graduating students are expected to complete a senior exit survey before graduation. Applications for graduation should be filed during the previous fall term for May, August, and December candidates. Specific deadlines are published in the academic calendar. To be certified to graduate at the end of the term for which the student applied, all degree requirements must be completed no later than July 1 for spring candidates, October 1 for summer candidates, and February 1 for fall candidates. After that date, the original application for graduation will be deleted. If the student is unable to complete the requirements during this period of time, the student must reapply for graduation in a subsequent term.

GRADUATION

Loyola confers degrees in May, August, and December. After grades are received, the university determines graduation grade point averages and distinctions. Subsequently, the Office of Student Records posts the degrees and distinctions to transcripts and provides the students with their diplomas. Diplomas and transcripts are not released until the student has discharged all financial and contractual obligations to the university and has completed the required senior exit survey. After a student has graduated, no change may be made in his or her record, except to correct a discrepancy (see Grade Reports) or as the result of a grade appeal (see Grade Appeals).

GRADUATION DISTINCTIONS

Graduation distinctions are determined on the basis of the student’s Loyola cumulative grade point average. A student who has made a cumulative average of 3.5 graduates cum laude; one who has made an average of 3.7, magna cum laude; one who has made an average of 3.9, summa cum laude. In addition, graduation distinctions for transfer students who complete 60 or more Loyola quality hours will be based solely on the Loyola cumulative grade point average. Graduation distinctions for transfer students who complete fewer than 60 Loyola cumulative quality hours will be based on two factors: 1) the Loyola cumulative grade point average, provided it is a 3.5 or better, and 2) the combined grade point average of coursework taken at Loyola and transfer institution(s). If the lower of the two averages is 3.5, the distinction will be cum laude; if the lower is 3.7, the distinction will be magna cum laude; if the lower is 3.9, the distinction will be summa cum laude.  On completion of all course requirements and certification for graduation by the student’s dean, the official distinction will be inscribed on the diploma and listed on the transcript. Distinctions noted in the commencement ceremony program are based on the previous term’s cumulative grades and, therefore, may not be the same as the official distinction.

COMMENCEMENT

Loyola University holds a commencement ceremony at the end of the spring semester. Students who are candidates for May, August, or December of that calendar year may participate in that ceremony.  Fall candidates may opt to participate in the following year ceremony.  You must notify the Office of Student Records of your intention when you apply to graduate.  The commencement program is not a certification document of the university. All students, regardless of their participation in the commencement ceremony, will be charged a graduation fee of $250. This fee will include the cost of the regalia, diploma and leather cover, and free lifetime transcripts.

DIPLOMAS

The diploma given to students upon graduation carries the university information, student’s name, university distinctions, and degree title. Diplomas will be released only to students who have discharged their financial and legal obligations to the university.

CROSS-ENROLLMENTS

Loyola University has a consortium arrangement in place with three universities, Tulane, Dillard and Xavier.  It allows undergraduate students at any one of the universities to take courses at each of the other three institutions on a space available basis.  The intent is for students to have access to a wider variety of coursework.  To participate, students must be full-time students and must be enrolled at their home institution for a minimum of nine hours. Students pay full-time tuition to his or her home institution to be eligible to cross-enroll.   Payment for all courses is at home institution rates and is remitted to the home institution.  However, any course lab fees or fines must be remitted to the host institution prior to the release of final grades.  The credit and grades will appear on the transcript of the home institution as if they were taken there.  Interested students should consult the dean or department chair for approval and then contact Diane Fletcher or Valencia Luke in the Office of Student Records to register for the cross enrollment.

Loyola University also has a enrollment agreement with American University, Washington Semester Program. Students may enroll, with permission of their dean, in this program. These courses will be placed on the Loyola transcript, and the grades will be included with their Loyola grades. Tuition is paid directly to American University.

ENROLLMENT AT OTHER UNIVERSITIES

Students must obtain the prior written permission of their dean to enroll in courses at other institutions. No transfer credit will be awarded for such work unless the courses are approved by the student’s department and dean. Only students in good standing are granted permission to attend another institution. Students are cautioned that deans will grant permission to take courses elsewhere only when the student can demonstrate compelling reasons to do so. Credit will be awarded only as earned hours for approved courses in which grades of C or above have been earned.An official copy of the transcript from the other institution must be submitted to the Office of Student Records prior to the completion of Loyola’s next semester or the course will be subject to the provisions of evaluation of transfer coursework. Students from Loyola who have been excluded are not allowed to take coursework elsewhere. If they violate this restriction, the transcript may be requested, but credit will not be given for the coursework nor will the grade point average be used to accept or reject a student who wishes to reenter Loyola. coursework taken after the period of the exclusion will be evaluated. However, the student is advised to follow the procedures for taking courses elsewhere as stated in this bulletin.

SUMMER SCHOOL POLICY

Students pursuing degrees at Loyola are encouraged to advance their progress toward completion by attending Loyola’s summer sessions. Loyola students desiring to attend summer sessions elsewhere must have prior, written permission from their dean if they want such credits to apply toward a Loyola degree. Credit will be awarded only as earned hours for approved courses in which grades of C or above have been earned.

 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE / INTENT TO RE-ENROLL

Students enrolled in a term may apply to their dean for a leave of absence for either the next term or academic year and process a leave of absence form in the Office of Student Records. Students returning from a leave of absence are subject to the policies of the bulletin under which they were originally admitted. A leave of absence is not granted to a student transferring to another university. Students who did not formally apply for a leave of absence are eligible to complete an intent to re-enroll form in the Office of Student Records if the student did not attend another university during the absence period or have an active probation status at Loyola.

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY

To withdraw officially from the university a student must:

  1. Obtain a withdrawal form from the Office of Student Records.

    Obtain signatures of the designated officials on the withdrawal form.

  2. Students should consult the official university calendar for the tuition refund schedule and deadlines.

Withdrawal is not complete or official until all signatures have been obtained and the student record’s copy is returned to the Office of Student Records.

Those students who withdraw officially from the university prior to the last day for dropping courses as recorded in the academic calendar will have the courses removed from their records. Students withdrawing from the university after the drop period but in the withdrawal period will receive Ws.

Students who have not been enrolled at the university for a period of two semesters or more must follow the degree requirements in effect at the time of their reentry.

MEDICAL WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY

A student will be granted a medical withdrawal for medical or mental health reasons from the University within the term the student is incapacitated, on the condition that detailed written documentation is provided by the student’s health care professional to the Vice President for Student Affairs and Associate Provost. Written notification will be provided to appropriate parties by the Vice President for Student Affairs. Any student receiving a medical withdrawal during the term may be required to remain out of class the succeeding term. (This decision will be based on seriousness of illness and time of withdrawal.) Medical withdrawals must be made within the term being requested (during illness), and are for the entire term. There are no partial medical withdrawals for a term. The Vice President for Student Affairs will recommend the appropriate refund, if any.

 

RECORDS RETENTION POLICY

Admissions Documents

The admissions records of enrolled students are retained for 10 years. Acceptance letters, applications, correspondence, credit by examination, test scores, transcripts, transfer credit evaluations, and admissions decision information are retained on non-enrolled students for a period of two years.

Records and Registration Documents are retained for a period of one year. Change of grade forms, final grade rosters, transcripts, catalogs, class schedules, and graduation certifications are retained indefinitely. Students are required to report and appeal all discrepancies regarding all academic records to the Office of Student Records within 30 days from the final class day of the semester in which the discrepancy occurred.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF VETERAN AFFAIRS

Immediately following registration held in the beginning of each semester, students who are enrolled in a V.A. approved program may be eligible for benefits through the U. S. Department of Veterans Affairs.   All inquiries concerning the certification should be directed to the Office of Student Records.

Loyola University participates in the Post 9-11 Yellow Ribbon Program.  Loyola will provide 50% of tuition and fees for eligible undergraduate, graduate and law students and VA will pay the additional 50% for qualified students.  These funds are paid directly to the university.  All questions regarding Yellow Ribbon should be directed to  Kathy Gros, Director of Student Records.  For additional information on this program, go to the VA website - www.gibill.va.gov.

Credit Hour Certification Rules for all students:

Classification Full Time 3/4 Time 1/2Time LT 1/2 Time 1/4 Time
Undergraduate 12 9 6 5 3
Graduate 9 6 4.5 4 3
Law 9 6 4.5 4 3
Summer School 6  - 3 - -
6 week session 4 3 2   1
8 week session 6 5 3 2 1

 

TRANSCRIPTS

Loyola is authorized to distribute only Loyola’s own transcripts, not the records of testing services or other universities. Students may have four records at Loyola which comprise the official transcript: undergraduate, graduate, law, or continuing education transcript. Upon a student’s request, all official transcripts are sent by the Office of Student Records to others. Transcripts marked “Issued to the Student” are given by the Office of Student Records to students. In accordance with recommendations of the American Association of College Registrars and Admissions Officers, official transcripts issued to students should not be treated as an official academic credential. Transcripts carry notations identifying major, minor, if applicable, degree program, Loyola term and cumulative statistics, degrees earned at Loyola and other institutions, transfer coursework by institution, credit by examination, date of birth, and prior academic level. Academic exclusion and academic dismissal are indicated on the transcript for students placed in this status.

Students who have attended Loyola as transients under the cross-enrollment/consortium policy will have their coursework posted on their home institution’s transcript. The Office of Counseling and Career Services issues copies of Loyola transcripts as part of its placement portfolio. This document should not be treated as an official transcript.Loyo la will withhold transcripts, diplomas, letters of good standing, and statements of honorable dismissal until indebtedness to the university has been discharged.

POLICY ON RELEASE OF INFORMATION

Loyola endeavors to keep the student’s educational records confidential and out of the hands of those who would use them for other than legitimate purposes. All members of the faculty, administration, and clerical staff respect confidential information about students which they acquire in the course of their work. At the same time, Loyola tries to be flexible enough in its policies not to hinder the student, the institution, or the community in their legitimate pursuits. Documents submitted by or for the student in support of an application for admission or for transfer credit are not returned to the student or sent elsewhere by request. In exceptional cases, however, when another transcript is unobtainable, copies may be prepared and released to prevent hardship to the student. The student should present a signed request. Usually the copy, marked as a certified copy of what is in the student’s file, is released.

The complete policy on release of student information follows. Public Law 93 – 380 (also known as the Buckley Amendment, and as the Privacy Rights of Parents and Students—Section 438 of the General Education Provisions Act) permits only the release of “directory information” about students without the student’s written consent. Directory information includes:

Student’s name, all addresses, telephone numbers, place of birth, college, major, honors, awards, photo, classification, dates of enrollment, degrees conferred, dates of conferral, any graduation distinctions, and the institution attended immediately prior to admission. The law provides that any student may, upon written request, restrict the release of or printing (in the student address directory) of such directory information. The student may so indicate at the beginning of each fall semester.

The law requires such written consent of the student for the release to anyone (including parents of non-dependent students) of other than “directory information” with the following exceptions—(a) other school officials within the educational institution who have legitimate educational interest; (b) officials of schools to which the student seeks to transfer; (c) the Comptroller General of the United States, the HEW Secretary, the administrative head of an education agency, or state educational authorities; (d) in connection with a student’s application for or receipt of financial aid; (e) state and local officials or authorities to which such information is specifically required to be reported under state statute adopted prior to November 19, 1974; (f) organizations or educational agencies conducting legitimate research, provided no personal identifiable information about the student is made public; (g) accrediting organizations; (h) in connection with an emergency when such information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other persons; and (i) the Veterans Administration.Loyola administrators and faculty may have access to information contained in students’ records on a need-to-know basis. Personal information shall only be transferred to a third party on the condition that such party will not permit any other party to have access to the information without the written consent of the student and that the information be utilized only for the specific purpose for which it was released. Under the law, any student has the right to inspect and challenge his or her own educational file, with the exception of letters of recommendation or other material when the author was guaranteed confidentiality prior to January 1, 1975. Positive identification of the student shall be required, and a university official shall remain in the immediate vicinity during the examination process.

Loyola University will provide access to LORA for Parents to currently enrolled dependent undergraduate students.  LORA for Parents will provide non-directory information on the student.

Security of Student Records

Loyola University New Orleans maintains all student records in electronic format. Such records are maintained on an administrative system housed in a secured environment. Access to all electronically stored information is controlled through the use of user IDs and passwords. Additionally, all records are copied to magnetic tape on a daily basis and stored offsite.

Policy on Intellectual Property Rights

The university’s policy for students, faculty, and staff on intellectual property rights can be found on the university web page under Policy, Procedures, and Reports at http://academicaffairs.loyno.edu/policies-and-guidelines.

Student Grievances and Complaints

The university has procedures to handle student grievances and complaints. Please see the Student Code of Conduct to determine the procedure to follow for a specific grievance or complaint.

Syllabi Policy

Beginning fall 2004, syllabi for courses are published at the web-based schedule of classes (https://lorasec.loyno.edu/) by term and subject and are available for review and downloading. Students requiring a copy of their syllabus prior to fall 2004 should request that information from the department which offered the course.

Email Policy

All students are assigned a Loyola University e-mail address. This is the only address that will be recognized and used by Loyola University. All official information from faculty, staff, and administrators will be sent to students at this address. It is the students’ responsibility to regularly check their e-mail account.

Student Assessments

The Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Assessment evaluates student learning and student perceptions through surveys of graduating seniors and alumni. Colleges and departments may also assess student learning outcomes and their perceptions of their Loyola experience.

Residency

At least 25 percent of the semester credit hours required for the degree must be earned through instruction offered by Loyola. Unless special permission is granted by the dean for the student to pursue coursework elsewhere, the last 30 credit hours must be completed at Loyola. Although transfer students are required to complete at least 15 credit hours in their major while at Loyola, additional hours are normally required. Transfer students in Loyola's Evening Division are required to complete at least 50 percent of the credit hours in the major at Loyola.

Tuition and Fees

All regular students are assessed tuition and fees on a semester basis.

These fees and the tuition pay for only about 75 percent of the actual cost of operating Loyola for one year. The other 25 percent is made up with funds raised by the annual fund program from alumni, friends, faculty, staff, foundations, corporations, and revenues from the university endowment.

Applicants for admission to Loyola and students who need assistance in paying for their education are encouraged to apply for financial aid. Applications for financial aid are included in the application packet. Additional forms may be obtained from the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid.

TUITION AND FEES

Traditional Undergraduate students are charged a flat rate for tuition if they are enrolled as full-time students having registered for 12 to 20 credit hours. Students taking less than 12 hours are charged on a per-hour basis. Students enrolled through the Office of Professional & Continuing Studies are charged the flat full-time rate for 13 to 20 credit hours and the per-hour rate for less than 13 credit hours.  Students taking more than 20 hours are charged the flat rate, plus the per-hour rate for the hours over 20. This overload rate does not apply to music or honors students. There is no full-time or flat rate during the summer session.

Because of the uncertainty of the economy and budgetary projections, Loyola University reserves the right to change tuition, fees, or other charges printed herein. The rates listed below are for 2010 – 11.

TUITION

Traditional Undergraduates
(freshman, sophomore, junior, senior, transient, non-degree)

Full-time (12 — 20 credit hours) (Professional Studies, 13 — 20 credit hours)

 

New and Continuing Students

15,234 per semester

Part-time (11 credit hours or less)

 

Undergraduate courses:

 
 

Traditional Students

$869 per credit hr.

Overload (each credit over 20) (except music and honors)

$869 per credit hr.

Evening Program Students (Students enrolled through the Office of Professional & Continuing Studies) (under 13 hours)
$434 per credit hr.

FEES

       

For Beginning Students

 

Application fee-undergraduates (not refundable)

$20

 

FYE/SYE Engagement fee

$250

 

Acceptance Deposit (not refundable)

 

Campus residents (includes housing deposit)

$300

 

Off campus

$200

For All Students

 

University Center Fee

 

This fee is dedicated to the partial support of the operation of the Joseph A. Danna Center including programming activities sponsored by the University Programming Board.

   

Full-time students

$113 per sem.

   

Part-time students

$56.50 per sem.

   

Summer Session

$56.50 per session

 

Student Government Association Fee

 

This fee supports the operation of the Student Government Association to include funding the internal operations of the SGA and recognized student organizations.

   

Full-time students

$50 per sem.

   

Part-time students

$25 per sem.

 

Athletic Fee

 

This fee provides the majority of support of the university’s intercollegiate athletic program, supplemented only by fund-raising. No funds from tuition revenue are used to support the athletic program. All students are entitled to free admission to all regular season games by presenting their Loyola Express Card at the entrance.

   

Full-time students

$120 per sem.

   

Part-time students

$60 per sem.

 

Publications Fee

 

This fee, supplemented only by paid advertisements, supports the publication of the student magazine, The Wolf. Each student is entitled to a copy of each of the four issues published during the academic year.

   

Fall semester only

$20

 

Information Technology Fee

 

This fee provides for unlimited high-speed access to the Internet and intranet servers for e-mail, web, news, chat, FTP, TELNET, and online library research services. Access to these services is available from anywhere on campus–computer labs, classrooms, common areas, and residence hall rooms.

   

Full-time students

$225 per sem.

   

Part-time students

$112.50 per sem.

 

Graduation Fee

 

This fee is assessed once the student applies for graduation. It provides the graduate with a cap and gown, the diploma cover, the graduation ceremony, and lifetime transcripts.

   

Senior

$250

 

Contingent Fees

 

Communications Major

$100 per semester

  Credit by examination  
 

Departmental examination

$200

 

External examination

$20

 

Late registration

$50

 

Late payment

$250

 

Library book not returned

$50 minimum

 

Lab Fee

$50, $75, $100 or $150 per lab course

 

M.S.N. Clinical Practicum

$500 per clinic course

  Portfolio Fee $250 per portfolio course
 

Student Health Insurance (cost varies)

Approximately $1,182 per yr.

 

Student teaching fee (part-time students only)

$100 per sem.

  Study Abroad
$250

Students are encouraged to make payment via our online payment system at www.loyno.edu/bursar/billpay.html. Payment may also be made by check or money order made payable to Loyola University with the bill remittance stub. Students not wishing to have their social security number or campus-wide identification number placed on their payment should contact the Office of the Bursar for available alternative options. Cash transactions are discouraged. A charge of $30 will be assessed for each check returned from the bank. VISA and MasterCard charges greater than $50 will be accepted as payment on the tuition account.

TUITION REMISSION

REFLECTIVE AGE–A remission of 100 percent of tuition is allowed to all students who are 65 years or older. The remission does not apply to normal student fees, and courses must be taken for audit.

RESIDENCE HALLS

Charges for room and board are due on a semester basis. Room rent is billed along with tuition and fees. The residence hall contracts are for both fall and spring semesters. Freshmen not from the metropolitan New Orleans area are required to live in a university residence hall. Board is paid separately. Proof of personal sickness and accident insurance coverage or participation in a university sponsored plan is required as a condition of residency in university housing.

Room Rates


The following are room rates in effect for the 2010 – 11 academic year.

  Double Room

Biever Hall

$3,050 per sem.

Buddig Hall

$3,050 per sem.

Cabra Hall

$2,529 per sem.

Carrollton Hall Suites

$3,155 per sem.

Carrollton Hall Apartments

$3,656 per sem.

Residence Hall Deposit (not refundable)1

$100

Residence Council fee
This fee applies only to students residing on campus and supports the programming efforts and activities of the respective residence councils.

Biever Residence Council Fee

$30 per sem.

Buddig Residence Council Fee

$30 per sem.

Cabra Residence Council Fee

$30 per sem.

Carrollton Hall Residence Council Fee

$30 per sem.

Rates apply to the academic semester only. The Christmas holiday period and the breaks between semesters are not included in the room charges. Information on accommodations and on reservations is provided in the section titled Student Life.

Meal Plans (Board)

Loyola Dining Services offers several meal plan options that offer a combination of all-you-can-eat meals and the declining balance dollars, known as Wolf Bucks. The all-you-can-eat meals include breakfast, lunch, dinners. Wolf Bucks are used for snacks, and late night dining. Additional Wolf Bucks may be purchased in $100 increments. While all students living in the residence halls are required to participate in a meal plan, first year students, freshmen and sophomores, must choose one of the weekly meal plans or the combination plan.

Weekly Plans: Any 19, 15, or 12 all-you-can-eat meals each week.

19 meals per week $2,114 (includes $200 in WolfBucks)
15 meals per week $2,044 (includes $400 in WolfBucks)
12 meals per week $1,962 (includes $660 in WolfBucks)

Semester Plans: Any 50, 75, or 100 all-you-can-eat meals each semester in any combination and at any point in time. The semester plan includes $500 Wolf Bucks per semester.

50 meals per semester $906
75 meals per semester $1,069
100 meals per semester $1,245

Wolf Bucks Only: Students may select from four plans that provide only Wolf Bucks.  These plans may be purchased for their actual value of $500, $750, $1,500 or $2,000.

Combination Plan: Any 9 all-you-can-eat meals per week, plus any 75 all-you-can-eat meals each semester, plus $600 Wolf Bucks per semester.

Combo Meal Plan $2,135

For more information about our meal plans, please visit our website at www.loyno.edu/dining.

Loyola Express Card


The Loyola Express Card is much more than just a student identification card; it is a safe, convenient, and economical way to make purchases all over campus without carrying cash, checks, or change. Much like a debit card, students simply deposit money into their Express Card account, and purchases are deducted from the account balance. It has proven to be an excellent method to pre-plan and monitor expenditures.

The Loyola Express Card is accepted at all campus food service locations, Convenience Store, Dunbar's, Loyola Bookstore, Central Reproduction, Student Health Service, Student Government Association, and residence hall laundry machines. Students may make deposits by cash, check, VISA, or MasterCard. Deposits to the Express Card may be made in the Office of the Bursar, Marquette Hall, Room 270. For deposit information, please call (504) 865-2388.

Funds deposited to the Loyola Express Card carry over from one semester to the next until spent. Balances in excess of $10 in a Loyola Express Card account will be refunded only if a member officially severs ties with the university by graduating, transferring, or otherwise leaving the university. Refund forms may be completed at the Office of Student Finance and must be accompanied by written proof of separation unless you are graduating. Refunds will be applied first to any outstanding university debt, with remaining funds issued, by check, to the student.

BILLING AND PAYMENT POLICY

Incoming students and returning students who have pre-registered are mailed a bill for tuition, fees, residence hall charges, and board plans prior to the beginning of the semester. All payments are due 30 days from the billing date unless other arrangements have been made. Accounts not paid by the due date will be placed in past due status.

Students who are not early registrants, students taking special program courses or continuing education courses, and all international students must pay in full at the time of registration.

A late fee of $250 will be assessed on accounts in past due status. If a bill is not received or if an adjustment should be made to the bill, the student should contact the Office of Student Finance so that payment can be made by the deadline. Students who have not met their financial obligations or made appropriate arrangements through the Office of Student Finance have not officially completed registration and may be subject to removal from enrollment and will not be allowed to register for subsequent semesters. Students whose checks are returned from the bank as unpaid also are subject to removal from enrollment.

Loyola will withhold statements of honorable dismissal, transcripts, the diploma, and all other reports or materials until all indebtedness to the university has been paid or until satisfactory arrangements have been made with the vice president for finance and administration. No one will be allowed to enroll for subsequent semesters as long as prior financial indebtedness has not been satisfied. It is also the policy of Loyola to withhold transcripts, registration, and diplomas on any student who has defaulted on a Guaranteed Student Loan, Stafford Loan, Direct Loan, Perkins Loan, NDSL, or other student loan. In the event that the delinquent account is placed with an outside agency for collection, all collection costs, attorney fees, and court costs incurred will be passed on to the student.

EMPLOYER TUITION REIMBURSEMENT PROGRAM

For Professional Studies and College of Business working students with employer reimbursement plans, the university will defer payment on 90 percent of tuition and regular fees. To become eligible for this deferment, the student must submit to the dean’s office a copy of the employer’s reimbursement policy and each semester submit verification on company letterhead of the student’s eligibility in the plan. By the university’s payment due date each semester, an Employer Reimbursement Agreement form must be submitted along with 10 percent of tuition and regular fees.  Any other charges must be paid within the normal deadlines.

Payment in full will be required 30 days after grades are due in the dean’s office. Other reports, such as transcripts and the diploma, are withheld until final payment is received.

MONTHLY PAYMENTS

Although Loyola has no monthly payment plan of its own, students may subscribe to one of two plans offered by outside companies.

TuitionPay by Sallie Mae and Tuition Management Systems, Inc. offer families several monthly payment options to help make education expenses more affordable.  The interest-free monthly payment option enables families to spread all or part of the annual tuition, fees, residence hall charges, and board plans over equal, monthly payments.   There are no interest charges, only a small annual fee.  Please contact the Office of Student Finance at (504) 865-3337, or visit our website at http://www.loyno.edu/studentfinance/monthlybudgetplans.html for more information on these programs.

REFUND POLICY

A student who withdraws from a course before the end of the term may be entitled to a refund of a percentage of the tuition charged for that course. The university’s general policy on refunds is described below. Federal statute requires an alternate calculation for recipients of federal Title IV financial assistance, and it is described as well.

TUITION–Full-time students who withdraw from the university or drop to part-time status or part-time students who drop a course(s) may be entitled to a refund of all or a percentage of their tuition. Students who withdraw must return a completed withdrawal form to the Office of Student Records. Mere cessation of attendance does not constitute withdrawal. The date of receipt of the withdrawal notice by the Office of Student Records will determine the amount of tuition refund. Refunds are a percentage of the tuition payable in the semester in which the student withdraws, not a percentage of the total amount billed. Only tuition is refundable. No refunds are made when a student is suspended or dismissed for academic, disciplinary, or financial reasons. Tuition refunds are made for the normal fall and spring semesters on the following basis:

  1. If formal notice is received within two weeks after the beginning of the semester, a refund of 100 percent of tuition is made.
  2. If formal notice is received within five weeks after the beginning of the semester, a refund of 50 percent of tuition is made.
  3. If formal notice is received within nine weeks after the beginning of the semester, a refund of 25 percent of tuition is made.
  4. No refunds are allowed after the ninth week of classes.

Since special sessions, short sessions, and summer sessions vary in length, please refer to the academic calendar for those refund deadlines. A student forced to withdraw for medical reasons should consult the Academic Regulations section of this bulletin for the university’s policy on medical withdrawals.

ROOM AND BOARD–Students who withdraw from the university may be entitled to a refund of all or a percentage of their room and board charges.  Students who withdraw must return a completed withdrawal form to the Office of Student Records that includes appropriate signatures from the Office of Residential Life and the Office of Student Affairs.  Mere cessation of attendance does not constitute withdrawal from the university.  Amount of refund will be determined by the date of receipt of the withdrawal notice by the Office of Student Records, or the date of official check out from the student's assigned residence hall, whichever is later.  No refunds of room or board will be made when a student is evicted, suspended, or dismissed for academic, disciplinary, or financial reasons.

  1. If formal withdrawal notice and residence hall check out are received within two weeks after the beginning of the semester, a full refund of room and board charges is made, less a sum pro-rated up to the next full week of actual usage of room and board, and actual Wolf Bucks used.
  2. If formal withdrawal notice and residence hall check out are received within five weeks after the beginning of the semester, a refund of 50 percent of room and board, less actual Wolf Bucks used, is made.
  3. If formal withdrawal notice and residence hall check out are received within nine weeks after the beginning of the semester, a refund of 25 percent of room and board, less actual Wolf Bucks used, is made.
  4. No refunds are allowed after the ninth week of classes.

During summer sessions, room and board charges will be pro-rated to actual usage, rounded up to the next full week when a student officially withdraws.  However, no refunds on room or board will be given after 50% of the session has expired.  Unused Wolf Bucks purchased for the summer sessions are not refundable other than by official withdrawal from the university, but are carried forward to the next academic year for students who continue their enrollment at Loyola.

Tuition Refund Insurance

An elective medical withdrawal insurance plan administered by A.W.G. Dewar, Inc., is offered to full-time students. This insurance provides a refund of 75 percent of tuition in the event the covered student is forced to withdraw due to illness or accident. The insurance reimburses the insured for the remaining tuition not refunded by the university’s refund policy, up to 75 percent described above.

Enrollment forms and descriptive materials are mailed to the student in midsummer prior to the start of the academic year. More information may be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs.

Withdrawals and Institutional Merit Scholarships

Institutional academic and merit scholarships are calculated based on the assumption that students will enroll and be charged full-time tuition. If a student on scholarship aid withdraws from a course and receives a tuition refund, the scholarship will be proportionately reduced based on the reduced tuition cost for the semester.

Withdrawals and Federal Financial Aid Programs

Federal Pell Grant eligibility is calculated based on the student’s enrollment status at the time funds will be disbursed.

Federal financial aid programs assume students will complete a full semester. Aid eligibility must be recalculated if a student totally withdraws or is dismissed from the university before 60 percent of the semester has been completed. Aid will be adjusted based on the number of days in the semester that have elapsed before the student indicated an intent to withdraw to a university official.

Additional information on the calculation of refunds (with examples) and the manner in which refunds will be applied against the financial assistance received may be obtained from the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid.

OVERPAYMENTS/EXCESS AID

If a credit exists on a student account due to an overpayment, withdrawal, or excess financial aid, a refund may be issued to the student upon request. If the student paid any portion of the bill by credit card, the refund will be issued to the credit card company for the appropriate amount. If the student paid any portion of the bill by personal check, a refund may be issued after the personal check clears. Please refer to the tuition refund schedule. Any form of financial aid (loans, grants, or scholarships) will be the priority form of payment to the tuition account. If a credit results from a combination of financial aid and a credit card payment after all adjustments have been made, the credit card will be refunded.

Financial Aid

The Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid provides information for and administers all aid programs on campus. For more complete information, please contact that office at (504) 865-3231, by e-mail at finaid@loyno.edu, or on the Internet at www.loyno.edu/financialaid.

Loyola’s scholarship and financial aid policy is to balance recognition of the superior student and necessary assistance to the needy. In instances where need is indicated, Loyola will try to provide sufficient funds to allow the student to attend Loyola. In instances where there is little or no need demonstrated, Loyola will still attempt to reward academic achievement with appropriate scholarship awards.

TYPE OF ASSISTANCE

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS–A scholarship is a commitment from Loyola that a portion of the tuition cost for an academic period will be covered by gift aid. The scholarships are awarded to outstanding students with superior academic records and national test scores. Preference is given to new freshmen; however, scholarships are also given to transfer students. Students already attending Loyola cannot receive scholarship assistance except to renew a prior year award. Loyola may consider that gift aid from other sources satisfies all or part of a student’s scholarship eligibility.

OTHER GIFT AID–Grants-in-aid that do not have to be repaid may be available to students who can demonstrate substantial financial need. Some grants are not available to students who have already earned a baccalaureate degree.

CAMPUS JOBS–The federal government and Loyola provide employment opportunities for students who can demonstrate financial need and who want to work on campus.

LOANS–Long-term, low-interest loans provide students with an opportunity to borrow a part of the costs of education. The loans must be repaid when you are no longer enrolled "at least half time" at an approved school. Borrowers must be able to demonstrate financial need. Loans with higher interest rates and less attractive repayment conditions are also available to students and parents on a non-need basis.

MAKING AN APPLICATION

If you want to apply for financial aid, you must submit a financial statement via the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). You can complete the FAFSA on the Internet at www.fafsa.ed.gov

A new student’s financial aid file cannot be evaluated until the student is admitted and the FAFSA has been received at Loyola. A continuing student’s file can be evaluated when the FAFSA is received at Loyola. You may expect a response from Loyola to your request for financial assistance within two weeks, after April 1.

Documentation to verify accuracy of application data is frequently required for federal programs. Requests for such information will be addressed to the applicant as the need arises.

You are urged to apply early and to supply all documentation well in advance of the beginning of the enrollment period. Offers which can be made by May 1 are considered timely and should meet as much of full need as funding permits; later applications will be subject to fund availability.

WHAT AID DOES ONE APPLY FOR?

Your admissions application serves as your application for all institutional merit scholarship funds. You should complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid ("FAFSA") to apply for all federal, state, and institutional need-based aid programs.

Merit-based scholarships are awarded on a competitive basis through the Office of Admissions. Interested applicants can contact an admissions counselor for specific requirements.

Scholarships in music are awarded directly by the College of Music. These scholarships are given for ability, need, and talent. Application should be made directly to the dean of the College of Music.

Oftentimes an award will include a combination of the four different kinds of financial aid–scholarships, grants, loans, and jobs. This combination may vary according to the applicant’s eligibility for certain types of funds as well as the availability of funds.

HOW MUCH CAN ONE EXPECT?

How much one receives depends upon one’s need. Need is the difference between the cost of education and what you and your family should be able to pay. Loyola bases the student/family contribution upon information provided on the FAFSA.

MAKING SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS

Students receiving scholarships and/or other financial assistance have the responsibility to make normal progress toward graduation and completion of their program of study. Recipients of assistance who habitually withdraw from classes or who habitually receive grades which show the coursework was not completed may be judged as not making progress.

Recipients who are in danger of losing financial aid eligibility for failure to make progress are normally warned in writing of the conditions to be met in order to maintain progress. Recipients who fail to meet the terms of the warning will lose the right to participate in all financial aid programs until such time as they will have demonstrated, at their own expense, that they are capable of completing their course of study in an orderly manner. Additional information is available on request in the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid, located in Marquette Hall, Room 110 or on the Internet at www.loyno.edu/financialaid

Federal regulations also require that all recipients of federal assistance who have completed two years of study have a grade point average that will permit them to graduate. Students beyond the second year whose average is below this level must be denied access to all federal aid programs until the required grade point average has been regained.

SCHOLARSHIPS

Academic Scholarships

A scholarship is a commitment from Loyola that a portion of the tuition cost for an academic period will be covered by gift aid. The scholarships are awarded to outstanding students with superior academic records and national test scores. Loyola may consider that gift aid from other sources satisfies all or part of a student’s scholarship eligibility.

Annual Scholarships

Alpha Kappa Alpha. This scholarship was established by the Alpha Beta Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. An annual grant is available to a black female student with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 and university status of sophomore or junior who has demonstrated good citizenship and leadership ability and financial need for tuition assistance.

Alpha Sigma Nu Scholarship. Alpha Sigma Nu, the National Jesuit Honor Society, established this scholarship at Loyola University. An award is given annually to Loyola for undergraduates to be administered by the university on the basis of scholastic excellence and financial need.

Booth-Bricker Scholarship. This scholarship was established at Loyola by the Booth-Bricker Fund in 1996 to train nuns who presently work, or who will work in the Archdiocese of New Orleans. Scholarships are awarded to Daughters of Our Lady of the Holy Rosary.

Joseph A. Breaux Scholarship. This scholarship was established by the late Judge Joseph A. Breaux to provide scholarships to Loyola students who are residents of Louisiana.

Greater New Orleans Foundation Class of Electric Rate Payers Scholarship. The Greater New Orleans Foundation distributes funds on an annual basis to several colleges and universities in New Orleans, including Loyola University. Each year, the amount allocated differs, as the prorata share is based on the total number of full-time students enrolled in relation to the total number of students at participating universities. Scholarships are awarded to students who have been residents of New Orleans for at least five years; are enrolled full-time; are enrolled in a program leading to a baccalaureate or graduate degree, and who demonstrate academic worthiness and financial need.

Clare Boothe Luce Scholarships. This fund was established by the Clare Boothe Luce Program to fund scholarships for junior and senior female students studying the sciences. Science majors who are pre-med are not eligible.

Dr. Robert G. Weilbaecher Scholarship. The Weilbaecher Scholarship was established in 2001 by Dr. Robert G. Weilbaecher, A’60, to encourage students to pursue the study of biology. Candidates must apply for, and receive a grant from the Cancer Association for Greater New Orleans, or other types of support. Recipients are selected by the Department of Biological Sciences.

Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation. This fund was established by the Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation to provide funds for the education of financially needy and academically deserving Christian girls who are residents of any of the following Southeastern states: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Virginia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

Fanny Edith Winn Education Trust Scholarship. The Fanny Edith Winn Educational Trust, an independent foundation based in Crowley, La., was established to support higher education at Louisiana universities. Scholarships are given annually to outstanding undergraduate students at Loyola.

The Presser Foundation Scholarship in Music. This scholarship was established by the Presser Foundation to recognize the outstanding music major at the end of his or her junior year. The student is selected annually by vote of the College of Music faculty.

Endowed Scholarships

Almar Foundation Scholarship. This scholarship was established through gifts from the Almar Foundation of New Orleans. It will be awarded to outstanding students from the greater New Orleans area.

Alumni Legacy Scholarship. This scholarship was established by the Loyola University New Orleans Alumni Association and is available to children or stepchildren of Loyola alumni.

Alice Powell Anderson Scholarship. This scholarship was established by Mr. Vernon E. Powell in memory of his mother, Alice Powell Anderson.

Dr. and Mrs. Jack Andonie Endowed Scholarship in Biological Sciences and Pre-Medicine. This fund was established by Dr. and Mrs. Jack A. Andonie. Dr. Andonie was a 1958 graduate of the College of Arts and Sciences. It will be awarded to deserving biology and pre-med students.

L. Dean Angeles Endowed Scholarship in String Education. This scholarship was funded in 2006 by the J. Edgar Monroe Foundation to honor Dean Angeles for guiding the string education program at Loyola's College of Music for 26 years. The recipient will be an outstanding string education student based on academic and musical achievement.

Meredith Alison Arnold Music Leadership Endowment. This fund was established to promote excellence in the College of Music and Fine Arts. The recipient will be an outstanding student instrumentalist who exhibits leadership skills and contributes positively to Loyola and the New Orleans music community.

Monsignor Michael Artim Memorial Scholarship Fund. This fund was established from the will of Monsignor Artim to promote excellence in undergraduate studies by offering assistance to talented students.

Eugene Barousse Scholarship. This fund was established by the late Eugene Barousse. The scholarship is awarded based on academic achievement and financial need.

John and Mary Jane Becker Endowed Scholarship. This scholarship was established through gifts from John, A’61, and Mary Jane, A’61, Becker. It will be awarded to outstanding business students.

Ralph "Tom" Bell Endowed Journalism Scholarship. This scholarship was established by the family and friends of the late Tom Bell, who taught journalism for many years at Loyola. It will be allocated to the editor of The Maroon student newspaper.

Rev. Francis A. Benedetto, S.J., and Rev. Karl A. Maring, S.J., Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of Fr. Benedetto and Fr. Maring, through gifts from the Department of Physics and former colleagues. Both Jesuits taught physics at Loyola for many years, and this scholarship will be awarded to outstanding physics students.

Guy F. Bernard Memorial Scholarship in Music. This music scholarship was established in memory of Guy F. Bernard. It is awarded annually to an outstanding student in keyboard.

The Sidney and Brenda Bezou English Scholarship Fund. This fund was established by bequest of Brenda Moore Bezou to promote excellence in the field of English. It is awarded to talented students majoring in English.

The Sidney and Brenda Bezou Mathematics Scholarship Fund. This fund was established by bequest of Brenda Moore Bezou to promote excellence in the field of Mathematics. It is awarded to talented students majoring in Mathematics.

Rev. Emmett M. Bienvenu, S.J., Endowed Scholarship for the Classics. This endowed scholarship was established at Loyola in honor of the Rev. Emmett M. Bienvenu, S.J. It will be awarded to deserving classics students.

M.J. Euphemie Blanc and Louis Alfred Blanc Joint Memorial Scholarship in Music. This scholarship was established with a bequest from Mary Jane Euphemie Blanc. The eligibility for the scholarship is the recipient must be a degree candidate in the College of Music; the recipient must be a vocalist, violinist, pianist, or organist; and first preference will be given to female students.

Regina H. Blanc Memorial Scholarship. In 2000, Loyola University New Orleans received a bequest from the estate of Mary Jane Euphemie Blanc, a donation to the College of Business for the sole purpose of establishing the Regina H. Blanc Memorial Scholarship. The recipient must be a female business student studying to become a certified public accountant.

Henry J. Boudreaux and Luke S. Boudreaux Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established by the late Flossie Mae Boudreaux in memory of her late husband, Henry J. Boudreaux, and of Luke S. Boudreaux.

Joseph A. Breaux Scholarship. Judge Joseph Breaux established this scholarship to promote excellence in undergraduate studies to Louisiana residents.

Gladys E. Brennan Endowed Scholarship Fund. This scholarship was established by Gladys Brennan in her will and is awarded to talented students who demonstrate financial need.

Otto F. Briede Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was created through a gift from Otto F. Briede, Jr., to establish the scholarship in memory of his father. The scholarship is awarded to a worthy student majoring in physics.

Ingrid Lily Fohlich Burns Scholarship. This fund was created by Madeline Burns, a Loyola University Institute of Ministry student in honor of her mother, Lily. The scholarship is awarded to talented students studying within Loyola's Institute of Ministry.

Rev. Joseph A. Butt, S.J., Memorial Scholarship. The Rev. Joseph A. Butt, S.J., Memorial Scholarship was established by Dr. J.C. Minge, Jr., M.D. The scholarship is to be awarded to needy students majoring in business administration.

Lois Josephine and Loretto Conway Cahill Scholarship. This arts and sciences scholarship in memory of Lois Josephine Cahill was established by the late William A. Cahill. In awarding this scholarship, priority is to be given first to Candidates, Student Brothers, and Brothers of the Sacred Heart attending Loyola University as beneficiaries thereof.

Mary Margaret Conway and Noel Cecelia Cahill Malloy Scholarship in Music. This music scholarship in memory of Mary Margaret Conway and Noel Cecelia Cahill Malloy was established by the late William A. Cahill. In awarding this scholarship, priority is to be given first to Candidates, Student Brothers, and Brothers of the Sacred Heart attending Loyola University as beneficiaries thereof.

Edward Conway Cahill (ROTC) Scholarship. This ROTC scholarship in memory of Edward Conway Cahill was established by the late William A. Cahill. In awarding this scholarship, priority is to be given first to Candidates, Student Brothers, and Brothers of the Sacred Heart attending Loyola University as beneficiaries thereof.

Elise Murray Cambon Memorial Scholarship Fund. Elise Cambon taught organ at Loyola and served as the Music Minister and Choral Director at St. Louis Cathedral. This scholarship was established in a bequest from Miss Cambon with preference given to students studying the repetoire of Gregorian chant, polyphonic music of the 16th century, or classical or serious contemporary organ and sacred choral music. The scholarship recipient must also demonstrate academic merit and financial need.

Chicago Alumni Scholarship. This scholarship was established by the Chicago Alumni Chapter of Loyola University New Orleans to benefit newly admitted Loyola students from the Chicago area.

City College Alumni Board Scholarship. This scholarship was established by the City College Alumni Board to promote excellence in studies by non-traditional students.

College of Business Alumni Board Scholarship. Created by the College of Business Administration (CBA) Alumni Board , this scholarship is given to a recipient who is a junior or senior at Loyola, pursuing a degree offered by the CBA, and who has a cumulative grade point average of 3.25 or above. Preference will be given to children on Loyola alumni.

College of Business Endowed Scholarship. Established by faculty and staff within the College of Business Administration, this scholarship is awarded to deserving students in the College of Business Administration.

The Philip Reilly Collins Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 1994 by Philip Collins in memory of his parents. Collins graduated from Loyola’s College of Arts and Sciences in 1939 and the School of Law in 1942.

The Philip R. and Mary C. Collins Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 2006 by Philip Collins, a native New Orleanian and successful Washington D.C. attorney. His wife, Mary, continued to support Loyola long after Philip passed away in 2003, and upon her passing in 2008, Loyola received annuities toward this scholarship to promote excellence in undergraduate studies.

Eleanore C. Condon Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established through gifts from Rita M. Condon, M’43. It will be awarded to outstanding business students studying accounting.

Zona B. Davis Memorial Scholarship in Music. This endowed scholarship was established by Zona B. Davis, former executive secretary in the Department of Physics, with the purpose of setting up an endowed scholarship in the College of Music. The recipient must be an outstanding female in the College of Music; the funds must be used to pay her tuition to attend the Loyola University College of Music; and the scholarship be given every four years.

The Edmond Deramee Music Scholarship Fund. This scholarship was established through a bequest from the will of Edmond Deramee, a 1924 graduate of the School of Law.

The Ferdinand Dominguez and Isabella Depetirate Dominguez Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in honor of Dorothy Ray's parents and will be used in the College of Arts and Sciences, exclusively for the education department. The funds will be awarded on the basis of financial need and academic achievement.

D. Donnaud Scholarship Fund in Music. In 1993, Loyola received a bequest from the succession of Delia Irene Donnaud to establish the D. Donnaud Scholarship Fund. This fund is for scholarships to Loyola’s College of Music for needy music students from New Orleans or the state of Louisiana at the discretion of the directors of the university.

The Adrian and Sally Duplantier Boys Hope Girls Hope Scholarship. This scholarship was established by the Hon. Adrian G. and Sally Duplantier. Judge Duplantier, who graduated from the law school in 1949, and his wife have been involved with Boys Hope Girls Hope and Loyola for many years. The scholarship will be awarded to outstanding students who are residents of Boys Hope Girls Hope.

Dr. Emilio Echevarria Endowed Scholarship. This fund was established by Dr. Echevarria of Tampa to promote excellence in the College of Humanities and Natural Sciences by offering incentives to talented students from the Tampa metropolitan area.

Rev. Larion Elliot, S.J., Scholarship. This scholarship was established through gifts from George L. Sirgo. Jr., L’61, in memory of Fr. Elliot. This scholarship will be awarded to students active with LUCAP.

Department of English Scholarship. This scholarship was established through gifts from Carolyn Callahan, A’88, a member of Loyola’s Board of Trustees. It will be awarded to outstanding students who are majors or minors in English.

Thomas Farr Memorial Scholarship Fund. This scholarship was established in memory of Thomas Farr, a sophomore in the College of Business Administration who passed away in 2003. Recipients must be male, undergraduate students, from a mid-level economic background, who receive help from Loyola’s Academic Resource Center. If there is a tie, the scholarship should go to a student from Atlanta, Ga.

Ferdinand Dominguez and Isabella Depetirate Dominguez Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in honor of Dorothy Roy’s parents and will be used in the College of Arts and Sciences, exclusively for the education department. The funds will be awarded on the basis of financial need and academic achievement.

Evelyn-Mae Durmeyer Fillion Scholarship in Music. The family of Evelyn-Mae Fillion established a scholarship in her memory in the College of Music. A 1938 graduate of the College of Music, Mrs. Fillion was an organist at Temple Sinai and other places of worship in uptown New Orleans. The recipient must be a degree candidate in the College of Music; majoring in cello or piano; with preference given to students in music education or music therapy.

Mary Ann Reising Flynn Scholarship Fund. The Mary Ann Reising Flynn Scholarship Fund was established with a gift from Dr. George Q. Flynn in memory of his late wife, who graduated from Loyola in 1960 from the College of Arts and Sciences. The recipient is to be a female of sophomore standing who shows leadership qualities and is of good academic standing.

Betty P. Fosberg Scholarship. This scholarship was established through gifts from the family and friends of Betty Fosberg to commemorate her retirement after working for many years in City College. It will be awarded to outstanding part-time undergraduate students enrolled in the Evening Division.

Marie de Renvillé-Franicevic Foundation Scholarship. This scholarship was a gift of the Marie de Renvillé-Franicevic Foundation of New Orleans. It will be awarded to outstanding students enrolled in Loyola's Institute for Ministry.

Msgr. Edward David Frugé Scholarship of Social Justice. This scholarship was established with the purpose of advancing the cause of social justice for all, while facilitating the Jesuit ideal of service to humankind. The funds are specifically for students in the College of Arts and Sciences who are majoring in social justice. The recipient must demonstrate participation in community service, social activism, and strong academic achievement.

Edward Augustin Generelly Scholarship. In 1982, Loyola received a gift from the succession of Gladys LaRoche Generelly to establish the Edward Augustin Generelly Scholarship. The candidate must be of good moral character, have an average grade of A or very close to A, maintain that average at Loyola, and show leadership qualities.

The Geoffrey Scholarship. The Geoffrey Scholarship was created and funded by the Loyola student organization Etcetera and is open to all current Loyola students who have demonstrated commitment and service to the GLBT community. Recipients of this award must be classified as full-time students (non-graduating seniors) currently enrolled at Loyola University New Orleans, and must present a grade point average of 2.75 or above.

William John Gilbert Memorial Scholarship. The William John Gilbert Memorial Scholarship was established through the estate of Gordon D. Gilbert. The scholarship provides for tuition assistance to a student or students of the College of Business Administration.

The Goizueta Foundation Scholarship. This scholarship was established by the Goizueta Foundation to provide need-based scholarship assistance to Hispanic/Latino students whose families reside in the United States.

John J. Grasser Scholarship Fund. This scholarship was established by Edward L. Schmidt, Jr., and Hugh Joseph Hecker, officers for the John J. Grasser Scholarship Fund. It will be awarded to deserving students.

William Randolph Hearst Scholarship Fund. In 1992, Loyola University received a grant from the William Randolph Hearst Foundation to establish an endowed scholarship fund for minority students.

Moses G. Hogan Memorial Scholarship in Music. Funded by friends and supporters of the choral music of the late Moses George Hogan, the Moses Hogan Scholarship is awarded to a student in Loyola's College of Music who has demonstrated ability in choral music. Preference is given to a student who also has demonstrated talent as a pianist.

Merl and Rita Huntsinger Endowed Scholarship in Music. This scholarship was funded by Mr. Merl Huntsinger to honor his wife, Rita. Mrs. Huntsinger has been an active supporter of Loyola’s College of Music. Recipients are selected based on academic and musical achievements.

Dr. Robert P. Ingram Scholarship. This scholarship was established through a bequest of Dr. Robert P. Ingram. It will be awarded to deserving students.

International Student Scholarship. Established by Loyola’s International Student Associate, this scholarship provides assistance to the university’s international students. The scholarship is awarded on the basis of merit and need.

Jesuit Community Scholarship. This scholarship was established through a gift from the Jesuit community of Loyola University New Orleans. It will be awarded to students who are graduates of any Jesuit high school.

Gayle and Merrick Jones Endowed Scholarship in Music. The Gayle and Merrick Jones Scholarship was funded by Gayle Jones, in memory of her late husband, J. Merrick Jones, in 2004. The recipient must be an outstanding student in Loyola’s College of Music, and must be selected by the faculty based on academic and musical achievements.

Clifford A. King Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established through a gift from Cyril P. Geary, Jr., in honor of Clifford King. It will be awarded to outstanding business majors.

The Tom and Kitty Kloor Scholarship. The Kloor scholarship endowment was established in 2007 with a generous gift by the Kloors. The scholarship provides support to academically qualified students who are the first generation of their family to pursue higher education.

Josie Greco LaNasa Memorial Scholarship in Business Administration. Funded by the LaNasa-Greco Foundation, the Josie Greco LaNasa Memorial Scholarship was established in 2001. This scholarship was created to award talented business students.

Jack and Sarah LaNasa Memorial Scholarship in Humanities and Natural Sciences. This scholarship was established in 2001 to talented students pursuing a degree in the College of Humanities and Natural Sciences.

Jack and Sarah LaNasa Memorial Scholarship Fund in Music. Funded by the LaNasa-Greco Foundation, the Jack and Sarah LaNasa Memorial Scholarship was established in 2001. Awards are made annually to outstanding students, in their second year of study, majoring in performance, music industry studies, jazz studies, music education, and music therapy.

Jack and Sarah LaNasa Memorial Scholarship for Non-Traditional Students. Funded by the LaNasa-Greco foundation, the Jack and Sarah LaNasa Memorial Scholarship was established in 2001. This scholarship is awarded to part-time evening students who demonstrate academic achievement and significant educational goals.

Alumni Legacy Scholarship. This scholarship was established by the Loyola University Alumni Association and is available to children or stepchildren of Loyola alumni.

Loyola Institute for Ministry (LIM) Scholarship. This scholarship was created to promote excellence in Loyola’s Institute of Ministry studies by offering incentives to talented students.

Elsa and Irving Lyons Memorial Scholarship in Music. Donated by Ileana Lyons, Peter Claverie, and friends of the College of Music, this scholarship was created to offer incentives to talented students in Loyola’s Music Industry Studies Program.

Marjorie Hebert Mailhes Endowed Memorial Scholarship in Music. This scholarship was established in honor of Marjorie Hebert Mailhes for the purpose of awarding talented music students.

Moses G. Hogan Memorial Scholarship in Music. Funded by friends and supporters of the choral music of the late Moses George Hogan, the Moses Hogan Scholarship is awarded to a student in Loyola’s College of Music who has demonstrated ability in choral music. Preference is given to a student who also has demonstrated talent as a pianist.

Dean John F. McCloskey Scholarship Fund. John F. McCloskey studied pharmacy at Loyola from 1933 to 1937 and served as dean of that college from 1933 to 1958. In 1983, his three children established a scholarship fund in his memory.

Rev. C.J. McNaspy, S.J., Endowed Scholarship for Excellence in Music. This scholarship was established through gifts from faculty, staff, and volunteers in the College of Music, in memory of Fr. McNaspy, who taught music and religion at Loyola for many years. It will be awarded to outstanding music students.

Marjorie Hebert Mailhes Endowed Memorial Scholarship in Music. This scholarship was established in honor of Marjorie Hebert Maihes for the purpose of awarding talented music students.

Nancy M. and Joseph J. Mansfield Endowed Scholarship in Psychology. Joseph J. Mansfield, former vice president for institutional advancement, and his wife established this scholarship. It will be awarded to undergraduate psychology students.

Rev. A. Ransom Marlow, S.J., Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of Fr. Marlow, through a gift from his sister, Therese Marlow Walker. Fr. Marlow taught physics at Loyola for many years, and this scholarship will be awarded to outstanding physics students.

Antoinette Famularo Mayeur and Harold M. Mayeur Scholarship. Harold M. Mayeur established music scholarships at Loyola in memory of his mother, Antoinette Famularo Mayeur, and himself. They are awarded to outstanding music students.

Fatemeh Moazami Endowed Scholarship in Middle East Studies. This scholarship was established by Dr. Moazami, a faculty member of the Department of History, and his wife, Jilla, in honor of Dr. Moazami's mother, Fatemeh. The purpose of the scholarship is to promote excellence in the field of Middle East History and Peace Studies with preference given to female students of Middle Eastern origin.

Octave Pierre and Marguerite Hitter Montagnet Endowed Scholarship Fund. This scholarship was established in 2001 by Royce Gauden, with the help of some of Mr. Montaguet's companions, as a birthday present to Mr. Montagnet. The scholarship is to promote excellence in undergraduate studies.

Rev. John H. Mullahy, S.J., Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of the late Rev. John H. Mullahy, S.J., longtime chair of the biology department and adviser to pre-med students. It will be awarded to outstanding biology and pre-med students.

Isabelle B. Murphy Endowed Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 2008 through the estate of Isabelle Murphy to offer incentives to talented students in the field of music education.

Edgar Murray Scholarship Fund. This scholarship fund was established by Edgar Murray and will be awarded to outstanding students.

Northwestern Mutual Life Scholarship. This scholarship was established through gifts from Will S. Hornsby, III, and Joseph E. Mahoney, Jr., A’76, and matching gifts from Northwestern Mutual Life. It will be awarded to outstanding students in the College of Business Administration.

Francis Robert O’Brien, Sr., Endowed Scholarship. J. Patrick O’Brien, dean of the College of Business Administration, and his wife, Karen, made a commitment to the Campaign for Loyola University New Orleans in 1996. Their gift funds a scholarship in the business school in memory of O’Brien’s late father.

J. Freyhan Odenheimer Endowed Music Scholarship. Rita Odenheimer Huntsinger, a member of Loyola’s Board of Trustees since 1995, established this endowed music scholarship in memory of her first husband, the late J. Freyhan Odenheimer. The scholarship will be awarded to undergraduate and graduate music students based on talent.

Jeremiah and Annette O'Keefe Endowed Scholarship. Jeremiah J. O'Keefe, a 1948 graduate of the College of Business Administration, established an endowed scholarship fund at Loyola in 1996. This scholarship is to supplement federal aid for students who are both academically-talented and needy.

Overture to the Cultural Season Scholarship. In 1982, the Overture to the Cultural Season established a scholarship endowment at Loyola for the benefit of students of the visual or performing arts.

Charles Paddock Memorial Scholarship. Named for Charles Paddock, a former vocal studies faculty member in Loyola’s College of Music, this scholarship is designed to promote excellence in the field of music by offering incentives to talented voice students.

The A.J. and Sherry Palermo Endowed Scholarship Fund. This scholarship was established by a gift of the Palermos in 2005 to promote excellence in the field of business to deserving students in the business school.

Parents Scholarship for Music Studies Abroad. This scholarship was funded by parents of the College of Music to provide Music students with the opportunity to study abroad. The recipient must be an outstanding student in the College of Music who will participate in a study abroad program.

Physically Challenged Scholarship. This scholarship was made possible through a gift from William M. Broderick, a 1966 graduate of the College of Business Administration. It will be awarded to gifted students with physical disabilities.

Valerie J. Poulette Scholarship in Violin. This scholarship was funded in 2006 to honor Valerie Poulette who taught violin at Loyola College of Music for 25 years. The recipient must be a violin student.

Regions Bank Endowed Scholarship in Humanities and Natural Sciences. The Regions Bank Scholarship was established through the vision of William G. Pope, Jr., a 1973 Loyola history graduate. Regions Bank is committed to excellence and opportunity in higher education. Regions Bank and Pope seek to help future business men and women to obtain the broad skills in critical thinking that a Loyola education provides. The recipient must be an undergraduate student in the College of Arts and Sciences with a grade point average of 3.3 or above. Preference will be given to students from states served by Regions Bank including Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, or Tennessee.

Nia Renée Robertson Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of Nia Robertson who received a Master of Arts degree in Mass Communication from Loyola in 2004. The recipient must be majoring in mass communication with preference being given to New Orleans area residents.

Richard D. and Christie A. Rose Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 2001 with a commitment from Mr. and Mrs. Rose. The student must be employed full time with one employer and be a business major enrolled in the undergraduate or graduate programs at the College of Business.

Dr. Norman Roussell Endowed Scholarship. This scholarship was created through funds raised by the Black Student Union (BSU) in honor of Loyola’s former vice president for administration, Dr. Norman Roussell. It will be awarded to outstanding students who are members of the BSU.

Louis O. Roy, Jr., and Dorothy Dominguez Roy Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established by the estate of Dorothy Roy and will be used in the College of Arts and Sciences, exclusively for the education department. The funds will be awarded on the basis of financial need and academic achievement.

Louis O. Roy, Sr., and Mercedes Sugasti Roy Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in honor of the parents of Dorothy Roy’s late husband, Louis O. Roy, Jr., and will be used in the College of Arts and Sciences, exclusively for the education department. The funds will be awarded on the basis of financial need and academic achievement.

Muriel Salvant Memorial Scholarship. The Muriel Salvant Memorial Scholarship was established through a gift from Mrs. Isabel Salvant in memory of her late daughter. It will be awarded annually to a local high school graduate who applies for undergraduate studies at the university.

Joel Larkin Schmiegel Endowed Scholarship Fund. This scholarship was established in 2007 by Joel Schmiegel to promote excellence in the field of chemistry. The recipient must have financial need and be majoring in chemistry.

Roger J. Schuler Scholarship Fund. Southern Marine and Aviation Underwriters, Inc. established the Roger J. Schuler Scholarship Fund. This scholarship is limited to students from the New Orleans area enrolled in the College of Business Administration.

Catherine A. Schulze Endowed Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 2005 by bequest of Catherine Schulze to promote excellence in the arts and sciences.

Helen V. and Frank E. Scully, Sr. Scholarship. Former Dean Frank Scully and his brother, Dr. J. Robert Scully funded this scholarship in honor of their parents. The Scully Scholarship is to be awarded to a student from Tampa who demonstrates both merit and need with preference given to graduates of Tampa Jesuit High School, the alma mater of both Frank and J. Robert Scully

Lydia and Raymond Scully Scholarship. This scholarship was named for Lydia Scully, who taught at Loyola and her husband Raymond, who was an artist. The recipient must demonstrate financial need, academic merit, and must be a student of the visual arts.

The Joseph P. Sendker and Juanita C. Sendker Endowed Scholarship Fund. In 2004, Juanita Sendker bequeathed a gift to establish this scholarship to provide academic assistance to students majoring in journalism in the School of Communications.

Dr. G. Ralph Smith. This scholarship was established in 2004 by F. Craig Barber, a 1966 graduate of the MBA program, as a tribute to Dr. Smith. Dr. Smith was the director of the MBA program during Mr. Barber’s tenure and was later named dean of the College of Business. The recipient shall be an MBA student who has high academic achievement.

Josephine Spato, Joseph Spato, and Sarah Spato Scholarship. This scholarship was established through a bequest from Jennie S. LeBlanc in honor of Josephine, Joseph, and Sarah Spato. It will be used to provide scholarship loans to deserving students.

Lawrence J. Strohmeyer Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of Lawrence J. Strohmeyer, A’38, through gifts from his friends and former colleagues. Strohmeyer taught physics at Loyola for many years, and this scholarship will be awarded to outstanding physics students.

Student Aid Endowed Scholarship. The purpose of this scholarship is to promote excellence in undergraduate studies by offering incentives to talented students.

The Times-Picayune Scholarships. These scholarships were established with a gift from The Times-Picayune through the Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation. They will be awarded to outstanding students from the New Orleans area.

Rev. Bernard Tonnar, S.J. Endowed Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 1996 by faculty and staff in memory of Fr. Tonnar who taught in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Loyola for many years. Eligible students must be pursuing a major in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science.

Israel Trestman Endowed Scholarship for a New Beginning. This scholarship was established in memory of Israel Trestman by Robert, C’86, and Fran, C’97, Lenter, his son-in-law, and daughter. It will be awarded to outstanding Loyola Evening Division students.

Anthony "Val" Valentino Memorial Scholarship in Music. The Anthony "Val" Valentino Memorial Scholarship in Music was established in 2000 by Mary Ann Valentino in honor of her husband. Awards are made annually to an outstanding student, in his or her junior or senior year, majoring in composition.

The Earl L. Weiser Scholarship. This scholarship was established in 2002 by Mr. Weiser to promote excellence by offering incentives to talented undergraduate students.

Dr. Richard P. Wendt Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of the late Dr. Richard P. Wendt, who taught in the chemistry department for many years. It will be awarded to deserving chemistry students.

V.M. Wheeler III Scholarship. This scholarship fund was established by Virgil M. Wheeler, III, an alumnus of the College of Business Administration, in 1985.

William Wildes Scholarship Fund. This scholarship was formed by friends and family in December 2006 in memory of William J. Wildes, the father of Kevin William Wildes, Loyola’s President. The recipient must be a first generation scholar with financial need.

Richard Drew Wilkie Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship was established in memory of Drew Wilkie, a junior in the College of Business Administration, who passed away in 2001. Many family members and friends have contributed to establish this endowed scholarship for finance majors who demonstrate both financial need and academic achievement.

John P. Winston, Sr. Memorial Fund in the College of Business. The National Automobile Dealers Charitable Foundation donated funds to establish this fund in the College of Business in 2002. The recipient is to be a student in the College of Business who exhibits financial need.

Mary Z. Wirth Scholarships in Music Education. These scholarships were established by Harold E. Wirth in memory of his wife, Mary Zichichi Wirth, M’40. They will be awarded to outstanding students studying music education.

Professor Thomas L. Zamparelli Memorial Endowed Scholarship Fund. In 2007, Theresa and John Barbieri donated a gift to establish this scholarship in memory of Theresa’s brother, Dr. Zamparelli. The recipient must be majoring or minoring in a foreign language.

Academic Support Facilities And Services

ACADEMIC RESOURCE CENTER

The Academic Resource Center provides tutoring across the curriculum and a broad range of other academic support services free of charge to all Loyola students.

Academic Counseling and Assessment

Each student is individually assisted in formulating a personal strategy for achieving academic success. The plan may involve Academic Resource Center tutoring or referral to other university services.

  • Individual assessment of the student’s learning strengths and weaknesses.
  • One-on-one academic counseling based on the student’s specific needs.

Tutorial Services

The Academic Resource Center provides peer tutoring under the supervision of the professional staff. Before being assigned to a tutor, students meet with an academic counselor to determine the best course of action.

The Academic Resource Center provides course-related tutoring across the curriculum. Subject areas include:

  • Accounting
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Classics
  • Common Curriculum
  • Communications
  • History
  • Music Literature
  • Music Therapy
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
  • Statistics (Business and Social Sciences)

Every effort will be made to provide tutoring in areas not listed.

Study Skills

The Academic Resource Center offers a one-hour course called Protocols of Learning, SPST A105, and non-credit weekend and evening seminars for all undergraduate students. The course is designed to allow the students to apply study skills to their current coursework. The syllabus is designed with input from the students taking the course. Topics may include time management, note taking, memory, effective reading, critical thinking, learning styles, and research skills.

Programs for Entering Freshmen and Transfer Students

To assist new students, there are comprehensive programs for entering freshmen and transfers around the year, including the Bridge, Fall Enrichment, and Spring Enrichment programs.

Fall and Spring Enrichment

The Fall and Spring Enrichment programs are designed to assist entering freshmen and transfer students in meeting the academic demands of their first two semesters at Loyola. Students take a Study Skills course and meet once a week with a member of the Academic Resource Center staff and an Academic Resource Center peer tutor to apply study skills to their actual coursework.

Bridge

The Bridge program allows students to begin taking their first-year courses from mid-June through the last week in July. It also affords students the opportunity to experience life on campus while earning seven hours credit. The Bridge professors are outstanding members of the faculty and work closely with the Academic Resource Center’s professional staff to provide an excellent beginning in college. The Academic Resource Center also provides academic counseling and peer tutoring under the supervision of the professional staff. Students are admitted through the Office of Admissions.

Disability Services

Disability Services was created to help provide equal access for students with disabilities. Our staff assists students in meeting the demands of university life by coordinating campus services for students with disabilities and offering academic support services. These services include but are not limited to the following:

  • Verification of a documented disability
  • Specialized counseling for students with disabilities
  • Advocacy services
  • Implementation of accommodations
  • Note-taking and transcription services
  • Tutorial services
  • Support groups
  • Assistance in obtaining other services

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

WEBSITE: http://www.loyno.edu/infotech/

Information Technology provides current technology, prompt service, and a robust network to allow the fair, accurate and free interchange of educational content, information and ideas throughout the Loyola community and the world.

Network Access
LoyolaNet, a state-of-the-art computer networking system, provides access to electronic mail, news groups, home pages, mailing lists, library resources, course offerings, student records, and financial information as well as a high-speed connection to the Internet and World Wide Web. All faculty and administrative offices, classrooms, residence halls, and common study areas provide outlets for connecting personal computers to the network. Wireless network access is also provided in many areas of the campus.

Computer Labs
More than 300 Dell and Macintosh computers are available for student use along with word processing, spreadsheet, database, graphics, and web-browsing software. A variety of printers, including laser printers, are available in the labs.

In addition to general access computer labs, special-purpose computer labs have been established for writing and english composition, math basic skills, music technology, business and accounting, law school, visual arts and communications.

Mainframe computer services for online registration and access to the university libraries’ online card catalogue and bibliographic services are accessed from the LoyolaNet network on campus or from off campus using any connection to the internet.

Computer Store
Software, accessories, and supplies are available in the University Bookstore located in the Danna Student Center.

Technical Support and Training
The Information Technology Help Desk, a hotline for computer related technical support, is available M-F 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.  After-hours emergency calls will be returned as soon as possible. The Help Desk may be reached at 865-CALL (865-2255).

TELEPHONE SERVICES

The Loyola community enjoys state-of-the-art telephone services including electronic voice messaging. Individual direct long-distance services and voice messaging are also provided to students in the residence halls.

Technical Support and Training
The Information Technology Help Desk, a hotline for computer related technical support, is available M-F 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.  After-hours emergency calls will be returned as soon as possible. The Help Desk may be reached at 865-CALL (865-2255).

J. EDGAR AND LOUISE S. MONROE LIBRARY

WEBSITE: http://library.loyno.edu/

The J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library won the 2003 Excellence in Academic Libraries Award, given by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and Blackwell's Book Services, in recognition of programs that deliver exemplary services and resources to further the educational mission of the university. In addition, the library received the 2004 H.W.Wilson Library Staff Development Award, and for the last three years has ranked in the top 10 in the "Best College Library" category of The Best 361 Colleges by The Princeton Review.

The state-of-the-art, 150,000-square-foot library offers a variety of seating for more than 700 students and provides abundant wired and wireless access to the Internet. The library offers three computer labs, two multimedia classrooms, four seminar rooms, 15 group study rooms, and an art gallery. The library houses a multimedia production classroom featuring computer workstations loaded with video, audio, imaging, and music production software. The library can accommodate a collection of up to 500,000 volumes and features a reading room for the use of its valuable archival and special collections.

The Monroe Library is committed to creative thinking, collaboration, and enhancement of the educational experience. This is expressed in the library's Learning Commons, a learning space that encompasses the first floor. In the Learning Commons, students, faculty, and staff come together to study, learn, teach, create, and socialize. At the Learning Commons desk, users can get assistance with standard circulation, reference, and technology questions. Those wanting or needing more in-depth knowledge are connected to appropriate experts, materials, programs, and workshops. The Learning Commons offers a variety of learning spaces, including the Living Room, a laptop collaboration area, computer carrels for individual or group work,  multimedia workstations, and listening stations.

The Monroe Library works with faculty to ensure that Loyola students have the skills needed to find, retrieve, analyze, and use information. The library encourages faculty to adopt best practices for incorporating information literacy standards in the classroom; supports the innovative use of instructional technologies in teaching and learning; advances faculty research; and builds partnerships to enhance student writing, career development, and lifelong learning.

The Monroe Library houses the Lindy Boggs National Center for Community Literacy, which serves as a national clearinghouse for information, research, and resources pertaining to literacy; Special Collections and Archives, housing the Walker Percy and His Circle Collection, the Archives of the Southern Province of the Society of Jesus, and the Frere Joseph Aurelien Cornet Collection on the art and culture of the Congo; and the Visual Arts Center and Collins C. Diboll Gallery, the fourth-floor exhibition, archival, and lecture space.

The Monroe Library's holdings include more than 382,000 volumes, access to more than 27,000 e-books and 36,000 print and electronic journals, 11,500 music scores, 90,000 microform units, and 4,700 media titles. Faculty and graduate students enjoy borrowing privileges at most of the areas academic libraries. Loyola and Tulane Universities offer reciprocal library borrowing privileges to undergraduates through the TULU program. The library's interlibrary loan service provides materials not available at Loyola's libraries.

MATHEMATICS CENTER

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/mathlab/

The Loyola Mathematics Center was established in 1981 with the original purpose of providing assistance to students in basic skills (developmental) mathematics courses. It has since evolved into a multimedia resource center for virtually all Loyola  students taking mathematics courses. The Math Center is commonly referred to as the Math Lab, where economics, chemistry, biology, and physics students frequently use it as  a working center. Well-qualified students provide one-on-one tutoring for students taking mathematics courses. Interactive computer software is available to those who prefer this method of assistance. Scientific Notebook, Matlab, SPSS, Visual Basic, Java, and other programs are available on our computers for the use of our students and staff. Textbooks, instructor's manuals, and other reference materials are available for almost all undergraduate math courses taught at Loyola.

ROSS FOREIGN LANGUAGE CENTER

WEBSITE: chn.loyno.edu/mfllits/rflc/index.html

The Ross Foreign Language Center, located in Bobet Hall 114, was established in 1988 and named for Rochelle Ross who taught Russian at Loyola from 1967-82. Staffed by student workers under the direction of a faculty member, the center provides peer tutoring and audio CDs for the language courses taught at Loyola in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish. Additional materials that support language learning are also available in Bobet 114, including bilingual dictionaries, grammar reviews, and magazines.

UPWARD BOUND

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/upwardbound/

The Loyola University New Orleans Upward Bound Program is a federally funded program that falls under the national umbrella of TRiO Programs. Upward Bound was established by the Higher Education Act of 1965 with the mission of helping high school students prepare for post-secondary education. Participants receive instruction, traditionally on a college campus, in literature, composition, mathematics, and laboratory science. Instruction is conducted after school, on Saturdays and during the summer. After high school graduation, Upward Bound provides a “bridge” program to aid in the transition from high school to college. To date, 971 programs are in operation throughout the United States.

Since 1966, the administration, faculty, and staff of the Upward Bound Program at Loyola University New Orleans have continued to provide educational assistance to high school students in the Metro New Orleans area. Currently, the Program serves four target schools on the Westbank of Jefferson Parish: Helen Cox, John Ehret, L.W. Higgins, and West Jefferson High School. Along with serving these four schools, the Upward Bound Program also serves students living in the target areas surrounding each school.

The Loyola University New Orleans Upward Bound Program consists of three program components: a six-week summer component, an academic year component conducted on Wednesday evenings and Saturday mornings and a summer bridge component for college pre-freshmen. During each program component, tutoring, counseling and individualized assistance is given to each program participant. For further information, please visit our website or contact the Program office.

WHELAN CHILDREN’S CENTER

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/~whelan/

Whelan Children’s Center is a high quality childcare program for the children of the faculty, staff, students, and alumni. The center, located on Loyola’s campus, provides a safe and stimulating educational environment with a highly qualified, experienced, nurturing staff. Twelve full-time teachers, twenty-five work-study students, and sixty-two children ranging in age from four months to five years make up the center’s population. Teachers of three- to five-year-old children have a B.S. in education with certification in early childhood. Teachers of one- and two-year-olds have associate degrees in early childhood and certification in early childhood education; teachers of infants and toddlers have extensive experience in working with young children. All teachers are certified in Infant and Child CPR and Pediatric First-Aid. Teachers attend the annual Greater New Orleans Association for the Education of Young Children conference and workshops throughout the year. Children are grouped by ages: infants, toddlers, one-year-olds, two-year-olds, three-year-olds, and preschoolers. A developmental program based on all areas of development: physical, social, intellectual, and emotional. Activities as well as the physical environment are carefully planned to enhance the growth and development of young children. For example, two-year-olds learn about cultural activities, music, and letter and color recognition. Older children develop social skills and academic concepts which prepare them for the kindergarten level. The center supports the philosophy that children are happiest when actively involved in learning.

WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/wac

Writing Across the Curriculum
Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) supports excellence in critical thinking and writing in all undergraduate programs and classes at Loyola.  WAC offers a variety of services to help students improve their writing and to assist faculty in designing effective writing assignments.

Student Tutoring  Services
WAC provides free tutoring on writing assignments, including

  • Analytical essays
  • Argumentative essays
  • Response papers
  • Research papers in all majors
  • Book reports and reviews
  • Film and drama reviews
  • Lab reports
  • Critiques
  • Proposals, business reports, letters, and memos
  • Service learning writing projects

Students receive help with all phases of the writing process, from brainstorming ideas to synthesizing sources, tightening arguments, and revising for clarity and style.  WAC tutors do not edit or correct students’ papers;  instead, they work with students to help them strengthen their critical thinking skills and improve their own writing.

Tutor Training
WAC writing tutors, who are drawn from a broad range of majors, are trained to help students with the rhetorical conventions, formats, writing practices, and citation demands of the differing academic disciplines. All first-semester writing tutors enroll in English 491, “Practicum in Teaching Writing,” and take additional tutoring workshops throughout subsequent years on staff.  In addition, beginning tutors are paired with experienced tutors who mentor them during the first year, include them as observers in tutoring sessions, and answer questions that arise about tutoring situations and resources.

Resources
WAC administers a writing center and electronic classroom in Room 100 Bobet Hall where students can conduct Internet research, draft papers, consult with writing tutors, and revise their work. The writing center makes available a library of print and online resources for writers, including discipline-specific guides to college writing, dictionaries, handbooks, grammar guides, style and citation guides, and other resources.

Locations
WAC’s tutorial services are available on a drop-in basis and by appointment seven days a week; tutoring is offered in a variety of locations, including

  • The WAC Writing Center, Room 100, Bobet Hall
  • The Reference Desk, First Floor, Monroe Library
  • Off-campus via phone consultations and e-mail

Faculty Services
WAC provides one-on-one consultation services to faculty who want to incorporate writing as a learning tool in their classes.  In these consultations, WAC professional staff work with faculty to design sequenced writing assignments for their courses, prepare guidelines for students on approaches to each assignment, and develop grading rubrics that help students identify the strengths and weaknesses of their writing.  WAC staff also offer workshops on these topics as well as others upon request.

Service Learning

WEBSITE: www.loyno.edu/servicelearning

The Office of Service Learning, located in Bobet 113, supports the development and implementation of service learning and community-based learning experiences in academic courses and programs of study at Loyola University New Orleans.  Our goal is to bring education to life by connecting classroom education to community needs.  In this way, we enact Loyola's Jesuit mission of helping young people become men and women for others.  

Courses with service learning components are noted in LORA.  Your professor will decide whether service learning will be optional or required.  Students should take note of service learning requirements when registering for classes.  Typically, service learning is considered part of the workload for a course.  Service learning students frequently devote some out-of-class time to working with local nonprofit organizations to benefit the greater New Orleans community.  Students who successfully complete a service learning project or placement for a class will receive a notation on their Loyola transcript.

Spiritual Formation

UNIVERSITY MINISTRY MISSION STATEMENT

University Ministry within the Office of Mission and Ministry at Loyola University New Orleans serves the holistic education of our students by attending to the spiritual formation of the university community. In collaboration with student leaders, staff, faculty, and administrators, we promote a vision of the "way of proceeding" set forth by St. Ignatius Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus. Embracing our common human dignity created in God’s image and likeness, we foster a greater respect for the truth, goodness, and grace to be found in a diversity of faith traditions and people of every culture, race, language, and economic status.

Our Christian, Catholic, and Jesuit traditions commission us to offer a welcoming environment and supportive services to all members of the university community. We assist the formation of our students as contemplatives-in-action: God’s spirit illuminating them with an ever deeper experience of the love of God and inspiring a more generous response to that love by their passionate commitment to service and justice as men and women with and for others.

SPIRITUAL GROWTH AND FAITH DEVELOPMENT

University Ministry supports the spiritual formation and faith development of the entire Loyola community through:

Pastoral Counseling and Spiritual Direction

University Chaplains are trained and available to assist the Loyola community with their spiritual formation and counseling needs. They offer a welcoming and trusting place to find a listening ear, an understanding heart, and a companioning mentor. Contact the University Ministry office or a university chaplain of your choice to inquire about pastoral counseling and spiritual direction. http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry

Worship and Communal Prayer

All faith communities are strengthened and missioned by their worship and prayer. University Ministry is dedicated to providing quality liturgies where community members actively participate in prayer, word, and sacrament. We offer a variety of worship opportunities and encourage students to share their gifts as a liturgical minister or volunteer.

Mass is celebrated on the main campus in Ignatius Chapel, Bobet Hall, Monday through Friday at noon, Monday through Wednesday at 9:00pm, and Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and 9:00 p.m. On the Broadway campus, Mass is celebrated at 12:20pm on Tuesdays and 12 noon on Wednesdays in the Martha and Mary Chapel in Greenville Hall. Contact Arlene Wiltz, 504-861-5494, for the weekly Broadway Campus schedule. For further information and for all listed Mass times, contact: http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry/area-church-services

The sacrament of Reconciliation is celebrated on the main campus from 8:15 to 8:45 P.M. on Sundays and by appointment with any priest. Contact the University Ministry office at 504-865-3226 to schedule an appointment. http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry

Sacramental Preparation

In addition to regularly administering the sacraments of Eucharist and Reconciliation, University Ministry provides instruction and guidance for students who are preparing for Confirmation and/or Marriage in the Catholic Church. For students considering joining or learning more about the Catholic Church, the RCIA (Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults) process will help them discern their decision and prepare them for the sacraments of Baptism, Holy Eucharist, and/or Confirmation. We also provide Anointing of the Sick as needed. Contact the University Ministry office for details about the formation process for any of the above mentioned sacraments. http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry

Retreats

University Ministry provides a variety of opportunities for retreats, discernment and days of reflection. This can be a time to experience God’s love more profoundly and intimately, to find rest and renewal, and to reflect upon God’s active presence in all the experiences of your life. For a complete list of retreat opportunities, please visit the retreat page at http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry/retreats.

Christian and Spiritual Life Communities

Ignatian spirituality and the Jesuit vision of education include: prayer, community, service, and working for peace and justice in the world. This tradition serves as a model for small groups of women and men who come together in a more intimate community for faith sharing. Christian Life Community (CLC) members meet on a regular basis to break open the word and to support and encourage each other in living out the gospel. Members also form a supportive community that socializes together and engages in works of social justice outreach. For people who would prefer to be involved with an interfaith community, there are opportunities to join a Spiritual Life Community (SLC) which centers their faith sharing on a rich diversity of spiritual resources. For further information on CLC, please visit the CLC page at http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry/christian-life-communities.

Interfaith and Ecumenical Opportunities

University Ministry provides many ecumenical and interfaith opportunities for students to celebrate their diverse faith and cultural traditions. We provide training for lay ministry and encourage involvement in a diversity of prayer experiences. We also facilitate relationships with local ministry offices from other faith traditions. Through our shared ownership and prayer, we seek enrichment through our differences while working to create community.

Faith Doing Justice

From the belief in the power of the Gospel to transform the world, University Ministry provides a variety of opportunities for a student to live a reflective life of action for service, justice, and peace. For more information, visit our web page at http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service.

LUCAP (Loyola University Community Action Program)

LUCAP provides numerous opportunities to serve, educate, and advocate for the poor and marginalized within the local community. LUCAP participants also meet weekly for reflection and mutual support. LUCAP provides the ideal environment for the integration of one’s deep motivational faith-based beliefs with their expression in action and world transformation. "Contemplation in Action" has long been a hallmark of Jesuit education. For more information, visit http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service/loyola-university-community-action-program.

Ignacio Volunteer Immersion Programs

In partnership with the Jesuit Center, University Ministry provides immersion opportunities in the U.S. and in various areas of the developing world with the Ignacio Volunteer Program. Contact the Jesuit Center, 504-865-2304, for more details. For more information, visit http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service/ignacio-volunteer-programs.

Office of Mission and Ministry Staff:

Vice President for Mission and Ministry and Director of the Jesuit Center: Fr. Ted Dziak, SJ
Director of University Ministry: Mr. Kurt Bindewald
Assistant Director of University Ministry/ Associate Chaplain, Christian Life Communities and Retreats: Ms. Laura Quigley
Executive Assistant for Mission and Ministry: Mrs. Deborah LaMarca
Associate Chaplain/Community Service and Sustainability Issues: Mr. Joshua Daly
Associate Chaplain/Liturgy and Music: Mr. Kenneth Weber
Associate Chaplain/College of Law Chaplain: Mrs. Arlene Wiltz
University Ministry Fellow: Mr. Joseph Albin
Assistant Director of the Jesuit Center: Dr. Ricardo Marquez
Jesuit Center Fellow: Mr. Scott Porot
Jesuit Center Fellow: Mr. Andrew Ryan
Jesuit Center Fellow: Ms. Katrina Weschler
Jesuit Center Administrative Assistant: Mrs. Leslie Fall

Loyola University Ministry: Main Office, 104 Bobet Hall, 504-865-3226, http://mm.loyno.edu/university-ministry.
Jesuit Center: 110 Bobet , 504-865-2305 http://mm.loyno.edu/jesuit-center.

Student Services

Living, learning, and leading happen in and out of the classroom, both on and off campus. Loyola University New Orleans supports students by cultivating a learning community that, in the Jesuit tradition, assists in developing student’s whole selves—mind, body, and spirit. We provide leadership with programs and services that enhance the curricular and cocurricular student experience.

ACADEMIC ADVISING

Each student at Loyola is assigned an academic adviser, a full-time faculty member, who will assist the student in planning his/her schedule, and who will discuss with him or her any problems encountered in his/her academic career. The student should see his/her adviser at least twice a semester.

CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER

The Career Development Center, in partnership with the academic community and employers, empowers students to identify and develop career decision-making and job search skills that help them establish purposeful, intentional, and authentic careers. Driven by a passion to help students find careers where they find their true calling.

The team of full-time career coaches is always available for students whenever they need it.  Career Coaches provide assistance with:

  • deciding on a major in line with each student's interests.
  • exploring different types of careers and what appeals to each student–there is more out there than doctors, lawyers, and teachers!
  • taking and understanding career assessments in order to investigate how each student's personality and interests might lead to various careers.
  • finding internships and gain practical experience prior to graduation.
  • creating resumes and cover letters.
  • developing job search strategies.
  • connecting with employers through career fairs, workshops, and on-campus recruiting.
  • putting together graduate school applications and establish necessary timelines for admittance.
  • identifying each students' options if you change they chaing their mind about a career path.
  • discovering alternative opportunities for a gap year between college graduation and finding a real job or enrolling in graduate school.

UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER

The University Counseling Center (UCC) is located on the main campus in the Danna Student Center. The UCC provides personal counseling, group counseling, psychiatric services and psychological assessments to all registered students. It exists to assist students with meeting the varied challenges of community life at Loyola. Concerns for which students have sought services include homesickness, grief and loss, eating disorders, sexual violence, anxiety and depression. These services are offered free of charge and on a confidential basis in which the UCC records are maintained independently of all other university records. The UCC staff includes mental health professionals and a consulting psychiatrist who have been professionally trained in their areas of expertise. To schedule an appointment, please call (504) 865-3835.

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES

Loyola’s Student Health Services is located on the main campus on the lower level of the Danna Student Center. Medical professionals administer a program of primary healthcare, medical assistance for illness/injury, and referral for emergency and/or specialty medical care to all registered students. The primary goal for Student Health Services is to promote personal healthcare and healthy lifestyles. Services provided include immunizations, allergy injection referrals, intimate healthcare treatment, anonymous HIV testing, and a licensed in-house laboratory for various testing. Treatment by medical professionals is provided at no charge to students and on a confidential basis as dictated by the medical code of ethics and federal law. Prescribed medicines, referrals to off-campus medical specialists, immunizations, laboratory tests, and hospitalization are at the student’s expense. For more information about Student Health Services please call (504) 865-3326 or visit our website for the hours of operation.

IMMUNIZATION POLICY

Loyola University New Orleans and Louisiana law requires all incoming students and students residing on campus to submit vaccination documentation. This requirement includes proof of immunization for tetanus/diphtheria (within the past 10 years), meningococcal disease, and for students born after 1956, measles, mumps, and rubella (two doses).

Registration for any course will be “temporary” until the completed proof of immunization compliance form has been submitted to Student Health Services by the student and reviewed by Student Health Services staff. Failure to submit the completed form will result in a cancellation of classes. This requirement can be met by providing evidence of prior vaccinations or being vaccinated at Student Health Services. All immunization forms can be found on the Student Health Services website.

HEALTH INSURANCE

Loyola University New Orleans provides a student health insurance plan through Gallagher Koster. The plan is available for students who are United States citizens. Gallagher Koster manages the insurance program and United Healthcare StudentResources (UHCSR) is the insurance company and claims administrator.

To enroll in the plan, or for details about what’s covered, locate participating providers, and answers to Frequently Asked Questions, visit the Gallagher Koster website. Gallagher Koster’s Customer Service Team is available to assist you Monday through Friday, 8:30 am – 6:00 pm, EST at 800-457-5599 or by email at LoyolaStudent@gallagherkoster.com. 

STUDENT HOUSING

Loyola operates three residence halls on the main campus: Biever Hall and Buddig Hall, which house undergraduate First-Year and upperclass students; and Carrollton Hall, which houses undergraduate upperclass students. Located approximately four blocks from the main campus on Loyola’s Broadway campus is Cabra Hall, which houses undergraduate upperclass students. Residence hall buildings are accessible to students who are physically disabled and each hall has resident rooms to meet the special needs of these students.

All First-Year and Sophomore undergraduate students under 21 years of age are required, as a condition of enrollment, to reside in university housing and participate in a meal plan. Advanced placement credits or transfer credits do not negate this requirement. First-Years and Sophomores from the New Orleans metropolitan area must either reside in university housing or with parents or a legal guardian at a permanent residence within commutable distance from campus. Information about current housing fees may be found on the Residential Life website.

LOYOLA EXPRESS CARDS

Picture identification cards, known as Loyola Express Cards, are issued during registration free to first-time Loyola students. Each student is responsible for obtaining a card at that time which shall remain in his/her possession at all times. After the start of classes, a $15 fee will be charged for all cards, including replacements. The cards are used to identify currently enrolled students and allow use of campus facilities. In addition, the card controls access to the Recreational Sports Complex and the residence halls, as well as serving as the card for students on a meal plan. Students may also deposit funds on the card for food, retail, vending, and laundry purchases. 

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION

All newly admitted first year and transfer students must attend the New Student Orientation program immediately preceding their first semester. A fee to cover the cost of the program, all meals, lodging, and materials will be charged to all new day, undergraduate students, without exception. During this program, new students will meet with faculty and staff in both formal and informal venues to receive placement, advisement, and information about academic success. The orientation program also provides new students and their families with critical information regarding academic policies and support services, financial aid, campus life and activities, and student services such as counseling, career planning, and leadership development.

For more information, visit the New Student Orientation website or call the Office of Co-Curricular Programs at (505) 865-3623.

 

Student Activities

Student activities and programs are the best opportunities for students to achieve educational relevance outside the classroom. The Office of Co-Curricular Programs is committed to learning beyond the classroom and to providing students opportunities to actively engage in orientation and leadership development programs, student governance, and clubs and organizations. Through participation in campus activities, students may integrate the experiences of the classroom with everyday experiences of living and working in a society of people of varied interests, ideas, and values. Student activities are considered an extension of the classroom and hence an important part of the total educational program of the university.

There are more than 100 student organizations recognized and active on the Loyola campus. Leadership development, Greek Life, and student government organizations are just a few of the opportunities for students. A complete listing of all recognized organizations is contained in the Student Code of Conduct.

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

The Student Government Association (SGA) consists of elected members representing the four colleges and the School of Law. The SGA acts as the voice of the student body to the university. Through this body, students act as members on most of the university committees in an effort to insure input in areas of student concern. The SGA enacts legislation, provides services, and assists student organizations through sponsorship and funding of events. Meetings of the SGA are held once a week and are open to all students and members of the university community. Freshmen have the opportunity for representation through special freshman elections held each fall semester. All freshmen are eligible to run for one of these elected positions.

UNIVERSITY PROGRAMMING BOARD

As a primary part of the development of the whole person, the University Programming Board (UPB) serves as an organization for student interaction and involvement. The UPB is a student-run organization dedicated to providing educational, cultural, social, and recreational programs for the Loyola community.

Through activities such as movies, mini-music festivals, contemporary lectures, trips into the New Orleans community, and performing arts, students can discover other cultures, learn about current events, and meet other peers. UPB has sponsored major events such as the Stop Global Warming Tour featuring Sheryl Crow and Laurie David, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Jody Williams, civil rights activist and member of the Little Rock Nine Minnie Jean Brown-Trickey, trips to the New Orleans Museum of Art, Angola Prison Rodeo, Swamp Tours, and many others.

The University Programming Board encourages students to become engaged in their campus community by attending programs and activities.  Through this involvement, students foster their learning and leadership skills outside the classroom.

CARDONER LEADERSHIP FELLOWS

The Cardoner Leadership Fellows program challenges first year students to develop their personal leadership style through engaging academics and co-curricular projects. Fellows live in a self-governing living and learning community, take academic leadership classes, create and follow a community code, and collectively address a social issue or concern. Students are nominated to apply to the program based on submitted applications for admission. Fellowships include financial aid and will be competitively awarded to each fellow. For more information, contact the Office of Co-Curricular Programs

ACADEMIC HONORARY ORGANIZATIONS

The following Loyola chapters of national academic honorary organizations are officially recognized by the university.

  • Alpha Kappa Delta, an International Sociology Honorary Society
  • Alpha Psi Omega, a National Honorary Dramatic Society
  • Alpha Sigma Lambda, Delta Nu Chapter, a National Honor Society for Students in Adult Higher Education
  • Alpha Sigma Nu, a National Jesuit Honor Society
  • Beta Alpha Psi, a National Accounting Honor Fraternity
  • Beta Beta Beta, a National Honor Society in Biology
  • Beta Gamma Sigma, a National Honor Society in Business Administration
  • Blue Key, a National Honor Society
  • Cardinal Key, a National Honor Society
  • Chi Sigma Iota, a National Honor Society in Counseling
  • Dobro Slovo, a National Slavic Honor Society
  • Eta Sigma Phi, a National Honor Society in Classical Studies
  • Kappa Delta Pi, an Honor Society in Education
  • Kappa Tau Alpha, a National Honor Society in Journalism and Mass Communication
  • Omicron Delta Epsilon, a National Honor Society in Economics
  • Phi Alpha Theta, an International History Honor Society
  • Phi Eta Sigma, a National Freshman Honor Society
  • Pi Delta Phi, a National Honor Society in French
  • Pi Sigma Alpha, a National Honor Society in Political Science
  • Psi Chi, a National Honor Society in Psychology
  • Sigma Delta Pi, a National Honor Society in Spanish
  • Sigma Tau Alpha, a National Spanish Honor Society
  • Sigma Tau Delta, a National Honor Society in English
  • Sigma Theta Tau, an Honor Society in Nursing
  • Theta Alpha Kappa, a National Honor Society in Religious Studies

IGNATIUS LOYOLA INSTITUTE FOR VALUES EDUCATION 

The Ignatius Loyola Institute for Values Education (ILIVE) provides each undergraduate student strategic co-curricular experiences to discover, develop, and apply principles for building ethical and meaningful lives. ILIVE provides students ways in which to learn and live the values of Loyola University New Orleans, enhance academic commitments, and transition into lives of service to others.

The Ignatius Loyola Institute for Values Education, formed by Jesuit and Catholic values, sponsors programs and activities encouraging the processes of reflection and discernment, which leads students to define their personal ethical code. Activities include opportunities for students to discover, develop and apply distinctive strengths, talents, and skills to the following: intentional exposure to wellness initiatives; speaker and lecture series on current issues and leadership topics; career discernment; commitment to diversity; character development; and service.

STRENGTHSQUEST™ AT LOYOLA

Every student is uniquely talented to engage themselves and the world around them. StrengthsQuest at Loyola equips students to leverage their own strengths for success as students, leaders and global citizens. Programs are offered to individuals and organizations as a mechanism by which students can achieve success by cultivating their natural talents.

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS AND WELLNESS

Intercollegiate Athletics and Wellness provides opportunities for Loyola students, employees, and alumni to participate in competitive and noncompetitive, organized and informal sports and fitness activities. It is the express purpose of  Intercollegiate Athletics and Wellness to meet the diverse needs of the university community with a broad-based, comprehensive program including intramural sports, extramural sports, club sports, noncredit instructional programs, open recreation, and special interest programs. Students participating in all sports are responsible for ensuring that they are medically able to withstand the rigors of the physical activity in which they plan to engage. Likewise, all students should have sufficient personal injury insurance in the event of an accident.

The University Sports Complex is a multipurpose sports facility which includes: courts for basketball, tennis, volleyball, badminton, , and floor hockey; racquetball courts; an Olympic-style natatorium for swimming and diving; a whirlpool; a suspended jogging track; a weight-lifting/conditioning area; and the Loyola Athletic Hall of Fame. It also has locker rooms, each with a sauna and steam room. Students are admitted free with their university ID card and may purchase memberships for immediate family members.

The Loyola Wolfpack competes in the N.A.I.A. (National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics), Division I, as a member of the Gulf Coast Athletic Conference (GCAC). Loyola currently fields varsity teams in the following sports: men’s and women’s basketball, tennis, cross-country, men’s baseball, and women’s volleyball. By a student referendum conducted in 1991, the program is financially supported by a student fee dedicated to the intercollegiate athletic program. Loyola offers athletic scholarships in men’s and women’s basketball.

Summer and Abroad Programs

International Education Programs

WEBSITE: studyabroad.loyno.edu

For students wanting an education abroad experience, the Center for International Education is the first stop with advising and information on both Loyola and non-Loyola programs, financial aid, and scholarships. A study abroad advisor works with students to help them find the right program that will meet their academic and personal goals, financial situation, and interests. Students must also meet with their academic adviser and the associate dean in their college prior to applying to a non-Loyola study abroad program.

Numerous programs are available for Loyola students. There are semester and year-long programs, community service/immersion programs, components to academic courses, and summer study abroad. While the majority of students study abroad for short summer programs, a growing number of students are selecting semester or year-long programs. Students can attend both Loyola and non-Loyola programs, but Loyola financial aid can usually only be applied to Loyola programs. The university has a number of affiliations with study abroad programs that provide limited scholarships or discounts for Loyola students. All the information that a student needs can be found at studyabroad.loyno.edu or contact us at cie@loyno.edu.

Semester and Exchange Programs

Dortmund University in Germany

Through an exchange agreement with Dortmund University, Loyola students can study German and take classes in both English and German. Dortmund has traditionally been known for its industrial landscape and beer brewing, but has grown to be one of the most respected educational and research centers in all of Germany. Dortmund offers a wide selection of courses for students including economics, business, Catholic theology, chemistry, communications, art studies, American and English Studies.

This is a great opportunity for students who have been studying German to get a first-hand experience with the German language and culture. One year of college-level German is required.  For more information, please check the website, or contact CIE (cie@loyno.edu).

Keele University in the United Kingdom

With its location set outside of London, Keele University is an exciting academic institution and was named the UK's favorite university, according to a recent online poll!  Keele is located in the Midlands of England, one and one-half hours from London by train and centrally located to Manchester, York, Newcastle, and Edinburgh. Keele University offers a wide range of majors and boasts the top-ranked American Studies program in the United Kingdom. The American Studies department offers students the opportunity to study the U.S. from the view of British scholars, and the English department has a very strong course list. Students have the opportunity to study any courses available at Keele University. Other popular departments include: sociology, psychology, computer science, communications, history, and music. Students may browse the course offerings on the Keele website.

Studying at Keele is a more affordable and enriching way for Loyola students to study in the UK! Not only is cost of living more affordable than other locations in the UK, but due to its North Highland location, Keele University offers a unique English experience set among a gorgeous countryside that many visitors to England do not experience. The Keele University campus is set within 617 acres of beautiful Staffordshire parkland. The surrounding North Staffordshire area, famous for the manufacture of fine china and pottery, is known, appropriately, as the Potteries.  For more information, please check the website, or contact CIE (cie@loyno.edu).

The Radboud University of Nijmegen in The Netherlands

With an enrollment of over 17,000 students Radboud University is a leading academic institution within the Netherlands. This program allows students to enroll in a host of courses that correlate well with their coursework at Loyola. With a strong emphasis on internationalization, Radboud University welcomes Loyola students in the Spring of Fall semesters.  Radboud University offers its English-speaking exchange students more than 400 courses taught in English, including English, American literature, philosophy, psychology, history, business, and many other disciplines. Students in the Loyola/Nijmegen Exchange Program have the opportunity to take any courses offered in languages in which they are fluent. For more information, please check the website, or contact CIE (cie@loyno.edu).

Sophia University in Japan

Study at Sophia University, the premiere Jesuit University of Japan! Located amongst the excitement of Tokyo, Sophia University offers study abroad students a unique overseas experience and a high quality education in and outside of the classroom.  Students attending this program will take classes with local students and other international students.  Students will enroll in Sophia’s Faculty of Liberal Arts, which offers a wide range of courses in the humanities, international business, social studies, religion, and other fields. All courses are taught in English. Classes are made up of approximately 85 percent Japanese students and 15 percent foreign students. Loyola students applying for the exchange must have at least one year of Japanese and a 3.0 grade point average. For more information, please check the website, or contact CIE (cie@loyno.edu).

Loyola’s Program in Mexico City

Loyola offers a program of courses in Mexico City at the Jesuit Universidad Iberoamericana, the flagship Jesuit university in Latin America. The program aims to give students a mastery of conversational and written Spanish as well as a global perspective on Latin America’s civilization and culture with a special emphasis on Mexico.

Mexico City, with more than 20 million inhabitants, is the world’s largest city and perhaps the most important in the Iberian world. It is itself a unique resource, offering visitors a majestic legacy of ancient temples and buildings of the pre-Columbian and Spanish past as well as an almost endless array of other attractions proper to a great cosmopolitan center. It is the cultural, political, economic, and social heart of Mexico and Mesoamerica. Classroom instruction is enriched with a series of field trips to museums, cultural events, political gatherings, social happenings, and economic activities tied to the content of the individual courses taken.

Courses for international students, of whom 90 percent are from the United States, will include Spanish courses and courses from the disciplines of journalism and mass communications, architecture, economics, education, history, law, political science, sociology, and visual arts, some in Spanish and some in English. During the semester hundreds of other courses and other disciplines taught in Spanish can be selected from the Ibero’s regular offerings.

In the summer session, most of the courses from disciplines other than Spanish are usually given in English; in the fall semester only two or three of these courses are in English; and in the spring semester all courses irrespective of their discipline are taught in Spanish. During the summer, Loyola’s Intensive Spanish Program is a language immersion program of three courses (nine semester hours) structured for an optimal achievement of Spanish proficiency for the beginning, intermediate, and advanced student.

Students should have intermediate Spanish to participate in the fall semester and advanced Spanish to participate in the spring semester. Students with no prior Spanish can participate in the summer program although beginning Spanish would be recommended. Students participating in the year-long program should ideally begin their cycle of courses with the language immersion program. For more information, contact Maurice Brungardt, Ph.D. (brungard@loyno.edu) or check out our website.

Loyola Semester in France

Loyola has joined a consortium of universities, led by the University of Southern Mississippi, to provide a unique experience in a small French town in the Loire Valley. Students live and study in The Abbey, a beautifully restored 17th-century monastery school in Pontlevoy, about 20 miles from Tours. Though students are not required to know French to attend the program, they study French and are given real exposure to France and French culture. Each student is provided with a family who hosts the student for occasional meals and cultural activities. Students take at least 15 hours of classes, which are held from Monday through Thursday. Students can travel on weekends. In addition to guided day trips, students, as part of the program, spend a week in Paris, where they experience an intensive introduction to the museums and cultural and historic sites of the city. They also have a two-week break during which they can travel. Loyola grants and scholarships apply. For additional information about the program, contact Bernard Cook, Ph.D. (cook@loyno.edu), or David Moore, Ph.D. (dmoore@loyno.edu) or check the website.

ISEP–International Student Exchange Program

Loyola is a member of ISEP, the International Student Exchange Program. Through this organization, Loyola students have access to over 140 institutions in more than 40  countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America including institutions in 21 countries which offer programs in English. As an ISEP participant, students enroll as full-time students at the host school, attend classes with local and other international students, and receive housing, a meal stipend, and on-site support from the host institution. Students exchanged through the ISEP network pay all of their fees, including room and board, to Loyola and take a place at a host institution. All Loyola scholarships and financial aid apply to the ISEP exchanges. For more information, please check the CIE website, or the ISEP website at www.isep.org, or contact CIE (cie@loyno.edu).

Summer Programs

Loyola in the Bahamas

Come learn about the rich history and culture of the Bahamas and the wider Caribbean while spending four weeks in Nassau, Bahamas. Students live in apartment-style accommodations in a residential area of Nassau that is a fifteen minute walk from their classes at the College of the Bahamas. This living arrangement allows participants to experience everyday community life in Nassau while they are just a 10-15 minute bus ride from the center of town. As part of their course work, participants will visit the National Art Gallery, take a historical tour of Nassau, and visit a Bahamian island outside of Nassau. In the seminar Encountering the Caribbean, students learn about the histories, politics, and cultures of the region and hear from a series of distinguished guest speakers who visit the class each week. The course Ethnographic Methods-Field Work in the Bahamas allows students to learn about Bahamian culture through hands-on work conducting interviews, working in the national archives, and keeping reflective and analytical journals about their everyday experiences.  In the biology course, students learn fundamental concepts of ecology and apply them to the ecology of terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments of the Bahamas.  For additional information about the program, please check the website, contact Dr. Angel Adams Parham, (aaparham@loyno.edu).

Loyola Summer Study Program in Belgium

In 2010 Loyola will conduct its 17th summer study program in the university town of Leuven in Belgium. Students can take six hours of credit in history and philosophy or religious studies courses, including Common Curriculum courses: World War I with Fr. Robert Gerlich, The American Character from European Perspectives with David Moore, Ph.D., and History of Belgium with Bernard Cook, Ph.D.. The program lasts four weeks with guided bus trips to Bruges and Ghent, Amsterdam in the Netherlands, Aachen and Cologne in Germany, Verdun in France, and Ypres. Students reside in a modernized dorm with full kitchen facilities operated by Loyola University of Maryland. There is opportunity for private travel on two weekends. For additional information check the website or contact Bernard Cook, Ph.D. (cook@loyno.edu).

Loyola in China

This program allows students to study contemporary Chinese history, culture, and business practices in the fascinating cities of Beijing, Xi'an, and Shanghai. Students will have the opportunity to visit the Great Wall, the old and new Summer Palaces, and the Forbidden City in Beijing. In Shanghai, they will visit the famous Water Town Shanghai History Museum. In Xi'an, they will visit the Big Mosque, the TerracottaWarriors, and the Big Goose Pagoda. Participants will study the Chinese economy and unique business traditions while experiencing a new culture, providing students with an unforgettable learning experience.  For more information, check the website or contact Dr. Wing Fok (fok@loyno.edu).

Loyola in Costa Rica

The Loyola Summer Program in Costa Rica offers students the opportunity to study environmental art and environmental philosophy, and to have a rich, diverse and exciting experience of nature and culture while exploring the cloud forests, rain forests, Pacific beaches, and other regions of Costa Rica. 

We will begin our tour of Costa Rica in San Jose, where we will visit the Central Market, the Museum of Contemporary Arts, the Museum of Gold, and the National Theater. We will then travel through a vast range of ecosystems and bioregions, including the Caribbean lowlands, the llanos (plains), several wilderness areas, the Guatuso Maleku indigenous area, the Arenal volcano, Playa Coyote and the Nicoya Peninsula on the Pacific Ocean, the Pacific Dry Forest, and the cloud forest of Cerro Azahar. During our travels, students will explore waterfalls, tide pools, mangrove swamps, volcanic beaches, mountains, volcanic hot springs, a lava observatory, and a primary rainforest, to mention only a few of the natural sites.

The many activities during the trip will include swimming, horseback riding, an aerial zipline canopy tour, music and fiestas, wildlife tours with crocodile, frog and butterfly exhibits, a visit to petroglyphs, cultural presentations, local cooking lessons, visits with indigenous artisans, a plant walk with a Guatuso shaman, and an ethnobotany ceremony. We will also visit ecological sites including organic agriculture, hydroelectric and wind energy projects. The program will culminate in an exhibition of the students' final art projects at the Museo de San Ramón in San Ramón and a reception to which local students will be invited.  For more information, check the website or contact Dr. Jonh Clark (clark@loyno.edu).

 

Loyola International Business in Europe

Students will interact with guest speakers from Europe's private and public sectors, visit international institutions, and make company visits to U.S. and European corporations. Each year, the program visits different locations in Europe.  Students have the opportunity to visit some of the most famous sites in Europe while learning about the development of the European economy and its laws and how business practices have changed with the advent of the European Union and with the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe.  Additionally, students will learn how European business practices differ from those of the United States.  They will also be introduced to how government and business interrelate in Europe. For more information, check the website

Loyola in India

The Loyola Program in India offers students the opportunity for summer study in regions of North India that are striking for their cultural diversity, natural beauty, and historical richness. The program will be based in Dharamsala, located in the Kangra Valley in the shadow of the Dhauladhar range of the Himalayas. Dharamsala is the center of India's Tibetan refugee community and the seat of the Tibetan Government in Exile.

In addition to experiencing immersion in Tibetan Buddhist culture, students will visit Delhi, one of India's largest and most historic cities; Agra, site of the Taj Majal; and Tso Pema, the "Lotus Lake" sacred to Buddhists, Sikhs, and Hindus. In the context of such fascinating experiences, students will study issues in global ethics and explore the religions of northern India. They will visit social service programs such as a facility operated by Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity, and the Tibetan Children's Village for refugee children. They will visit Hindu and Buddhist temples, Sikh gurudwaras, Tibetan Buddhist monasteries, and great Muslim architectural sites, and hear talks by traditional Tibetan teachers. For additional information about the program check the website or  contact John P. Clark, Ph.D. (clark@loyno.edu) or Catherine Wessinger (wessing@loyno.edu).

Loyola Irish Studies Program

The Irish Studies Program offers students the opportunity to study Irish literature and culture at Trinity College, Dublin. Housing is provided by Trinity College where students will share a kitchen and bathroom. The program has excursions most weekday afternoons as well as a visit to Sligo to study Yeats and the Gore-Booth family. There is also a week-end trip to Northern Ireland in conjunction with the religious studies course. This excursion provides an educational tour of Belfast and accommodations at Queens College Belfast. Students will be housed in a residential dorm with single rooms and shared kitchens and bathrooms. For more information, check the website or  contact Mary McCay, Ph.D. (mccay@loyno.edu).

Loyola in Paris

Discover the Paris of American expatriate writers Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Gertrude Stein - the Paris that nourished their talents. Study French artists in the museums of Paris and French writers and musicians of the romantic, impressionist, and modern periods. Through the Loyola program, you will explore Paris, a wonderful walking city steeped in the culture from the middle ages to the present.  Students study American literature of the expatriate writers of the '20s and '30s or France in the Modern World. In conjunction with the coursework, students tour several museums and historical sites such as the Musee D’ Orsay, the Louvre, the Pompidou, and the Picasso and Rodin Museums. In addition to the museum visits, which are part of the coursework, students tour major historical sites of Paris such as Notre Dame and make day trips to visit Versaille, Giverny, Chartres, and Rheims.  The students reside and have classes in a modern living, learning facility in the 14th arrondissement near the Luxembourg Gardens. For more information, check the website or contact Mary McCay, Ph.D. (mccay@loyno.edu).

Loyola Summer Program in Spain

Students study for four weeks in July in Ávila, Spain, a provincial capital located in central Spain, about one hour from Madrid. Ávila is a national historical heritage city, still surrounded by its medieval city walls. Friday day trips go to Segovia, Salamanca, Salamanca, the Prado Museum in Madrid, and Carmelite sites in nearby villages (Fontiveros, Alba de Tormes) are an integral part of the cultural experience. The program is sponsored in Spain by the Universidad Católica de Ávila, where classes are held. Housing is in a Spanish residence within walking distance from the university. Students take two of following classes: a language course at the appropriate level, Culture and Civilization of Spain, or Spanish Mysticism. All classes are taught in Spanish. Prerequisite of SPAN A100 or equivalent. For more information, check the website or contact Eileen Doll, Ph.D. (edoll@loyno.edu).

Short Programs

Management and Culture in Latin American Business Environment

The College of Business’ winter study abroad program to Latin America is a three credit courses that can fulfill an international business or other business elective in our BAcc, BBA or MBA program while offering you a unique opportunity to develop both theoretical and practical knowledge of Latin America. The course is taught in a combination of lectures, case discussions, and site visits, including a 2-week field trip to various sites in the Southern Cone, depending on the year, Argentina, Chile and other location. In addition to classroom instruction, participants will also meet and interact with guest speakers from the public and private business sectors, visit local companies, and meet with executives from multinational enterprises to gain insights into the culture and business environment of Latin America as well as economic or social developments. The course is open to any upper division undergraduate (junior or senior) or graduate student in business or in Latin American studies. Enrollment is capped at 20 students, so sign-up soon to ensure your place in the course. Interested students past the first 20 will be placed on a waitlist, in case additional spots become available.

Tropical Ecology

Tropical Ecology is a three-credit-hour course that involves weekly lectures each spring semester and culminates in a two-week fieldtrip to Belize. The trip is composed of two sections: tropical jungle and coastal atolls and reefs. The jungle portion includes treks through tropical rainforest (both day and night), birding, dugout canoe trips down exotic rivers, visits to Mayan sites, and overnights in Maya villages. The sea portion includes snorkeling, diving, and camping on isolated cayes (islands). Emphasis is on attaining a deep understanding and appreciation of tropical ecosystems, learning and experiencing local culture, developing a thorough knowledge of global environmental dynamics, and having fun. For more information, contact Frank Jordan (jordan@loyno.edu).

Mission + Ministry Immersion Programs

Ignacio Volunteer Program Goals
  • TO SERVE: Participants will work with those of the greatest need -- the impoverished & challenged, the disadvantaged young and the elderly.
  • TO LEARN: Participants will have an opportunity to explore the political, sociological, and economic issues that have created the environment and situation in which they will find themselves.

Christmas Break Immersions

Ignacio Volunteers: Jamaica Christmas Camp 2011

Christmas Camp in Kingston, Jamaica (Dec 27, 2010 - Jan 6, 2011)

Ten to twelve Loyola University students will be invited to serve as teachers/ coaches at a five-day Christmas day-camp for disadvantaged primary school children in a shanty town area of Kingston, Jamaica. The program is an eleven-day experience, where participants will have an opportunity to immerse themselves in Jamaican culture with its reggae music, unique food and environment, and learn of the political, sociological, economic and spiritual issues of the Caribbean and developing world.

For more information, contact Ignacio Volunteers at IgVols@loyno.edu. Or visit: http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service/ignacio-volunteer-programs

Ignacio Volunteers: Belize Winter Camp 2011

Christmas Camp in the Mayan Village of San Jose in Belize (Dec 27, 2010 - Jan 8, 2011)

Six to eight Loyola University students will be invited to serve as teachers/ coaches at a five-day Christmas day-camp for primary school children in one or more of the (English-speaking) Mayan villages in the Punta Gorda area of southern Belize, Central America. The program is an eleven-day experience in a very rural area of Belize, where electricity and running water is limited. Participants will have an opportunity to immerse themselves in the simple lifestyle of Mayan/ Belizean culture, within the rain forest and its unique food and environment, and learn of the political, sociological, economic and spiritual issues of the Mayan/ Belizean, Central American and developing world.

For more information, contact Ignacio Volunteers at IgVols@loyno.edu. Or visit: http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service/ignacio-volunteer-programs

Spring Break Immersions

Ignacio Volunteers: The Bayou Experience 2011

The wetlands of The Barrataria-Terrebonne National Estuary, Louisiana. (April 16 –22, 2011)

The Bayou Experience will work with the Barrataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program (BTNEP). BTNEP works on coastal and wetlands restoration and education on the threats to that ecosystem. Participants will spend the days doing beach combing, wetlands planting and invasive species removal. The evenings will be spent learning about the realities and consequences of the devastating loss of the Louisiana coast. In addition, in partnership with the Diocese of Houma-Thibadoux, participants will experience the Houma Indian culture, and learn about what Catholic parishes are doing both to respond to coastal erosion and promote sustainable rebuilding. Participants will stay at a dorm style USDA-owned facility in Golden Meadow, Louisiana.

For more information, contact Ignacio Volunteers at IgVols@loyno.edu. Or visit: http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service/ignacio-volunteer-programs

Summer Break Immersions

Ignacio Volunteers: The El Paso Border Experience 2011

At the Border of the US and Mexico near El Paso, TX (May 15 – 22, 2011)

The El Paso Border Experience will work with Project Puente and focus on issues such as global economics, immigration and the drug war. The experience will include trips to shelters, maquillas, the border patrol, a detention facility among other places in order to provide a first-hand experience of some of the realities of immigration. There will also be a day or two spent volunteering with organizations like Sacred Heart Church, a thriving, immigrant Jesuit parish. In addition, there will be an excursion to Palomas, Mexico to visit a women's cooperative there.

For more information, contact Ignacio Volunteers at IgVols@loyno.edu. Or visit: http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service/ignacio-volunteer-programs

Ignacio Volunteers: Jamaica Experience 2011

Kingston, Jamaica (May 16- May 25, 2011)

Ten to twelve Loyola University students will be invited to participate in volunteer service work in the poor urban areas of Kingston. The program is a eleven-day immersion experience, where participants will have an opportunity to work with those of the greatest need, which include the impoverished and challenged, and the disadvantaged young and the elderly. Although specific volunteer activities vary, all participants will work with Mother Teresa’s Missionaries of Charity, with the Missionaries of the poor as well as at other Catholic social service agencies. This program is designed to give participants an exposure to the Jamaican culture and the political, sociological, economic and spiritual issues of the Caribbean and developing world.

For more info, contact Ignacio Volunteers at IgVols@loyno.edu. Or visit: http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service/ignacio-volunteer-programs

Ignacio Volunteers: Belize Summer Camp 2011

Summer Camp in Dangriga, Belize, Central America (July 16 - Aug 9, 2011)

Eight to ten Loyola University students will be invited to serve as teachers/ coaches at a two-week summer day-camp in English-speaking Belize, Central America. The program is a three-week (22 day) simple-lifestyle immersion experience, where participants have an opportunity to experience the country of Belize; a land of rain forests, Mayan ruins, islands, waterfalls, wildlife, and culture. Participants will teach / coach at a day camp for over 300 local Belizean primary school students (age 8-12 years old) and live together in a local community center in the town. Each participant will co-teach with a local Belizean university student, and will teach Arts & Crafts, Reading & Writing, and Math in the mornings, and coach sports (basketball, soccer & volleyball) and children’s games in the afternoons.

For more information, contact Ignacio Volunteers at IgVols@loyno.edu. Or visit: http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service/ignacio-volunteer-programs

Ignacio Volunteers: Belize Faculty/Staff Experience 2011

Faculty and Staff Experience of Rural Belize (May 21 - May 29, 2011)

Eight to ten Loyola University Faculty and Staff members will participate in an immersion/ service program in English-speaking Belize, Central America. The trip will assist as needed with youth and/or building a small church in the Mayan villages. In addition, volunteers will have an opportunity to learn of the works and ministries of the Jesuits in Belize and Loyola LIM alumni. There will also be one day of recreation at a local caye. Evenings will include reflections and discussions including local speakers.

For more information, contact Ignacio Volunteers at Jesuit@loyno.edu. Or visit: http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service/ignacio-volunteer-programs

Ignacio Volunteers: Jamaica Alumni Experience 2011

An experience of Kingston, Jamaica for Alumni (May 21 - May 29, 2011)

This trip is open to all Loyola University New Orleans alumni and their spouse/friends/family. Participants will work with the elderly or disadvantaged youth in Kingston, Jamaica. The volunteers will work with The Home for the Destitute and Dying run by Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity, Missionaries of the Poor homes for children with physical or mental disabilities, and Riverton City Catholic Early Education Centre, a school for disadvantaged children. The type of work will vary at each site, and may include helping serve meals, washing/shaving, entertaining or writing letters, tutoring or sports & games, painting/ cleaning/ fixing up and just spending quality time with the elderly or young children.

For more information, contact Ignacio Volunteers at IgVols@loyno.edu. Or visit: http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service/ignacio-volunteer-programs

Programs Under Development:

Ignacio Volunteers: Uganda African Experience 2011 (The program is still being planned and it has not yet been given final approval)

Experience and Serve the people of Uganda, Africa (Tentative Dates: May 15-July 1, 2011)

Tentative: Eight to ten Loyola New Orleans students will be invited to participate in a new Ignacio Volunteer six-week summer program to Uganda in Eastern Africa, Volunteers and staff will leave from New Orleans to Kampala, Uganda. They will spend one week in the capital city of Kampala. T hey will learn about the country, city as well as the work and ministry of the Jesuit Refugee Service and the Jesuits in Uganda. Fr. Isaac Kiyaka, Country Director for the Jesuit Refugee Service-Africa, will serve as the host while in Uganda. The group will travel to the town of Gulu in northern Uganda, where a new Jesuit high school is being built.

For more information, contact Ignacio Volunteers at Jesuit@loyno.edu. Or visit: http://mm.loyno.edu/community-service/ignacio-volunteer-programs

Military Science (ROTC)

ARMY ROTC

Loyola students who participate in Army ROTC take their courses on the Tulane University campus. Up to 15 hours of Army ROTC coursework may be used toward the total number of hours required for graduation at Loyola.

Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) is a comprehensive program of studies through which a student can qualify to be commissioned as an officer in the United States Army, the National Guard, or the United States Army Reserve. Students learn leadership and management skills that will help in any profession. The Army ROTC program consists of a two-year basic course, which is open to freshmen and sophomores only, and a two-year advanced course. Non-scholarship students participating in the first two years of ROTC do not incur any obligation to the United States Army.

Admission to ROTC is conditional on meeting academic, physical, and age requirements as well as the approval of the professor of military science.

Physical training is an integral part of the ROTC program.

To be commissioned as an officer, a student must complete either the regular four-year program, a three-year program (whereby the basic course is compressed into one year), or a two-year program requiring completion of the summer ROTC basic camp. Advanced placement for ROTC training may be given to veterans and to students with previous ROTC experience. In addition to these requirements, a student must complete at least one course in the area of written communications, military history, and computer literacy.

Learn more about the Army ROTC »

AIR FORCE ROTC

The Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) offers two- and four-year programs through which students, upon graduation, can earn a commission as a second lieutenant in the United States Air Force. Through a comprehensive program of both academics and hands-on training, students have the unique opportunity to enhance their interpersonal skills in the areas of communications, teamwork, leadership, and management.

The four-year program is divided into two parts: the General Military Course (GMC) for freshmen and sophomores and the Professional Officers Course (POC) for juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Students in the GMC attend a one-hour class and a one and one half-hour laboratory each week, while the POC students attend three hours of class and a one and one half-hour laboratory weekly. All POC classes and laboratories are conducted on the Tulane Campus. The GMC classes are held on both the Tulane and UNO campuses, while the laboratories are held at Tulane.

The two-year program consists of the Professional Officer Course only. Interested students should apply for the two-year program during the first semester of their sophomore year. Selected candidates will attend a six-week field training session prior to entry into the POC. Applicants must have four semesters of either undergraduate or graduate work remaining after attendance at our summer field training session.

Students may enroll in the GMC without incurring any military obligation. Entry into the POC is competitive. All students in the four-year program must compete for a slot at one of our four-week field training camps. Field training sessions, for which applicants are paid and yet incur no military obligation, are held in the summer and are normally attended between the sophomore and junior years. Non-scholarship students do not incur any commitment to military service until they begin the POC. Students may also register for an Aerospace Studies course for academic credit only, without joining the cadet corps.

Textbooks are issued without cost. Uniforms are issued, but require a $50 deposit at time of issuance. A $20 nonrefundable Cadet Activity Fee is charged each semester. POC cadets and GMC scholarship cadets qualify for a $100 per month subsistence allowance during the fall and spring semesters.

The Air Force offers some excellent scholarship opportunities in a wide variety of academic majors. These scholarships cover tuition, university fees, and textbook reimbursement. Contact AFROTC Detachment 320, Tulane University, at (504) 865-5394 or (800) 7-AFROTC for more information on the two- and four-year programs and scholarship eligibility. Work with your adviser for integration of Aerospace Studies into your academic program.

Learn more about the Air Force ROTC »

NAVAL RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS

Loyola University offers the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) through a cross-enrollment agreement with the NROTC Unit, Tulane University. There are three general programs through which students can qualify for commissions in the naval service: The United States Naval Academy, The NROTC Navy or Marine option programs, and direct accession through Officer Candidate School. The NROTC program at Tulane University offers students the opportunity to earn a commission in the Navy or Marine Corps through four-year, three-year, and two-year scholarship programs, and through the NROTC College Program. Students matriculating to Loyola University, who have not already been awarded an NROTC scholarship, may participate in the NROTC College Program and compete for a three-year scholarship. These students are selected from applicants each year by the Professor of Naval Science.

NROTC scholarship program students are selected annually on a nationwide competitive basis. They receive four-year scholarships that include full tuition, university fees, uniforms, textbooks, and a $200 per-month subsistence stipend. Scholarship students participate in paid summer training periods and receive commissions in the Navy or Marine Corps Reserve as ensigns or second lieutenants upon graduation. They have a minimum four-year active duty obligation after commissioning, followed by four years in the inactive reserves.

NROTC college program students are selected from applicants each year by the professor of naval science. Students may apply to participate in the college program any time during their freshman year. They participate on a four-year naval science program with one paid summer training period (between junior and senior years) and receive commissions in the Navy or Marine Corps Reserve upon graduation. They incur a minimum three-year active duty obligation, followed by five years in the inactive reserves. College program students are furnished uniforms and naval science textbooks and a subsistence stipend of $200 per month during their junior and senior years. Additionally, four-year college program students may compete nationally for a three-year or two-year NROTC scholarship.

NROTC two-year college scholarship program participants are selected from local undergraduate applicants. To apply, students should contact the NROTC unit on campus not later than the middle of the first semester of the sophomore year or the first semester of the third year if in a five-year program. Applicants who are qualified and accepted attend a six-week Naval Science Institute at Newport, Rhode Island, during the summer prior to entering the program. Travel expenses are paid to and from the institute, and candidates receive approximately $500 in salary, plus meals and lodging from the training period. Upon successful completion of the Naval Science Institute, the students are enrolled in the NROTC program in the fall. Students then receive full tuition scholarships plus $200 per month in subsistence for the remaining two years of college. Active duty obligations are a minimum of four years of active duty followed by four years in the inactive reserves.

Those students who desire a Navy or Marine Corps commission but do not participate in NROTC programs may apply for the direct accession program that leads to a commission upon completion of degree requirements and Officer Candidate School.

The Naval ROTC Unit sponsors many teams in campus intramural sports and many specialty organizations that represent the unit on campus and throughout Louisiana and the southern United States. These include the Drill Team, the Drum and Bugle Corps, the Cannon Crew, and the Color Guard, all of which participate in many Mardi Gras parades and other unit and university functions. Other special organizations which include NROTC representation are the Anchor and Chain Society and The Raiders.

Learn more about the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps »

Volunteer Service

Office of Mission and Ministry

LUCAP (Loyola University Community Action Program)

LUCAP provides numerous opportunities to serve, educate, and advocate for the poor and marginalized within the local community. LUCAP participants also meet weekly for reflection and mutual support. LUCAP provides the ideal environment for the integration of one’s deep motivational faith-based beliefs with their expression in action and world transformation. "Contemplation in Action" has long been a hallmark of Jesuit education. Find out more »

Ignacio Volunteers

In partnership with the Jesuit Center, Mission & Ministry provides immersion opportunities in Jamaica, Belize, El Paso, The Bayou in Louisiana and other locations with the Ignacio Volunteer Program. Contact the Jesuit Center, (504) 865-2304, for more details. Find out more »

Center for Volunteer and Public Service

Launching in Fall 2011, the Center for Volunteer and Public Service will provide needed support to the volunteer activities of the entire university. Find out more »

Other Volunteer Opportunities

Numerous volunteer opportunities exist through the colleges and the Office of Student Affairs. Find out more »

Faculty
  • KATHERINE H. ADAMS, Ph.D., William and Audrey Hutchinson Distinguished Professor, Professor of English, Chair of the Department of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., 1976; M.A., 1978, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Florida State University, 1981.
  • S.L. ALEXANDER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mass Communication; Social Sciences. B.A., University of Florida, 1968; M.A., University of Miami, 1970; Ph.D., University of Florida, 1990.
  • JON ALTSCHUL, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy; Humanities and Natural Sciences.  B.A., University of Wisconsin, 2003; M.A., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2007; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara.
  • BLANCA ANDERSON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., University of Puerto Rico, 1977; M.A., New York University/Madrid, 1979; Ph.D., Boston University, 1987.
  • ROSALIE A. ANDERSON, Ph.D., Professor of Biology; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., 1987; M.S., 1989; Ph.D., 1992, Tulane University.
  • VALERIE ANDREWS, Assistant Professor of Mass Communication; Social Sciences. B.S., Northwestern State University, 1977; M.A., Louisiana State University, 1981.
  • KAREN ARNOLD, Ph.D., Associate Professor in Management; Business. B.S., 1971; M.B.A., 1972, University of New Orleans; Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 1979.
  • KATHLEEN BARNETT, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Management, Internship Coordinator; Business Administration. B.A., University of Louisiana/Lafayette, 1980; M.E., University of South Carolina, 1981; Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 2005.
  • WILLIAM BARNETT, Ph.D., J.D., Professor of Economics and BankOne Distinguished Professor of International Business; Business. B.B.A., Loyola University New Orleans, 1967; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1974; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans, 1982.
  • JAMES H. BASKETT, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Accounting; Business. B.B.A., 1961; M.A., 1966, Texas Tech University; M.B.A., West Texas State University, 1968; Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1976; C.P.A.. 1982.
  • E. LETITIA BEARD, Ph.D., Professor of Cellular Physiology; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., 1952; B.S., 1953, Texas Christian University; M.T. (ASCP), 1953; M.S., Texas Christian University, 1955; Ph.D., Tulane University, 1961.
  • TERRI BEDNARZ, R.S.M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, Humanities and Natural Sciences.  B.A., West Texas State A & M University, 1985; M.A., Catholic Theological Union, 2002; Ph.D., Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University, 2010.
  • JOSEPH C. BERENDZEN, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy; Humanities and Natural Sciences.  B.A., Saint Louis University, 1997; M.A.  1999, Villanova University; Ph.D., Villanova University, 2002.
  • PETER J. BERNARDI, S.J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Religious Studies; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Xavier University, Cincinnati, 1972; M.A., University of Detroit, 1979; M.Div., Toronto School of Theology, University of Toronto, 1984; Licentiate in Sacred Theology, Weston School of Theology, 1987; Ph.D., Catholic University of America, 1997.
  • NANCY BERNARDO, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Visual Arts; Music and Fine Arts. BA, Valparaiso University, 1993; MFA, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 2006.
  • JOHN J. BIGUENET, M.F.A., Robert Hunter Distinguished Professor, Professor of English; University Professor, Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Loyola University New Orleans, 1971; M.F.A., University of Arkansas, 1975.
  • BARBARA A. BIHM, D.N.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing; Social Sciences. B.S.N., University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1973; M.S.N., Boston College, 1976; D.N.S., Louisiana State University Medical Center, 1991.
  • KURT R. BIRDWHISTELL, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., University of West Florida, 1980; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1985.
  • TIRTHABIR BISWAS, PhD, Assistant Professor of Physics; Humanities and Natural Sciences.  M.Sc. Physics, Indian Institute of Technology 1998; PhD Physics, Stony Brook University 2003.
  • WALTER BLOCK, Ph.D., Harold E. Wirth Eminent Scholar in Economics, Professor of Economics; Business. B.A., Brooklyn College, 1964; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1972.
  • BOYD BLUNDELL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Religious Studies; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., McMaster University, 1996; M.A., University of St. Michael’s College/Regis College, Toronto, 1998; Ph.D., Boston College, 2003.
  • DONALD ROY BOOMGAARDEN, Ph.D., Dean for the College of Music and Fine Arts. B.M.E., Texas State University, 1977; M.A., University of Rochester, 1978; Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1985.
  • PAUL J. BOTELHO, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Music Technology; Music and Fine Arts. B.F.A., College of Santa Fe, 1998; M.A., Dartmouth College, 2001; M.F.A., Princeton University, 2003; Ph.D., Princeton University, 2008.
  • PATRICK L. BOURGEOIS, Ph.D., William and Audrey Hutchinson Distinguished Professor, Professor of Philosophy; Humanities and Natural Sciences. A.A., St. Joseph Seminary, 1960; B.A., 1962; M.A., 1964, Notre Dame Seminary; M.A., Notre Dame University, 1965; Ph.D., Duquesne University, 1970.
  • CARL H. BRANS, Ph.D., Bank One/Rev. James C. Carter, S.J., Distinguished Professor of Physics; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., Loyola University New Orleans, 1957; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1961.
  • KIM BARRILLEAUX BRANNAGAN, Ph.D., MBA, RN, MSN, BS Ed. Assistant Professor of Nursing; Social Sciences . BS Ed., Nicholls State University, 1986; M.B.A., 1993, Nicholls State University; BSN, 1993, Nicholls State University; MSN, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 2001; Ph.D., 2006, Southern University and A&M College.
  • MARY MARGARET BRAZIER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology; Chair of the Department of Psychological Sciences, Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Loyola University New Orleans, 1977; M.S., 1985; Ph.D., 1986, Tulane University.
  • ROBERT BRICE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy; Humanities and Natural Sciences. Michigan State University, Ph.D. Philosophy, May 2004; West Chester University of Pennsylvania: M.A. Philosophy, December 1997; University of Houston: B.A. Philosophy, May 1994
  • SUSAN F. BROWER, M.A., Associate Professor, Media Services Coordinator; Library. B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1975; M.A., University of Michigan, 1985.
  • BETHANY BROWN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice; Social Sciences. Ph.D., University of Delaware.
  • MAURICE P. BRUNGARDT, Ph.D., Professor of History; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., University of Notre Dame, 1963; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1974.
  • PETER F. BURNS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science; Social Sciences. B.A., University of Connecticut, 1992; M.A., 1994; M.A., 1997; Ph.D., 1999, University of Maryland.
  • SARA M. BUTLER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Glendon College/York University, 1995; M.A, University of Toronto, 1996; Ph.D., Dalhousie University, 2001.
  • TIMOTHY C. CAHILL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Religious Studies; Chair of the Department of Religious Studies, Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Andhra University, 1984; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1995.
  • MARIA E. CALZADA, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics; Humanities and Natural Sciences. A.B., Boston College, 1986; M.S., 1988; Ph.D., 1991, Tulane University.
  • GERALD L. CANNON, M.F.A., Associate Professor of Visual Arts; Music and Fine Arts. B.A., University of North Alabama, 1977; M.F.A., University of New Orleans, 1981.
  • NICHOLAS CAPALDI, Ph.D., Clarence and Mildred Legendre-Soule Distinguished Scholar Chair in Business Ethics, Professor of Business Management; Business. B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1960; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1965.
  • GEORGE E. CAPOWICH, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology; Social Sciences. B.A., Providence College, 1972; M.A., University of South Florida, 1980; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1997.
  • ARTHUR E. CARPENTER, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Archivist; Library. B.A., UCLA, 1977; M.A., University of New Orleans, 1979; Ph.D., Tulane University, 1987.
  • NIKHIL CELLY, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Management, Business. B.E., University of Delhi (India), 1990; M.S., University of Rochester, 1991; cand., Ph.D., University of Western Ontario (Canada).
  • CHRISTOPHER CHAMBERS, M.F.A., Associate Professor of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1984; M.F.A., University of Alabama, 1999.
  • RONALD C. CHRISTNER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Finance; Business. B.A., St. Procopius College, 1969; M.S., 1971; Ph.D., 1973, University of Minnesota.
  • ALICE V. CLARK, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Music, Coordinator of Music History and Literature; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., Ohio State University, 1984; M.M., University of Texas at Austin, 1987; M.F.A.,1989; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1996.
  • JOHN P. CLARK, Ph.D., Gregory F. Curtin, S.J. Distinguished Professor, Professor of Philosophy; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., 1967; M.A., 1971; Ph.D., 1974, Tulane University.
  • BERNARD A. COOK, Ph.D., Provost Distinguished Professor of History; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Notre Dame Seminary, New Orleans, 1963; M.A., 1966; Ph.D., 1970, St. Louis University.
  • FRANCIS P. COOLIDGE, JR., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Trinity College, Hartford, 1978; M.A., 1980; Ph.D., 1988, The Pennsylvania State University.
  • DEBRA B. COPELAND, Ph.D., MSN, CNE, Associate Professor of Nursing, Social Sciences. M.S.N, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; Ph.D., Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center.
  • ANTHONY A. DAGRADI, M.F.A., Associate Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., Jazz Studies, Loyola University New Orleans, 1986; M.F.A., Tulane University, 1990.
  • DANIEL J. D'AMICO, Ph.D., Assisant Professor of Economics; Business. B.B.A., Loyola University New Orleans, 2006; M.A., Ph.D., George Mason University, 2008.
  • ANTHONY A. DECUIR, Ph.D., Professor of Music, Associate Dean for the College of Music and Fine Arts. B.S., Xavier University, 1970; B.M.T., 1970; M.M.T., Loyola University New Orleans, 1974; Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 1982.
  • ADRIAN J. DE GIFIS, PhD., Visiting Assistant Professor of History; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A. University of California, Santa Barbara, 1999; MA, University of Chicago, 2001; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2010.
  • PATRICIA DEL NERO, M.L.I.S., Associate Professor, Outreach Librarian; Library. B.A., Boston University, 1981; M.L.I.S., University of Rhode Island, 1989.
  • ROBERT B. DEWELL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Davidson College, 1968; Ph.D., Tulane University, 1975.
  • MEHMET F. DICLE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Finance; Business. B.B.A., University of Massachusetts, 1995; M.B.A., Yeditepe University, Istanbul, 2003; M.S., University of New Orleans, 2006; Ph.D., University of New Orleans, 2008.
  • EILEEN J. DOLL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., 1976; M.A., 1980; Ph.D., 1986, Purdue University.
  • PATRICIA L. DORN, Ph.D., Professor of Biological Sciences; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., University of California, San Diego, 1980; Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park, 1989.
  • ANDREW J. DOUGLAS, ABD, Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science, Social Sciences. B.A., University of California at Berkeley, 2002; M.A., 2005; Ph.D. expected August 2008, University of Virginia.
  • ERIN C. DUPUIS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., New England College, 2003; M.S.T., College Teaching, University of New Hampshire, 2008; Ph.D., Social Psychology, University of New Hampshire, 2008.
  • PHILIP A. DYNIA, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science, Chair of the Department; Social Sciences. B.S.F.S., 1965; Ph.D., 1973, Georgetown University.
  • HILLARY EKLUND, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English, Humanities and Natural Sciences.  B.A., University of Washington, 1999; Ph.D., Duke University, 2008.
  • PHANUEL A. EGEJURU, Ph.D., Professor of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., University of Minnesota, 1968; M.A., 1971; Ph.D., 1973, University of California at Los Angeles.
  • KIM ERNST, Ph.D., R.N., Associate Professor of Psychology; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., 1987; M.A., 1990, Southeastern Louisiana University; Ph.D., University of New Orleans, 1996.
  • BARBARA C. EWELL, Ph.D., Dorothy Harrell Brown Distinguished Professor of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., University of Dallas, 1969; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1974.
  • GERALD M. FAGIN, S.J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Theology; Social Sciences. B.A., 1962; M.A., 1963, Spring Hill College; M.Th., Regis College, Toronto, 1970; Ph.D., University of St. Michael’s Theology College, Toronto, 1974.
  • WILLIAM J. FARGE, S.J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Japanese; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Loyola University New Orleans, 1971; B.A., 1977; M.A., 1979; S.T.L., 1979, Sophia University; M.A., 1995; Ph.D., 1997, Indiana University.
  • MARK F. FERNANDEZ, Ph.D., Professor of History; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., 1983; M.A., 1985, University of New Orleans; Ph.D., College of William and Mary, 1991.
  • KATHERINE FIDLER, Assistant Professor of History, Humanities and Natural Scicences.  B.A., Reed College, 2003; Ph.D., Emory University (expected 2010). 
  • BARBARA J. FLEISCHER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pastoral Studies and Psychology, Social Sciences. A.B., 1970; M.S., 1975; Ph.D., 1978, St. Louis University; M.P.S., Loyola University New Orleans, 1990.
  • WING FOK, Ph.D., Dean Henry J. Engler, Jr., Distinguished Professor of Management and Director of the International Business Center; Business. B.B.A., Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1979; M.B.A., University of Baltimore, 1983; Ph.D., Georgia State University, 1992.
  • MARY C. FOLEY, MSN, RN, NE-BC, Instructor of Nursing, Social Sciences. A.S.N., Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; B.S.N., Loyola University New Orleans; M.S.N, Loyola University New Orleans.
  • MARGARET HULLEY FRAZIER, D.M.A., Francisco M. Gonzalez, M.D., Distinguished Professorship in Music, Associate Professor of Music, Director of Choral Activities; Music and Fine Arts. B.M.E., 1983; M.M., 1989, Sam Houston State University; D.M.A., Louisiana State University, 1998.
  • ELLEN FROHNMAYER, Artist Diploma, Associate Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.A., Beloit College, 1970; Artist Diploma, Curtis Institute, 1975.
  • PHILIP FROHNMAYER, M.M., Professor of Music, Coordinator of Vocal Activities; Music and Fine Arts. A.B., Harvard University, 1969; M.M., University of Oregon, 1972.
  • PATRICK L. GARRITY, PhD, Assistant Professor of Physics; Humanities and Natural Sciences.  Mechanical Engineering B.A., University of New Orleans 2002; MSc Physics, University of New Orleans 2003; PhD Physics, University of New Orleans 2009.
  • C. PATRICK GENDUSA, M.F.A., Extraordinary Assistant Professor of Theatre Arts; B.A., St. Edwards University, 1992; M.F.A., Texas Tech University, 1998.
  • ROBERT S. GERLICH, S.J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of History; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., 1972; M.A., 1977; Ph.D., 1987, St. Louis University.
  • LAURIE PHILLIPS GIBSON, M.A., M.L.S., Associate Professor, Technical Services Coordinator; Library. B.A., Dickinson College, 1986; M.A., Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester, 1988; M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1990.
  • ROBERT K. GNUSE, Ph.D., Chase/Rev. James C. Carter, S.J., Distinguished Professor; Professor of Old Testament, Humanities and Natural Sciences. M.Div., 1974; S.T.M., 1975, Concordia Seminary in Exile; M.A., 1978; Ph.D., 1980, Vanderbilt.
  • VALERIE W. GOERTZEN, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.A., Whittier College, 1976; M.M., 1980; Ph.D., 1987, University of Illinois.
  • JERRY R. GOOLSBY, Ph.D., Hilton/ Baldridge Eminent Scholar in Music Industry Studies, Professor of Marketing; Business. B.A., 1974; M.B.A., 1984; Ph.D., 1988, Texas Tech University.
  • MARK GOSSIAUX, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy; Chair of the Department of Philosophy; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Fordham University, 1986; M.A., magna cum laude, 1990; Ph.D., 1998, Catholic University of America
  • GEORGIA C. GRESHAM, M.F.A., Professor of Theatre Arts; Chair of the Department of Theatre Arts and Dance; Music and Fine Arts. B.F.A., University of Evansville, 1972; M.F.A., Florida State University, 1974.
  • KELLIE GRENGS, M.F.A., Costume Director; B.S., University of Wisconsin-Stout, 1991; M.F.A., Tulane University, 1996.
  • WILLIAM M. GROTE, M.F.A., Professor of Visual Arts; Music and Fine Arts. B.F.A., School of Dayton Art Institute, 1972; M.F.A., Washington University, 1975.
  • GEOFFREY HALL, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Design and Technical Theatre; A.L.A., Leicester Junior College, 1971; A.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology, 1972; B.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology, 1974;  M.F.A., Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, 1978; United Scenic Artists Local 829.
  • DEE W. HARPER, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology, Social Sciences. B.A., George Peabody College, 1962; M.A., 1965; Ph.D., 1967, Louisiana State University.
  • DONALD P. HAUBER, Ph.D., Professor of Biology; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., 1978; M.A., 1980, University of Kansas; Ph.D., Texas Tech University, 1984.
  • JOSEPH G. HEBERT, JR., Ph.D., Professor of Music, Coordinator of Wind and Percussion Activities; Music and Fine Arts. B.M.E., Loyola University New Orleans, 1963; Mus.M., Manhattan School of Music, 1965; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi, 1978.
  • NATHAN HENNE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Spanish; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., University of Texas, Austin, 1991; M.A. San Diego State University, 2001; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2007.
  • GARY B. HERBERT, Ph.D., Rev. Guy Limieux S.J. Distinguished Professor, Professor of Philosophy; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1965; M.A., The American University, 1967; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1972.
  • THOMAS HICKMAN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Marketing; Business. B.A., University of Iowa, 1993; M.B.A., 1999; Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2005.
  • WENDY L. HICKS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Criminal Justice, Social Sciences. B.A., Illinois State University, 1991; M.A., 1994; Ph.D., 2001, Michigan State University.
  • SANFORD E. HINDERLIE, M.M., Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., Washington State University, 1974; M.M., North Texas State University, 1982.
  • JAMES B. HOBBS, M.L.S., Associate Professor, Reference Librarian/Online Services Coordinator; Library. B.A., Centenary College, 1973; M.L.S., Louisiana State University, 1980.
  • GINGER HOFFMAN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy; Humanities and Natural Sciences.  B.A., Wesleyan University, 1994; Ph.D., Neuroscience, Yale University, 2001; Ph.D. Philosophy, Massachusetts Insitute of Technology, 2009.
  • CRAIG S. HOOD, Ph.D., Professor of Biological Sciences, Chair of the Department of Biological Sciences; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., 1977; M.A., 1981, California State University; Ph.D., Texas Tech University, 1986.
  • LAURA HOPE, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Theatre History; B. F. A., University of Colorado, 1990; M. A., San Francisco State University, 1997; Ph. D., University of California, 2007.
  • WILLIAM P. HORNE, D.M.A., Professor of Music, Coordinator of Theory/Composition; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., Florida State University, 1974; M.M., Yale University, 1976; D.M.A., University of North Texas, 1983.
  • GEORGE HOWARD, M.A., Assistant Professor of Music Industry Studies; Business. B.A., Boston University, 1992; M.A., University of New Hampshire, 2004.
  • SIMEON HUNTER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Visual Arts; Chair of the Department of Visual Arts; Music and Fine Arts. B.A. Hons., University College London, 1992; Ph.D., Courtauld Institute of Art, 1997.
  • GLENN M. HYMEL, Ed.D., LMT Associate Professor of Psychology, Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., 1969; M.Ed., 1970, Loyola University New Orleans; Ed.D., University of New Orleans, 1974.
  • DENIS R. JANZ, Ph.D., Provost Distinguished Professor, Professor of Historical Theology; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., University of Winnipeg, 1971; M.A., 1974; Ph.D., 1979, University of St. Michael’s College, Toronto.
  • MICHELLE KIRTLEY JOHNSTON, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Management; Business. B.A., 1991; M.A., 1994, Auburn University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 1999.
  • FRANK JORDAN, Ph.D., Professor of Biology; Humanities and Natural Sciences. A.S., Florida Junior College at Jacksonville, 1984; B.S., 1987; M.S., 1989, Florida State University; Ph.D., University of Florida, 1996.
  • BRENDA E. JOYNER, Ph.D., Assistant Provost for Teaching, Learning, and Faculty Development; Business. B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University, 1983; M.B.A., Emory University, 1987; Ph.D., University of Georgia, 1995.
  • GEORGE KARAMESSINIS, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Marketing; Business. B.S., University of Patras; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State Univeristy.
  • ARMIN KARGOL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics; Chair of the Department of Physics, Humanities and Natural Sciences. M.S., University of Wroclaw (Poland), 1987; M.S., 1992; Ph.D., 1994, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
  • MICHAEL R. KELLY, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics, Chair of the Department of Mathematical Sciences; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., University College at Cortland, 1975; M.A., 1977; Ph.D., 1985, State University of New York at Binghamton.
  • KENNETH P. KEULMAN, Ph.D., Professor of Religious Studies; Humanities and Natural Sciences. A.B., Maryknoll College, 1964; M.A., Theologate, Archdiocese of San Francisco, 1969; Ph.D., University of St. Michael’s College, Toronto, 1979.
  • DAVID KHEY, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice; Social Sciences. M.S., University of Florida; Ph.D., University of Florida.
  • WILLIAM J. KITCHENS, M.F.A., Associate Professor of Visual Arts; Chair of Department; Music and Fine Arts. B.F.A., Virginia Commonwealth University, 1975; M.F.A., University of Georgia, Athens, 1975.
  • MARCUS KONDKAR, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology; Social Sciences. B.A., 1991; M.A., 1995; Ph.D., 2001, University of Virginia.
  • LYNN VOGEL KOPLITZ, Ph.D., Earl and Gertrude Vicknair Distinguished Professor of Chemistry; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1981; M.A., 1983; Ph.D., 1986, Princeton University.
  • JEFFREY A. KRUG, Ph.D., Jack & Vada Reynolds Chair in International Business and Professor of Management; Business. B.A., M.S., 1982, 1984, Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., 1993, Indiana University.
  • ANTHONY E. LADD, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology; Social Sciences. B.A., Ball State University, 1976; M.A., 1978; Ph.D., 1981, University of Tennessee.
  • PATRICIA LANE, Ph.D., FNP-BC, Professor of Nursing, Social Sciences. B.S.N., University of Texas - Austin, 1972; M.S.N., MCG, 1979; FNP (post-masters), UTMB Galveston, 1998; Ph.D., University of Texas - Austin, 1986.
  • KATHERINE LAWRENCE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Marketing; Business. B.F.A., University of Texas, 1986; M.B.A., University of the Incarnate Word, 1999; Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2004.
  • CAROL LEAKE, M.F.A., Associate Professor of Visual Arts; Music and Fine Arts. B.F.A., Newcomb College, 1967; M.F.A., Pratt Institute, 1975.
  • JOHN D. LEVENDIS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics; Business. B.B.A., Loyola University New Orleans, 1997; M.A., University of Iowa, 2000; M.S. 2003; Ph.D. 2004.
  • JUSTIN E. LEVITOV, Ph.D., Professor of Counseling; Social Sciences. B.A., 1973; M.A., 1974, University of South Florida; Ph.D., University of New Orleans, 1980.
  • LAWRENCE LEWIS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology, Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., 1993, Loyola University New Orleans; M.A 1996, University of Virginia; Ph.D., 1999, Emory University.
  • JING LI, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Management; Business. M.S., Zhejiang University (China), 1982; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, 1995.
  • XUEFENG LI, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., Beijing, 1984; Ph.D., Tulane University, 1990.
  • WILLIAM B. LOCANDER, Ph.D. Dean of the College of Business and Professor of Marketing; Business. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1966, 1970, 1973.
  • ALFRED L. LORENZ, Ph.D., A. Louis Read Mass Communication Distinguished Professorship, Professor of Mass Communication; Social Sciences. B.S., Marquette University, 1958; M.A., 1965; Ph.D., 1968, Southern Illinois University Carbondale.
  • DAVID LUECHAUER, Ph.D., Executive Director of Special Projects for the College of Business and Professor of Management; Business. B.S., Ohio Northern University; M.A., Miami University of Ohio; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati.
  • PATRICK M. LYNCH, M.S., Assistant Profesor of Accounting; Business. B.S., University of New Orleans, 1972; M.S. 1987.
  • CASSANDRA P. MABE, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French; Chair of the Department of Classical & Modern Languages and Cultures; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., Appalachian State University, 1969; M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 1972; Ph.D., Tulane University, 1978.
  • ANDREW F. MACDONALD, Ph.D., Professor of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., 1965; M.A., 1966, Tulane University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1972.
  • JAMES S. MACKAY, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., 1987; M.M., 1991; Ph.D., 2000, McGill University.
  • JOHN R. MAHONEY, M.M., Francisco M. Gonzales, M.D., Distinguished Professor of Music, Coordinator of Jazz Studies; Music and Fine Arts. B.S., SUNY at Potsdam, New York, 1970; M.M., Eastman School of Music, 1978.
  • DAPHNE MAIN, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Accounting; Business. B.S., University of Vermont, 1976; M.S., Western Michigan University, 1982; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1990.
  • DANIELA MARX, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Visual Arts; Music and Fine Arts. B.A., North Carolina State University, 1996; M.F.A., California Institute of the Arts, 2001.
  • ANA MARIA MATEI, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics; Humanities and Natural Sciences.  BSc, University of Timisoara, 1993; Ph.D., University of Tours, 1999. 
  • BRETT P. MATHERNE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Management, Chase Minority Entrepreneurship Chair; Business.. B.S. Louisiana State University, 1987; M.B.A., 1991; Ph.D., Georgia State University, 2004.
  • JANET R. MATTHEWS, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., University of Tampa, 1966; M.S. Trinity University, 1968; Ph.D., University of Mississippi, 1976.
  • MARY A. McCAY, Ph.D., Moon and Verna Landrieu Distinguished Teaching Professor, Professor of English, College of Humanities and Natural Sciences. A.B., Catholic University of America, 1963; M.A., Boston College, 1965; Ph.D., Tufts University, 1973.
  • EDWARD R. McCLELLAN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Music Education; Music and Fine Arts. B.S., Duquesne University, 1983; MME, 1987; PhD., The University of North Carolina, 2007.
  • PEGGY McCORMACK, Ph.D., Professor of English; Director of Film Buffs Institute; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., University of St. Thomas, 1972; M.A., 1974; Ph.D., 1977, Rice University.
  • H. JAC McCRACKEN, M.M., Associate Professor of Music, Coordinator of Keyboard Studies; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., East Carolina University, 1970; M.M., University of Cincinnati, 1974.
  • MARTIN McHUGH, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., cum laude, University of Rochester, 1985; M.S., 1987; Ph.D., 1992, University of Colorado.
  • MELANIE A. McKAY, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. Special Assistant to the Provost for Professional Development. B.A., 1972; M.A., 1974; Ph.D., 1982, Tulane University.
  • TRIMIKO MELANCON, Ph,D., Assistant Professor of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A. Xavier University, 1999; M.A., Univerity of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2002; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2005.
  • SUE FALTER MENNINO, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology, Social Sciences. B.A., University of North Florida, 1997; M.A., 1999; Ph.D., 2003, Tulane University.
  • HOYT MEYER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Humanities and Natural Sciences.  B.S., University of Texas at Austin, 1991; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1996.
  • JEAN MEYER, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Accounting; Business. B.S., Louisiana State University, 1979; M.B.A., 1987; Ph.D., 2007.
  • LUIS MIRÓN, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology, Dean of the College of Social Sciences.  B.A. Tulane University 1972; M.A. Louisiana State University, 1981; Ph.D. Tulane University 1986.
  • KIMBERLEE MIX, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S. Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1998; Ph.D. Dartmouth College, 2004.
  • BEHROOZ MOAZAMI, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History; Humanities and Natural Sciences. M.A., University of Paris, 1991; Ph.D., University of Paris, 1998; Ph.D., The New School for Social Research, 2004.
  • JEAN MONTES, DMA, Assistant Professor of Music, Coordinator of String Activities; Music and Fine Arts. B. A., Duquesne, 1994; M. A., University of Akron, 1997; D. M. A., University of Iowa, 2003.
  • DAVID W. MOORE, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History, Chair of the Department of History; Humanities and Natural Sciences. A.B., Loyola University New Orleans, 1967; M.A., 1972; Ph.D., 1978, University of Maryland.
  • JOHN F. MOSIER, Ph.D., Professor of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., 1964; M.A., 1966; Ph.D., 1968, Tulane University.
  • CONSTANCE L. MUI, Ph.D., Rev. Youree Watson, S.J., Distinguished Professorship in Arts and Sciences, Professor of Philosophy; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Loyola University, Chicago, 1982; M.A., 1984; Ph.D., 1987, Brown University.
  • CYRIL LEE MUNDELL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Decision Science; Business. B.S./B.A., University of Florida, 1967; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 1976.
  • JOHN R. MURPHY, D.M.A., Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., Southern Illinois University, 1970; M.M., University of Washington, 1973; D.M.A., University of Michigan, 1977.
  • DAVID M. MYERS, Ph.D., Rev. Aloysius B. Goodspeed, S.J., Beggars Communications Distinguished Professorship, Professor of Communications; Social Sciences. B.A., Yale University, 1975; M.A., University of Southwest Louisiana, 1977; M.F.A., Florida State University, 1979; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1984.
  • ALLEN NISBET, M.M., Associate Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., 1973; M.M., University of Illinois, 1975.
  • JUSTIN NYSTROM, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History; Humanities and Natural Sciences. Ph.D., University of Georgia, 2004; M.A., University of Georgia, 2000; B.A., Kennesaw State University, 1994.
  • KATHLEEN O’GORMAN, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Religion and Education; Social Sciences. B.A., Notre Dame of Maryland, 1970; M.R.E., Loyola University New Orleans, 1978; M.Ed., 1984; Ed.D., 1986, Columbia University Teachers College.
  • ANGEL ADAMS PARHAM, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology; Social Sciences. B.A., Yale University, 1994; M.S., 1998; Ph.D., 2003, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • LESLIE G. PARR, Ph.D., Professor of Mass Communication; Social Sciences. B.A., Trinity College, 1971; M.A., Northeastern University, 1980; M.F.A., 1988; Ph.D., 1994, Tulane University.
  • MICHAEL M. PEARSON, Ph.D., Chase/Francis C. Doyle Distinguished Professor of Marketing; Business. B.A., Gustavus Adolphus, 1965; M.B.A., 1968; Ph.D., 1971, University of Colorado-Boulder.
  • ASHLEY PILLOW, M.A., M.S., Assistant Professor, Outreach Coordinator; Library. B.A., Rhodes College, 1999; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 2000; M.S., University of Tennessee, 2004.
  • DEBORAH L. POOLE, M.L.I.S., Associate Professor, Public Services Coordinator; Library. B.A., Humboldt State University, 1981; M.L.I.S., Louisiana State University, 1988.
  • ARTEMIS PREESHL, M. F. A., Associate Professor of Theatre and Movement; B. A., Bates College, 1984; M. A., Ohio State University, 1988; M. F. A., University of Arizona, 1989.
  • URIEL QUESADA, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Languages and Cultures, Humanities and Natural Sciences.  Bachillerato, University of Costa Rica, 1986; Licenciatura, University of Costa Rica, 1990; M.A., New Mexico State University, 1999; Ph.D., Tulane University, 2003.
  • F. CONRAD RAABE, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science; Social Sciences. A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1962; M.A., 1964; Ph.D., 1970, Pennsylvania State University.
  • A. DUANE RANDALL, Ph.D., Rev. John Keller, S.J., Distinguished Professor of Mathematics; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Butler University, 1962; M.A., Stanford University, 1964; Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1968.
  • KENDRA REED, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Management, MBA Director, and Area Chairperson of Management / Marketing / International Busi Business. B.S. Ed., Northwestern University, 1987; M.B.A., DePaul University, 1992; Ph.D., University of Nebraska—Lincoln, 1998.
  • CONNIE L. RODRIGUEZ, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Classical Studies; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., University of Richmond, 1977; M.A., 1985; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1989.
  • J. CATHY ROGERS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mass Communication; Social Sciences. B.A., Louisiana College, 1982; M.J., Louisiana State University, 1985; Ph.D., Ohio University, 1993.
  • PETER S. ROGERS, S.J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of French; Humanities and Natural Sciences. M.A., Middlebury College, 1973; M.A., Faculté de Théologie, Lyon-Fourvières, 1975; Doc. de 3è Cycle, Université de Paris IV—Sorbonne, 1978; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1982.
  • KAREN ROSENBECKER, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Languages and Cultures; Humanities and Natural Sciences; B.A., University of Minnesota, 1993; M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1996; Ph.D., Unniversity of Pittsburgh, 2003.
  • STEPHEN C. ROWNTREE, S.J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Spring Hill College, 1967; M.A., 1969; Ph.D., 1973, Fordham University.
  • W. STEVE RUCKER, M.F.A., Associate Professor of Visual Arts; Music and Fine Arts. B.F.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 1977; M.F.A., Louisiana State University, 1979.
  • DARLA H. RUSHING, M.L.S., Associate Professor, Library Development Coordinator; Library. B.A., William Carey College, 1966; B.A., University of New Orleans, 1975; M.L.S., Louisiana State University, 1976.
  • EMILY B. RUSSELL, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology; Humanities and Natural Sciences.  B.A., University of Northern Iowa, 2001; M.A., University of Missouri-Kansas City, 2004; Ph.D., University of Missouri-Kansas City, 2007.
  • MARITZA E. SALGADO, DNP, MSN, APRN, FNP-BC, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Social Sciences.  B.S., Tulane University, 1997; A.D.N., Charity School of Nursing, 1999; M.S.N., Loyola University New Orleans, 2004. D.N.P., The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 2010.
  • JOSEFA SALMÓN, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish; Humanities and Natural Sciences. M.A., University of Houston, 1980; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1986.
  • JANNA P. SASLAW, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.A., Barnard College, 1980; M.A., 1985; M.Phil., 1987; Ph.D., 1992, Columbia University.
  • KATARZYNA SAXTON, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics; Humanities and Natural Sciences. M.S., University of Warsaw, 1972; Ph.D., Polish Academy of Sciences, 1979.
  • CHRISTOPHER SCHABERG, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English, Humanities and Natural Sciences.  B.A., Hillsdale College, 2000; M.A., Montana State University, 2003; Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 2010.  
  • JANELLE A. SCHWARTZ, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English, Humanities and Natural Sciences.  B.A., Hamilton College, 1997; M.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2001; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • CHRISTOPHER T. SCREEN, J.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Legal Studies; Business. B.A., Loyola University New Orleans, 1972; J.D., Tulane University, 1975.
  • JOHN SEBASTIAN, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Georgetown University, 1998; M.A. 2000; Ph.D. Cornell University, 2003.
  • ROBERT SELF, B.A., Technical Director of Theatre Arts; B.A., San Francisco State University, 1982.
  • A. MICHAEL SIBLEY, Ph.D., Professor of Finance; Business. B.S., 1966; M.A., 1968, Appalachian State University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1972.
  • RICHARD SNOW, M.A., M.L.S., Associate Professor, Collection Development Librarian; Library. B.A., 1970; M.A., 1974, Auburn University; M.L.S., Louisiana State University, 1977.
  • JOHN N. SNYDER, J.D., Conrad Hilton Eminent Scholar in Music Industry Studies, Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.M.E., University of North Carolina, Greensboro, 1970; J.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1973.
  • THOMAS G. SPENCE, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry, Chair of the Department of Chemistry; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., Birmingham Southern College, 1992; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1997.
  • AARON SPEVACK, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Islam; Humanities and Natural Sciences. New England Conservatory of Music, 1993-1995; Bachelors of Liberal Arts, Harvard University, 2003; Ph.D. Boston University, 2008
  • RHETA LEANNE STEEN, Assistant Professor of Counseling; Social Sciences. B.A, University of Texas at Austin, 1995; M.A., Texas State University, 1999; Ph.D., University of North Texas, 2004.
  • MARY LEE SWEAT, M.S.L.S., M.B.A., Associate Professor, Dean of Libraries; Library. B.A., Rhodes College, 1968; M.S.L.S., University of North Carolina, 1969; M.B.A., Loyola University New Orleans, 1981.
  • JEREMY J. THIBODEAUX, Ph,D., Assistant Professor of Mathematical Sciences; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S. in Mathematics, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, 2002; M.S. in Mathematics, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, 2004; Ph.D. in Mathematics, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, 2007.
  • ROBERT A. THOMAS, Ph.D., Professor and Loyola Chair in Environmental Communications; Social Sciences. B.S., University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1970; M.S., 1974; Ph.D., 1976, Texas A&M University; Postdoctoral Fellow, Louisiana State University Medical Center, 1977 – 78.
  • WILLIAM E. THORNTON, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology, Chair of the Department of Criminal Justice; Social Sciences. B.A., 1969; M.A., 1973, East Carolina University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 1977.
  • RIAN R. THUM, Ph,D., Assistant Professor of History; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A. University of Missouri-Columbia, 2000; Ph.D., Harvard University, 2010.
  • LEN J. TREVIÑO, Ph.D., Gerald N. Gaston Eminent Scholar Chair in International Business; Business. B.B.A., University of Notre Dame, 1982; M.B.A., Indiana University, 1986; Ph.D., 1991. 
  • RALPH P. TUCCI, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Brown University, 1970; M.A.; Ph.D., 1976, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee; M.S., Tulane University, 1985.
  • JOELLE S. UNDERWOOD, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Tulane University, Newcomb College, 1995; Ph.D., University of Southern California, 2005.
  • VICTORIA P. VEGA, Ph.D. (Cand.), Assistant Professor of Music, Coordinator of Music Therapy; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., West Virginia University, 1980; M.M.T., Loyola University New Orleans, 1984.
  • LYDIA VOIGT, Ph.D., University Distinguished Professor; The Rev. Joseph H. Fichter, S.J., Distinguished Professor of the Social Sciences, Academic Affairs; Professor of Sociology, Social Sciences. B.A., 1969, Boston University; M.A., 1971; Ph.D., 1977, Boston College.
  • BRENDA VOLMAN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice; Social Sciences. B.A., Ohio State University; M.A., University of New York; Ph.D., John Jay College of Criminal Justice
  • NICHOLAS R. VOLZ, M.M., Assistant Professor of Music; Music and Fine Arts.  B.M.E., Loyola University New Orleans, 2002; M.M., Southeastern Louisiana University, 2004; A.B.D., Indiana University.
  • WILLIAM F. WALKENHORST, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., Bradley University, 1983; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1993.
  • PATRICK D. WALSH, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Criminal Justice, Social Sciences. B.C.J., Loyola University New Orleans, 1978; M.C. J.,2002, Loyola University New Orleans; Ph.D., 2006, University of Southern Mississippi.
  • WARREN P. WAREN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology, Social Sciences. B.A., Northeastern State University, 1993; M.A., University of Arkansas, 2003; Ph.D., Texas A&M University, 2008.
  • JAMES L. WEE, Ph.D., Professor of Biological Sciences; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., Central Michigan University, 1973; M.S., 1976; Ph.D., 1981, Iowa State University.
  • FRANKIE J. WEINBERG, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Management; Business. B.B.A., 2000, Loyola College in Maryland; M.B.A., 2005, SUNY Binghamton; Ph.D., 2010, University of Georgia.
  • CATHERINE WESSINGER, Ph.D., Rev. H. James Yamauchi, S.J. Distinguished Professor, Professor of History of Religions; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.F.A., University of South Carolina, 1974; Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1985.
  • DAVID A. WHITE, Ph.D., Professor of Biology; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., 1974; M.S., 1976; Ph.D., 1979, Tulane University.
  • ROGER WHITE, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science, Social Sciences. B.A., University of New Orleans, 1974; M.A., 1986; Ph.D., 1989, University of California, Santa Barbara.
  • MICHAEL S. WILSON, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Management, Business.  B.S., Nicholls State University, 1976; M.E., Tulane University, 1980; Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 2004.
  • J. STUART WOOD, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics / Finance; Business. B.S., Tulane University, 1966; M.S., Princeton University, 1970; M.B.A., 1975; M.Phil., 1978; Ph.D., 1980, New York University.
  • CHARLES G. WRIGHTINGTON, S.J., Visiting Assistant Professor of French; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A. Assumption College, 1988; M.A.,Fordham University, 1995; S.T.B., Centre Sevres, France, 2000.
  • LEE J. YAO , Ph.D., Professor of Accounting; Area Chairperson of Accounting / Economics / Finance; Joseph A. Butt, S.J. Distinguished Professor of Accounting, Business. B.S., Minnesota State University, 1980; M.B.A., 1981; Ph.D., Deakin University (Australia), 1993.
  • MARK YAKICH, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A. Illinois Wesleyan, 1992; M.A. Indiana University, 1995; M.F.A. University of MeFmphis, 2001; Ph.D. Florida State, 2006.
  • LAURA ZAMBRANO, B.A., Extraordinary Faculty and Director of Loyola Ballet; B.M., Loyola University of New Orleans, 1984; B.B.A., Loyola University New Orleans; Certified Teaching Diploma Ballet Pedagogy (Vaganova Syllabus), State Choreographic School, Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia, 1991.
  • CATHERINE P. ZEPH, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Religion and Education; Social Sciences. B.A., Drew University, 1978; M.A., The George Washington University, 1984; Ed.D., University of Georgia, 1989; M.T.S., Jesuit School of Theology, 1996.
  • DAVID R. ZEMMELS , M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Mass Communication and Director of Digital Technology; Social Sciences. B.A., California State University, Fullerton, 1983; M.F.A., 1986.
  • EVAN L. ZUCKER, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology; Humanties and Natural Sciences. B.S., University of Maryland, 1974; M.A., 1980; Ph.D., 1983, Emory University.

Faculty Emeriti

  • NANCY FIX ANDERSON, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of History; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Stanford University, 1965; M.A., University of California, Irvine, 1967; Ph.D., Tulane University, 1973.
  • JESSE BARFIELD, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Accounting; Business. B.S., 1961; M.A., 1963, Florida State University; C.P.A., 1963; Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 1971.
  • LLOYD BRANDT, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Accounting; Business. B.A., Southeastern Louisiana University, 1955; M.B.A., 1960; Ph.D., 1973, Louisiana State University; C.P.A., Louisiana, 1962.
  • CHARLES BRASWELL, M.M., Professor Emeritus of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., North Texas State University, 1950; M.M., American Conservatory of Music, Chicago, 1952; R.M.T., Kansas University and Menninger Clinic, 1956.
  • DOROTHY H. BROWN, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Louisiana State University, 1949; M.A., 1965; Ph.D., 1975, University of Southwestern Louisiana.
  • ROGENE A. BUCHHOLZ, Ph.D., Legendre-Soulé Chair in Business Ethics, Professor Emeritus of Business Management; Business. B.A., North Central College, 1959; M.S., University of Illinois, 1960; B.D., Southern Methodist University, 1964; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1974.
  • JOSEPH B. BUTTRAM, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Music Education, Dean Emeritus; Music and Fine Arts. B.M., 1954; M.M.E., 1957, North Texas State University; Ph.D., Kansas University, 1967.
  • JAMES C. CARTER, S.J., Ph.D., Emeritus President, University Chancellor, and Associate Professor Emeritus of Physics; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., Spring Hill College, 1952; M.S., Fordham University, 1953; Ph.D., The Catholic University of America, 1956; S.T.L., Woodstock College, 1959.
  • WILLIAM T. COTTON, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Cornell University, 1958; M.A., 1963; Ph.D., 1974, University of New Mexico.
  • IGNATIUS J. D’AQUILA, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Visual Arts; Music and Fine Arts. B.S., Loyola University New Orleans, 1953; M.A., Louisiana State University and A&M College, 1966.
  • LAURA DANKNER, M.A., M.L.S., Associate Professor Emerita, Music Library Services Coordinator; Library. B.M., Ithaca College, 1967; M.A., Brooklyn College, 1971; M.L.S., State University of New York at Albany, 1976.
  • ERNEST C. FERLITA, S.J., D.F.A., Professor Emeritus of Theatre Arts; Music and Fine Arts. B.S., Spring Hill College, 1950; S.T.L., St. Louis University, 1964; D.F.A., Yale University, 1969.
  • EDWINA FRANK, Ed.D., Ph.D., Professor Emerita of Psychology; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., Dillard University, 1952; M.A., 1958; M.Ed., 1967; Ed.D, 1969, Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi, 1986.
  • JAMES W. GAFFNEY, S.T.D., Professor Emeritus of Ethics, Religious Studies; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., Spring Hill College, 1956; S.T.L., Woodstock College, 1963; M.A., Fordham University, 1965; M.Ed., Texas Southern University, 1972; S.T.D., Gregorian University, 1968.
  • HENRY A. GARON, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Physics; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., Loyola University New Orleans, 1947; M.S., University of Notre Dame, 1950; M.R.E., Loyola University New Orleans, 1980.
  • VERNON GREGSON, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies; Humanities and Natural Sciences. Ph.D., Marquette University, 1978, J.D., Loyola University New Orleans, 1993.
  • BRUCE C. HENRICKSEN, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., University of Minnesota, 1963; M.A., 1967; Ph.D., 1970, University of Southern California.
  • GWEN HOTCHKISS, M.M., Associate Professor Emerita of Music, Coordinator of Music Education; Music and Fine Arts. B.M.E., Pittsburgh State University, Kansas, 1955; B.M., 1956; M.M., 1957, Conservatory of Music, Kansas City, Missouri.
  • RICHARD E. JOHNSON, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English, Director of Composition; Humanities and Natural Sciences. A.B., University of Connecticut, 1962; M.A., 1964; Ph.D., 1969, Tulane University.
  • DAVID G. KEIFFER, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Physics; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., Loyola University New Orleans, 1952; M.S., 1953; Ph.D., 1956, University of Notre Dame.
  • CRESTON A. KING, JR., Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Physics; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Rice University, 1958; M.A., Duke University, 1962; Ph.D., Rice University, 1965.
  • STAN J. MAKIELSKI, JR., Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Political Science; Social Sciences. Ph.D., Columbia University, 1965.
  • HARRY MCMURRY, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Music; Music and Fine Arts. B.A., Tulane University, 1960; M.Mus., North Texas State University, 1971; M.Div., Toronto School of Theology, 1972; Ph.D., Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, Ca., 1982.
  • JANET G. MELANCON, Ed.D., Professor Emerita of Education, Social Sciences. B.S., McNeese University, 1970; M.Ed., 1978.; Ed.D., University of New Orleans, 1981.
  • LEO A. NICOLL, S.J., Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of History; Humanities and Natural Sciences. A.B., Spring Hill College, 1954; M.A., Fordham University, 1960; S.T.L., Jesuitenkolleg, 1962; Ph.D., University of Vienna, 1970.
  • ROSARY O’NEILL, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of Theatre Arts; Music and Fine Arts. B.A., Newcomb College of Tulane University, 1966; M.A., Tulane University, 1967; M.F.A., Ohio University, 1968; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1973.
  • JOHN H. PENNYBACKER, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Communications; Social Sciences. B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1951; M.A., Temple University, 1956; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1961.
  • MARGARET ALUMKAL PARANILAM, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emerita of Management; Business. B.A., St. Teresa’s College, 1954; M.B.A., DePaul University, 1962; Ph.D., University of Nebraska, 1967.
  • RUTH RENAUD, M.L.S., Assistant Professor Emerita; Library.
  • EDWARD F. RENWICK, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of Political Science; Social Sciences. B.A., Georgetown University, 1960; M.A., University of Arizona, 1962; Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1967.
  • SANDRA B. ROSENTHAL, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of Philosophy; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Newcomb College, 1964; M.A., 1965; Ph.D., 1967, Tulane University.
  • HERBERT L. SAYAS, JR., M.F.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Theatre Arts; Music and Fine Arts. B.A., University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1959; M.A., University of Denver, 1961, M.F.A., University of New Orleans, 1978.
  • MARCUS A.J. SMITH, Ph.D., J.D., Professor Emeritus of English; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.A., Rice University, 1958; M.A., Boston College, 1960; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1964; J.D., Loyola University New Orleans, 1983.
  • FRANK J. STASS, M.B.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Accounting, Assistant to the Dean for Continuing Education; Business. B.S., Loyola College, Baltimore, 1951; M.B.A., Tulane University, 1953.
  • SR. MARY GRACE SWIFT, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of History; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., 1956; M.A., 1960, Creighton University; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1967.
  • JAGDISH M. UPADHYAY, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Microbiology; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.Pharm., Gujera University, India, 1951; M.S., University of Michigan, 1957; Ph.D., Washington State University, 1963.
  • JASJIT SINGH WALIA, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry; Humanities and Natural Sciences. B.S., Honors, 1955; M.S., Honors, 1956, Punjab University, India; Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1960.
  • BILLIE A. WILSON, R.N., Ph.D., Professor Emerita of Nursing; Social Sciences. B.A., Newton College of the Sacred Heart, 1965; M.S., Purdue University, 1973; B.S.N., Northwestern State University, 1978; M.N., Louisiana State University Medical Center, 1981; Ph.D., University of New Orleans, 1987.

 

College of Business

Dean: William Locander, Ph.D.
Associate Dean: Angela Brocato Hoffer

The deans are assisted by the leadership team:

  • M.B.A. Director: Stephanie Mansfield
  • M.B.A. Advisor: Kendra Reed, Ph.D.
  • Director of the Intl Business Center: Wing Fok, Ph.D.
  • Director of Portfolio and Internships: Kathy Barnett, Ph.D.
  • Exec. Director of Special Projects: David Luechauer, Ph.D.

For more information on the college, visit its website at:
http://www.business.loyno.edu/about-college

For more information on the M.B.A. Progam, visit its website at:
http://www.business.loyno.edu/mba

ASSOCIATIONS + ACCREDITATION

The Joseph A. Butt, S.J., College of Business, founded in 1947, holds membership in the American Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, Association of American Colleges, Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities, National Catholic Educational Association, the Southern Business Administration Association, and the Southwestern Business Administration Association.

The College of Business' baccalaureate program was accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) in 1950. The graduate division of the college was established in 1961, accredited by the AACSB in 1974, and reaccredited in 1983, 1999, and most recently in 2010. The College of Business is also accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). 

"AWAKEN, ENLIGHTEN, TRANSFORM" MISSION

The College of Business acts in accordance with the following mission:

Today, more than ever, businesses need ethical, empowered leaders who invite trust, build community, and value their professional responsibility more than self-interest. In the College of Business, our vision is to create a learning place that awakens, enlightens, and transforms students to become those kind of leaders and not to leave their values, ethics, and character behind when they graduate.

In the Ignatian tradition, the mission of the College of Business is to provide a superior values-laden education that motivates and enables our students to become effective and socially responsible business leaders. We strive to contribute quality research, serve local and intellectual communities, and graduate students who possess critical thinking skills and courage to act justly in a global business environment. 

AWARDS FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENTS

Each year in May, the College of Business hosts an annual awards ceremony to honor outstanding students and faculty. Awards are given to students of all class ranks. There are four types of student awards: college-wide awards, awards in each major, awards given by student organizations, and awards from outside agencies. There are also four types of faculty awards: for outstanding advising, research, service, and teaching.

The College of Business is proud to honor these awardees for their outstanding academic and professional achievements and to display their names on plaques located in the Miller Hall 3rd floor lobby. 

CHAIR ENDOWMENTS + DISTINGUISHED PROFESSORSHIPS

The College of Business recognizes exemplary faculty with the following honorary chairs and professorships:

Chairs

  • Gerald N. Gaston Eminent Scholar Chair in International Business: Len Treviño
  • Harold E. Wirth Eminent Scholar Chair in Economics: Walter Block
  • Hilton / Baldridge Distinguished Chair in Music Industry Studies: Jerry Goolsby
  • Jack + Vada Reynolds Chair in International Business: Jeffrey Krug
  • Legendre-Soule Distinguished Chair in Business Ethics: Nicholas Capaldi

Professorships

  • Bank One Distinguished Professorship of International Business: William Barnett
  • Barry + Teresa LeBlanc Distinguished Professorship of Business Ethics: Kate Lawrence
  • Chase / Francis C. Doyle Distinguished Professorship: Michael Pearson
  • Chase Minority Entrepreneurship Distinguished Professorship I: Brenda Joyner
  • Chase Minority Entrepreneurship Distinguished Professorship II: Brett Matherne
  • Dean Henry J. Engler, Jr., Distinguished Professorship in Management: Wing Fok
  • Dr. John V. Connor Professorship in Economics + Finance
  • Merl M. Huntsinger Distinguished Professorship in Investments + Finances: Ron Christner
  • Rev. Joseph A. Butt, S.J., Distinguished Professorship in Accounting: Lee Yao
  • Stanford H. Rosenthal Distinguished Professorship for Risk + Entrepreneurship
  • Thomas H. + Catherine B. Kloor Professorship in Entrepreneurship + Small Business 

DEGREE PROGRAMS OFFERED IN BUSINESS

The College of Business offers the following undergraduate degree programs:

Other programs offered include:

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES + ELECTIVES

The College of Business offers required and elective courses in the following areas:

DOUBLE MAJORS + BUSINESS MINORS

Because students often have multiple interests, the College of Business offers the flexibility of adding a double major or minor to any of its degree programs.

Double Majors

Students earning the B.B.A. or the B.Acc. may elect to have a double major. The total number of hours required varies, depending on the majors chosen. For example, management + marketing may require as few as 6 additional credit hours.

Double majors can be earned in the College of Business, with any combination of 2 business degree programs, or with any of Loyola's other undergraduate colleges or degree programs. Students should consult their advisor for further information.

Business Minors

The College of Business offers business minors for both non-business majors and minors for business majors. In general, these require 18-21 additional credit hours of study outside of the requirements of a student's chosen major. 

ELIGIBILITY + REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

In order to graduate, a student must meet the graduation requirements of the university and college and must possess a Loyola grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0, as well as a GPA of at least 2.0 in all business courses taken at Loyola. Students must also complete all of the required courses for their major(s) and have a GPA of at least 2.0 in those major courses taken at Loyola.

At least half of the business adjunct courses taught in the College of Business, half of the business core courses, at least 15 credit hours of required major courses, and the capstone BA B445 "Business Policy" course must be taken at Loyola. Course substitutions and exceptions to these guidelines or requirements are allowed only with permission of the associate dean.

EXCEPTIONS + LIMITATIONS ON COURSE CREDIT

Because each student's academic needs and life circumstances differ, the College of Business offers the flexibility of earning some course credit through independent study or transfer credit from other accredited institutions.

Independent Study

A student may apply for an independent study in the following cases:

  1. The student needs a course for graduation which is not being offered, or
  2. The student desires to study a topic(s) not covered in courses offered by the college.

An overall GPA of 2.0 is required in order to be eligible to enroll in independent study.

Students must also complete a formal application prior to registration and obtain approval from the desired instructor and the associate dean.

Application forms and additional information are available from the associate dean.

Transfer Credit

Credit may be granted for work successfully completed at other accredited institutions of higher learning. Transfer credits acceptable for admission purposes shall be valid for degree credit in the college only to the extent to which they represent courses acceptable in thecurriculum of their degree. All questions regarding the application of transfer work to degree requirements must be resolved within the first semester of enrollment.

The college will not accept transfer credit for any course in which a grade lower than C has been received. Credit will not be allowed for business courses completed at the freshman or sophomore level at another college or university that are only offered at the junior or senior level in this college. Transfer students who have already enrolled in the College of Business should not expect courses taken at a community college or an institution not accredited by AACSB to be applied toward their degree.

After matriculating at Loyola, students wishing to take courses at another college or university must receive written permission from the associate dean. Permission will be granted only to students in good standing and, for business courses, only for schools accredited by AACSB. Permission is not granted to take courses at a community college. Students are cautioned that permission to take summer courses elsewhere will be granted only for compelling reasons. Courses taken elsewhere prior to and after matriculation at Loyola transfer as earned hours; the grades do not enter into the student's Loyola GPA calculation.

EXCEPTIONS TO NORMAL ACADEMIC PROGRESS

In order to ensure that students graduate on time and are adequately prepared for their coursework, the College of Business monitors each student's course schedule and academic workload according to the following guidelines.

Prerequisite Courses

Most courses have specific prerequisites. Students may not register for a course until they have met the prerequisites listed in the course descriptions in this bulletin. It is the student’s responsibility to become familiar with course prerequisites.

Prerequisites are also listed in the semester schedule of course offerings in LORA. Students with fewer than 56 credit hours are not permitted to enroll in 300-level or 400-level business courses, which require Junior and Senior standing, respectively. 

Probation + Workload

A student must maintain a cumulative Loyola GPA of 2.0 to remain in good academic standing. If a student's GPA falls below 2.0, they will be placed on academic probation and given 1 semester in which to bring their GPA back up to 2.0.

A full-time student not on probation may not take more than 20 credit hours during a fall or spring semester or 6 credit hours during a summer session without permission of the associate dean. Students on probation are limited to 16 credit hours.

INTERNSHIP PROGRAM + REQUIREMENTS

Because many experiences in business are impossible to gain in the traditional classroom setting, College of Business students are required to participate in the college’s internship program. The College of Business internship program provides students with an opportunity to:

  • Gain relevant career-related experience,
  • Reinforce and/or reevaluate classroom study through a comparison of theory and practice, and
  • Pursue the study of specialized business topics in a professional setting related to their particular field of interest.

Students will participate in the internship program during their junior or senior year upon completion of the following core business courses: ACCT B202, BA B101, DECS B205, ECON B200, MGT B245, and MKT B280. Internships may take place in the summer, fall, or spring semester.

Internships require a minimum of 120 hours over a minimum of 5 weeks at the job site and regular interaction between the student and academic supervisor. Students must also complete an academic component as defined and approved by the academic internship supervisor.

The internship grade (pass/fail) is based on the following criteria:

  • Meeting requirements set by the academic supervisor and the site supervisor,
  • Confidential performance evaluation by the internship site supervisor, and
  • Completion of an academic component.

The required internship course (BA B497) is 3 credit hours and counts as a business elective credit. Students must have an overall GPA of 2.0 to enroll in an internship. Credit earned through an internship may not be applied to the university or college's residence requirement. 

PORTFOLIO PROGRAM + REQUIREMENTS

The Business Profession Program—"Portfolio" for short—initiated by the College of Business in Fall of 2009, serves to address issues related to transitioning from college student to real-life opportunities. This required series of eight, sequential, non-credit courses and experiences is designed to expand on the traditional academic and classroom experience, focusing on student personal and career development.

Courses include both academic and non-academic learning experiences. The focus of the freshman year courses is self exploration as it relates to career knowledge and development. Subsequent classes include career development skills, job search skills and assistance with job placement. Students will be assessed on each course competency and will include those assessment outcomes in their CoB portfolio.

The Portfolio program provides both students and faculty with the ability to track each student's progress over their four-year college career.

Portfolio grades are assigned on a Pass/Fail basis. Students who fail a portfolio course will need to repeat the course in order to graduate.  

The learning goals of the program are:

  • To explore and assess career interests by developing career goals and plans.
  • To demonstrate understanding of and ability to conduct oneself in a professional and ethical manner.
  • To demonstrate an ability to critically reflect on current issues related to both business and practical life experiences based on Jesuit ideals.
  • To demonstrate competency in several areas including but not limited to professional development, leadership, program management and cultural diversity.

PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITIES + HONOR SOCIETIES

Learning takes place both in and outside of the classroom. In addition to internships, Portfolio, study abroad programs, and service learning opportunities, College of Business students can join many academic and professional fraternities and honor societies.

Professional Fraternities

Alpha Kappa Psi

The objects of Alpha Kappa Psi are to further the individual welfare of its members; to foster scientific research in the fields of commerce, accounts, and finance; to educate the public to appreciate and demand higher ideals therein; and to promote and advance in institutions of college rank, courses leading to degrees in business administration.

Delta Sigma Pi

Delta Sigma Pi is an international professional commerce society. Its purposes are to foster the study of business; encourage scholarship, social activities, and the association of students for the mutual advancement by research and practice; promote closer ties between the commercial world and students of commerce; and further a high standard of commercial ethics and culture for the civic and commercial welfare of the community. 

Student Honor Societies

Beta Alpha Psi

The purposes of this national scholastic and professional fraternity are to recognize outstanding academic achievements in the fields of accounting, finance, and information systems; promote the study and practice of these professional fields; provide opportunities for self-development and association among members and practicing financial professionals; and encourage a sense of ethical, social, and public responsibilities. Functions include professional meetings as well as social and service activities. Membership is open to degree-seeking undergraduate students who, at a minimum, are majoring in accounting, finance, or information systems; are at least first-semester sophomores; and have attained a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (or above) overall and within their major.

Beta Gamma Sigma

The purposes of this national honor society are to encourage and reward scholarship and accomplishment among students of business administration, to promote the advancement of education in the art and science of business and management, and to foster integrity in the conduct of business operations. Juniors, seniors, and graduate students who have achieved a high level of academic performance are considered for membership in this organization. Invitations go to the upper seven percent of the second semester junior class, the upper 10 percent of the graduating senior class, and to the upper 20 percent of the graduating master’s degree class.

Omicron Delta Epsilon

The purposes of this international honor society in economics are the encouragement of excellence in economics and the recognition of scholastic attainment in economics. Membership is open to those undergraduates who have completed at least 12 semester hours of coursework in economics with a grade point average of 3.5 or better, and who have an overall average of at least 3.0. 

STUDENT-LED CLUBS + STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

The College of Business sponsors student organizations because there is a need for a balance among academic, social, and service opportunities. Active involvement in one or more of these organizations will enhance the college career and professional marketability by providing a forum for developing lasting friendships and establishing a professional network.

American Marketing Association

As a professional organization, the AMA helps develop, encourage, and strengthen working relations between students studying marketing and marketing professionals in the business community. The resulting exchange of ideas, knowledge, and experience is mutually beneficial. Meetings regularly feature business leaders from both the local and national arena.

Economics Club

The Economics Club is designed to stimulate interest in economics among university students. Economics is a social science that analyzes the relationship between human behavior and the production and exchange of goods and services. Club activities are designed to promote an understanding of current economic issues, current economic controversies, and the role that economics plays in personal and professional decision making. The Economics Club is open to all majors.

Financial Management Association

The purposes of the Financial Management Association and the FMA Honor Society are to assist in the professional, educational, and social development of university students interested in finance, banking, and investments, and to encourage interaction among business executives, faculty, and students of business and finance. To join the FMA, a student must have a sincere interest in finance. To be considered for membership in the FMA Honor Society, a student must have an overall GPA of 3.25 and at least six hours of finance coursework with a GPA of 3.25.

Loyola International Business Organization

The purpose of the Loyola International Business Organization is to assist students in becoming more aware of the importance of business on an international level, and to foster activities for the professional advancement of those interested in international business careers.

Students in Free Enterprise

Students In Free Enterprise (SIFE) is a student organization that is active on more than 1,700 college and university campuses and in 42 countries and territories around the world. Students work together as a team and through the mentoring of faculty advisers develop and implement educational outreach programs that teach individuals in their communities the principles of market economics, entrepreneurship, personal financial success skills, and business ethics. The Loyola SIFE team works with local elementary, middle and high schools to teach free enterprise principles. Loyola SIFE also works with senior citizens in the area as well as homeless shelters. SIFE is open to all students on campus regardless of major. 

STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS + REQUIREMENTS

All students majoring in business are encouraged to study abroad. Students considering study abroad must inform the staff in the Center for International Education of their intentions. The staff will assist in locating a suitable program and in pre-departure planning. Students will also be required to participate in the de-briefing session upon their return. Students should plan ahead to take advantage of these opportunities

The College of Business offers short summer programs in Europe and Asia. The programs are taught in English by Loyola faculty and by local guest lecturers. Site visits to local companies, meetings with public officials and multinational corporation executives, and field trips are included.

The college also participates in several exchange programs. Students can study in the native language in France and Spain. The host institution assists with housing, registration, and integration into the local society. Tuition is based on Loyola’s full-time tuition, and is paid to Loyola; no tuition is paid at the other school. The student will be assisted by the associate dean’s office or their academic advisor with selection of courses.

Students may also wish to engage in an internship while or after studying abroad. Interning, working, or studying abroad obviously requires planning well in advance, so any student considering such activities should make those interests known as early as possible.

Economics

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

The purpose of the economics major is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of economic processes and the ability to analyze critically economic issues, so they can function as intelligent, informed business leaders and productive members of society. Emphasis is placed on understanding how interactions among people in their roles as consumers and producers, and as individuals or members of social, cultural, political, and economic organizations, are coordinated.

LEARNING GOALS

  • Graduates will be able to critically analyze the economic effects, both intended and unintended, of decisions made under diverse institutional frameworks.
  • Graduates will have a broad understanding of the functional areas of business and the application of economics to business decision making.
  • Graduates will be able to effectively communicate economic theories and analyses.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

All economics majors must take the following sequence of courses:

Course
Title
Credits
ECON B300
Intermediate Microeconomics
3
ECON B301
Intermediate Macroeconomics
3
ECON B305
International Economics
3
ECON B###
Economics Electives*
9
  Business Electives 6
Total Credits in Major 24
Total Credits in Degree 120

* May also choose FIN B310, Financial Institutions.

OTHER INFORMATION

ECON Course + Elective Descriptions

Common Curriculum Requirements

Business Adjunct Requirements

Business Core Requirements

Finance

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

The purpose of the finance major is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the methods and techniques employed to manage the financial resources of an enterprise so they can function as business leaders. Emphasis is placed on understanding and managing working capital, long-term capital, capital structure, and dividend policy, and on evaluating a firm’s financial condition and prospects.

LEARNING GOALS

  • Graduates will have a broad understanding of the functional areas of business and the application of finance to business decision-making.
  • Graduates will be able to analyze the financial statements of a business enterprise.
  • Graduates will be able to effectively communicate financial theories and analyses.
  • Graduates will have an understanding of the financial system of the United States.
  • Graduates will have an understanding of international finance and markets.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

All finance majors must take the following sequence of courses:

Course
Title
Credits
ACCT B205 Corporate Accounting + Reporting I
3
FIN B305
Analysis of Financial Statements
3
FIN B310
Financial Institutions
3
FIN B315
Investments
3
FIN B325 International Finance 3
FIN B400 Advanced Financial Management 3
FIN B###
Finance Elective*
3
  Business Electives 3
Total Credits in Major 24
Total Credits in Degree 120

* May also choose ACCT B206, Corporate Accounting + Reporting II, or ACCT B300, Tax Accounting I; may NOT include FIN B200, Personal Finance.

OTHER INFORMATION

FIN Course + Elective Descriptions

Common Curriculum Requirements

Business Adjunct Requirements

Business Core Requirements

 

International Business

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

The purpose of the international business major is to prepare students to manage and lead in a variety of societies and organizations that exist in today’s increasingly interdependent global economy. To achieve the following objectives, international business majors take a comprehensive curriculum that includes business, language, and social science courses related to the country/region of interest (as indicated by the language chosen). Also, international business majors must participate in either the international summer or semester-long study abroad or exchange programs offered by the college.

LEARNING GOALS

  • Graduates will be able to understand, appreciate, and thrive in cultures other than their own, and in organizations composed of and serving individuals with diverse social and ethnic backgrounds.
  • Graduates will be able to conduct business transactions in at least two languages using the practical skills and modern techniques of management practice.
  • Graduates will feel comfortable in reconciling conflicting ethical, political, and economic dilemmas of the emerging global economy.
  • Graduates will be able to incorporate both the broad and specific implications of global trends and unexpected events into the design and implementation of business strategies.
  • Graduates will be ready to assume positions of responsibility in internationally-oriented organizations in which these individuals can leverage their managerial skills and expertise.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

All international business majors must take the following courses:

Course
Title
Credits
INTB B200 Introduction to International Business
3
INTB B325 International Finance
3
INTB B330 International Marketing  3
INTB B435 Multinational Business Strategy
3
HIST / POLS / SOCI #### History, Political Science, or Sociology Electives* 6
FREN / GERM / ITAL / JPNS / SPAN Modern Foreign Language Electives** 6
INTB B###
International Business Electives
6
Total Credits in Major 30
Total Credits in Degree 120

* Must have an international focus; these courses fulfill the business elective requirements.

** Choose one modern foreign language, consistent with the world region of specialization and other electives chosen; these courses fulfill the non-business elective requirements.

OTHER INFORMATION

INTB Course + Elective Descriptions

Common Curriculum Requirements

Business Adjunct Requirements

Business Core Requirements

Management

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

The purpose of the management major is to provide students with an understanding of the challenges, concerns, and responsibilities that they will experience in the business world. This is accomplished through academic course offerings which cover the functional areas of business and through a specialized management core which provides in-depth study in human resources, entrepreneurship, international issues, and decision-making.

LEARNING GOALS

  • Graduates will have an intimate knowledge of, and practical skills in, modern techniques of management practice that can be implemented in organizations so that those graduates may step into positions of responsibility in any organizational setting.
  • Graduates will have a clear understanding of ethical and behavioral concerns that managers face in the workplace to encourage respect for the individual and the environment.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

All management majors must take the following sequence of courses:

Course
Title
Credits
MGT B310 Human Resources Management 3
MGT B315 International Management 3
MGT B375 Contemporary Managerial Decision-Making 3
MGT B430 Small + New Venture Development 3
MGT B### Management Electives 6
  Business Electives 6
Total Credits in Major 24
Total Credits in Degree 120

OTHER INFORMATION

MGT Course + Elective Descriptions

Common Curriculum Requirements

Business Adjunct Requirements

Business Core Requirements

Marketing

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

The purpose of the marketing major is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the marketing process and how this process integrates with the other functional areas of business. Emphasis is placed on application of key strategic marketing concepts within various environments under various conditions. Students should appreciate the implications that marketing decisions have on a firm’s internal and external constituencies.

LEARNING GOALS

  • Graduates will have a knowledge of current marketing practices and concepts.
  • Graduates will be able to apply strategic marketing concepts in a realistic or simulated environment.
  • Graduates will be able to plan and evaluate systems for customer input before, during, and after production and distribution of a product or service.
  • Graduates will be able to construct a coordinated marketing plan that shows the ability to assess the competitive environment and integrate all the marketing mix areas.
  • Graduates will have developed a value structure to judge the implications of their marketing strategies on the internal and external constituencies of a firm.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

All marketing majors must take the following sequence of courses:

Course
Title
Credits
MKT B330 International Marketing
3
MKT B340 Promotions Management
3
MKT B390 Consumer Analysis + Research
3
MKT B450 Advanced Marketing Strategy
3
MKT B### Marketing Electives 6
  Business Electives 6
Total Credits in Major 24
Total Credits in Degree 120

OTHER INFORMATION

MKT Course + Elective Descriptions

Common Curriculum Requirements

Business Adjunct Requirements

Business Core Requirements

 

Business of Music

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

The purpose of the business of music major is to provide students with the knowledge needed to apply sound business theory to professional fields within the entertainment industry.  Having an intentional entrepreneurial focus, graduates are equipped to prepare comprehensive business plans for founding new entertainment-related businesses or taking leadership positions for the expansion of existing enterprises.  Building on the thorough business coursework, graduates are prepared to excel in a wide-range of business opportunities. 

LEARNING GOALS

  • Graduates will have a broad understanding and appreciation of the music industry and its unique financial dynamics.
  • Graduates will understand intellectual property laws and associated legislation that impacts the music industry.
  • Graduates will have the knowledge needed to create a comprehensive strategic plan, marketing plan, funding proposal and overall business plan for a new music-related enterprise.
  • Graduates will present a comprehensive portfolio of work prepared from coursework and evidence of application of knowledge from internships and other outside school activities.  

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

All business of music students must take the following course sequence:

Course
Title
Credits
MUSB B110 Introduction to Music Industry Studies 3
MUSB B205 Legal Issues in the Music Industry 3
MUSB B250 Music Marketing + Promotion 3
MUSB B310 Music Finance 3
MUSB B350 Music Management + Concert Production 3
MUSB B400 Music Industry Entrepreneurship 3
MUSB B450 Music Industry Senior Seminar 3
  International Business Elective 3
Total Credits 24

OTHER INFORMATION

MUSB Course + Elective Descriptions

Accounting

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

The primary purpose of the accounting major is to provide students with the technical and ethical educational background that will allow them to succeed in the public, private, and not-for-profit economic sectors and to provide faculty with the resources that will allow them to engage in high quality teaching, intellectual contributions, and service activities. This program is designed to attract students nationwide.

LEARNING GOALS

The accounting major has the following learning goals:

  • Graduates will be proficient in the use of information technology and able to provide accounting information that meets user needs.
  • Graduates will have the accounting background necessary to meet the education requirements for various professional examinations.
  • Graduates will be able to critically analyze business and accounting problems to make informed and technically appropriate decisions.
  • Graduates will be able to communicate business information clearly in order to assume leadership roles in their chosen professions.
  • Graduates will exhibit ethical conduct in all their activities and be able to apply a values-laden method for making ethical decisions.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

All accounting majors must take the following sequence of courses:

Course
Title
Credits
ACCT B205 Corporate Accounting + Reporting I 3
ACCT B206 Corporate Accounting + Reporting II 3
ACCT B300 Tax Accounting I 3
ACCT B307 Accounting for Public Sector Entities 3
ACCT B340 Accounting Information Systems 3
ACCT B400 Advanced Accounting 3
ACCT B403 Auditing + Assurance Services 3
ACCT B410 Strategic Cost Management 3
ACCT B460 International Accounting 3
ACCT B### Accounting Elective 3
  Business Electives 3
Total Credits in Major 33
Total Credits in Degree 120*

 * 150 credit hours are required to sit for the Certified Public Accountants' Examination in the state of Louisiana. Many of the specific required courses are included in this program. Students who plan to sit for the exam in another state should inform themselves of the requirements in that state.

OTHER INFORMATION

ACCT Course + Elective Descriptions

Common Curriculum Requirements

Business Adjunct Requirements

Business Core Requirements

Courses: Accounting (ACCT)

Business

ACCT B202 Financial Accounting for Decision Making 3 crs.

This course is designed to help students appreciate the role of accountants in providing information helpful to decisions of investors, creditors, government regulators, management and others, and understand how that information can be used. Emphasis is on comprehending the meaning and value of the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of case flows.

Prerequisite: MATH A092, if required

ACCT B203 Managerial Accounting for Decision Making 3 crs.

This course covers uses of accounting information for managerial decision making to aid planning and control activities of managers in business enterprises. Topics include methods for determining the costs of products ad services, for assessing product and project profitability, and for budgeting and monitoring of costs and profits.

Prerequisite: ACCT B202

ACCT B205 Corporate Accounting + Reporting I 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to accounting theory underlying financial statements. Emphasis is on the study of accounting principles relating to presentation of cash, receivables, inventories, statement of cash flow, income recognition and debt and equity investments in corporate securities.

Prerequisite: ACCT B202 with grade of C (2.0) or above

ACCT B206 Corporate Accounting + Reporting II 3 crs.

This course is a continuation of ACCT B205. Topics include plant and equipment, intangibles, current and long-term liabilities, deferred taxes, pensions, stockholders equity and earnings per share, accounting changes and errors, and leases.

Prerequisite: ACCT B205 with grade of C (2.0) or above

ACCT B300 Tax Accounting I 3 crs.

This course examines the concepts and methods of determining federal income tax liability for individuals. Topics emphasized include personal deductions, capital gain and loss provisions, and accounting methods.

Prerequisites: ACCT B202 with grade of C (2.0) or above; junior standing

ACCT B307 Accounting for Public Sector Entities 3 crs.

This course studies accounting, budgeting, fiscal processes, and the financial records of governmental agencies and non-profit organizations. Fund accounting is emphasized.

Prerequisites: ACCT B205 with grade of C (2.0) or above; junior standing

ACCT B340 Accounting Information Systems 3 crs.

This course emphasizes the problems of integrating automatic data processing and accounting information systems. Problems inherent in the development of systems are also covered.

Prerequisites: ACCT B205 with grade of C (2.0) or above; junior standing

ACCT B400 Advanced Accounting 3 crs.

This course covers the application of accounting principles for parent/subsidiary companies, intercompany transactions. Accounting for partnerships is also covered.

Prerequisites: ACCT B205 with grade of C (2.0) or above; junior standing

ACCT B403 Auditing + Assurance Services 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to auditing and assurance services in the public accounting profession. The course covers the auditing environment, the auditing process, and the application of auditing concepts to various types of audits, including financial, operational, and compliance.

Prerequisites: ACCT B205 with grade of C (2.0) or above, ACCT B340; junior standing

ACCT B410 Strategic Cost Management 3 crs.

This course emphasizes contemporary topics in strategic cost management through an understanding of the underlying concepts and fundamental techniques involved in cost accounting for manufacturing and service companies. Job-order, process, and standard costing are examined to support an understanding of just-in-time and activity based systems, continuous improvement, quality measurements, and the theory of constraints, among others. Emphasis is on how cost management systems, with their performance evaluation and reward systems, encourage efforts to achieve an organization’s strategic goals.

Prerequisites: ACCT B202 with grade of C (2.0) or above; junior standing

ACCT B460 International Accounting 3 crs.

Comparison of accounting and auditing across countries, and examination of financial/managerial accounting issues faced by U.S. multinational firms. Topics include cultural issues affecting accounting and auditing; international accounting harmonization; standard setting bodies; disclosure practices; currency exchange rates and the accounting impacts of transactions conducted in foreign currencies; defenses against currency rate changes such as forward exchange contracts; restating subsidiary foreign currency financial statements; differences in auditor qualifications and auditing standards; and selected managerial accounting issues.

Prerequisites: ACCT B206 with grade of C (2.0) or above; junior standing

ACCT B493 Special Topics in Accounting 3 crs.

Prerequisite: Junior standing

ACCT B499 Independent Study in Accounting arr.

See description in College of Business overview

Courses: Business Administration (BA)

Business

BA B100 Introduction to Business 3 crs.

The course introduces the nature of business and its complexities in the context of the environment in which it operates. Subjects covered include ownership forms, organization, management, marketing, accounting, financial institutions, labor relations, basic word processing, e-mail, spreadsheets, data base, library resources, and small businesses.

BA B101 Business Communications 3 crs.

This course will improve the student's ability to create successful communication products–both written and oral. Topics include word processing applications, the process for successful communication, business writing, report writing using style guidelines, résumé writing, Internet, and presentation skills. The course will also focus on multicultural sensitivity, ethical considerations, collaborative writing, and career issues.

Prerequisites: BA B100, ENGL T122

BA B200 Introduction to International Business 3 crs.

This course prepares students to be effective decision makers in an international setting.  It seeks to provide them with a working knowledge of issues relating to making decision in today’s global environment.  It also aims at equipping students with the theoretical and analytical tools needed to make sound business decisions in international setting.  It covers the international business environment, dealing with topics such as national differences in political economy and culture, international trade, exchange rates, intellectual property rights and other topics which affect the international business operations.  It also focuses on the individual firm strategies, covering foreign direct investment, firm market entry strategies, financial and other business decisions that the successful multinationals need to make. 

Cross-listing: INTB B200

BA B400 Global Startups 3 crs.

This course is designed to enhance the student’s analytical, research, communication, and entrepreneurial skills via two methods–first, in-depth discussions of concepts and cases focusing on the opportunities, challenges, and strategies pursued by small and/or new international ventures; and second, an applied research project whereby students design and defend global strategic plans (specifying the financial, marketing, human, technological, and operational resources) with which to take advantage of an attractive business opportunity identified in the first part of the course.

Prerequisites: FIN B300, MGT B245, MGT B325, MKT B280; senior standing

BA B405 New Venture Funding 3 crs.

This course will help students to develop skills that enable them to manage the specific funding issues that cause greatest concern for new and growing ventures. Primary topics are securing funding for a developing venture, developing a financial plan to present when seeking funding, establishing successful banking relationships, use of accounting software packages, cash flow management, and credit and collections. The course will be applied in nature and will build on prior work in accounting and finance in the CBA core curriculum. Students will develop entrepreneurial skills by combining analytical skills with intuition and creative problem solving techniques.

Prerequisites: MGT B245, MKT B280; junior standing

BA B410 Business Plan Development 3 crs.

This course will help students to develop skills that enable them to develop and present superior business plans to use when seeking funding for new ventures. Students will work with business owners, bankers, venture capitalists, and other professionals in developing these business plans. Primary topics are (1) expanding on the basic business plan developed in prior coursework, (2) using the business plan to secure funding, and (3) competing with other proposed ventures for funding. Student teams will compete among themselves for the right to represent the CBA in business plan competitions with students from other universities. The course will be applied in nature and will build on prior work in the basic business core of the CoB and the Small and New Venture class, MGT B430. Students will develop skills needed to develop actual new venture business plans by combining analytical skills with intuition and creative problem solving techniques.

Prerequisites: MGT B430, MKT B280; junior standing

BA B415 Business Ethics 3 crs.

This course examines the sources of societal pressure, business reaction, and the community’s expectation. The entire spectrum of corporate and government activities are discussed against the framework of the demands made on the firm and government by forces outside of the marketplace.

Prerequisites: ECON B201, MGT B245, PHIL V252; junior standing

BA B435 Multinational Business Strategy 3 crs.

This course is designed to enhance the student’s analytical, research, communication, and strategic skills via two methods–first, in-depth class discussions of concepts and cases focusing on the opportunities, challenges, and strategies pursued by large multinationals; second, an applied research project whereby students formulate and defend a global strategic plan for a company, after performing a strategic audit and assessing the forces and trends shaping the future of the industry in which it operates.

Prerequisites: FIN B300, MGT B245, MGT B325, MKT B280; senior standing

Cross-listing: INTB B435

BA B445 Business Policy 3 crs.

This course will (1) provide students with the opportunity to integrate the skills acquired in prior coursework in analyzing the internal and external environments of organizations and (2) have students learn how to formulate and implement strategies that will allow a firm to compete successfully within its environment.

Prerequisites: FIN B300, MGT B245, MGT B325, MKT B280, (ACCT B410 for accounting majors); senior standing

BA B493 Special Topics 3 crs.

Prerequisite: Junior standing

BA B497 Internship 1 - 6 crs.

See description in College of Business overview

BA B499 Independent Study arr.

See description in College of Business overview

Courses: Decision Science (DECS)

Business

DECS B205 Business Statistics 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to the statistics used in business. Topics covered are sources and collection of business data, describing data, probability concepts, the use of confidence limits to estimate the mean or the proportion, the use of hypothesis tests, analysis of variance, chi-square test for independence, simple correlation and regression analysis to discover how two variables are related to each other. The use of a business spreadsheet program is an integral part of this hands-on course.

Prerequisite: MATH A115

DECS B499 Independent Study in Decision Science arr.

See description in College of Business overview

Courses: Economics (ECON)

Business

ECON B200 Principles of Microeconomics 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to economic analysis: efficiency and equity; production and exchange; costs, supply, and demand; markets, organizations, and government; competition, cooperation, and coercion; and international trade.

Prerequisite: College math

ECON B201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to alternative theories of inflation and unemployment; economic growth; money, banking, and financial intermediation; interest rates; business cycles; exchange rates, trade balances, and the balance of payments; deficits and the national debt; monetary, fiscal, exchange rate, incomes, and regulatory policies; national income and product; and international payments accounting.

Prerequisites: College math; ECON B200

ECON B300 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 crs.

This course is an analysis of market and firm coordination; the theory of consumer behavior and demand; the theory of supply; competition; the pricing of goods and resources; and government policies.

Prerequisites: MATH A116 or MATH A257, ECON B200*; junior standing

ECON B301 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 crs.

This course considers various theories concerning the functioning of the macroeconomy: Classical, Keynesian, and the Neoclassical Synthesis; Monetarism, Rational Expectations, and Real Business Cycles; Supply-Side, Neo- (or New) Keynesian, Post Keynesian, and Austrian.

Prerequisites: MATH A116 or MATH A257, ECON B201*; junior standing

ECON B305 International Economics 3 crs.

This course considers exchange rate systems; adjustments in international disequilibrium situations; relationships among rates of exchange, inflation, interest, and unemployment; and domestic and international economic policies. It also considers various theories of competitive advantage in international trade, the nature and effects of commercial policies, and international economic integration.

Prerequisites: ECON B201*; junior standing

Cross-listing: INTB B305

ECON B325 The Market Process 3 crs.

This course serves as an introduction to subjectivist economics. Primary emphasis is on the Austrian School. Topics covered include history and methodology; the market process and intervention; capital and interest; money, credit, and the financial system; and business cycles.

Prerequisites: ECON B201*; junior standing

ECON B330 Law + Economics 3 crs.

This course is an economic analysis used to consider the effects of legal rules upon people’s actions. Alternative rules are considered, with particular attention paid to the differing effects each is likely to have on the structure of incentives, and thus on human actions.

Prerequisites: ECON B200*; junior standing

ECON B335 Economic Development 3 crs.

This course will consider the disparity of material well-being among the masses of people in different countries. Topics include causes of poverty and wealth; nature of economic growth; the roles of the state, markets, and social and cultural institutions in economic development.

Prerequisites:ECON B200*, ECON B201*; junior standing

Cross-listing: INTB B335

ECON B340 History of Economic Thought 3 crs.

This course will discuss the origins and evolution of the history of economic ideas and theories. Topics include ancient and medieval thought, Roman and early Christian thought, the mercantilists, the physiocrats, Adam Smith and the Classical economists, Karl Marx, the Marginal Revolution, the Keynesian Revolution, and Contemporary Economics.

Prerequisites: ECON B201*; junior standing

ECON B345 Labor Economics 3 crs.

This course is an overview of diverse topics in economics which deal specifically with labor market issues. Topics include the supply and demand of labor; human capital theory; migration and mobility; the job search process; employment and unemployment; unions; compensation issues; discrimination; and earnings and income distribution.

Prerequisites: ECON B201*; junior standing

ECON B350 Industrial Organization + Public Policy 3 crs.

This class will investigate the nature of firms and industries: why firms exist and why firms have diverse organizational structures; why industry structures differ; competition and monopoly; firm behavior; transaction cost theory; and the effects of antitrust policy.

Prerequisites: ECON B201*; junior standing

ECON B360 Econometrics 3 crs.

An intermediate level statistics course. After a brief overview of statistics, the course covers least squares estimation, inference, diagnostic methods, forecasting and forecast evaluation, and simultaneous equations estimation. The course focuses more on applied work than on its theoretical underpinnings. You will be actively involved with computer exercises in this course, using the STATA software program. 

Prerequisites: ECON B200*, ECON B201*, DECS B205; junior standing

ECON B493 Special Topics in Economics 3 crs.

Prerequisites: ECON B201*; junior standing

ECON B499 Independent Study in Economics arr.

See description in College of Business overview

ECON X130 Economics + Society 3 crs.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the tools available for understanding and making decisions about current economic problems such as crime, education, pollution, unemployment, and inflation. Focus is on the proposition that basic economic concepts are essential for making better decisions.

Not open to business students or to students who have completed ECON B200 or B201

Common Curriculum course category: Behavioral / Social Science

* Economics majors and minors must earn a grade of C (2.0) or above in the relevant prerequisite courses to fulfill these prerequisite requirements.

Courses: Finance (FIN)

Business

FIN B200 Personal Finance 3 crs.

This course explores those topical areas of finance which have direct impact on an individual’s lifestyle. Emphasis is on budgeting, planning, cash management, credit, basic insurance, consumer information, estate planning, and tax planning. May not be used as a major elective.

FIN B300 Financial Management 3 crs.

This course introduces the analytic techniques commonly used for the financial management of business firms. Topics include analysis of financial statements, financial forecasting, asset valuation, capital budgeting, working capital management, and financial structure.

Prerequisites: ACCT B202, DECS B205, ECON B201; junior standing.

FIN B305 Analysis of Financial Statements 3 crs.

This course examines common techniques for the analysis of financial statements. In addition to covering traditional analytic approaches, this course explores the relationship between the selection of accounting procedures and the quality of the resulting statements.

Prerequisites: ACCT B205, FIN B300*; junior standing

FIN B310 Financial Institutions 3 crs.

This course examines the purpose and functions of financial institutions. Emphasis is on asset/liability management. Cases may be used to foster an understanding of the problems and opportunities of different financial institutions. It is highly recommended that the student take FIN B300, Financial Management, first.

Prerequisites: ECON B201; junior standing

FIN B315 Investments 3 crs.

This course analyzes different investment alternatives in a risk-return framework. Techniques for selection, timing, and diversification of investment choices are emphasized. Estate planning is also examined to help formulate a long-run investment strategy.

Prerequisites: FIN B300*; junior standing

FIN B325 International Financial Management 3 crs.

This course explores the problems and complexities that arise when trade and investment take place across national boundaries. Topics include financing international trade, exchange rate risk, risk exposure and management, and international investments.

Prerequisites: FIN B300*; junior standing

Cross-listing: INTB B325

FIN B400 Advanced Financial Management 3 crs.

This course examines the theory and practice of financial management through case analysis and readings. Topics considered include working capital management, capital budgeting, financial structure, and dividend policy.

Prerequisites: ACCT B205, FIN B300*, FIN B305; junior standing

FIN B405 Personal Financial Planning 3 crs.

This course is primarily for business majors and concentrates on preparation of professional financial planners. This course concentrates on understanding the financial planning process in areas such as risk management and insurance, investments, retirement planning, estate planning, and the Louisiana community property and inheritance laws.

Prerequisites: FIN B300*; junior standing

FIN B410 Management of Financial Institutions 3 crs.

This course analyzes the asset and liability management problems of financial institutions. Emphasis is on the particular problems of managing a commercial bank. Cases are used to illustrate the alternative solutions to problems common to financial institution management.

Prerequisites: FIN B310*; junior standing

FIN B450 Real Estate Investments + Finance 3 crs.

This course analyzes real estate financing and investment, vis-a-vis other investment alternatives in a risk-return framework. Primary focus is on evaluating the risk-return potential of income producing real property.

Prerequisites: FIN B300*; junior standing

FIN B493 Special Topics in Finance 3 crs.

Previous topics include speculative markets; real estate appraisal; portfolio analysis; global financial markets; entrepreneurship, expectations, and equilibrium; and investment banking.

Prerequisites: FIN B300*; junior standing

FIN B499 Independent Study in Finance 3 crs.

See description in College of Business overview

 * Finance majors must earn a grade of C (2.0) or above in the relevant prerequisite courses to fulfill these prerequisite requirements.

Courses: International Business (INTB)

Business

INTB B200 Introduction to International Business 3 crs.

This course prepares students to be effective decision makers in an international setting.  It seeks to provide them with a working knowledge of issues relating to making decision in today’s global environment.  It also aims at equipping students with the theoretical and analytical tools needed to make sound business decisions in international setting.  It covers the international business environment, dealing with topics such as national differences in political economy and culture, international trade, exchange rates, intellectual property rights and other topics which affect the international business operations.  It also focuses on the individual firm strategies, covering foreign direct investment, firm market entry strategies, financial and other business decisions that the successful multinationals need to make.  

Cross-listing: BA B200

INTB B305 International Economics 3 crs.

This course considers exchange rate systems; adjustments in international disequilibrium situations; relationships among rates of exchange, inflation, interest, and unemployment; and domestic and international economic policies. It also considers various theories of competitive advantage in international trade, the nature and effects of commercial policies, and international economic integration.

Prerequisites: ECON B201; junior standing

Cross-listing: ECON B305

INTB B210 Law for International Business 3 crs.

This course discusses basic legal principles of engaging in business transactions subject to the law of foreign jurisdictions, and processes available and rules that apply to the solutions of international business problems.

Prerequisites: LGST B200 or LGST B205; junior standing.

Cross-listing: LGST B210

INTB B315 International Management 3 crs.

This course explores the complexities arising from managing an international business with a framework for analyzing and successfully operating across nations. Students develop interpersonal and cross-cultural understanding and negotiation skills through in-class participatory exercises, case discussions, supplementary readings, and a group research project.

Prerequisites: MGT B245; junior standing

Cross-listing: MGT B315

INTB B325 International Financial Management 3 crs.

This course explores the problems and complexities that arise when trade and investment take place across national boundaries. Topics include financing international trade, exchange rate risk, risk exposure and management, and international investments.

Prerequisites: FIN B300; junior standing

Cross-listing: FIN B325

INTB B330 International Marketing 3 crs.

This course explores similarities and differences of domestic and international marketing programs; sources of information available to firms considering foreign marketing efforts; costs and problems of gathering this information; formulation and implementation of marketing strategies in other environments.

Prerequisites: MKT B280; junior standing

Cross-listing: MKT B330

INTB B335 Economic Development 3 crs.

This course will consider the disparity of material well-being among the masses of people in different countries. Topics include causes of poverty and wealth; nature of economic growth; the roles of the state, markets, and social and cultural institutions in economic development.

Prerequisites:ECON B200, ECON B201; junior standing

Cross-listing: ECON B335

INTB B340 Business Environment and Practices in Latin America 3 crs.

This course aims at developing skills essential for being an effective manager either in Latin America or with a business that does business in that region; and understanding how U.S.-based companies may profit from the prospects emerging from the current social, political, and economic landscape in Latin America. Discussion will be centered on identifying, analyzing, and comparing the factors surrounding such markets, and on understanding the implications of such elements for organizations and managers, highlighting business practices and cross-cultural differences. Students will also develop "country profiles" of Latin American nations or markets. The course method includes lectures and case discussions, as well as numerous local and foreign guest speakers.

Prerequisite: Junior standing

INTB B345 Business Environment and Practices in Asia 3 crs.

This course aims at developing skills essential for being an effective manager either in Asia or with a business that does business in that region; and understanding how U.S.-based companies may profit from the prospects emerging from the current social, political, and economic landscape in Asia. Discussion will be centered on identifying, analyzing, and comparing the factors surrounding such markets, and on understanding the implications of such elements for organizations and managers, highlighting business practices and cross-cultural differences. Students will also develop "country profiles" of Asian nations or markets. The course method includes lectures and case discussions, as well as numerous local and foreign guest speakers.

Prerequisite: Junior standing

INTB B350 Business Environment and Practices in Europe 3 crs.

This course aims at developing skills essential for being an effective manager either in Europe or with a business that does business in that region; and understanding how U.S.-based companies may profit from the prospects emerging from the current social, political, and economic landscape in Europe. Discussion will be centered on identifying, analyzing, and comparing the factors surrounding such markets, and on understanding the implications of such elements for organizations and managers, highlighting business practices and cross-cultural differences. Students will also develop "country profiles" of European nations or markets. The course method includes lectures and case discussions, as well as numerous local and foreign guest speakers.

Prerequisite: Junior standing

INTB B370 Import / Export Operations 3 crs.

This course covers the basics of international trade, transaction sequencing, transportation and logistics, export pricing, freight forwarding, shipping and collection documents, payment terms and bank collections, tariffs and duties, packing and marking, marine cargo insurance, and import procedures.

Prerequisite: Junior standing

Cross-listings: MGT B370, MKT B370

INTB B435 Multinational Business Strategy 3 crs.

This course is designed to enhance the student’s analytical, research, communication, and strategic skills via two methods–first, in-depth class discussions of concepts and cases focusing on the opportunities, challenges, and strategies pursued by large multinationals; second, an applied research project whereby students formulate and defend a global strategic plan for a company, after performing a strategic audit and assessing the forces and trends shaping the future of the industry in which it operates.

Prerequisites: FIN B300, MGT B245, MGT B325, MKT B280; senior standing

Cross-listing: BA B435

INTB B499 Independent Study in International Business arr.

See description in College of Business overview

 

Courses: Legal Studies (LGST)

Business

LGST B200 Business Law I 3 crs.

This course covers private commercial transactions, including contracts, sales, and property. Commercial paper, agency, partnerships, and corporation law are also included.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

LGST B201 Business Law II 3 crs.

This course covers in greater depth selected topics from LGST B200.

Prerequisite: LGST B200; sophomore standing

LGST B205 Legal Environment of Business 3 crs.

This course is an introductory course covering the nature and operation of the U.S. legal system, constitutional law affecting commerce, employment discrimination law, and environmental protection law.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

LGST B210 Law for International Business 3 crs.

This course discusses basic legal principles of engaging in business transactions subject to the law of foreign jurisdictions, and processes available and rules that apply to the solutions of international business problems.

Prerequisites: LGST B200 or LGST B205; junior standing

LGST B493 Special Topics in Legal Studies 3 crs.

Prerequisite: Junior standing

LGST B499 Independent Study in Legal Studies arr.

See description in College of Business overview

Courses: Management (MGT)

Business

MGT B245 Management + Organizational Behavior 3 crs.

The course explores organizations as social units and the phenomena of individual and group behavior in organizations. Topics include evolution of research in organizational principles and practices; personality, perception, and attitude formation; motivation; behavior; performance; structure; groups; planning and decision making; communication; power and conflict; leadership; stress; and international issues.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122

MGT B250 Management Information Systems 3 crs.

This course introduces the significant uses of information technology in the business world. The student will study steps necessary to design, implement, and operate a computer-based information system. More significantly, the student will study the complex issues involved in managing information technology, including the rapidly changing issues involving the telecommunications industry.

MGT B305 Labor Relations 3 crs.

This course is a study of the history and development of organized labor; the background and techniques of collective bargaining; union security and management rights; job rights and due process.

Prerequisites: ECON B201, MGT B245; junior standing

MGT B310 Human Resource Management 3 crs.

This course focuses on current issues in human resource management in both the private and public sectors. Topics include civil service systems, manpower, planning, job analysis, recruitment, selection, training, appraisal, compensation, benefits, job evaluation, and personnel systems evaluation.

Prerequisites: MGT B245; junior standing

MGT B315 International Management 3 crs.

This course explores the complexities arising from managing an international business with a framework for analyzing and successfully operating across nations. Students develop interpersonal and cross-cultural understanding and negotiation skills through in-class participatory exercises, case discussions, supplementary readings, and a group research project.

Prerequisites: MGT B245; junior standing

Cross-listing: INTB B315

MGT B320 Psychology in Management 3 crs.

This course presents the theories, experiments, and problem-solving efforts of the psychologist and the behavioral scientist in the area of administrative action. Topics include cognitive dissonance, reinforcement theory, need achievement, leadership, and attitude change.

Prerequisites: MGT B245; junior standing

MGT B322 Retail + Value Chain Management 3 crs.

This course studies the merchandising and management activities of the retailer, as well as retailers’ interactions with distribution intermediaries and manufacturers. Distribution strategies are studied both from the point of view of the manufacturer and retailer.

Prerequisites: MGT B245, MKT B280; junior standing

Cross-listing: MKT B322  

MGT B325 Production + Operation Management 3 crs.

This course deals with the decision making involved in selecting, designing, operating, and controlling activities of the operations system for continuous improvement. Topics include total quality management, forecasting, product design and process selection, capacity planning and location, facility layout, project planning and control, production planning, and just-in-time production and inventory management.

Prerequisites: DECS B205, ECON B200; junior standing

MGT B335 Advanced Business Communication 3 crs.

This course explores a core of advanced communication topics including meeting management, negotiation, conflict resolution, and cultural communication skills. Case studies are discussed and analyzed. A team project allows students to gain experience in conducting, analyzing, and writing a communication audit.

Prerequisites: BA B101, ENGL T122; junior standing

MGT B360 Essentials of Total Quality Management 3 crs.

This course introduces the fundamentals of Total Quality Management (TQM) through lectures and hands-on teamwork.

Prerequisites: DECS B205, MGT B245, MKT B280; junior standing

Cross-listing: MKT B360

MGT B370 Import / Export Operations 3 crs.

This course covers the basics of international trade, transaction sequencing, transportation and logistics, export pricing, freight forwarding, shipping and collection documents, payment terms and bank collections, tariffs and duties, packing and marking, marine cargo insurance, and import procedures.

Prerequisites: LGST B200 or LGST B205, MGT B245, MKT B280; junior standing

Cross-listings: INTB B370, MKT B370

MGT B375 Contemporary Managerial Decision Making 3 crs.

This course prepares students to be effective decision makers by providing them with the basic analytical, quantitative, and qualitative tools/skills to make effective decisions. A course project requires students to use (1) diagnostic skills to formulate problems, (2) data collection skills to obtain appropriate information, (3) data analysis skills to draw conclusions, and (4) presentation skills to explain why and how the problem can be solved. Decision implementation issues are also analyzed.

Prerequisites: DECS B205, ECON B201, MGT B245; junior standing

MGT B420 Leadership + Team Building 3 crs.

This course examines leadership as a process of influencing others toward the achievement of goals. The process functions through complex interactions among the leader, relevant followers, and shared situations. This course introduces students to current research and methodology relating to each of the three components of leadership, in the role of developing effective teamwork.

Prerequisites: MGT B245; junior standing

MGT B430 Small + New Venture Development 3 crs.

This course gives students an opportunity to go through the steps required to start a business and to experience some of the frustrations and achievements associated with the process. Experience gained in other business courses will be used extensively.

Prerequisites: MGT B245; junior standing

MGT B465 Sports Marketing + Management 3 crs.

This course covers the essentials of sports marketing and management–planning, promotions, operations, recruiting, contracts, and market analysis. The course will make use of traditional lecture and exams plus papers, cases, speakers, and field trips.

Prerequisites: MGT B245, MKT B280; junior standing

Cross-listing: MKT B465

MGT B493 Special Topics in Management 3 crs.

Prerequisites: MGT B245; junior standing

MGT B499 Independent Study in Management arr.

See description in College of Business overview

 

Courses: Marketing (MKT)

Business

MKT B280 Basic Marketing 3 crs.

This course assists students in understanding the role of marketing from a managerial perspective. It examines how product, pricing, promotion, and distribution decisions are made to satisfy the needs of specific target markets. The impacts of political-legal, competitive, socio-cultural, technological, and economic environments on marketing are also studied.

Prerequisite: ECON B200

MKT B322 Retail + Value Chain Management 3 crs.

This course studies the merchandising and management activities of the retailer, as well as retailers’ interactions with distribution intermediaries and manufacturers. Distribution strategies are studied both from the point of view of the manufacturer and retailer.

Prerequisites: MGT B245, MKT B280; junior standing

Cross-listing: MGT B322

MKT B330 International Marketing 3 crs.

This course explores similarities and differences of domestic and international marketing programs; sources of information available to firms considering foreign marketing efforts; costs and problems of gathering this information; formulation and implementation of marketing strategies in other environments.

Prerequisites: MKT B280; junior standing

Cross-listing: INTB B330

MKT B340 Promotions Management 3 crs.

This course emphasizes development of integrated promotional programs. Advertising, public relations, personal selling, promotional packaging, along with many other sales stimulating methods and techniques are covered.

Prerequisites: MKT B280; junior standing

MKT B360 Essentials of Total Quality Management 3 crs.

This course introduces the fundamentals of Total Quality Management (TQM) through lectures and hands-on teamwork.

Prerequisites: DECS B205, MGT B245, MKT B280; junior standing

Cross-listing: MGT B360 

MKT B370 Import / Export Operations 3 crs.

This course covers the basics of international trade, transaction sequencing, transportation and logistics, export pricing, freight forwarding, shipping and collection documents, payment terms and bank collections, tariffs and duties, packing and marking, marine cargo insurance, and import procedures.

Prerequisites: LGST B200 or LGST B205, MGT B245, MKT B280; junior standing

Cross-listings: INTB B370, MGT B370 

MKT B375 Data-based Marketing 3 crs.

This course covers the use of databases in marketing. The student learns how to create, manage, and interpret marketing databases. Use of databases to enhance marketing strategy development is stressed.

Prerequisites: MKT B390; junior standing

MKT B385 Business to Business Selling 3 crs.

This course presents the techniques of effective personal selling in business-to-business situations. Included within this presentation is exploration of the function and duties of the sales representative, and the sales management tasks of staffing, training, and motivating the sales force.

Prerequisites: MKT B280; junior standing

MKT B390 Consumer Analysis + Research 3 crs.

This course teaches the student how to measure and analyze consumer attitudes and behavior. Measurement techniques covered include observation, interviews, focus groups, and surveys. Analysis tools used include descriptive statistics, chi square, and spreadsheet analysis for value determination.

Prerequisites: DECS B205, MKT B280; junior standing

MKT B450 Advanced Marketing Strategy 3 crs.

This course is an analysis of a wide variety of marketing problems. The case-situation method is employed, with emphasis on managerial problem solving amid real world constraints; and the use of behavioral and quantitative techniques.

Prerequisites: MKT B280, MKT B390; senior standing

MKT B465 Sports Marketing + Management 3 crs.

This course covers the essentials of sports marketing and management–planning, promotions, operations, recruiting, contracts, and market analysis. The course will make use of traditional lecture and exams plus papers, cases, speakers, and field trips.

Prerequisites: MGT B245, MKT B280; junior standing

Cross-listing: MGT B465

MKT B493 Special Topics in Marketing 3 crs.

Prerequisites: MKT B280; junior standing

MKT B499 Independent Study in Marketing arr.

See description in College of Business overview

 

Courses: Music Business (MUSB)

Business

MUSB M100 Music Industry Forum 0 crs.

This course consists of weekly seminars with guest speakers and discussion of current music industry topics. Attendance by music industry majors is required. Open to all students.

MUSB M110 Introduction to Music Industry Studies 3 crs.

This course provides students with an overview of the music industry, including the many careers it offers. The following topics will be addressed: the artist’s “team” (managers, lawyers, agents, PR, producers), legal issues (recording contracts, songwriting contracts,
licenses, etc.), touring, merchandising, motion picture music, group issues, music on the Internet, entrepreneurship, the future of the business, and ethics.

MUSB M205 Legal Issues in the Music Industry 3 crs.

This course covers the legal issues and related information considered as basic knowledge expected of successful practicing musicians who deal with the commercial aspects of music. This includes standard contracts; a foundation of intellectual property, copyright knowledge and terminology, and evolving law; and the basics of music publishing.

MUSB M250 Music Marketing + Promotion 3 crs.

This course is an in-depth study of the principles and application of marketing, promotion, and distribution of products and services within the music industry. Case studies of various music products and companies will be studied and analyzed.

Prerequisite: MKT B280 Basic Marketing

MUSB M310 Music Finance 3 crs.

This course provides students with the financial management knowledge needed to finance and manage cash flows in music enterprises. The following topics are addressed: obtaining capital, cost of capital, budgeting, time value of money, asset valuation, financial statement analysis, and portfolio analysis.

Prerequisites: BA B100, ECON B200, FIN B300; junior standing

MUSB M350 Music Management + Concert Production 3 crs.

This course is a thorough study of how to successfully manage and administer an artist’s career or music organization along with concert production. Topics discussed include: selection of artist and venue, organization and administration, back-timing, financial and legal issues, promotion sponsorship, and settlement. Case studies of successful managers and management companies as well as concerts will be studied and analyzed. Students will develop a written management plan for a musical artist or business and produce a concert.

Prerequisites: MGT B245; junior standing

MUSB M400 Music Industry Entrepreneurship 3 crs.

This course is a thorough study of how to successfully start a business within the music industry. Case studies of successful entrepreneurs and their companies will be researched and analyzed. Students will develop a written business plan for their own music industry enterprise.

Prerequisites: MUSB B250, MUSB B310, MUSB B350; junior standing

MUSB M450 Music Industry Senior Seminar 3 crs.

This course prepares students to undertake their internship by providing an in-depth study of how to prepare to successfully enter a career path.

Prerequisite: MUSB B400; senior standing

Business Minors

MINORS FOR BUSINESS MAJORS

Business students may select any of the minors that are available through the College of Humanities + Natural Sciences, the College of Music + Fine Arts, or the College of Social Sciences. Courses required for the minor will be counted as non-business electives toward fulfillment of the business curriculum. Upon completion of the non-business elective courses, nine additional hours from the minor may be applied to the business elective portion of the curriculum. Further information about specific requirements may be obtained in the College of Business office of student records and admissions.

Additionally, the college offers the following business minors for students with a business major: 

Accounting

Course Title Credits
ACCT B202 Financial Accounting for Decision-Making
3
ACCT B203 Managerial Accounting for Decision-Making
3
ACCT B205 Corporate Accounting + Reporting I 3
ACCT B206 Corporate Accounting + Reporting II 3
ECON X130 or
ECON B200
Economics + Society or
Principles of Microeconomics
3
LGST B201 or
LGST B205
Business Law I or
Legal Environment of Business
3
ACCT B300 or
ACCT B340 or
ACCT B480
Tax Accounting I or
Accounting Information Systems or
Forensic Accounting + Fraud Examination
3
  Total Credits
21

International Business

Course Title Credits
BA B200 Introduction to International Business
3
BA B435 Multinational Business Strategy
3
FIN B325 International Finance 3
MKT B330 International Marketing 3
POLS or HIST Social Science Elective* 3
FREN / GERM / ITAL / JPNS / SPAN / etc Modern Foreign Language 6
  Total Credits 21

* Must have international focus (e.g. HIST A220, Latin America Studies)

Legal Studies

Course Title Credits
PHIL A201 or
PHIL A206
Practical Logic or
Introduction to Symbolic Logic
3
POLS A100 Introduction to American Government
3
SPCH A100 Fundamentals of Speech 3
Choose 4 below:    
LGST B201 Business Law I*
3
LGST B205 Legal Environment of Business*
3
LGST B310 Law for International Business
3
POLS A300 Constitutional Law I
3
POLS A301 Constitutional Law II
3
ACCT B300 Tax Accounting I **
3
ECON B330 Law and Economics
3
CMMN A401 Law of Mass Communications**
3
  Total Credits
21

* Must include at least 1 of these courses.

** See Communications bulletin for prerequisites.

MINORS FOR NON-BUSINESS MAJORS

Because business is an essential and unavoidable part of society, many students in non-business majors find that additional training in the business disciplines is of benefit to them in their career in music, fine art, education, science, or the humanities.

The College of Business offers the following business minors to all Loyola students:

Business

The psychologist who goes into private practice will soon discover that he or she is running a business. Drama majors will quickly learn that the theater is a business operation. The business minor is designed to provide a basic understanding of business functions to succeed in these and other areas.

The business minor consists of the following courses:

Course Title Credits
BA B100 Introduction to Business
3
ACCT B202 Financial Accounting for Decision-Making
3
ECON X130 or
ECON B200
Economics + Society or
Principles of Microeconomics
3
FIN B200 Personal Finance
3
LGST B205 Legal Environment of Business
3
MKT B280 Basic Marketing
3
MGT B245 Management + Organizational Behavior
3
  Total Credits
21

Economics

Economics is a study of human behavior and decision making. More specifically, economics is a way of thinking about human action and about how and why individuals make the choices which they make. The basic and enduring strength of economics is that it provides a logical, ordered way of looking at various problems and issues.

The economics minor consists of the following courses:

Course Title Credits
  College Math (Proficiency level)
3
ECON B200 Principles of Microeconomics
3
ECON B201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
ECON B305 International Economics
3
ECON B3## / B4## Economics Electives 9
  Total Credits
21

Marketing

The marketing minor is designed for students with majors in disciplines outside business who will benefit in their future careers from a knowledge of the principles of marketing. The minor emphasizes decision-making within the framework of the total marketing process for people in such areas as advertising, communications, music, law, political science, public affairs, and psychology.

The marketing minor consists of the following courses:

Course Title Credits
BA B100 Introduction to Business
3
ECON X130 or
ECON B200
Economics + Society or
Principles of Microeconomics
3
MKT B280 Basic Marketing 3
MKT B3## / B4## Marketing Electives 12
  Total Credits
21

Pre-M.B.A.

The pre-M.B.A. minor introduces the student to the functional areas of business and the basic tools of business analysis. In addition, the pre-M.B.A. minor provides the student with 5 of the 6 foundation courses required for the M.B.A. program at Loyola. The student with a pre-M.B.A. minor can waive these courses and begin immediately with M.B.A. core courses.

The pre-M.B.A. minor consists of the following courses:

Course Title Credits*
ACCT B202 Financial Accounting for Decision Making
3
DECS B205 Business Statistics
3
ECON B200** Principles of Microeconomics 3
ECON B201** Principles of Macroeconomics
3
MGT B245 Management + Organizational Behavior
3
FIN B300 Financial Management
3
  Total Credits 18

* A grade of B or higher must be earned in each course in order to waive the equivalent graduate course.

** Both ECON B200 and ECON B201 must be taken in order to waive the M.B.A. ECON B603 requirement.

College of Humanities and Natural Sciences

DEAN: Jo Ann Moran Cruz, Ph.D., OFFICE: 202 Bobet Hall
ASSOCIATE DEAN: Judith Hunt, Ph.D.
WEB PAGE: chn.loyno.edu/

The College of Humanities and Natural Sciences serves as the anchor for all undergraduate study at Loyola. The liberal arts and sciences are key to the cultural and intellectual formation of the individual.

Students in the College of Humanities and Natural Sciences have distinguished themselves in scholarship, research, and service. In recent years, students have been awarded prestigious Rhodes, British Marshall, Mellon, and Fulbright scholarships. The college regularly recognizes the academic excellence of our students through the Dean's List, published at the end of each academic term.

The centerpiece of Loyola's liberal-arts education is the Common Curriculum, housed in the College of Humanities and Natural Sciences and required of all Loyola undergraduates regardless of the college in which they are enrolled. Writing, literature, and mathematics requirements combine with philosophy, history, religious studies, and other courses to afford students the perspective, skills, and knowledge that can enable them to form their convictions, beliefs, and commitments in an atmosphere of study and reflection.

BACHELOR DEGREES

The College offers the following degrees within each department:

  • Biological Sciences: Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences
  • Chemistry: Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, Bachelor of Science in Chemistry (with a concentration in Biochemistry or Forensic Chemistry)
  • English: Bachelor of Arts in English (with a concentration in Literature, Writing or Film/Digital Media)
  • History: Bachelor of Arts in History
  • Languages and Cultures: Bachelor of Arts in Classical Studies, Bachelor of Arts in Languages and Cultures (with a concentration in French, Latin American Studies or Spanish)
  • Mathematical Sciences: Bachelor of Science in Mathematics or Bachelor of Science in Mathematics (with a concentration in Computational Mathematics)
  • Philosophy: Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy or Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy (with a concentration in Pre-Law Philosophy)
  • Physics: Bachelor of Science in Physics, Bachelor of Science in Physics (with a concentration in Liberal Arts Physics, *Pre-Engineering Physics or Pre-Health Physics),
  • Psychological Sciences: Bachelor of Science in Psychology or Bachelor of Science in Pyschology Pre-Health
  • Religious Studies: Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies (with a concentration in Christianity or World Religions)

Students who wish to earn a bachelor’s degree through programs not regularly available in the College of Humanities and Natural Sciences may consult the Associate Dean about the possibility of a contract degree.  *Through a special arrangement with the School of Engineering of Tulane University, Loyola students may participate in a program which leads to a B.S. degree from Loyola and an engineering degree from Tulane upon successful completion of both segments of the program. Interested students must consult the Associate Dean.

COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE

The requirements for the bachelor of arts and bachelor of science are the following:     

  1. Successful completion of an approved degree program within the college.
  2. At least a 2.0 Loyola cumulative average, major average, and minor average if minor is pursued.
  3. Completion of the Common Curriculum requirements, including the pre-modern requirements.
  4. Completion of the foreign language requirement.
  5. Completion of at least one course that meets the college’s Cultural/Environmental/Gender/Ethnic studies requirement.
  6. Completion of all course requirements specified by major department.
  7. Completion of at least 30 hours in the major. (Some departments require more.)
  8. Certification for graduation by the student’s department.
  9. Completion of a comprehensive examination in the major for those departments requiring a comprehensive examination. Such departments will establish and publish in advance the nature of the comprehensive examination and the standard for acceptable performance.
  10. Residency requirements: a minimum of 30 hours at Loyola University; a minimum of 15 hours in the major and 9 hours in the minor (if pursued); a minimum of 12 hours in the Common Curriculum, and 3 hours from any other area of a major's DPCL.

GENERAL STUDIES

Director: Judith L. Hunt, Ph.D., Associate Dean

Many students enter college undecided about the field of study they would like to pursue. For students unsure of their educational and/or career goals, Loyola University offers the General Studies Program. While in this program, students work toward the completion of the Common Curriculum requirements while exploring major courses offered in a variety of disciplines at Loyola.

During their first semester, General Studies freshmen are assigned a General Studies advisor who will continue as their advisor until a major is declared. General Studies advisors are knowledgeable about all the degree programs in the college, and help guide students in determining a major that best suits their interests. Courses taken in this exploration process generally fulfill requirements for the major, adjunct, or general electives once the student selects a particular degree program.

Students may remain in the General Studies Program for a maximum of 55 hours. Since the college does not grant a degree in General Studies, students must officially declare a major by the end of their sophomore year.

CURRICULUM DESIGN

The curriculum is meant to achieve two goals: to give the student a solid and well-rounded preparation in the major and to enable the student to grapple with current convictions, beliefs, and commitments in an atmosphere of study and reflection. The curriculum matches the goals of Catholic and of Jesuit liberalizing education, both of which function best in an open society, a pluralistic culture, and an ecumenical age. The curriculum is divided into five parts:

Part One–Major

Major: that series of courses which leads to a bachelor’s degree in a subject area. The major generally requires between 30 and 40 credit hours of study and is described under each departmental heading.

Part Two–Adjunct Courses

Adjunct Courses: that series of courses in areas allied to the major which leads to a well-rounded person. Thus, mathematics is necessary to a physicist and chemistry to the biologist. Some of these courses are specifically named under degree programs; others are selected in consultation with the student’s adviser or chairperson.

Part Three–Common Curriculum

Common Curriculum: The Common Curriculum complements the major and adjunct courses by providing a broad humanistic dimension to every undergraduate’s program. The program is comprised of introductory and advanced courses. Find out more »

Curriculum Design for Professional Studies Students

The curriculum is divided into four basic components, and although all students have the same basic core requirements, each degree program has specific requirements in the major and adjunct areas.

Major courses–are those courses in particular disciplines, which lead to a bachelor’s degree.

Adjunct courses–are those required courses in areas supportive of the major.

Core Curriculum (Professional Studies' Students)

Core courses–are those courses, which, in the liberal arts tradition, ensure the degree-seeking student a well-rounded education. All degree-seeking students have the following core course requirements (42 hours total):

Foundations:    
Writing ENGL T122 3
Philosophy PHIL T122 3
Religious Studies RELS T122 3
Literature LIT C260 or ENGL T125 3
Liberal Arts and Sciences:    
Social Sciences HIST T122 or T124 3
Two social science electives from two different disciplines 6
Mathematics MATH A115 or higher 3
Natural Science Science Elective 3
Arts/Humanities Fine Arts Elective 3
Literature Elective   3
Philosophy Elective   3
Religious Studies elective   3
Liberal Arts elective   3

Electives are those courses chosen from among all offerings, which the student may schedule for enrichment or professional development. 

HUMANITIES AND NATURAL SCIENCES LIMITATIONS ON CREDIT TOWARD DEGREES:

Transfer work:

  1. Remedial work taken at Loyola or at other institutions will not apply to Humanities and Natural Sciences degree programs.

  2. The dean’s office will determine the applicability of the student’s transfer credit as accepted by the Office of Admissions to the Humanities and Natural Sciences degree programs.

Other:

  1. Students may not go back and do freshman-level work in a subject in which they have already successfully completed a more advanced course.
  2. No more than 20 hours may be taken in any one semester without the authorization of the dean. No more than six hours may be taken in any one summer term without authorization of the dean.

  3. No more than 20 hours may be taken in any one semester without the authorization of the dean. No more than six hours may be taken in any one summer term without authorization of the dean.

  4. Humanities and Natural Sciences students must obtain prior written permission of their adviser and/or department chair and the dean in order to take courses at another university (summer school, study abroad, etc.). Permission will not be given to students on academic probation.

  5. Intensive Weekend courses are not open to Humanities and Natural Sciences degree-seeking students.

  6. Courses in physical education will not apply to the degree programs in Humanities and Natural Sciences.

DOUBLE MAJORS

Qualified students who have completed two full semesters of their freshman year and have earned a minimum GPA of 3.0 may pursue two majors within the College of Humanities and Natural Sciences. Such students must successfully complete the Common Curriculum requirements of the first major as well as the major and named adjunct requirements for both declared degree programs of study as set forth in the Undergraduate Bulletin.Students must successfully complete the comprehensive examination requirements for both majors if the departments require a comprehensive examination.Students who complete the requirements for two majors will receive only one degree from Loyola. However, the transcript will indicate which bachelor’s degree (B.A. or B.S.) was awarded as well as the two majors which were completed.Students interested in pursuing a double major should consult with the Associate Dean.

Early Law Admissions

Students who enter law school generally do so after having completed a bachelor’s degree. However, the Loyola School of Law may accept students after they have completed three years of exceptionally good undergraduate work and have earned an appropriate score on LSAT. Students in the College of Humanities and Natural Sciences who wish to attempt early admission into the Loyola School of Law after three years must have completed all but the last 30 hours on the undergraduate level, including all Common Curriculum, major, named adjunct, and foreign language requirements. The first 30 hours earned in law school will be applied as general elective credits for completion of the humanities and natural Sciences undergraduate degree.

A humanities and natural sciences student who completes the hour requirement in three years as outlined above is not guaranteed acceptance into the Loyola School of Law, for the School of Law has final authority on all admissions decisions. Interested students should consult the Loyola School of Law Office of Admissions for information concerning admissions standards.

SAMPLE EARLY ADMISSIONS DEGREE PROGRAM

This is a sample program. Hours in major, named adjunct, and general electives may vary slightly depending on the major selected. The Common Curriculum and foreign language requirements are the same for all departments.

Freshman  
F
S
Major  
3
3
Foreign Language  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
9
9
   
15
15
     
30
Sophomore  
F
S
Major  
3
3
Adjunct/Electives  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
9
9
   
15
15
     
30
Junior  
F
S
Major  
6
6
Adjunct/Electives  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
6
6
   
15
15
     
30
Senior  
F
S
Electives (taken in School of Law)  
15
15
     
30
TOTAL: Humanities and Natural Sciences
90 cr. hrs.
  School of Law
30 cr. hrs.
   
120 cr. hrs

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

English

CHAIR: Katherine H. Adams, Ph.D., Office: 316 Bobet Hall
PROFESSORS: Katherine H. Adams, John J. Biguenet, Barbara Ewell, Andrew F. Macdonald, Mary A. McCay, Peggy McCormack, John F. Mosier
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Christopher Chambers, Melanie McKay, John Sebastian, Mark Yakich
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Hillary Eklund, Trimiko Melancon, Chris Schaberg, Janelle Schwartz
PROFESSORS EMERITI: William T. Cotton, Phanuel A. Egejuru, Marcus A.J. Smith
LECTURERS: C.W. Cannon, Dale Hrebik, Mary Waguespack, Robert Bell, Brooke Ethridge, Jennifer Jeanfreau, Jarret Lofstead, Laura T. Murphy, Kevin Rabalais, Nancy Rowe, Jennifer Shimek, Tracey Watts
WEB PAGE: chn.loyno.edu/english/

Requirements for Major in English (Literature, Writing, and Film & Digital Media)

For a bachelor of arts degree in English with a concentration in literature, students must compete 36 hours in British and American literature, literary criticism and interpretation, and literature or writing electives, after first taking ENGL T122, A205, or A210. ENGL A205 is the required freshman composition course for English majors; ENGL A210 is a more advanced version of A205; students entering the major after taking ENGL T122 need not take A205 or A210. ENGL A205 or A210 and ENGL A206 should be completed in the freshman year. Majors take 18 hours of distribution requirements in Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration/18th-century, 19th-century, and American literature before 1900, as well as critical theory, not necessarily sequentially. One literature course listed in the Common Curriculum may be taken for major credit with the permission of the adviser and instructor.

For a bachelor of arts degree in English with a concentration in writing, students should take ENGL A205 or ENGL A210 plus ENGL A206 in their freshman year. In addition, students take five literature courses, including one course in British literature before 1800 and one course in American literature. Students must also complete six writing courses. As a part of the writing major, many students complete an internship at a magazine, business, or school. Many also work with The New Orleans Review, a nationally prominent literary periodical sponsored by the department.

For a bachelor of arts degree in English with a concentration in film and digital media, students should take ENGL A205 or ENGL A210 plus ENGL A206 in their freshmen year.  In addition students take five literature courses, including one course in British literature and one course in American literature.  Students also complete six film and digital media courses, including ENGL A220.

For English majors in either the writing, literature, or film and digital media concentration who are participants in the University Honors Program, ENGL H233 and ENGL H234 are accepted in lieu of A205/A210 and A206. However, English Honors students are encouraged to take one or the other of the two latter courses with their English-major classmates.

English majors and minors can take advantage of many extracurricular activities within the department. They can join Sigma Tau Delta, the international English honor society, as well as ALEPH, an English department club. They work on ReVisions, our student literary magazine, and The Reader’s Response, our annual anthology of students’ academic writing. The department also sponsors regular poetry readings involving students and faculty and presents guest lecturers.

English majors can expand their academic program by participating in our summer Irish studies program in Dublin, our summer Paris studies program, or our exchange programs with Keele University in England and the University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands.

English majors may take a minor in another discipline, to be determined in consultation with the adviser. Students must consult their assigned advisers in curriculum matters before registering for each semester.

Bachelor of Arts - English Literature, Writing, or Film and Digital Media

Freshman  
F
S
Major ENGL A205 or ENGL A210 — ENGL A206
3
3
Foreign Language  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
9
9
   

15

15

     

30

English majors in the University Honors Program must take one English honors course, ENGL H233, H234, or H235. English Honors students should also take ENGL A210 and A206.

Sophomore  
F
S
Major Combination of distribution requirements and electives (ENGL A 220 for the film and digital media concentration)
6
3
Electives  
6
6
Common Curriculum  
3
6
   
15
15
     
30
Junior  
F
S
Major Combination of distribution requirements and electives
6
6
Electives  
6
3
Common Curriculum  
3
6
   
15
15
     

30

Senior  
F
S
Major Combination of distribution requirements and electives
6
6
Electives  
3
6
Common Curriculum  
6
3
   

15

15

     

30

There is an optional honors thesis for majors with a 3.5 GPA in the major and 3.0 cumulative. The thesis must be registered for in the fall of the senior year, but students must get approval from the Thesis Director and the English Honors reader. Students must start research in the summer following their junior year, and must complete the assignments listed on the English department web page. The thesis is worked on during the summer and the first semester and is completed in the second semester of the senior year (3+3 hours). English majors who are in the University Honors Program are required to write either the English Honors thesis or the University Honors thesis (1 + 2 hours).

TOTAL: 120 cr. hrs.    

View English Course Descriptions

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

History

CHAIR: David W. Moore, Ph.D., Office: 428 Bobet Hall
PROFESSORS: Maurice P. Brungardt, Bernard A. Cook, Mark F. Fernandez
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Sara M. Butler, Robert S. Gerlich, S.J., David W. Moore
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Katherine G.V. Fidler, Behrooz Moazami, John P. Nielsen, Rian R. Thum
EXTRAORDINARY FACULTY: Adrian J. DeGifis, Justin A. Nystrom, Christi K. Sumich
PART-TIME FACULTY: Judith L. Hunt, Cyril M. Lagvanec, Leo A. Nicoll, S.J., Lori F. Ranner, Gene S. Yeager
WEB PAGE: chn.loyno.edu/history/

History at Loyola is an integral part of the university’s liberal arts program. By offering students the indispensable context for evaluating contemporary problems, the challenges of human existence are brought into sharper focus. Students are thus able to examine proposed solutions from within the framework of human experience.

Guiding the students intellectual formation is a dedicated history faculty. As professional educators and researchers they are engaged in the quest for knowledge through continual research and active scholarship. In addition to classroom teaching, faculty members serve as academic advisers, counseling history majors in their course selections and career planning. Students are strongly encouraged to keep in close contact with their advisers.

Courses are designed to develop habits of inquiry and judgment. Students come to appreciate the ebb and flow of human history in all its complexity. Cultural, religious, and social values that echo economic and political developments are all subject to careful and reflective investigation.

Departmental course offerings reflect the broad expertise of the history faculty and treat such diverse areas as American, European, Asian, Middle Eastern, and African history, with thematic courses in intellectual, social, legal, political, and military, as well as African-American, church, and women’s histories. In addition, the department offers a variety of internships for qualified students interested in museum or archival work.

Students play an active role in the life of the department. Input from our history majors is welcomed by the faculty, as it provides an interchange of ideas that is most helpful in planning and developing courses. The Loyola University Student Historical Association (LUSHA) plans department activities from speakers and career seminars to picnics and (historical) movie nights.

An undergraduate degree in history is a valuable preparation for careers in a number of fields: law, Foreign Service, politics, journalism, publishing, public relations, teaching, religious ministry, and naturally, historical research and writing. Moreover, historical studies serves as an indispensable adjunct to the humanities and the social sciences. History also plays an important role in the growing number of Interdisciplinary Programs and minors at Loyola. It is a prominent part of American Studies, Africana Studies, Asian Studies, Catholic Studies, Latin American Studies, Legal Studies, Medieval Studies, Middle East Peace Studies, Women’s Studies, and the Center for the Study of New Orleans.

Traditionally, large numbers of history graduates have sought careers in business and in education. The faculty adviser can recommend specific business courses that will allow the student to obtain a minor in business and thus form the basis of work necessary to enter an M.B.A. program. The adviser likewise can recommend courses that will help prepare the student who intends to enter an education program after graduation.

In order to graduate with a degree in history, a student must earn 37 credit hours in the major, including the two World Civilizations courses required of all students. The student must maintain an overall 2.0 GPA as well as a 2.0 departmental GPA.

History majors are required to take HIST A202 (Historical Methods Lab), usually in conjunction with HIST A200 or A201 and ordinarily in the first year. It is a 1 credit requirement for the degree.

Area Requirements Within the Major: In addition to HIST T122/124, HIST A200/201/202, and HIST A400, history majors must take at least three credit hours in U.S. history, three credit hours in pre-modern history (not to include HIST T122), three credit hours in European history, and six credit hours in non-U.S./European history. The student can choose the areas of the remaining nine required history credit hours.

Departmental Comprehensive: Students participate in an evaluation of the progress they have made in the study of history at Loyola. An important element in that evaluation is the Departmental Comprehensive that all students nearing graduation are required to take.

Honors

History majors wishing to earn a "departmental honors in history" designation that will appear on their Official Transcripts should have a 3.3 Loyola GPA and a 3.5 GPA in history in order to qualify. Coursework for the "departmental honors in history" consists of the writing of a thesis or the creation of a project, under the supervision of a faculty mentor, during the two semesters prior to graduation. For further information, contact the history chair.

Student achievement is also recognized by Phi Alpha Theta, a national history honor society. Membership in the campus chapter, Pi Chi, is open to students who have a 3.1 GPA in 12 or more hours of history, and a 3.0 GPA in their non-history courses. Among the many activities of this honor society is the annual publication of the Student Historical Journal, available in hard copy and online at www.loyno.edu/~shj/

Internships

The history department has established internships with a number of local museums and manuscript collections, including the Louisiana State Museum, The Historic New Orleans Collection, The WWII (D-Day) Museum, and the Amistad Collection. Students interested in careers in public history are encouraged to schedule such an internship. A student ordinarily must have achieved junior status before applying for an internship. Only three internship credits can be used in the Major.

Adjunct Courses

The student’s academic adviser will suggest courses in the social sciences and humanities that will complement the student’s interests and areas of concentration. Students intending to enter graduate school are strongly advised to complete the 200 level of a foreign language.

Bachelor of Arts - History
Freshman  
F
S
Major HIST T122 — T124
3
3
Foreign Language  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
6
6
Major HIST A200 — A201
3
3
Major HIST A202
1
0
   
16
15
     
31
Sophomore  
F
S
Major  
3
3
Adjunct/Electives  
6
6
Common Curriculum  
3
3
   
15
15
     
30
Junior  
F
S
Major HIST Non-U.S., Non-European Electives
3
3
Major HIST U.S. Elective, European Elective
3
3
Adjunct/Electives  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
6
6
   
15
15
     
30
Senior  
F
S
Major HIST A400 — HIST Elective
3
3
Major HIST Electives
3
3
Common Curriculum  
3
3
Adjunct/Electives  
6
5
   
15
14
     
29
TOTAL: 120 cr. hrs.    

*At least one history course, not including T122, must be pre-modern.

View History Course Descriptions

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

 

Languages and Cultures

CHAIR: Fr. William J. Farge, Ph.D., Office: 305 Bobet Hall
PROFESSORS: Josefa Salmón
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Blanca Anderson, Robert Dewell, Eileen Doll, William Farge, S.J., Cassandra Mabe, Connie Rodriguez, Peter Rogers, S.J.
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Nathan Henne, Uriel Quesada, Karen Rosenbecker
EXTRAORDINARY ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Isabel Durocher, Alice Kornovich
EXTRAORDINARY VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Michael Bouzigard, S.J., Lisbeth Philip, Charles G. Wrightington, S.J.
LECTURERS: Khedidja Boudaba, Masako Dorrill, Cynthia Garza, Ching Chi Lee, Laura Papadopoulos, Lori Ranner

WEB PAGE: http://chn.loyno.edu/languages-cultures

The Department of Languages and Cultures offers a Bachelor’s Degree in Classical Studies, and a Bachelor’s Degree in Languages and Cultures with a concentration in French, Spanish or Latin American Studies. These programs are designed to train students not only in the target language but also in the culture of those countries where the language is or was spoken. The department also participates in the interdisciplinary minor program in Latin American Studies and Asian Studies.

The department also offers language courses in Arabic, Chinese, German, Greek, Japanese, Italian, and Latin, which can be taken to satisfy the university language requirement. Other languages may be available through cross-enrollment at Tulane, Dillard, and Xavier University.

A minor in French or Spanish requires at least 21 credit hours, of which at least 12 credit hours must be at the 300-400 level in the major language. Students who begin with the first-semester course (A100) will thus need to take a total of 24 hours in the language, while all other students will need to take a total of 21 hours. Students who have already completed 12 hours at the 300-400 level may also take their remaining courses in the history and culture of the countries where the language is spoken, or in linguistics.

The minor in Classical Studies requires a total of 24 hours. At least 12 of those hours must be in Latin or Greek, with the remaining courses selected by the student and the advisor.

The Interdisciplinary minor in Latin American Studies requires at least 21 credit hours depending on the original level of placement in Spanish. The Interdisciplinary minor in Asian Studies requires at least 21 credit hours in approved courses. See interdisciplinary.loyno.edu/asianstudies

Bachelor of Arts in Languages and Cultures

Concentration in Spanish or French

The concentrations in French and Spanish require an absolute minimum of 31 hours in the major language, of which at least 25 hours must be taken at the 300-400 level. Students who begin with the first semester course (A100) will thus need to take 37 total hours of course work in the major. These figures include a 1-hour capstone course taken in the senior year. Students are encouraged to complement their language studies with other courses in history and culture of the countries where the language is spoken, as well as with the study of another foreign language, courses in world history, linguistics, international economics and political relations.

Freshman   F S
Major A100 — A101 of Language 3 3
Elective   3 3
Common Curriculum   9 9
    15 15
      30
Sophomore   F S
Major A200 — A201 of Language 3 3
Common Curriculum   6 6
Elective   9 6
    18 15
      33
Junior   F S
Major A300 — 400 Level 6 6
Common Curriculum   6 6
Electives   6 6
    18 18
      36
Senior   F S
Major A300 — 400 Level 6 7
Electives   6 6
Common Curriculum   3 3
    15 16
      31
TOTAL: 130 cr. hrs.    

Concentration in Latin American Studies

The concentration in Latin American Studies requires 37 hours, with 6 hours of Spanish at the intermediate level. Students who begin with the first-semester Spanish course (A100) will need to take 12 hours of language prior to the intermediate level. To complete the program, students will take a variety of courses from several disciplines, including History, Sociology, and Religious Studies.

The Latin American Studies concentration offers you the opportunity to tailor your studies to your specific interests and future professional goals. You can choose many of your classes to focus on one region (say Cono Sur) or to revolve around several disciplines. Because of this flexibility, the sample plan outlined below only provides an idea of how to structure your 4-year degree plan.

In addition, the requirements for the degree depend heavily on your level of Spanish upon entering the program. While we welcome into the program those who are native speakers and those who have no Spanish, this difference will determine the exact number of hours available for Latin American Studies courses.

 

Freshman   F S
Major A100 — A101 of Language 3 3
Elective   3 3
Common Curriculum   9 9
    15 15
      30
Sophomore   F S
Major A200 — A201 of Language 3 3
Common Curriculum   6 6
Elective   9 6
    18 15
      33
Junior   F S
Major A300 — 400 Level 6 6
Common Curriculum   6 6
Electives   6 6
    18 18
      36
Senior   F S
Major A300 — 400 Level 6 7
Electives   6 6
Common Curriculum   3 3
    15 16
      31
TOTAL: 130 cr. hrs.  

View Latin American Studies Course Descriptions

Bachelor of Arts in Classical Studies

The major degree in Classical Studies requires 36 credit hours, again including a 1-hour capstone course in the senior year. At least 18 of these hours must be in either Latin or Greek, and the remaining 25 hours may be additional courses in Latin or Greek, courses in the classical humanities, and/or designated courses from related fields such as history, philosophy and religious studies.

Freshman   F S
Major A100--A101 of Language 3 3
Adjunct/Electives   3 3
Common Curriculum   9 9
    15 15
      30
Sophomore   F S
Major A200--A400 Level 3 3
Adjunct/Electives   6 6
Common Curriculum   6 6
    15 15
      30
Junior   F S
Major   6 6
Adjunct/Electives   3 3
Common Curriculum   6 6
    15 15
      30
Senior   F S
Major   6 7
Adjunct/Electives   6 6
Common Curriculum   3 3
    15 16
      31
TOTAL: 121 cr. hrs.      

View Classical Studies Course Descriptions

View Course Descriptions Arabic, Chinese, Classical Studies, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Latin American Studies, Linguistics, Spanish Courses.

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)  

Philosophy

CHAIR: Mark Gossiaux (on sabbatical 2010-2011), Acting Chair: Constance L. Mui, Office: 411 Bobet Hall
PROFESSORS: Patrick L. Bourgeois, John Clark, Gary B. Herbert, Constance L. Mui
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: J.C. Berendzen, Francis P. Coolidge, Jr., Mark Gossiaux, Stephen Rowntree, S.J.
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Jon Altschul, Robert Brice, Ginger Hoffman
FACULTY  EMERITI: David A. Boileau, Henry J. Folse, James R. Watson
WEB PAGE: chn.loyno.edu/philosophy/

The study of philosophy plays a central role in Jesuit liberal education. It provides students with the opportunity to develop their critical thinking and writing skills as they reflect on the meaning of human existence, the nature of human knowledge, moral values, and the existence of God. Courses in philosophy acquaint students with the great thinkers and fundamental concepts that have shaped Western civilization, and prepare them to become responsible leaders in pursuit of the common good.

In addition to its regular Philosophy major (PHIL), the Department also offers a special Philosophy Pre-Law major (PHPL) for those students seeking admission to law school. The Philosophy Pre-Law major provides students with a rigorous training in the skills and habits of reasoning required in the study and practice of law, familiarizes students with the conceptual foundations of law, government, and ethics, and exposes students to the classical philosophical history presupposed by our Western legal tradition.

The Philosophy Department also provides courses for various interdisciplinary programs on campus, such as Catholic Studies, Environmental Studies, Medieval Studies, Middle East Peace Studies, and Women’s Studies.

The following courses are required for a major in Philosophy (PHIL): nine hours in the Systematic Sequence (selected from the areas of Logic & Language, Mind & Knowledge, Reality & God, and Ethics & Values); nine hours in the Historical Sequence (three hours of Ancient Philosophy, three hours of Medieval Philosophy, three hours of Modern Philosophy), and an advanced majors seminar, usually taken in the Junior or Senior year. Students pursuing the Philosophy Pre-Law major (PHPL) are required to complete: twelve hours in the Systematic Sequence (three hours of Philosophy of Law, three hours of courses from Moral & Political Theory, three hours of courses from Philosophy & Social Topics, three hours of courses from Theoretical Philosophy); nine hours in the Historical Sequence (three hours of Ancient Philosophy, three hours of Medieval Philosophy, three hours of Modern Philosophy), and an advanced majors seminar, usually taken in the Junior or Senior year. The normal requirements in credit hours for both majors are 30 hours. Philosophy major electives are offered on a continuous and rotational basis.

Bachelor of Arts - Philosophy

Freshman  
F
S
Major PHIL Systematic Sequence1
0
3
Foreign Language3  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
12
9
   
15
15
     
30
Sophomore  
F
S
Major PHIL Systematic Sequence1
3
0
Major PHIL Historical Sequence2
0
3
Adjunct/Electives  
6
6
Common Curriculum  
6
6
   
15
15
     
30
Junior  
F
S
Major PHIL Historical Sequence2
3
3
Major PHIL Electives/PHIL Systematic Sequence1
3
3
Common Curriculum  
6
6
Adjunct/Electives  
3
3
   
15
15
     
30
Senior  
F
S
Major PHIL Electives
6
3
Common Curriculum  
3
0
Adjunct/Electives  
6
12
   
15
15
     
30
TOTAL: 120 cr. hrs.    

Bachelor of Arts - Philosophy Pre-Law

I. Systematic Philosophy

Phil A225: Philosophy of Law

Moral and Political Theory (Choose 1):

  • Phil A215 Ethics
  • Phil A320 Social and Political Theory
  • Phil A330 Modern Political Theory
  • Phil V235 Philosophy of Right

Philosophy and Social Topics (Choose 1):

  • Phil V234 Medical Ethics
  • Phil 241 Phil Perspective on Woman
  • Phil V243 Environmental Philosophy
  • Phil V260 Social Justice

Theoretical Philosophy (Choose 1):

  • Phil A201 Practical Logic
  • Phil A210 Metaphysics
  • Phil A220 Epistemology
  • Phil A300 Philosophy of Science
  • Phil A307 Philosophy of Mind
  • Phil A340 Being and God

II. History of Philosophy

(Choose 1 from each of the 3 historical periods):

Ancient:

Phil A400  History of Ancient Philosophy
Phil A490  Major Seminar: Ancient

Medieval:

Phil A405 History of Medieval Philosophy
Phil A408 Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas
Phil A491 Major Seminar: Medieval

Modern:

Phil A410 History of Modern Philosophy
Phil A492 Major Seminar: Modern

III. Electives

Students must take 3 electives. Some of the courses offered recently are:

  • Phil A210: Metaphysics
  • Phil A220: Epistemology
  • Phil A430: American Philosophy
  • Phil A465: Introduction to Analytical Philosophy

IV. Major Seminar course

All majors must complete at least one Major Seminar course (A490, A491, A492 or A493) prior to graduation.

View Philosophy Course Descriptions

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

1 Systematic Sequence: choose nine hours from A206, A210, A215, A220, A221, A245, A300, A307, A340.
2 Historical Sequence: choose nine hours from A400, A405, A408, A410, A490, A491, A492.
3 Students who wish to be recommended for graduate studies in philosophy must either manifest a reading knowledge in a foreign language or successfully complete 12 credit hours in one of the following: Greek, Latin, German, French, or Russian.

Religious Studies

CHAIR: Timothy Cahill, Ph.D., Office: 409 Bobet Hall
Professors: Robert Gnuse, Denis Janz, Kenneth Keulman, Catherine Wessinger
Associate Professors: Peter Bernardi, S.J., Boyd Blundell, Timothy Cahill
Assistant Professors: Terri Bednarz, R.S.M., Aaron Spevack
Extraordinary Faculty: Michael Bouzigard, S.J., Ann Daniells, Jill Hickson, David Liberto, Robert Loewy, Michael A. Novak, Hollis Phelps, Mari Rethelyi, Elizabeth Willems, S.S.N.D.
WEB PAGE: http://chn.loyno.edu/religious-studies

The academic study of religion is pursued in a spirit of free intellectual inquiry. The immediate concern of the religious studies program is to achieve an understanding of the person as a religious believer and of the impact of religion upon human existence. This means that religion is reflected upon as a force that has shaped and been shaped by social, political, scientific, and ethical concerns. Since Loyola is a Catholic university, these studies are undertaken from within the perspective of the Catholic tradition. The Department of Religious Studies is ecumenical both in the composition of its faculty and in its outlook.

Students electing a religious studies major are assigned a faculty adviser in the department. They can choose a track in Christianity or a track in World Religions. For the track in Christianity, students must complete 30 credit hours of religious studies with the following required courses: Introduction to World Religions (prerequisite), Old Testament as Literature, New Testament as Literature, Christian Ethics, Early Christian Thought, Medieval Christian Thought, Modern Christian Thought, one major elective (not in Common Curriculum), and three additional elective courses. For the track in World Religions, students must complete 30 credit hours of religious studies with the following required courses: Introduction to World Religions (prerequisite), Old Testament as Literature, New Testament as Literature, one of Early, Medieval, or Modern Christian Thought, one major elective (not in Common Curriculum), and six additional elective courses. Minors are also available in both tracks. Adjuncts in appropriate disciplines and foreign language study are encouraged.

The Department of Religious Studies supports and oversees the interdisciplinary minor in Catholic Studies.  The department's longstanding commitment to interdisciplinary learning is evidenced not only in its curriculum, but in the support of interdisciplinary majors and minors across the university.  We offer courses in support of the following interdisciplinary minors: Asian Studies, Catholic Studies, Latin American Studies, Legal Studies, Medieval Studies, Middlel East Peace Studies, Womens Studies.

Bachelor of Arts - Religious Studies
Christianity Track

Freshman  
F
S
Major RELS T122
3
0
Major RELS U249 — U247
3
3
Common Curriculum  
6
9
Foreign Language  
3
3
   
15
15
     
30
Sophomore  
F
S
Major RELS A200 — A201
3
3
Major RELS Elective
3
3
Adjunct/Electives  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
9
6
   
18
15
     
33
Junior  
F
S
Major RELS A202 & V242
3
3
Adjunct/Electives  
6
9
Common Curriculum  
6
3
   
15
15
     
30
Senior  
F
S
Major RELS Electives
3
3
Common Curriculum  
3
0
Adjunct/Electives  
9
12
   
15
15
     
30
TOTAL: 120 cr. hrs.    

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

Specific Common Curriculum requirements are given in the beginning of this chapter under Curriculum Design. Refer to Common Curriculum in the index for page number.

Bachelor of Arts - Religious Studies World Religions Track

Freshman  
F
S
Major RELS T122
3
0
Major RELS U249 — U247
3
3
Common Curriculum  
6
9
Foreign Language  
3
3
   
15
15
     
30
Sophomore  
F
S
Major RELS A200 or A201 or A202
3
0
Major RELS Elective
3
3
Adjunct/Electives  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
9
9
   
18
15
     
33
Junior  
F
S
Major RELS Electives
6
3
Adjunct/Electives  
3
9
Common Curriculum  
6
3
   
15
15
     
30
Senior  
F
S
Major RELS Electives
3
3
Common Curriculum  
3
0
Adjunct/Electives  
9
12
   
15
15
     
30
TOTAL: 120 cr. hrs.    

View Religious Studies Course Descriptions

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

Humanities

Bachelor of Liberal Studies

Major (33 credit hours)
Cr. Hours
Humanities Electives
33
A student may select courses from English, foreign language, history*, music, philosophy, religious studies, and visual arts. A minimum of 18 credit hours and a maximum of 27 credit hours are required in one discipline. At least 18 credit hours in major courses must be upper division-level courses.  
Adjunct (12 credit hours)  
Social Sciences Electives
9
A student may select courses from anthropology, criminal justice, history*, organizational behavior, political science, psychology, and sociology.  
Mathematics/Natural Sciences Elective
3
A student may select from computer information systems, computer science, mathematics, and natural sciences.  
Core Courses (42 credit hours)
42
Free Electives (33 credit hours)
33
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS
120

(View Core Curriculum Requirements.)

Biological Sciences

CHAIR: Craig S. Hood, Ph.D., Office: 347 Monroe Hall
PROFESSORS: Paul W. Barnes, E. Letitia Beard, Patricia L. Dorn, Donald P. Hauber, Craig S. Hood, Frank Jordan, James L. Wee, David A. White
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Rosalie A. Anderson
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Kimberlee Mix
REV. J.H. MULLAHY CHAIR IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY: Paul W. Barnes
INSTRUCTORS: Kathy Anzelmo, Elizabeth Simon
VISITING PROFESSOR: Julie Guathier
WEB PAGE: chn.loyno.edu/biology/

The undergraduate program in biology provides an outstanding modern science education with required courses in biology (34 hours), chemistry (16 hours), physics (8 hours), calculus (4 hours), and an additional mathematics or statistics course. In addition to these science experiences, the program stresses a liberal arts education in which non-science courses make up approximately half of the curriculum. Thus, biology graduates are prepared to compete in the best graduate and professional programs in the country and abroad. This course of study provides excellent support for students pursuing all health professional careers, including medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, physical therapy, pharmacy, optometry, podiatry, nursing, and related areas. The breadth of educational experiences offered by the program provides the foundation for diverse career opportunities in the life sciences–from health and human services to the environment, to basic and applied research in molecular genetics, cell and molecular biology, developmental biology, botany, ecology and evolutionary biology, marine biology, microbiology, physiology, and zoology.

BIOLOGY CURRICULUM

To earn a B.S. degree in biological sciences, students must complete a curriculum of required biology courses (34 hours) which includes a biology freshmen seminar, three core lecture courses and two lab courses, biology electives (minimum of 22 hours), and adjunct and Common Curriculum courses, and they must complete a departmental comprehensive and exit interview. These requirements are described below.

Biology Core Curriculum: All majors are expected to complete the biology core courses during their first three semesters. These courses present the fundamental concepts of the biological sciences through lectures, discussions, field experiences, and investigative laboratories. Upon completing the biology core courses, students are prepared to enroll in biology elective courses.

Biology Core Courses
  BIOL A100 Biology Freshman Seminar (fall freshman year)
  BIOL A106 Cells and Heredity (fall freshman year)
  BIOL A107 Cells and Heredity Lab (fall freshman year)
  BIOL A108 Biology of Organisms (spring freshman year)
  BIOL A109 Biology of Organisms Lab (spring freshman year)
  BIOL A208 Ecology and Evolution (fall sophomore year)

Elective Courses: The remainder of the courses required for the major are biology electives (a minimum of 22 hours) which the students select according to their interests. Students are encouraged to conduct original research under the supervision of a faculty member (see the following page) for which they may receive elective course credit (maximum of six hours).

Laboratory Requirement: The department views field and laboratory experiences as being critical for a modern science education. Therefore, at least five of the core and elective biology courses that students complete must include laboratory experiences. For example, students completing the core courses Cells and Heredity Lab (BIOL A107) and Biology of Organisms Lab (BIOL A109) will have taken two laboratory courses toward this requirement. They then will need to ensure that at least three of the elective courses they select include laboratories.

Undergraduate Research: Research experiences are invaluable to the education of a biologist. Students may elect to conduct original research under faculty guidance in an independent study format in three courses. Research Proposal (BIOL A400), Independent Research (BIOL A401), and Research Thesis (BIOL A402). Students present their findings in a departmental seminar and write their results in a thesis format at the completion of their project.

Departmental Comprehensive: All candidates for graduation must successfully complete comprehensive exit examinations during their senior year.

Departmental Honors Program: Students who complete original research projects (see Undergraduate Research, above) and maintain 3.0 in both their Loyola cumulative and in their biology major coursework are awarded departmental honors in biology.

FACILITIES AND AFFILIATIONS

Teaching and Research Facilities: The department has outstanding modern teaching and research facilities to support its programs. State-of-the-art cellular and molecular instrumentation allows students to carry out experiments including protein analyses, DNA and RNA sequence analyses, gene cloning and expression, and cell and organ differentiation. Equipment and facilities to conduct field investigations in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems of southeastern Louisiana include field vehicles, boats, and collecting equipment for environmental sampling instrumentation.

Affiliations: In addition to Loyola’s membership in the New Orleans Consortium, the faculty of the Department of Biological Sciences have long-established informal affiliations with research programs in regional institutions. Faculty and students in the department regularly interact with research scientists from LSU Medical Center, LSU Dental School, Tulane University Medical School and School of Public Health, Tulane University, Southern Regional Research Center (USDA), Southern Regional Office of U.S. Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, LSU-Baton Rouge, Southeastern Louisiana University, University of New Orleans, and Xavier University. These affiliations have provided our students with outstanding opportunities to work in diverse areas of the life sciences–including basic and applied research in heart disease, cancer, AIDS, aquaculture, immunology, neurobiology, microbiology, cellular physiology, parasitology, conservation of biodiversity, and management of natural resources.

LUMCON Programs in Marine Science: Loyola University is an affiliate member of the Louisiana Universities Marine Science Consortium (LUMCON), which includes 13 state institutions and three private universities. LUMCON maintains a state-of-the-art marine science center on the Gulf Coast in Cocodrie, Louisiana. LUMCON offers undergraduate summer courses in marine sciences which students may take as electives.

Bachelor of Science – (supports preparation for any field of the health professions and graduate studies)

Freshman   F S
Major BIOL A100 / 106 / 107 5 4
Adjunct CHEM A105/A107 — A106/A108 4 4
Adjunct MATH A257 — A258 or MATH A260 4 3 or 4
Foreign Language   3 3
    16 14 - 15
      30 - 31
Sophomore   F S
Major BIOL A208 - BIOL Elective 3 4 - 7
Adjunct CHEM A300/A301 — A305 3 5
Common Curriculum   9 3 or 6
    15 15
      30
Junior   F S
Major BIOL Electives 3 or 4 4 - 6
Elective   3 0
Adjunct PHYS A115 — A116 4 4
Common Curriculum   6 6
    16 - 17 14 - 16
      30 - 33
Senior   F S
Major BIOL Electives 4 - 6 4- 6
Elective   3 4
Common Curriculum   6 4
    14 - 16 12 - 18
      26 - 30
  TOTAL: 120 cr. hrs.

View Biology Course Descriptions

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

Chemistry

CHAIR: Thomas G. Spence, Ph.D., Office: 425 Monroe Hall
PROFESSORS: Kurt R. Birdwhistell, Lynn V. Koplitz
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Thomas G. Spence, William F. Walkenhorst
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Joelle S. Underwood, Hoyt Meyer
EXTRAORDINARY FACULTY: Kathleen T. Crago
DIRECTOR OF FORENSIC CHEMISTRY: Anna S. Duggar
DIRECTOR OF LABORATORIES: Thorsten Schmidt
WEB PAGE: chn.loyno.edu/chemistry/

The chemistry department has a broad spectrum of undergraduate programs leading to the bachelor’s degree. They are described below under the headings of ACS certified chemistry program, biochemistry/pre-health program and chemistry-forensic science program.

ACS CERTIFIED CHEMISTRY PROGRAM

The chemistry department is on the approved list of the American Chemical Society for professional training in chemistry. Students who graduate with the bachelor of science in chemistry will have a degree certified by the American Chemical Society as having met the standards of the Committee on Professional Training. The salient points of the curriculum are as follows:

  1. Two semesters of introductory chemistry with quantitative analysis.
  2. Two semesters of organic chemistry.
  3. Two semesters of physical chemistry.
  4. Two semesters of integrated laboratory which includes physical, analytical, and inorganic chemistry along with training in the chemical literature.
  5. One semester of inorganic chemistry.
  6. One semester of modern analytical chemistry.
  7. total of 500 hours of laboratory and 440 hours of classroom work.

The curriculum also includes 1) two semesters of calculus, 2) a year of foreign language, 3) a year of physics, 4) a year of math/science electives, and 5) one credit in Oral Presentation.

BIOCHEMISTRY/PRE-HEALTH PROGRAM

This track serves both students interested in pursing careers in health fields such as medicine and dentistry, as well as those interested in attending graduate school in biochemistry or working in the pharmaceutical industry. The required chemistry courses are:

  1. Two semesters of general chemistry lecture and lab.
  2. Two semesters of organic chemistry lecture and lab.
  3. One semester of inorganic chemistry lecture.
  4. One semester of physical chemistry lecture.
  5. One semester of biochemistry lecture and lab.
  6. One semester of integrated lab.
  7. One semester of Oral Presentation.
  8. Two advanced chemistry electives.

The required adjunct courses are:

  1. Two semesters of biology lecture and lab.
  2. Two semesters of physics lecture and lab.
  3. Two semesters of calculus.

CHEMISTRY-FORENSIC SCIENCE PROGRAM

Forensic science applies chemical and biochemical methods of analysis to problems of a forensic nature. The science of forensics is becoming more technically demanding and as a result, there is a demand for better educated forensic personnel at local, state, and national law enforcement agencies.

The Loyola chemistry department program in forensic science provides a B.S. degree in chemistry with a forensic science emphasis within the chemistry department for students at Loyola University. The new degree program started in 2000 includes: 1) a basic degree in chemistry; 2) focused coursework in biology and criminal justice; 3) advanced coursework in Forensic Analytical Chemistry, and 4) finishes with an internship at a forensics lab.

RESEARCH AND ORAL PRESENTATION

The faculty encourage students to do research in chemistry under the supervision of one of the faculty members. The student can receive chemistry credits for engaging in such research. Undergraduate research is a valuable experience for students. The research experience 1) teaches critical thinking skills, 2) allows students to develop a deeper understanding of one area of chemistry, 3) develops a student’s confidence in his or her abilities as a chemist, and 4) provides good work experience in chemistry.

Oral Presentation provides a capstone experience for all chemistry majors. Each student writes a paper on either his or her research results or a chemistry related topic. The student then presents the paper orally to the faculty and to the other students participating in the Chemistry Seminar course.

HONORS THESIS

In order to receive the bachelor of science in chemistry with departmental honors, the student must:

  1. Earn an overall grade point average of 2.5 and a chemistry course grade point average of 3.0 while completing the requirements for either the ACS chemistry or pre-health chemistry degree program.

  2. Engage in and do satisfactory independent work on a chemistry research project under the supervision of a faculty member. The results will be written up as an honors thesis.

  3. Earn five honors credits by enrolling in Research (CHEM A498) for at least four semesters of credit and by enrolling in Oral Presentation (CHEM A493) and presenting a departmental seminar on the results of your research project. The four credits in CHEM A498 shall be in addition to the 120 credit hours required for graduation.

MINOR IN CHEMISTRY

The minor in chemistry consists of 22 hours of chemistry which includes General Chemistry with lab (eight hours), Organic Chemistry with lab (eight hours), and six additional hours in chemistry at or above the 300 level. CHEM A496 credits will not count toward the minor.

MINOR IN FORENSIC CHEMISTRY

The minor in forensic chemistry consists of 22 hours of chemistry which includes General Chemistry with lab (eight hours), Organic Chemistry with lab (eight hours), Introduction to Forensic Methods (CHEM A315, three hours), and a three-credit-hour internship at a crime lab (CHEM A497).

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE–CHEMISTRY

Freshman  
F
S
Major CHEM A105 — A106 General Chemistry I & II Lecture
3
3
Major CHEM A107 — A108 General Chemistry I & II Lab
1
1
Adjunct MATH A257 — A258 Calculus I & II
4
4
Foreign Language A100 — A101/First Year
3
3
Common Curriculum  
3
6
   
14
17
     
31
Sophomore  
F
S
Major CHEM A300 — A301 Organic Chemistry I&II Lecture
3
3
Major CHEM A302 — A303 Organic Chemistry I&II Lab
2
2
Adjunct PHYS A101 — A102 Intro to Mechanics and Intro to Electromagnetism and Relativity and PHYS A112-A113 Physics Lab I&II
5
5
Adjunct MATH A310, A200, or A260 (or A271) or PHYS A228
0
3
Elective  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
3
0
   
16
16
     
32
Junior  
F
S
Major CHEM A306 — A307 Physical Chemistry Lecture
3
3
Major CHEM A320 — A330 Integ Lab I & II
3
2
Major CHEM A350 Inorganic Lecture
0
3
Major CHEM A498 — A498 Research
(1)*
(1)*
Major CHEM A493 Oral Presentation
0
1
Adjunct Science/Math Elective
3
0
Common Curriculum  
6
6
   
15 (16)*
15 (16)*
     
30 (32)*
Senior  
F
S
Major CHEM A415 Modern Analytical Chemistry
0
3
Major CHEM A400 Biochemistry Lecture I
3
0
Major CHEM A400 Level Electives**
3
2
Major CHEM A498 — A498 Research
(1)*
(1)*
Common Curriculum  
9
6
Elective  
0
1
   
15 (16)*
12
(13)*
     
27 (29)*
TOTAL: 120 (124)* cr. hrs.    

Students seeking ACS Certification must complete adjunct courses. Specific Common Curriculum requirements are given in the beginning of this chapter under Curriculum Design. Refer to Common Curriculum in the index for page number.

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

* Honors requirements in parentheses.
** Restricted to a maximum of three hours of CHEM A498 and/or CHEM A496.

B.S. CHEMISTRY (BIOCHEMISTRY/PRE-HEALTH Program) *

Freshman  
F
S
Major CHEM A105 — A106 General Chemistry I&II Lecture
3
3
Major CHEM A107 — A108 General Chemistry I&II Lab
1
1
Adjunct MATH A257 — A258 Calculus I&II
4
4
Foreign Language A100 — A101/First Year
3
3
Common Curriculum  
3
6
   
14
17
     
31
Sophomore  
F
S
Major CHEM A300 — A301 Organic Chemistry I&II Lecture
3
3
Major CHEM A302 — A303 Organic Chemistry I&II Lab
2
2
Adjunct PHYS A115--A115 Physics for Life Sciences and Lab I&II
5
5
Adjunct BIOL Electives
4
4
Common Curriculum  
3
0
   
17
14
     
31
Junior  
F
S
Major CHEM A350 Inorganic Lecture
0
3
Major CHEM A320 Integrated Lab I
3
0
Major CHEM A306 Physical Chemistry I Lecture
3
0
Elective  
3
0
Common Curriculum  
6
12
   
15
15
     
30
Senior  
F
S
Major CHEM A400 Biochemistry I
3
0
Major CHEM A402 Biochemistry I Lab
0
1
Major CHEM A401 Biochemistry II
0
3
Major CHEM A493 Oral Presentation
0
1
Major Advanced Chemistry Elective    
  300 or 400 Level**
3
2
Elective — Adjunct Math/Science Elective
3
0
Elective  
3
0
Common Curriculum  
3
6
   
15
13
     
28
TOTAL: 120 cr. hrs.      

Specific Common Curriculum requirements are given in the beginning of this chapter under Curriculum Design. Refer to Common Curriculum in the index for page number.

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

* Students considering the Tulane early acceptance program for medical school should consult their advisers.
** Restricted to a maximum of three hours of CHEM A498 and/or CHEM A496.

FORENSIC SCIENCE PROGRAM IN CHEMISTRY

Freshman  
F
S
Major CHEM A105 — A106 General Chemistry I&II Lecture
3
3
Major CHEM A107 — A108 General Chemistry I&II Lab
1
1
Adjunct MATH A257 — A258 Calculus I&II
4
4
Foreign Language A100 — A101 First Year
3
3
Adjunct BIOL A108 — A109 Biology of Organisms Lec/Lab
0
5
Adjunct BIOL A106 Cells and Heredity
3
0
   
14
16
     
30
Sophomore  
F
S
Major CHEM A300 — A301 Organic Chemistry I&II Lecture
3
3
Major CHEM A302 — A303 Organic Chemistry I&II Lab
2
2
Adjunct FRSC C201 Criminalistics: Crime Lab
3
0
Adjunct MATH A241 Statistics
3
0
Adjunct PHYS A115 — A116
5
0
Adjunct PHYS A112 — A113
0
5
Elective  
0
6
   
16
16
     
32
Junior  
F
S
Major CHEM A320 Integ Lab I
3
0
Major CHEM A315 Intro to Forensic Methods
0
3
Common Curriculum  
12
12
   
15
15
     
30
Senior  
F
S
Major Chemistry Elective (300 — 400 Level)**
3
2
Major CHEM A400 Biochemistry Lecture
3
0
Major CHEM A402 Techniques in Biochemistry
0
1
Major CHEM A493 Oral Presentation
0
1
Major CHEM A497 Internship
3
0
Common Curriculum  
6
9
   
15
13
      28
TOTAL 120 cr. hrs.      

View Chemistry Course Descriptions

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

** CHEM A498 will not apply to these hours.

Mathematical Sciences

CHAIR: Michael R. Kelly, Ph.D., Office: 540 Monroe Hall
Professors: Michael Kelly, Duane Randall, Katarzyna Saxton, Ralph Tucci
Associate Professors: Maria Calzada, Xuefeng Li
Assistant Professor: Ana Maria Matei, Jeremy J. Thibodeaux
WEB PAGE:http://chn.loyno.edu/mathematics

The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers the bachelor’s degree in Mathematics, and the bachelor's degree in Mathematics with a concentration in Computational Mathematics. In the future, the major source of employment for the mathematician will continue to be industry, business, and other analytical fields. Employers will be concerned less about the actual degree than with the diversity of the student’s experiences. They will expect more than a superficial knowledge of mathematics and will also expect the student to be experienced in communicating with people such as engineers, managers, and stockholders, whose activity is outside the discipline of the mathematical sciences.

Since individual courses of study are peculiar to each student, a faculty adviser is assigned to a student at registration for the first semester. The faculty adviser will endeavor to tailor a particular program for the student with a proper mixture of adjunct and elective courses.

The faculty are active in research and hold active memberships in a number of professional organizations: the Mathematical Association of America, the American Mathematical Society, and the American Statistical Association, to name a few.  Majors are encouraged to work on research projects with a faculty mentor.

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM

There are many reasons for students to choose a major in mathematics or computational mathematics. To meet the broad interests of all mathematical scholars, the department offers flexibility in its programs.

The mathematics student is encouraged to obtain as broad an educational experience as possible by selecting elective courses from several other disciplines in such diverse fields as physics, chemistry, economics, computer science, history, sociology, language, biology, psychology, music, English, business administration, and others.

The basic program is designed for the student wishing to have a career where mathematics might be used directly or indirectly, for example, in aeronautics, electronics, marketing, social engineering, opinion analysis, insurance, accounting, automation, management, computer applications, sales, teaching, and government operations or research.

In addition to the majors, the Mathematics department coordinates an interdisciplinary minor in Computational Science.

Several other minors are available to the student majoring in mathematics. In addition to Computation Science, minors such as biology, chemistry, business/economics, and physics are easy to fit into the mathematics major curriculum and can help broaden a student’s career opportunities.

The departmental honors program is designed to prepare the student for graduate work in mathematics. The departmental honors program requires a GPA of 3.0 in mathematics courses and two additional courses in mathematics; one at the 300 level or higher and the second is MATH A498, which has a research thesis component.

The mathematics program may be tailored to meet the needs of students interested in industrial applied mathematics, biomathematics, or mathematical statistics.

Bachelor of Science-Mathematics

This is a sample curriculum sequence. Some courses are offered every other year. Students may have the opportunity of taking some of the courses in a different order.

Download the Degree Program Course Listing (DPCL) for this major »

Freshman

Fall

Spring

Major

MATH A200

0

3

Major

MATH A257 — A2581

4

4

Major

MATH A211

3

0

Common Curriculum/Foreign language

 

9

9

Semester Totals

16

16

Total

32

 

1 Students without the knowledge of trigonometry should take MATH A118 in the summer before their freshman year or during the fall semester. 

Sophomore

Fall

Spring

Major

MATH A259 — A310

3

3

Major

Math 320*

3

0

Common Curriculum

PHYS A101— A102

5

5

Common Curriculum

3

9

Semester Totals

14

17

Total

31

 

 

Junior or Senior*

Fall

Spring

Major

MATH A410* — A411*

3

3

Major

MATH (A300 or A400 level)

3

0

Common Curriculum

0

6

Electives

9

3

Semester Totals

15

12

Total

27

 * Course offered every other year.

Bachelor of Science-Computational Mathematics

Below you will find a sample curriculum sequence. Some courses are offered every other year. Students may have the opportunity of taking some of the courses in a different order.

Download the Degree Program Course Listing (DPCL) for this major »

Freshman

Fall

Spring

MATH A200

0

3

MATH A257 — A258*

4

4

MATH A211 -A212

3

3

Common Curriculum/Foreign Language

9

6

Semester Totals

16

16

Total

32

*Students without the knowledge of trigonometry should take MATH A118 in the summer before their freshman year or during the fall semester. 

Sophomore

Fall

Spring

MATH A259 - A310

3

3

MATH A271*

0

3

Common Curriculum PHYS A101— A102

5

5

Common Curriculum

6

6

Semester Totals

14

17

Total

31

 

Junior

Fall

Spring

MATH A340* — A341*

3

3

MATH A375*

0

3

MATH (A300 or A400 level)

3

0

MATH A498 (Research)

0

1

Common Curriculum

3

3

Elective

6

6

Semester Totals

15

16

Total

31

 

Senior

Fall

Spring

MATH A410*

3

0

MATH (A300 or A400 level)

3

0

MATH A498 (Research)

1

1

Common Curriculum

3

6

Electives

3

6

Semester Totals

13

13

Total

26

* Course offered every other year.

TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours

In summary, the Computational Mathematics major requires five computations courses (Math A211, Math A212, Math A271, Math A375, and Math A498) while the Mathematics major requires Math A211 and replaces the other four courses with three more theoretical courses (Math A320 Linear Algebra, Math A400 Abstract Algebra, Math A411 Advanced Calculus II) and an elective.

View Math Course Descriptions

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

1 Students without the knowledge of trigonometry should take MATH A118 in the summer before their freshman year or during the fall semester.

Physics

CHAIR: Armin Kargol, Ph.D., Office: 451 Monroe Hall
PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Carl H. Brans, James Carter, S.J., Creston A. King
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Armin Kargol, Martin P. McHugh
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Tirthabir Biswas, Patrick L. Garrity
EXTRAORDINARY FACULTY:  Darryl L. Steinert
WEB PAGE: chn.loyno.edu/physics/

The department is dedicated to the training of undergraduates and to the preparation of students for advanced studies. In designing the program, the department has taken into account the fact that a thorough understanding of the fundamental laws of nature, and of the mathematical and experimental methods used in physics, provide a solid background for graduate studies not only in physics but also in many other disciplines.

The department’s facilities and research laboratories are located in Loyola’s Monroe Hall. Students are encouraged to participate in a research program. This opportunity to work closely with the faculty using the sophisticated equipment of modern physics is one of the features of the department. 

PHYSICS CURRICULUM

All physics programs share a set of core physics courses:

  • Introduction to Mechanics (PHYS A101)
  • Mechanics Laboratory I (PHYS A132)
  • Introduction to Electromagnetism and Relativity (PHYS A102)
  • Electromagnetism Laboratory (PHYS A113)
  • Introduction to Waves and Quantum Physics (PHYS A240)
  • Introduction to Thermal Physics (PHYS A241)
  • Classical Mechanics (PHYS A340)
  • Electricity and Magnetism (PHYS A350)
  • Advanced Laboratory Physics (PHYS A445)
  • Quantum Mechanics (PHYS A450)

Five semesters of mathematics courses are also required for all physics programs:

  • Introduction to Linear Algebra (MATH A200)
  • Calculus I (MATH A257)
  • Calculus II (MATH A258)
  • Calculus III (MATH A259)
  • Introduction to Differential Equations (MATH A310)
  • Math Elective (choose one: A350, A410, or A415)

A B.S. degree in physics will be awarded to those students who complete all university and departmental requirements. A B.S. degree in physics (departmental honors) will be granted to those students who have satisfied the requirements for a B.S. in physics, obtained a grade point average of 3.0 or better in physics and math, and completed a thesis based on their senior year research. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE–PHYSICS


A rigorous program designed primarily for students intending to pursue graduate studies in physics or a closely related field. Additional requirements above the core courses include three upper level physics electives (a fourth is strongly recommended) and an additional upper level mathematics course.

Freshman   F S
Major PHYS A101 / A102 4 4
Major PHYS A132 / A133 1 1
Common Curriculum / Adjunct MATH A257 — A258 4 4
Adjunct MATH A200 0 3
Foreign Language   3 3
Common Curriculum   3 0
    15 15
      30
Sophomore   F S
Major PHYS A240 / A241 3 3
Common Curriculum CHEM A105 / A107; A106 / A108 or BIOL 4 4
Adjunct MATH A259 / A310 3 3
Common Curriculum   6 6
    16 16
      32
Junior   F S
Major PHYS A340 / A350 4 4
Major Upper Level Physics Electives 3 3
Adjunct MATH A350 or A410 or A415 3  
Common Curriculum   6 9
    16 16
      32
Senior   F S
Major PHYS A445 / A450 3 4
Major Upper Level Physics Elective 3  
Common Curriculum   6 3
Electives   3 6
    15 13
      28
TOTAL: 122 hrs.    

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

PRE-ENGINEERING - PHYSICS

This is a 3-2 program where students take physics and general education courses at Loyola during their first three years and then pursue an engineering degree at another university for an additional two years. With the successful completion of the engineering degree the student also earns a physics degree from Loyola. We currently have partnerships with engineering departments at the University of New Orleans. There is an additional upper level mathematics requirement above the core requirements. 

Freshman   F S
Major PHYS A101 / A102 4 4
Major PHYS A132 / A133 1 1
Common Curriculum / Adjunct MATH A257 — A258 4 4
Adjunct MATH A200 0 3
Foreign Language   3 3
Common Curriculum   3 3
    15 18
      33
Sophomore   F S
Major PHYS A240 / A241 3 3
Common Curriculum CHEM A105 / A107; A106 / A108 4 4
Adjunct MATH A259 / A310 3 3
Common Curriculum   6 6
    16 16
      32
Junior   F S
Major PHYS A340 / A350 4 4
Major PHYS A445 / A450 3 4
Adjunct MATH A350 or A410 or A415 3  
Common Curriculum 6 6
  16 14
      30
TOTAL: 94 hrs.      

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

PRE-HEALTH - PHYSICS

This program is designed for students wishing to apply to medical school or other health-related professional schools. The physics requirements are restricted to the core courses. Additional adjunct requirements in Biology and Chemistry satisfy pre-med admissions requirements.

Freshman   F S
Major PHYS A101 / A102 4 4
Major PHYS A132 / A133 1 1
Common Curriculum CHEM A105 / A107; A106 / A108 4 4
Common Curriculum / Adjunct MATH A257 / A258 4 4
Adjunct MATH A200 0 3
Common Curriculum   3 0
    16 16
      32
Sophomore   F S
Major PHYS A240 / A241 3 3
Adjunct MATH A259 / A310 3 3
Adjunct BIOL A106 / 107; A108 / A109 4 4
Adjunct CHEM A300 / A301 / A305 3 5
Common Curriculum   3
    15 16
      31
Junior   F S
Major PHYS A340 / A350 4 4
Common Curriculum 9 12
    13 16
      29
Senior   F S
Major PHYS A445 / A450 3 4
Common Curriculum   9 3
Foreign Language   3 3
Elective   _ 3
    15 13
      28
TOTAL: 120 hrs.      

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

LIBERAL ARTS PHYSICS

This is the most flexible program aimed at students who want the scientific and analytic training that a physics degree offers. A single upper level physics elective in addition to the core courses is required for this degree.

Freshman   F S
Major PHYS A101 / A102 4 4
Major PHYS A132 / A133 1 1
Common Curriculum / Adjunct MATH A257 / A258 4 4
Adjunct MATH A200 0 3
Foreign Language   3 3
Common Curriculum   3 0
    15 15
      30
Sophomore   F S
Major PHYS A240 / A241 3 3
Common Curriculum CHEM A105 / A107; A106 / A108 4 4
Adjunct MATH A259 / A310 3 3
Common Curriculum   6 6
    16 16
      32
Junior   F S
Major PHYS A340 / A350 4 4
Common Curriculum   6 9
Electives 6 3
    16 16
      32
Senior   F S
Major PHYS A445 / A450 3 4
Major Upper Level Physics Elective 3  
Common Curriculum   6 3
Electives   3 6
    15 13
      28
TOTAL: 121 hrs.      

View Physics Course Descriptions

(View Common Curriculum Requirements.)

Psychological Sciences

CHAIR: Mary Brazier Office: 444 Monroe Hall
PROFESSORS: Glenn M. Hymel, Janet R. Matthews, Evan L. Zucker
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Mary M. Brazier, Kim Ernst
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Lawrence Lewis, Erin Dupuis, Emily Russell
WEB PAGE: chn.loyno.edu/psychology/

Today psychology plays an important part in the background that every well educated person should have. For this reason, the department emphasizes the contribution that psychology can make to the liberal education of all students, including helping all students become intelligent "consumers" of psychological information. At the same time, the departmental program is designed to provide a thorough base of knowledge and skills for those students who are preparing to pursue graduate degrees to become professional psychologists or earn graduate or professional degrees in fields other than psychology (i.e., M.S.W., M.B.A., J.D.), as well as for those desiring a terminal degree in psychology without plans for graduate education.

The department also offers a formal degree program in which the student can major in psychology and simultaneously complete the course requirements expected for admission to medical, dental, veterinary, and other health-related post-baccalaureate programs.

As undergraduate psychology majors have a variety of goals, the department makes a conscious effort to individualize the learning process and the curriculum. Incoming psychology majors are assigned to faculty advisers, and the effort is made to maintain this student-advisor relationship until the student graduates. Higher level instruction for psychology students is done with heavy reliance on close work with a faculty adviser who directs the student in the choice of areas of study and adjunct courses designed with the goals and interests of the individual student in mind. Students are encouraged to engage in research under the supervision of a faculty member, enroll in off-campus practicum experiences, and conduct course-related service learning. This permits maximum flexibility and efficiency in the planning of a truly personalized undergraduate education.

The program leading to the B.S. in psychology consists of a core of four courses (including a capstone course), four structured psychology electives involving psychology both as a social science and a natural science, one lab, and three other psychology electives. Electives and adjunct courses are chosen in consultation with the advisor to help the individual student attain their desired educational goals.

Adjunct Courses

The department maintains no set list of required adjuncts for students majoring in Psychology. Those fulfilling the requirements for admission to health-related professional programs do have a set of prescribed adjunct courses to complete.

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE

Total hours in psychology are 34 as follows:

1. Core   12 hours
  a. Introduction to Psychology 3 hours
  b. Introduction to Research 3 hours
  c. Statistics and Methods 3 hours
  d. History and Systems (capstone) 3 hours
2. Psychology as a Social Science   6 hours
3. Psychology as a Natural Science   7 hours
4. Psychology Electives   9 hours

Departmental Comprehensive Examination

In order to demonstrate adequate knowledge of the depth and breadth of psychology, a senior comprehensive exam is given the semester before graduation. Successful performance on the departmental comprehensive exam is required for graduation. Information on both the comprehensive examination and the required criterion score is available from the chair of the department.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE–PSYCHOLOGY

Freshman  
F
S
Major PSYC A100 — Electives
3
6
Foreign Language  
3
3
Common Curriculum  
9
6
   
15
15
     
30
Sophomore  
F
S
Major PSYC A301 / A303 - Electives
6
3
Adjunct/Electives  
3
6
Common Curriculum  
6
6
   
15
15
     
30
Junior  
F
S
Major PSYC Electives
3
7
Adjunct/Electives  
6
3
Common Curriculum  
6
6
   
15
16
     
31
Senior  
F
S
Major PSYC Electives — A470
3
3
Adjunct/Electives  
9
9
Common Curriculum  
3
3
   
15
15
     
30
TOTAL: 121 cr. hrs.    

View Common Curriculum Requirements

Specific Common Curriculum requirements are given in the beginning of this chapter under Curriculum Design. Refer to Common Curriculum in the index for page number.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE–PSYCHOLOGY/PRE-HEALTH PROGRAM

Freshman  
F
S
Major PSYC A100 — Electives
3
6
Adjunct BIOL A106 / A107 — A108 / A109
4
4
Adjunct CHEM A105 / A107 — A106 / A108
4
4
Adjunct MATH A257
4
0
Common Curriculum  
3
3
   
18
17
     
35
Sophomore  
F
S
Major PSYC A301 / A303 - Electives
6
3
Adjunct CHEM A300 — A301
3
3
Adjunct CHEM A305
0
2
Adjunct PHYS A112 — A113 [ plus labs]
4
4
Common Curriculum  
3
6
   
16
18
     
34
Junior  
F
S
Major PSYC Electives
3
7
Adjunct  
3
0
Common Curriculum  
3
3
Foreign Language  
0
3
Electives   3 0
   
12
13
     
28
Senior  
F
S
Major PSYC Elective — A470
3
3
Common Curriculum Advanced
9
9
Elective Elective
3
3
   
15
15
     
27
TOTAL: 124 cr. hrs.    

View Psychology Course Descriptions

View Common Curriculum Requirements

Courses: Arabic (ARAB)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

ARAB A100 First Year Arabic I 3 crs.

This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Modern Arabic.  Students will learn the Arabic alphabet, basic writing and conversational skills, and entry-level Arabic grammar, including gender of nouns and verbs and regular conjunctions.  Students will also be exposed to Arabic culture and customs of polite society.

ARAB A101 First Year Arabic II 3 crs.

This course will expand students' vocabulary and use of basic grammatical structures. Lessons will focus on the sound patterns of Arabic, with attention to mastery of scripts, pronunciatio and listening comprehension.

Arabic A200 Second Year Arabic I 3 crs.

Students of Arabic 200 are expected to enhance the four language skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing in Modern Standard Arabic.  This class will introduce hollow, double-root, and defective verbs, absolute negation, and conditional tense.  Students will be exposed to different native speakers of Arabic through audio-visual materials and will continue learning about Arab culture.

Arabic A201 Second Year Arabic II 3 crs.

This course will focus on listening comprehension and reading, exposing students to increasingly authentic texts from newspapers, journals, and other sources. Controlled writing assignments will also be introduced. 

Courses: Biology (BIOL)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

BIOL A106 Cells and Heredity 3 crs.

This course emphasizes the principles and concepts of chemical, cellular, and genetic processes common to all life. Topics include the scientific method, basic chemical concepts, macromolecules, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure, membrane structure, energy and metabolism, meiosis, mitosis, Mendelian inheritance, and the Central Dogma.

Prerequisite:  Eligibility to enroll in MATH A257, evidenced by completion of MATH A118, or Prerequisite ACT/SAT test scores.
Co-requisite: BIOL A107

BIOL A107 Cells and Heredity Lab 1 cr.

Students investigate the scientific method, basic chemical concepts, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and function, Mendelian inheritance, and the structure, function, and technological uses of DNA.  This laboratory course emphasizes student-designed experiments, data collection and analysis, oral and written presentation, and the use of the scientific literature.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite:  Eligibility to enroll in MATH A257, evidenced by completion of MATH A118, or Prerequisite ACT/SAT test scores.
Corequisite:  BIOL A106

BIOL A108 Biology of Organisms 3 crs.

This course compares the biology of microbes, plants, and animals focusing on morphology, physiology, reproduction, and natural history.

Prerequisite: BIOL A106, BIOL A107

Co-requisite: BIOL A109

BIOL A109 Biology of Organisms Lab 1 cr.

This course examines the diversity of life through field trips, demonstrations, dissections, and experimental activities. Form and function of microbes, plants, and animals will be compared to demonstrate how organisms have adapted to their environments. Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: BIOL A106.

Co-requisites: BIOL A108, A110.

BIOL A118 Tropical Ecology 3 crs.

Two weeks will be spent in the field in Belize, Guatemala, or Trinidad studying the plants and animals in several different ecological zones: coral reefs, pine savannah, rain forest, and mangrove swamps. A paper on the ecology of the area will be written after returning from the expedition.

BIOL A208 Ecology and Evolution 3 crs.

This course introduces current concepts and principles of ecology and evolution. Animal behavior, populations, communities, ecosystems, biogeography, natural selection, speciation, the history of life, human evolution, and other topics will be studied through lectures, readings, discussion, and a field trip.

Prerequisites: BIOL A106 — A109.

BIOL A300 Microbiology 3 crs.

Bacteriological technique, the classification and study of the properties of important protists, fungi, and bacteria, will be discussed. The principles of immunity, serology, and virology are also considered. Prerequisites: completion of biology core courses; two years of chemistry including Organic Chemistry.

Prerequisites: completion of biology core courses; two years of chemistry including Organic Chemistry.
Co-requisite: BIOL A301.

BIOL A301 Microbiology Lab 1 cr.

Laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A300.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisites: completion of biology core courses; two years of chemistry including Organic Chemistry.

Co-requisite: BIOL A300.

BIOL A303 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates 2 crs.

Through lectures, demonstrations, and dissections, vertebrate structure is analyzed in terms of phylogeny and function.

Prerequisites: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A304.

BIOL A304 Comparative Anatomy– Vertebrate Lab 2 crs.

Laboratory experience that meets four hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A303.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A303.

BIOL A305 Histology 2 crs.

The study of the microscopic structure of tissues and organs of the mammalian body and the study of the fundamentals of hematology will be the focus of this course. Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A306.

BIOL A306 Histology Lab 2 crs.

Laboratory experience that meets four hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A305.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A305.

BIOL A308 Developmental Biology 3 crs.

Events and mechanisms of developmental genetics, gametogenesis, fertilization, morphogenesis, and organogenesis in selected vertebrates and invertebrates will be examined. The laboratory includes experimental approaches to the study of development.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A309.

BIOL A309 Developmental Biology Lab 1 cr.

Laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A308.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A308.

BIOL A310 General Physiology 2 crs.

This course is an introductory study of physiochemical processes in cells, tissues, and organs.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A311.

BIOL A311 General Physiology Lab 2 crs.

Laboratory experience that meets four hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A310.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A310.

BIOL A312 Anatomy and Physiology 4 crs.

Anatomy and Physiology focuses on the interrelationships of the structural components of the human body to their function at the cellular, tissue, organ, and organ system level. Particular emphasis is placed on study of mechanisms responsible for maintaining homeostasis in the human body. Designed for allied health and other pre-health professional students.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A313.

BIOL A313 Anatomy and Physiology Lab 2 crs.

Laboratory experience that meets four hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A312.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A312.

BIOL A322 Population Genetics 3 crs.

This is an advanced course dealing with methods of measuring and expressing the genetic variation within and among natural populations. The course focuses on the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and how various factors modify it including selection, inbreeding, genetic drift, migration, and mutation.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

BIOL A324 Evolutionary Biology 3 crs.

This course for majors addresses topics in Darwinian evolution, mechanisms of evolutionary change and speciation, life history characters, and others. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of how evidence from various disciplines such as morphology, genetics, ecology, development, and geology supports the evolutionary synthesis.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

BIOL A326 Molecular Genetics 3 crs.

Fundamentals of molecular genetics such as: transcription, DNA synthesis and repair, and RNA processing will be discussed. Through review and discussion of scientific literature and laboratory experience, students will learn the process of scientific investigation, recent findings, and new technologies in the field of molecular genetics.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A327.

BIOL A327 Molecular Genetics Lab 1 cr.

Laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A326.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A326.

BIOL A328 Genetic Analysis 3 crs.

This course for majors addresses advanced topics in transmission genetics, cytogenetics, evolutionary genetics, and mutagenesis. Emphasis is placed on development of quantitative skills and written and oral communication.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

BIOL A330 Ecology 3 crs.

Basic ecological principles and concepts are considered including the nature of the ecosystem, energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, and the ecology of populations and communities.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A331.

BIOL A331 Ecology Lab 1 cr.

Field and laboratory experience that meets four to five hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A330.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A330.

BIOL A334 Biology of Fishes 3 crs.

This course examines phylogenetic relationships, functional morphology, physiology, sensory biology, reproduction, behavior, ecology, biogeography, and conservation of fishes. Special emphasis will be placed on identification and natural history of Louisiana’s freshwater and marine fishes through field trips and laboratory exercises.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A335.

BIOL A335 Biology of Fishes Lab 1 cr.

Field and laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A334.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A334.

BIOL A336 Animal Behavior 3 crs.

This course examines behavioral adaptations of animals and critically evaluates hypotheses to account for the evolution of these adaptations. Student activities emphasize field observation of animal behavior, experimental design, and scientific communication.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

BIOL A338 Plant Ecology 3 crs

An introduction to the quantitative study of plants and their environment.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding the functional ecology of individual plants and vegetation in terrestrial ecosystems.

 Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses, co-requisite BIOL A339

BIOL A339 Plant Ecology Lab 1 cr

Laboratory course accompanying BIOL A338, will expose students to modern field and laboratory techniques in plant physiological ecology.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses, co-requisite BIOL A338

BIOL A345 Herpetology 2 crs.

Introduction to the study of morphology, adaptation, classification, distribution, and ecology of amphibians and reptiles. Field work and identification of North American groups and field studies of local fauna. Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A346.

BIOL A346 Herpetology Lab 2 crs.

Field and laboratory experience that meets six hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A345.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A345.

BIOL A355 Conservation Biology 3 crs.

The study of the conservation of biodiversity based in the principles of ecology, evolution, and genetics. The primary goal is to understand natural ecological systems in the context of a human dominated world to learn to best maintain biological diversity in concert with an exploding human population. This is accomplished through lecture, socratic discussion, and videos.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

BIOL A356 Aquatic Microbiology 3 crs.

An introduction to the study of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes as well as viruses in the aquatic environment. The course emphasizes the functional role of microbes in aquatic habitats, the relationship of microbial biodiversity to environmental gradients and the interaction of aquatic microbes with human affairs.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.
Co-requisite: BIOL A357.

BIOL A357 Aquatic Microbiology Lab 1 cr.

Field and laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A356. Students are exposed to modern field and laboratory techniques used with prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes from aquatic habitats. Field trips will emphasize local freshwater and estuarine environments.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.
Co-requisite: BIOL A356.

BIOL A360 Cell Biology 3 crs.

An analysis of cell structure and function. Topics to be discussed include protein synthesis, the nucleus, cytoplasmic organelles and bioenergetics, endomembrane systems, vesicular transport, the cytoskeleton, cell signaling, cell cycle control, and cancer.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A361.

BIOL A361 Cell Biology Lab 1 cr.

Laboratory experience that meets three hours per week in conjunction with BIOL A360.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

Co-requisite: BIOL A360.

BIOL A363 Virology 3 crs.

Virology will cover cell and molecular biology of animal virology in detail. Topics to be addressed include virus structure, replication, pathogenesis, taxonomy, viral transformation, and cancer with specific virus families explored in depth. Some epidemiology, including recent research of specific viruses in the news, will be explored.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

BIOL A365 Immunology 3 crs.

The field of experimental cellular and molecular immunology will be explored in this course. Clinical immunology will not be emphasized. Topics include: organization of the immune system, structure and function of antigen recognition molecules, immune cell interactions, and regulation of the immune system and immunity-related diseases.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

BIOL A370 Introduction to Marine Science 4 crs.

This course is an introduction to physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes in the oceans and coastal environments and their interactions. Interrelationships of man and the marine environment. Five-week summer course at LUMCON in Cocodrie, La.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

BIOL A375 Introduction to Marine Zoology 4 crs.

This course is a field and laboratory survey of marine animals, particularly those of the Louisiana Gulf Coast, including classification, morphology, physiology, and ecology. Five-week summer course at LUMCON in Cocodrie, La.

Prerequisite: completion of biology core courses.

BIOL A400 Research Proposal 1 cr.

Students work with a faculty research adviser to identify an original question in the biological sciences and develop and write a proposal/prospectus to investigate this question. This course is required of all biology honors students and students intending to complete a thesis in biological sciences.

BIOL A401 Independent Research 1 — 4 crs.

Students work with a faculty research adviser to conduct theoretical, field, and/or laboratory research. Students may register for one to four credit hours per semester and may enroll in this course in more than one semester, but the cumulative total credit hours earned may not exceed four.

BIOL A402 Research Thesis 1 cr.

Students work with a faculty research adviser to prepare a written thesis describing their original research and make an oral presentation at the undergraduate research symposium. This course is required of all biology honors students and students intending to complete a thesis in biological sciences.

Prerequisite: BIOL A400.

Co-requisite: BIOL A401.

BIOL A444 Marine Vertebrate Zoology 4 crs.

General study of the marine chordates with particular emphasis on the fishes, including classification, structure, function, and ecology will be the focus of this course. Five-week summer course at LUMCON in Cocodrie, La.

Prerequisite: BIOL A370 or A375.

BIOL A446 Marine Ecology 4 crs.

This course concerns the relationships of marine and estuarine organisms to environmental factors: interactions among organisms, ecological processes of energy and materials flow, communities, and ecosystems of the Louisiana Coastal Zone. Five-week summer course at LUMCON in Cocodrie, La.

Prerequisite: BIOL A370 or A375.

BIOL A448 Topics in Marine Science 1 cr.

This course is an advanced lecture, laboratory, and field work on a selected topic in the marine sciences. Two- to three-week summer course at LUMCON in Cocodrie, La.

Prerequisite: BIOL A370 or A375.

BIOL A499 Independent Study arr.

BIOL H233 Honors: Human Ecological Biology 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: University Honors Program

This in-depth course covering the ecological impact of humans on the biosphere is innovative in content, design, and topic. Through discussion, field trips, lab-setting demonstrations, films, debates, and readings, students learn the world of ecological science by active participation for application to issues of global, regional, and local concern.

BIOL T122 Cultural Biology 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Introductory

The range of subject matter for this course concerns survey of plant and animal taxonomic groups; survey of major organ and other structural systems in man; introduction to principles of genetics, ecology, and evolution. Not required of science majors.

BIOL Z230 Human Ecology 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

This course is a consideration of the basic concepts of ecology, including the nature of ecosystems, energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, and characteristics of populations and communities of organisms. The role of humans in the ecosphere will be emphasized, with particular attention to human population problems, food production, and pollution problems.

Pre-Requisites and Co-Requisites:  Sophomore standing or completion of an Introductory Common Curriculum course in the Natural Sciences is required.

BIOL Z232 Impact of Biology on Society 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

This course examines moral problems biology brings to society–e.g., abortion, "test-tube" babies, mouse with four parents, mouse-human cell hybrids, artificial life support for terminally ill, dangers and promise of recombinant DNA, building of artificial genes, and cloning. Effects of these areas on our lives will be considered.

Pre-Requisites and Co-Requisites:  Sophomore standing or completion of an Introductory Common Curriculum course in the Natural Sciences is required.

BIOL Z236 Evolution 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

This course examines the issues relating to the changes in life forms during the history of life on earth. Concepts are illustrated using examples from living systems and the fossil record. Human evolution also is considered. Designed for non-biology students.

Pre-Requisites and Co-Requisites: 

Sophomore standing or completion of an Introductory Common Curriculum course in the Natural Sciences is required.

BIOL Z237  Marine Biology & Conservation   3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

This course examines diversity, physiology, ecology, and conservation of microbes, plants, and animals that live in the marine environment. Emphasis is placed on how marine organisms have adapted to living in their environment and how humans depend upon and affect marine ecosystems. Participation in a weekend fieldtrip is required.

Pre-Requisites and Co-Requisites:  Sophomore standing or completion of an Introductory Common Curriculum course in the Natural Sciences is required.

BIOL Z238 Genetics and Society 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

This course studies the basis of heredity and reproduction with a primary focus on human aspects. Recent genetic research and its application to medicine, industry, and agriculture. Social and ethical considerations of current genetic research and practices.

Pre-Requisites and Co-Requisites:  Sophomore standing or completion of an Introductory Common Curriculum course in the Natural Sciences is required.

BIOL Z242 Microbes: Friend or Foe? 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

This course is designed to relate daily living to the activities of the microbial world. Topics of discussion include: infectious diseases including sexually transmitted diseases, vaccines and immunity, antibiotics and disease treatment, pollution, food production and spoilage, viruses and cancer, and developments in biotechnology.

Pre-Requisites and Co-Requisites:  Sophomore standing or completion of an Introductory Common Curriculum course in the Natural Sciences is required.

BIOL Z244 Mississippi River Delta Ecology 3 crs.

This course is a basic study of the ecology of the Mississippi River deltaic plain. Emphasis is on the importance of coastal erosion, accompanied by study of the physical and biological aspects of the Mississippi River, its delta, estuaries, and their habitats, flora and fauna, and relevant environmental issues. The course is designed to enhance the student’s understanding of the relevance of the ecology of the Mississippi River Delta to the activities of humans.

Pre-Requisites and Co-Requisites:  Sophomore standing or completion of an Introductory Common Curriculum course in the Natural Sciences is required.

BIOL Z264  Global Ecology   3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern
This course is a consideration of the basic concepts of ecology, including the nature of ecosystems, energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, and characteristics of populations and communities of organisms. The role of humans in the ecosphere will be emphasized, with particular attention to human population problems, food production, and pollution problems.

Pre-Requisites and Co-Requisites:  Sophomore standing or completion of an Introductory Common Curriculum course in the Natural Sciences is required.

Courses: Chemistry (CHEM)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

CHEM A105 General Chemistry I Lecture 3 crs.

This course is a basic one-year course in the fundamental principles of general chemistry. This is the first chemistry course for all science majors and includes the history of chemistry, the development of modern atomic theory, chemical bonding and structure, and the nature of matter and physical states. Included is an introduction to thermodynamics and kinetics with a more thorough development of equilibria concepts. Descriptive chemistry is liberally sprinkled throughout the course.

Prerequisite: eligibility to take MATH A257.

Co-requisite: CHEM A107.

CHEM A106 General Chemistry II Lecture 3 crs.

Same description as CHEM A105.

Prerequisite: CHEM A105, CHEM A107.

Co-requisite: CHEM A108.

CHEM A107 General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 cr.

This lab involves experiments to accompany General Chemistry Lecture. One three-hour laboratory period per week.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A105 or co-registration in CHEM A105.

CHEM A108 General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 cr.

Same description as CHEM A107. Also includes qualitative analysis.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A106, CHEM A107, or co-registration in CHEM A106.

CHEM A300 Organic Chemistry I Lecture 3 crs.

This is an intensive course in organic chemistry covering structural theory, organic reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and reactions of organic compounds.

Prerequisite: CHEM A105 — A108 or permission of department chair.

CHEM A301 Organic Chemistry II Lecture 3 crs.

Same description as CHEM A300.

Prerequisite: CHEM A300.

CHEM A302 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 2 crs.

This is a laboratory course to accompany CHEM A300 — A301. Introduction to laboratory techniques of organic chemistry: preparations, separations, and identification of organic compounds. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A300 or co-registration in CHEM A300.

CHEM A303 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory for Chemistry Majors 2 crs.

Same description as CHEM A302.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A301 or co-registration in CHEM A301.

CHEM A305 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2 crs.

This is a laboratory course for non-chemistry science students to accompany CHEM A301. Introduction to laboratory techniques of organic chemistry: simple preparations, separation, and identification of organic compounds. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A301 or co-registration in CHEM A301.

CHEM A306 Physical Chemistry I Lecture 3 crs.

This course is a general survey of physical chemistry stressing thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics.

Prerequisites: CHEM A105 — A108, MATH A257, A258, CHEM A301, or permission of instructor.

CHEM A307 Physical Chemistry II Lecture 3 crs.

This is an advanced course in physical chemistry treating elementary quantum theory and spectroscopy with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

Prerequisites: CHEM A105 — A108, MATH A257, A258, PHYS A110, A111, CHEM A306, or permission of instructor.

CHEM A310 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 1 cr.

This is a laboratory course for chemistry and non-chemistry science students to accompany CHEM A301. Introduction to laboratory techniques of organic chemistry: simple preparations, separation, and identification of organic compounds. Three-hour laboratory four days per week. Offered in the summer only.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A300 or co-registration in CHEM A300.

CHEM A311 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 1 cr.

This is a laboratory course for chemistry and non-chemistry science students to accompany CHEM A301. Introduction to laboratory techniques of organic chemistry: simple preparations, separation, and identification of organic compounds. Three-hour laboratory four days per week. Offered in the summer only.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A301 or co-registration in CHEM A301.

CHEM A315 Introduction to Forensic Methods 3 cr.

This course will be an introduction to instrumental and chemical analysis techniques used in forensic investigations. Topics will include: fingerprint analysis, soil and glass analysis, hair and fiber analysis, arson/explosive analysis, document analysis, and drug/toxicological analysis.  Lab fee $75.

Prerequisites: CHEM A300.

CHEM A320 Integrated I Laboratory 3 crs.

This is an advanced laboratory with one hour of recitation each week for all chemistry majors. The lecture and experiments cover a wide range of techniques and topics including chemical literature, inorganic synthesis and characterization, photochemistry, titrations, kinetics, extractions, magnetic susceptibility, TLC, UV-Vis, crystal field theory, mass spectrometry, and chromatography.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisites: CHEM A301, A303.

CHEM A330 Integrated II Laboratory 2 crs.

This course is an advanced chemistry laboratory that involves structural analysis, thermodynamics, chemical separations, electrochemistry, advanced kinetics, and spectroscopy. Classical and modern spectroscopic techniques, such as UV-Vis, FT/IR, and LIF are employed along with molecular modeling techniques. The semester concludes with a special project derived from the chemical literature.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisites: CHEM A303, A306.

CHEM A350 Inorganic I Chemistry 3 crs.

This lecture course is designed to introduce various topics in inorganic chemistry. The topics covered will include atomic structure, symmetry and group theory, introduction to ionic and covalent bonding models in coordination complexes, acid-base theories, aqueous chemistry, electrochemistry, and an introduction to bioinorganic chemistry.

Prerequisite: CHEM A301.

CHEM A400 Biochemistry I Lecture 3 crs.

This course is a detailed description of the structure and function of the major classes of biological macromolecules: proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and sugars. Physical, chemical, experimental, and mechanistic aspects of macromolecules and their behavior are emphasized based on an understanding of the underlying principles of bonding, equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Topics covered include protein structure and folding, experimental methods used to characterize and manipulate proteins and DNA, allostery and other types of regulation, molecular disease, enzyme mechanism and inhibition, and membranes.

Prerequisites: CHEM A300, A301.

CHEM A401 Biochemistry II Lecture 3 crs.

This course is a thorough coverage of metabolism and metabolic regulation. It begins with a brief review and expanded treatment of concepts from the first semester course of particular relevance to the study of metabolism such as energetics, membranes and membrane transport, receptors, and enzymes and their regulation. Topics covered include vitamins and cofactors, glycolysis, TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, glycogen metabolism, gluconeogenesis, photosynthesis, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids, amino acids, and nucleotides. Emphasis is placed on understanding the chemical conversions involved, the interplay between various metabolic processes, and on understanding a variety of metabolic diseases.

Prerequisites: CHEM A300, A301, A400.

CHEM A402 Techniques in Biochemistry 1 cr.

Selected chemical and instrumental techniques will be performed by students based on lecture material covered in CHEM A400. Topics covered will include methods to label or sequence proteins, optical methods, NMR spectroscopy, enzyme kinetics and inhibition, column chromatography, introduction to basic molecular biology methods, and acrylamide and agarose gel electrophoresis.  Lab fee $75.

Prerequisites: CHEM A302, A400.

CHEM A415 Modern Analytical Chemistry 3 crs.

This combined lecture/lab course applies the principles of analytical chemistry to instrumental methods of analysis. The goal will be to provide the student with an introduction to the principles of spectroscopic, electrometric, and chromatographic methods of analysis. We will discuss the kinds of instruments that are available and the strengths and limitations of these instruments. We will focus on spectrometric, chromatographic, and electrochemical techniques such as: AA, UV/VIS/NIR, fluorometry, GC, GC/MS, HPLC, and CV.  Lab fee $100.

Prerequisite: CHEM A306 or permission of instructor.

CHEM A455 Inorganic Chemistry II 3 crs.

This course will cover advanced topics in inorganic chemistry. Topics will emphasize structure function relationships in inorganic substances. These topics will include 1) bonding, electronic spectra, magnetism, kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and structure of coordination compounds; 2) organometallic chemistry; 3) solid state chemistry including polymers; 4) bioinorganic chemistry; and 5) catalysis.

Prerequisites: CHEM A307, A350.

CHEM A493 Oral Presentation 1 cr.

This course is designed to strengthen the student’s oral and writing skills in technical communication. A secondary objective is to practice skills retrieving data from the chemical literature in both written and electronic form. The course requires one paper and one oral presentation at the departmental seminar.

Prerequisites: CHEM A303, A320, or permission of instructor.

CHEM A495 Special Project arr.

This course focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

CHEM A496 Seminar/Workshop arr.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

CHEM A497 Internship/ Practicum arr.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

CHEM A498 Research arr.

All majors are encouraged to, and honors program students must, register for one to three credit hours for each semester starting with the second semester of their sophomore years for a total of four credit hours. Credit will be prorated on the basis of one credit hour for four hours devoted to research.

Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson.

CHEM A499 Independent Study arr.

CHEM T122 Introduction to Chemistry 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Introductory

This course is an introduction to chemistry for non-scientists that they may be concerned, clear thinking citizens. In a complex scientific and technological society, an average person must be able to understand chemistry-related problems, e.g., food, energy, pollution, ozone depletion, global warming, space exploration, drugs, medicinals, genetic engineering, and even life itself.

CHEM Z130 World Food and Nutrition 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

This course is a brief review of nutritional requirements of Homo sapiens and a historical review of how male and female members of the species have met these requirements, individually and collectively. This review will serve as a background for intensive discussion of the modern world food situation and possible future solutions.

CHEM H295 Chemistry Honors Seminar

Courses: Chinese (CHIN)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

CHIN A100 First Year Chinese I 3crs.

This is a beginning Mandarin Chinese course designed for students with no previous knowledge of any Chinese dialect or written Chinese.  Students will learn basic Chinese characters, conversational skills, and entry-level Chinese grammar.  The course will focus on Chinese pinyin Romanization system, tones and pronunciation.

CHIN A101 First Year Chinese II 3crs.

This course is a continuation of First Year Chinese I.  The emphasis in this course is still on speaking and listening.  Reading and writing will be developed in conjunction with oral skills.  THe course aims to expand vocabulary and introduce more complex grammatical structures.  The course will help students expand from their base of the previous semester.

CHIN A200 Second Year Chinese I 3crs.

Students who have completed First Year Chinese will continue to develop the four skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing in Mandarin Chinese.  The use of more complex communicative activities and readings on various topics will be introduced.

CHIN A201 Second Year Chinese II 3 crs.

This course further expands students' vocabulary base to permit reading of increasingly authentic texts from newspapers, journals and other sources and introduces writing assignments.  By the end of this course students are expected to be able to deal with daily-life related Chinese.

Courses: Classical Studies (CLHU)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

CLHU A480 Capstone: Special Topics 3 crs.

This capstone course will pull together the varied aspects of a classical studies education by focusing on one topic (e.g., friendship, death, entertainment, the citizen) in the contexts of the Greek and Roman worlds, thereby allowing students who have taken diverse paths through the major to share and expand their understanding of the ancient world through discussions, presentations, and research.

CLHU H498 Honors Thesis Research 2 crs.

This course offers students who wish to pursue an honors thesis time to do research under the guidance of their thesis adviser.

CLHU H499 Honors Thesis 3 crs.

Students who have satisfactorily completed their research register for this course while they write their honors thesis.

CLHU U238 Justice in Greek Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

Justice is the foundation of civilized society. It is at once the condition and means of concord and harmony among men. Greek poets and philosophers were among the first to investigate the nature of justice. Examination of their writings on this subject can alert latter-day students to its importance and to its nature.

CLHU U242 The Development of Greek Tragedy 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course involves the reading in English of a selection of plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides and their relationship to the development of Greek theater and performance.

CLHU U244 The Greek and Roman Epic 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course is a survey in English of Greek and Latin epics, such as the works of Homer, Apollonius of Rhodes, Vergil, Lucan, and Statius.

CLHU U246 Greek Mythology 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course is a study of the origins, themes, and significance of Greek mythology, with emphasis on myth as a vestige of primitive thought and on the corpus of Greek myths as a source of Greek and Roman literature.

CLHU U248 Greek Art and Archaeology 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

A survey of artistic works and monuments of ancient Greece from the Geometric through the Hellenistic periods (c. 1000 — 50 B.C.) with an emphasis on stylistic developments in the main areas of painting, sculpture, and architecture.

CLHU U250 Roman Art and Archaeology 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

A survey of the most important works of art and monuments of ancient Rome from the beginnings of the city through the period of Constantine, emphasizing stylistic developments in the areas of sculpture, architecture, and painting, with some consideration of materials and techniques. Works of the Etruscans, Greeks, and Italic peoples will be considered for their influence.

CLHU U256 Greek Elegies and Lyrics 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course is an introduction to lyric and elegiac forms of individual poetic expression. Consideration will be given to the technical terms referring to the poems studied, their themes, and performance. Authors include Archilochus, Tyrtaeus, Alcaeus, and Sappho among others.

CLHU U257 Greek Culture 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course will examine the literature, culture, history, art, and daily life of the Greeks from the Minoan period to the rule of Alexander the Great. coursework will include readings in Greek literature in translation and secondary texts and assignments using Internet resources such as Perseus 2.0.

CLHU U258 Roman Culture 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course examines the literature, culture, history, politics, and daily life of the ancient Romans from the legendary beginning of the city in 753 B.C. to the fifth century A.D. Readings will include Latin literature in translation and secondary texts which provide archaeological evidence and the historical context.

CLHU U260 Pandora’s Daughters 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course examines the status of women in classical antiquity from the Bronze Age through the late Roman Empire. Readings include selections from a wide variety of ancient documents and contemporary scholarship. Archaeological and artistic evidence will also be considered.

CLHU U263 Greek and Roman Comedy 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course is a survey of Greek and Roman comedy including works by Aristophanes, Menander, Terence, and Plautus. The course will consider the significant social and political issues as well as the plays’ appeal, significance, and legacy for us today.

CLHU U265 Pagans and Christians 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course examines the triumph of Christianity over paganism in the Roman Empire. Focusing on the debate and culture clash between the two in the fourth century, students will discuss and write on important controversies of the age and their relation to our own times.

CLHU U268 Roman Republic 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course examines the rise and decline of the Roman Republic from the founding of the city (c. 800 B.C.) to the assassination of Julius Caesar (44 B.C.). The course explores political, economic, military, religious, and societal topics.

CLHU U270 The Later Roman Empire 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course explores all the major aspects of late Roman civilization, roughly from 300 — 700 A.D. Study will cover political, economic, military, social, and religious developments with focus on the effects of the Germanic and Islamic invasions. Students will examine a wide variety of textual and physical evidence.

CLHU U272 The Early Roman Empire 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course will examine the rise and the first decline of the Roman empire from the establishment of the autocracy by Octavian Augustus (30 B.C. — 14 A.D.) to the reordering of the Roman empire by Diocletian (284 — 305 A.D.). It will explore political, social, military, economic, cultural, and religious topics.

CLHU U274 The Byzantine Empire 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course will survey the medieval Roman empire, also known as the Byzantine empire, from the rise of Islam in the seventh century to the fall of Constantinople to the Turks in 1453. The course will examine political, military, economic, social, religious, and cultural features of the Byzantine world.

CLHU U275 The Ancient Novel 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course traces the development of the novel in the earliest examples from Greek and Roman antiquity. These works detail the adventures of young men and women determined to preserve their integrity while searching for their true identities. Readings include Longus’ Daphne and Chloe, Petronius’ Satyricon, and Heliodorus’ An Ethiopian Story.

CLHU U280 Ancient Mystery Cults 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

By their very nature, ancient mystery cults were secretive and their rituals known only to the initiates. This course examines, in translation, a wide variety of ancient sources to see what can be learned about cults ranging from Demeter to Isis to early Christianity.

Courses: English (ENGL)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

ENGL A100 Expository Writing 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to English composition with special focus on grammar, paragraph structure, expository essay structure, and critical reading skills. This course is for students who are not yet qualified to take ENGL T122. Students are assigned to the course on the basis of a placement test administered by the English department.

ENGL A105 English Composition– International Students 3 crs.

This course involves intensive review of study skills, bilingual language problems, and composition for students who speak English as a second language and are not ready to take ENGL T122. Entrance is by English department placement test.

ENGL A205 Writing about Texts 3 crs.

This course is the introductory composition course for English majors and minors that provides training in the writing process. It covers rhetorical, argumentative, and representational dimensions of literary and non-literary texts (cf. ENGL A210).

Required of entering freshman majors and minors; other interested students must have permission of the departmental chair.

ENGL A206 Reading Poetry 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to the basic tools needed to read English and American poetry, including concepts of genre, form, metrics, figurative representation, and history.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A208 Writing from Sources 3 crs.

This course focuses on the research process, evaluation of sources, and in-depth writing assignments with emphasis on primary research.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205

ENGL A209 Writing and Research 3 crs.

This course involves guided instruction in locating, interpreting, and using a variety of library sources for such projects as annotated bibliographies, term papers, and creative works including fiction and scripts.  Special attention is given to writing the multisource research paper, accessing electronic texts and sources, and using sources ethically.

ENGL A210 Texts and Theory 3 crs.

Texts and Theory applies contemporary theories of literary criticism to works of fiction, drama, and film. The course requires students to analyze their readings in frequent writing assignments using various critical approaches. It is recommended for English majors who place out of Writing about Texts (ENGL A205).

ENGL A211 Introduction to Creative Writing 3 crs.

The course is an introduction to writing fiction and poetry. Student writing will be discussed in a workshop format and in individual conferences with the instructor. Students will also read and discuss a wide range of contemporary fiction and poetry.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A212 Introduction to Major British Authors 3 crs.

This course is designed to treat works of literature as representative parts of the continuous evolution/growth of the English literary tradition. It introduces students to the works of major British authors from three contiguous modern or pre-modern historical periods.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A213 Survey of British Literature I 3 crs.

This course will introduce students to the first half of English literary history (from Chaucer to the late eighteenth century). By looking at how different literary forms and genres (poetry and prose, comedy and tragedy, romance and neoclassicism) interacted with changing social realities, we’ll explore the various uses of literature, how it was used both to explain a changing world and to resist those changes by building refuges from them.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A214 Survey of British Literature II 3 crs.

We'll begin our quest in 1789, the year Rousseau’s Confessions was published posthumously, one of the acknowledged beginnings of the Romantic Era. From there we’ll progress through over 200 years of literature, ending somewhere around 10 minutes ago. Our aim is breadth rather than depth, sampling works and writers in order to develop a flavor for each successive literary age. We’ll be reading a lot and enjoying it immensely. Much of what we read will be poetry (especially early on), sprinkled with a patina of other genres as they suit our needs.  

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A215 World Literature I 3 crs.

This course offers students an introduction to literature from around the world from the beginnings of written texts to 1650. Ancient Greece, early China, the Roman Empire, India’s classical age, the rise of Islamic literature, the cultural flowering of medieval Japan, African literary cultures, and the European Renaissance will be covered.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A216 World Literature II 3 crs.

This course focuses on the literature of the world from 1650 to the present. It highlights the Enlightenment in Europe; Asia’s movement into global dialogue; the Ottoman Empire; and African, American, and European revolutions in art, politics, and industry.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A220 Introduction to Film and Digital Media 3 crs.

This course provides an introduction to the means by which creative narratives are being re-interpreted through film and other digital media.

ENGL A242 Contemporary Nonfiction Prose 3 crs.

This course is a study of the more important examples of prose nonfiction written since 1920. The topics covered include autobiography, travel writing, and personal experience narratives.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A243 American Masterworks 3 crs.

A survey of American writers from the Colonial period to 1900, this course includes Bradford, Edwards, Franklin, Irving, Cooper, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Dickinson, and Twain. Several major texts–such as Walden, The Scarlet Letter, Moby Dick, and Huckleberry Finn–will be studied as well as extensive selections from other writers’ works.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A244 American Literature Since 1900 3 crs.

This course is a survey of American Literature from 1865 to the present. It will provide a chronological overview of American literature from the Civil War to the present. We will try to answer the following questions in order to understand both the literature and the culture that produced it: What constitutes literature and how does it change over time? What does it mean to call literature “American?” What social and cultural factors affect literature and how is it produced and understood? How do we choose what to read and what not to read?

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A246 Modern Short Fiction 3 crs.

This course introduces the student to modern short fiction–that is, short stories and novellas written in the last hundred years. Modern short fiction begins with continental writers like Chekhov, so the emphasis is on authors writing in languages other than English.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A250 Introduction to African-American Literature 3 crs.

This course is a survey of African-American literature from the early slavery period through Emancipation and Reconstruction up to the late 1890s. We sample various genres, including poetry, speeches, fiction, essays, and biographies, and examine dominant themes, motifs, and styles characteristic of the period.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A251 African-American Literature Since 1900 3 crs.

A survey of modern African-American literature from 1900 to the present, this course broadly samples major writers, genres, and themes of 20th-century African-America. It provides a conceptual framework for this body of literature; reviews key terms, ideas, motifs, and individual styles; and evaluates the contributions of African-American writers to American literary culture.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A255 Introduction to Shakespeare 3 crs.

This course acts as a student’s introduction to Shakespearean drama. In addition to covering the cultural and thematic content of the plays, close attention is given to Shakespeare’s use of the visual, spatial, and temporal elements of stagecraft that distinguish his drama as a performance art.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A306 Professional Writing 3 crs.

This course trains students in the basic writing techniques required by the professional world.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A311 Writing Fiction 3 crs.

This course offers intermediate instruction in writing short fiction. Focusing on the form and theory of the genre, the course employs a workshop format and individual conferences with the instructor to critique student writing. Students will read widely and analyze short stories throughout the semester.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211 and/or permission of instructor.

ENGL A312 Writing Poetry 3 crs.

This course offers intermediate instruction in writing poetry. Focusing on the form and theory of the genre, the course employs a workshop format and individual conferences with the instructor to critique student writing. Students will read widely and analyze poems throughout the semester.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211 and/or permission of instructor.

ENGL A313 Feature Screenwriting I 3 crs.

This workshop-oriented writing course takes students through the study of classical and nonclassical feature scripts and asks students to develop a feature narrative concept through the stages of treatment and outline and to write half of the script itself.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211.

ENGL A314 Feature Screenwriting II 3 crs.

Designed as the second in a two-part sequence with ENGL A313, this workshop writing course asks students to complete their feature narrative screenplays while studying further examples of classical and nonclassical scripts. Students will also analyze and complete a rewrite of their scripts and study production potentials.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211, A313; junior standing.

ENGL A316 Medieval Literature 3 crs.

Covering material from Beowulf and Arthurian legend to drama and lyrics, this course provides an introduction not only to the masterworks of the period but also to the complex culture and world view that produced such divergent works as The Divine Comedy and The Art of Courtly Love.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A317 Writing the Short Script 3 crs.

Writing the Short Script will focus on monologues, dialogues and short scripts. Designed to strengthen the dialogue and blocking skills of students interested in writing fiction, nonfiction, screenplays and stage plays, the course will combine extensive readings of modern and contemporary literature with workshop discussions and individual conferences with the instructor about writing assignments.

ENGL A320 Shakespeare Survey 3 crs.

This survey covers representative comedies, tragedies, and histories.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A321 Shakespeare: Tragedies 3 crs.

This course provides an intensive study of all of the tragedies, with considerable attention given to five "great" plays: Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, Othello, and Antony and Cleopatra.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A322 Shakespeare: Histories 3 crs.

This course covers the major history plays, with attention given to the concept of the history play in the Renaissance.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A323 Shakespeare: Comedies 3 crs.

This course is designed to permit extensive reading in all of Shakespeare’s comedies and late romances, with attention given to the idea of comedy in the Renaissance.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A330 Modern European Fiction in Translation 3 crs.

This course acts as an introduction to the modern European novel: that is, novels written since the publication of Flaubert’s Madame Bovary in 1857. Attention is given to the major writers in French, German, Russian, and Spanish. (European writers most notable for their shorter fiction are covered in ENGL A246, Modern Short Fiction.)

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A340 Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales 3 crs.

This course is an examination of medieval culture, with special emphasis on art, philosophy, and religious and social codes as they are reflected in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A341 Chaucer: Dreams and Troilus 3 crs.

This course is an examination of medieval culture, with special emphasis on art, philosophy, and religious and social codes as they are reflected in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde and the dream visions.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A344 A Survey of Modern Drama 3 crs.

An introduction to the major figures and works in modern Western drama, this course emphasizes those authors and plays that helped shape the development of drama as a cultural form. Primary stress will be placed on the literary aspects of the works, but considerable attention will be given to dramaturgical matters.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A348 Modern Poetry 3 crs.

This course surveys the major figures in England and America from Whitman to the beginning of World War II. Figures include Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Frost, Stevens, Williams, and Auden.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A349 20th-century American Fiction 3 crs.

This course examines the American novel from the 1920s to the present, and readings may include Stein, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Faulkner.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A350 New Orleans in Literature 3 crs.

This course emphasizes the importance of place in literature by focusing on continuity and change in literary representations of New Orleans from the 1830s to the present. Readings include drama, poetry, and prose written by both residents and visitors.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A351 Louisiana Literature 3 crs.

This course is an exploration of the literary traditions of Louisiana, including works of fiction, drama and poetry that prominently feature the state, both past and present.

ENGL A355 Americans in Paris 3 crs.

The course covers the literature of the Lost Generation and the works of later writers who fled to Paris from repression in America. Studying the literature of the Lost Generation in the place where it was written and understanding the impact of Paris on the group of writers will help students understand the cultural symbiosis between America and France.

ENGL A360 Folklore and Literature 3 crs.

This course surveys such traditional, oral literature as legends, folk tales, and ballads.  It examines the uses of these genres and the representation of folk culture in poetry and fiction by selected writers from countries around the world.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A370 How to Read a Film 3 crs.

This course introduces students to reading films, gives some familiarity with film criticism, provides an introduction to the history of the cinema and to its development as an industry, and exposes students to a wide variety of films.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A372 Studies in American Cinema 3 crs.

Designed to explore the development of the classical Hollywood narrative film and its alternatives, the course focuses on aesthetic as well as sociocultural aspects of American film in relation to production, distribution, and consumption. The specific topic will change each term.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A373 The Black Writer in America 3 crs.

This course will survey the many contributions of African-American writers to the literary traditions of the United States. Those contributions are virtually contemporary with the colonization of North America--represented in the poetry of African-born Phyllis Wheatley--and shaped the themes and genres of American literature for the next three hundred years. The wealth of available material will force us to be selective, but we will try to construct a coherent overview of the major writers and significant periods: from the slave narrative to local color fiction, from the Harlem Renaissance to the Civil Rights movement. Writers will include familiar figures like Frederick Douglass, Richard Wright (whose centennial is being celebrated) and Toni Morrison as well as lesser-known authors such as Charles Chesnutt, Nella Larsen, and Lorraine Hansberry (whose 1959 play was recently revived on Broadway). And to help us better appreciate the contexts of these works, we will also read a selection of non-fiction, by influential thinkers like W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Toni Morrison and James Baldwin.

Requirements will include reading and reflection on the texts, participation in weekly discussion forums on Blackboard, and the completion of a multi-part writing and electronic project on a Black writer in America.

ENGL A388 Grammar and Language 3 crs.

This course is an advanced study of modern English grammar and linguistics, as well as the history of the language.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; sophomore standing.

ENGL A404 Creative Nonfiction Workshop 3 crs.

This course provides opportunity for peer critiques of writing projects of students’ own choosing. The course closely examines assumptions, style, and rhetorical techniques in writing for various purposes and audiences.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A405 Editing and Publishing 3 crs.

This course introduces the student writer to contemporary publishing and editing processes, with emphasis on an understanding of these as they affect both the creative writer and the writer of nonfiction.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A406 Internship: Editing and Publishing 3 crs.

This course introduces students to the production cycle of the New Orleans Review, an internationally known journal. Students work with print professionals on and off campus who cooperate to produce the magazine.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A408 Writing: Technique and Technology 3 crs.

This course introduces how current computer technology can be used to help the student develop as a mature writer. Students apply word processing to the classical tasks of revision, stylistic development, translation, and editing.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205.

ENGL A409 Contemporary Topics in Rhetoric 3 crs.

This course examines significant trends in contemporary theories of rhetoric and the writing process. Special emphasis on how the theories relate to the teaching of composition at all grade levels.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A410 Writing Gender 3 crs.

The course examines the impact of contemporary feminist thought on rhetorical theory and introduces students to writing practices resulting from that impact. Readings from Hélène Cixous, Luce Irigary, Julia Kristeva, Judith Butler, Bell Hooks, Rosi Braidotti, Nancy Mairs, Maxine Hong Kingston, Jeanette Winterson, and others provide a foundation for nonfiction writing assignments that combine personal experience with critical theory and encourage experimentation with voice and form.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A411 Fiction Workshop 3 crs.

This course examines advanced topics in the writing of fiction, with special attention to contemporary trends in the genre. Some attention is paid to publishing. In addition to writing short fiction, students read extensively and analyze contemporary fiction.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211; junior standing.

ENGL A412 Poetry Workshop 3 crs.

The course examines advanced topics in the writing of poetry, with special attention to contemporary trends in the genre. Some attention is paid to publishing. In addition to writing poetry, students read extensively and analyze contemporary poetry.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211; junior standing.

ENGL A415 Creative Writing Workshop 3 crs.

This course examines advanced topics in creative writing to be determined by the instructor, with special attention to contemporary trends in creative writing. Some attention is paid to publication in the field. In addition to writing their own work, students read extensively and analyze examples relating to the topic. Repeatable with permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; ENGL A211 or permission of instructor.

ENGL A423 Renaissance Poetry 3 crs.

This course offers a consideration of the poetry of the major figures of the period–Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Herbert, and Marvell–but omits the longer works of Spenser and Milton.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A424 Medieval Drama 3 crs.

This course surveys Roman-style comedies, Latin liturgical drama and Anglo Norman religious plays in medieval England before turning to Middle English biblical, morality and saints' plays. Dramatic texts will be supplemented by non-dramatic literature. Music, theological writing, and visual materials and some emphasis will be placed on stagecraft.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A425 Restoration/ 18th-century Literature 3 crs.

This course is a survey of the major poets and prose writers of the Restoration and the 18th century with an emphasis on Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson, and Boswell.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A426 18th-century British Fiction 3 crs.

This course is a study of the development of the novel in England through the French Revolution, with readings from Defoe, Swift, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A427 Romanticism 3 crs.

This course offers a consideration of the Romantic movement in English poetry, concentrating on Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A428 Victorian England 3 crs.

This course is a cultural and historical study of the age, with particular attention to Tennyson, Arnold, Browning, Carlyle, and Ruskin.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A429 19th-century British Fiction 3 crs.

A continuation of ENGL A426, this course examines the development of the novel in the 19th century with study of works of Austen, the Brontës, Thackeray, Dickens, George Eliot, Hardy, and the minor novelists.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A430 20th-century British Fiction 3 crs.

A continuation of ENGL A426 and A429, this course examines the fiction of writers such as Conrad, Ford, Forster, Joyce, Lawrence, and Woolf with some attention given to contemporary fiction.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A431 Revising American Texts 3 crs.

"Why should we not also enjoy an original relation to the universe?" asks Emerson, and that original relation is revealed in the examination of pre-20th-century American literature in the light of 20th-century texts and films. The course creates a double vision of early and modern writing and film that broadens understanding of both eras and sheds light on what is truly original in the American experience.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A432 American Dreams 1620 — 1860 3 crs.

This course is an examination of how traditional American writers saw America emerging and how native Americans, African-Americans, women, and other minorities viewed the country’s development. The contrast calls into question all of our myths about the American Dream–as new Eden, as fountainhead of democracy and freedom, as a world of rugged individualism, innocence, and rags to riches.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A433 19th-century American Fiction 3 crs.

The American novel from the Romantics to the Naturalists will be examined; readings include Poe, Melville, Hawthorne, Twain, James, Crane, and Dreiser.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A434 American Romanticism 3 crs.

The course re-examines two major 19th-century movements in American literature, Romanticism and Transcendentalism, in order to understand how they influenced and were influenced by Americans’ perceptions of race, class, and gender. The course focuses on literary and philosophical works in the light of deconstructionist and gender criticism to consider the varied approaches to defining America.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A437 American War Literature 3 crs.

This course is an examination of the impact of two world wars and the Vietnam conflict on the culture, politics, and literature of the U.S. The course will analyze war fronts and home fronts in order to aid students in understanding the images of wars and the impact of each conflict on later wars.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A438 Southern Literature 3 crs.

This course is a consideration of regionalism in literature. It examines the influence of such topics as history, race, and economic development on 19th- and 20th-century Southern writers.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A439 American Drama 3 crs.

This course is a study of American drama, including plays by O’Neill and Miller as well as more recent playwrights.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A450 Black Aesthetics 3 crs.

This course focuses on selected works by black writers from Africa, the U.S., and the Caribbean. It examines critical works and articles on black literary aesthetics and makes a comparative study of themes, motifs, structure, characterization, language, and style to establish the characteristics which confer a definite identity on black literary works.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A461 Contemporary Women's Literature 3 crs.

The course will introduce the major works by women writers which heavily influenced the development of the modernist and postmodernist movements in literature. The course will also explore the relationship of gender identity to the development of various literary techniques.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A466 Southern Women Writers 3 crs.

This course explores the contributions of women writers to the southern mystique, their achievements as artists, and the complex relationships they shared with each other and with their traditional culture.

ENGL A470 Film and the Art of Literary Adaptation 3 crs.

This course provides students with an understanding of how a work of literature is translated into a movie. The core material for the course is an analysis of fiction works that have been made into movies, but the course also deals with films created from folklore and historical records.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A472 Studies in European Cinema 3 crs.

This course explores European cinemas, including Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, in relation to the individual cultures from which they arise. Aesthetic and sociocultural differences between these national cinemas and Hollywood are stressed. The specific topic changes each term.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A475 Great Figures– Medieval 3 crs.

This course is an intensive study of one or two great medieval literary figures. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A476 Great Figures– Renaissance 3 crs.

This course offers an intensive study of one or two great literary figures from the Renaissance. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A478 Great Figures– 19th-century 3 crs.

This course offers an intensive study of one or two great literary figures from the 19th century. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A479 Great Figures– American Pre—1900 3 crs.

This course offers an intensive study of one or two great American literary figures of the pre-1900s. The course traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. This course may be repeated with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A483 Semiotics 3 crs.

This course advances a theory of communications based on the study of verbal and visual signs.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A484 Critical Theory to 1900 3 crs.

This course is a historical survey of the major theories of literary interpretation, focusing on the aesthetics of major philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Longinus, Saint Augustine, Locke, Hume, Croce, and Nietzsche. In addition, the course will cover the theories of major western writers such as Horace, Sidney, Dryden, Pope, Johnson, Wordsworth, Keats, Arnold, Goethe, and Schiller. It concludes with a discussion of Freud, Marx, and Engels.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A485 Interpretive Approaches 3 crs.

This course looks at the more recent developments in interpretive theory, as it has been influenced by such concepts as formalism, mythography, phenomenology, structuralism, Marxism, Freudianism, and New Criticism.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A487 Contemporary Critical Issues 3 crs.

Under this heading, various courses will be offered that focus on different contemporary issues in literary criticism and theory.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A490 Great Figures 3 crs.

This course is an intensive study of one or two great literary figures. It traces the development of the author’s art, noting influences, historical and philosophical contexts, critical receptions, and modern assessments. Repeatable with permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; junior standing.

ENGL A491 Practicum in Teaching Writing 1 cr.

This practicum focuses on methods and materials for teaching writing. Students work in the English writing lab and the Writing across the Curriculum lab.

Prerequisites: ENGL T122 or A205; permission of instructor.

ENGL A493 Directed Readings 3 crs.

ENGL A495 Special Project arr.

This project focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students.

ENGL A496 Seminar/Workshop arr.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

ENGL A497 Internship/ Practicum arr.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

ENGL A498 Research Project arr.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

ENGL A499 Independent Study arr.

This course includes work leading to the English Honors thesis or the University Honors senior thesis, as well as work done independently under professorial supervision.

ENGL H233 Honors Literature I: Classic Epic 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: University Honors Program

Gilgamesh, Beowulf, and The Song of Roland establish the idea of the epic as a high artistic expression of a culture. The Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Aeneid are studied in the light of this concept.

ENGL H234 Honors Literature II: Modern Epic Tradition 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: University Honors Program

This course considers the ways epic tradition has developed in the modern era. Several modern epics such as Moby Dick, Huckleberry Finn, Ulysses, and Gravity’s Rainbow will be examined closely, using perspectives furnished by the classical epics as well as by contemporary critical concepts.

ENGL H235 Great Love Stories 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: University Honors Program

This course examines the literature of love from several centuries and several continents. It focuses attention on cultural notions of love, marriage, family, romance, gender and sexuality.

ENGL T122 Critical Reading and Writing 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Introductory

This course gives intensive training in English composition. It is designed to develop the students’ ability to analyze arguments, create their own arguments, and conduct research.

ENGL T125 Writing About Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Introductory

This course explores the theme of initiation, or the emerging self, in a number of its literary forms. Most, though not all, of the tales are modern, realistic, and concerned with young adults in a pluralistic society. The narratives will confirm or challenge the experience of young people and may foreshadow images of their future lives.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL U230 Renaissance Masterworks 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course examines major works of great European authors from the period 1350 — 1650 to give a sense of what constitutes the Renaissance. A series of important related themes will be traced in order to elucidate the Renaissance system of values: individual and community, permanence and change, illusion and reality, art and nature.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL U232 Vision of Utopia 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

Utopia is the possible vision of an impossible world (i.e., the best of all possible worlds). To contemplate utopia as an idea, criticize it as a literary form, and participate in it as a means of aesthetic appreciation will be the purposes of the course.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

 ENGL U287 Martyrs, Minstrels, Mystics 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course introduces a vast body of literary and non-literary writings produced by women from Western Europe and Japan during the period 900-1500. Genres to be studied include drama, romance, diary, lyric, epistle, mystical narrative and political allegory. Students will explore issues of authority, patronage and gender, among others.

ENGL U288 The World of the Vikings 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

The World of the Vikings examines literature of the Viking period and examines its impact on Early English Literature.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL U289 Chaucer and His World 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course is an examination of medieval culture, with special emphasis on art, philosophy, and the religious and social codes of the period as they are reflected in the work and thought of one of the great Western writers.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL U295 The Legend of Robin Hood 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course is an examination of the medieval origins and subsequent transmutations of Robin Hood, the medieval greenwood outlaw. The course will include 20th-century film adaptations of the legend, and emphasis will be on viewing the Robin Hood story from a number of different critical perspectives.

ENGL U297 Heroes and Monsters 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course offers a multidisciplinary introduction to early medieval literature, history and archaeology. Students will explore Anglo-Saxon attitudes toward heroism, lordship, the gods and God, space and time, gender, and death as preparation for a month-long reading of the Old English epic Beawulf.

ENGL U299 Arthurian Legend 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course is a survey of Arthurian literature and art from the Middle Ages to the present, tracing the growth of the legend from early 10th-century chronicles through the romances of the high Middle Ages and its eventual evolution to such contemporary works as the film Excalibur or the feminist novel The Mists of Avalon.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V234 Literature and Justice 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

Much excellent literature has been produced by men and women reacting to wrongs inflicted upon them by society. Excellent literature has also been written showing the "Failure of the Word"–how the legal justice system has blocked rather than achieved justice.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V244 Screen Power 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course aims to introduce students to an analytical model dealing with the ideological power of film with respect to its aesthetics, content, and audience appeal. Recent studies argue that film is not ideologically free and that any serious study of film history, aesthetics, or criticism should take this into account. This course may be taken more than once as the subject matter changes.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V250 Myth and Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The course focuses on the relationship between myth and literary narrative. It explores the function of myth and examines literary texts in the light of recurrent patterns of culture. Readings from anthropology, psychology, and comparative religion will offer a framework for the consideration of literary texts, including fiction, poetry, and drama.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V256 Regional American Writers 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course is a study of the North American sense of place from nineteenth century local color fiction to contemporary literatres of diversity.

ENGL V259 Romantic Words/Pictures 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

A study of Romantic verbal and visual imagery, emphasizing the issues and values at stake in debates over the 18th- and 19th-century sister arts tradition in England. Poetry by Blake, Wordsworth, Keats, and others. Paintings by Constable, Turner, and others. Readings in Burke, Lessing, Reynolds, and others.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V260 Detective Fiction 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The course examines detective fictions within the context of British and American literary traditions from the mid-nineteenth century forward. Lectures, discussions and writing assignments focus on the evolution of the genre from the puzzles of Poe and Conan Doyle through the British Golden Age and the American "hard boiled" school to contemporary and post modern forms.

ENGL V269 Multicultural Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course is in literature dealing with cross-cultural themes and experiences. It will include, but not be limited to, literature of colonial and post-colonial experience. Its purpose is to create a greater awareness of how representations of other people, places, and cultures function in our personal and communal lives.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V270 The American Character 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course concerns those characteristics of American culture that seem to define America as unique among nations. It will concentrate on contemporary American values and politics but will begin with the observations of de Tocqueville and include the writings of contemporary journalists, social scientists, novelists, travel writers, and foreign observers.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V273 The African Novel 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The course examines the form and texture of the African novel and looks at the dominant themes of colonization, assimilation, alienation, and neo-colonialism, with the aim of determining the role of the African novel in teaching the world about Africa.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V274 Women Writers 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course is a historical study of literature focusing upon women’s struggle for equality. Readings include fiction, drama, poetry, and biography by and about women, and historical, sociological, and psychological essays.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V275 Black Women Novelists 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The course focuses on black women as creative literary artists and evaluates the contributions of these women to the literary culture of their respective countries and to the world in general. It seeks to establish the common links and the divergent views of these writers on problems facing black people wherever they live.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V276 Literary Modernism 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

Modernism is a term that has come to include not only the styles of late 19th- and early 20th-century art and literature but also the philosophic and moral issues represented in these art forms. This course examines major 20th-century works of art and literature and the issues of modern life raised by these works. (Also listed as VISA V140.)

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V277 Harlem Renaissance 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course focuses on the first major African-American literary and cultural movement of the 20th century. In addition to familiarizing the student with the literary and cultural background out of which the Harlem Renaissance developed, the course covers the major writers of the movement with emphasis on their relationship to the artists of the jazz era.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V278 Black Thought and Art 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course is a survey of major themes, genres, and motifs in black literature of Africa, the U.S., and the Caribbean. It explores the religious, historical, sociopolitical, and cultural ideals of black people. It evaluates the role of black writers in projecting the contributions of black people to the world of culture and civilization.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V280 Science Fiction and Fantasy Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The course surveys the major science fiction/fantasy themes and forms in an effort to assess their relevance to our complex postmodern society. The values discussed and the issues raised by this study should help the student better grasp the individual’s role in our contemporary technological world.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V281 The Literature of Nature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

Humans' encounter with nature has produced some of the most lasting literature in the world. This course examines texts from early to contemporary nature writers, such as John James Audubon to John McPhee and Terry Tempest Williams. Students will also study and practice the craft of Nature writing.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V285 Contemporary Catholic Writers 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course examines issues of Catholic faith and practice as explored in major works of literature and film produced since Vatican II by artists from the U.S. and from around the world.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V289 Vampires in Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The course will cover different legends, texts, and films that deal with vampire myths.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

ENGL V292 The Sixties Through Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course examines America during one of its most exciting and idealistic periods–through the literature of the civil rights movement, the anti-war movement, the counterculture movement, and the women’s movement–in order to understand the values, assumptions, and conflicts of the decade.

Prerequisite: ENGL T122.

Courses: French (FREN)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

FREN A100 First-year French I 3 crs.

This course focuses on the fundamental structure of the language. Development of the four basic skills–comprehension, speaking, reading, writing–are of primary concern.

FREN A101 First-year French II 3 crs.

This course is a continuation in appropriation of the four basic skills with emphasis on correct pronunciation and the acquisition of fundamental vocabulary.

Prerequisite: FREN A100 or equivalent.

FREN A200 Second-year French I 3 crs.

Development of basic language skills continues with emphasis on complete grammar review and on the acquisition and use of new vocabulary in cultural contexts. Reading and discussion of articles and other writings are undertaken with grammatical exercises and short compositions based on cultural topics.

Prerequisite: FREN A101 or equivalent.

FREN A201 Second-year French II 3 crs.

This course consists of readings and discussion in the language of literary and cultural texts. Students will write short essays based on the readings and demonstrate use of basic techniques of textual analysis through discussion and in writing.

Prerequisite: FREN A200 or equivalent.

FREN A300 Advanced Grammar and Composition 3 crs.

This course reviews intensively the structure of the language and of idiomatic expressions. Daily translations and frequent original compositions are required.

Prerequisite: FREN A201 or equivalent.

FREN A301 Advanced Conversation and Phonetics 3 crs.

The student will acquire an extensive working vocabulary and fluency through conversation, reading, and discussion of cultural texts. French phonetics and its application to the improvement of pronunciation are also studied.

Prerequisite: FREN A201 or equivalent.

FREN A315 Analysis of French Texts 3 crs.

This course discusses specific techniques of intensive reading and analysis through an in-depth study of a variety of short texts in French chosen to represent various discourse styles, periods, genres, themes, and traditions from both French and Francophone cultural milieux. Special emphasis is on training students in the commentaire or explication de texte.

Prerequisite: FREN A201 or equivalent.

FREN A320 Culture and Civilization I 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to French civilization from Lascaux and Gallo-Roman times to the 18th century. It includes the study of the geography of the French hexagon, from the centrality of Paris to the regionalism of the provinces. Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque art and music are discussed.

Prerequisite: FREN A201 or equivalent.

FREN A321 Culture and Civilization II 3 crs.

This course is a study of the important historical events from the 18th century to present day and social and economic changes beginning with the Revolution of 1789. The nature and development of French aesthetics and artistic traditions in painting, sculpture, and music will be presented, along with current topics including education, and the politics of modern-day France.

Prerequisite: FREN A201 or equivalent.

FREN A330 Introduction to French Literature I 3 crs.

This course is a survey of the chief literary currents and principal authors from the Middle Ages through the 18th century.

Prerequisite: FREN A201 or equivalent.

FREN A331 Introduction to French Literature II 3 crs.

This course is a survey of the chief literary currents and principal authors of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Prerequisite: FREN A201 or equivalent.

FREN A351 Enlightenment and Pre-Romanticism 3 crs.

Major trends and ideas in 18th-century literature are examined. Emphasis is on the works of the philosophes and on the development of the novel.

Prerequisite: At least one 300-level course or the equivalent.

FREN A352 19th-century Prose 3 crs.

This course involves readings in French theory and in the novels of Balzac, Flaubert, Sand, Stendhal, and Zola. Texts may change.

Prerequisite: At least one 300-level course or the equivalent.

FREN A353 20th-century Prose 3 crs.

This course involves readings in French theory and in the works of Bernanos, Butor, Camus, Gide, Malraux, Proust, and Sartre. Texts may change.

Prerequisite: At least one 300-level course or the equivalent.

FREN A354 Introduction to French Poetry 3 crs.

This course centers on the reading and analysis of poems reflecting the major currents in French poetry from Lamartine, Baudelaire, and Mallarmé to the more recent work of Perse and Ponge.

Prerequisite: At least one 300-level course or equivalent.

FREN A355 Introduction to French Theatre 3 crs.

This course is a chronological view of the development of French drama from its origins to the 20th century through the intensive study of representative dramatists and their handling of the elements of theatre.

Prerequisite: FREN A201 or equivalent.

FREN A360 Rousseau 3 crs.

This course focuses on the life, writings, and major contributions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

Prerequisite: At least one 300-level course or the equivalent.

FREN A495 Special Project 1 cr.

Capstone course required of all seniors. Student will work independently on a research paper in conjunction with a regular advanced course, and under the supervision of a professor. Capstone work should reflect the skills and knowledge the student has acquired as a Foreign Language major.

FREN A496 Seminar/Workshop arr.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

FREN A497 Internship/ Practicum arr.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory.

FREN A498 Senior Thesis arr.

FREN A499 Independent Study arr.

FREN G105 Survival French 1 cr.

Taught in France as part of the Paris Summer Program, this course emphasizes oral communication skills which will be put into practice in daily life. Vocabulary and some simplified grammar are taught as well. Appropriate for beginners and those who have some knowledge of French.

FREN V140 France and the Modern Experience 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course will examine Paris as a major cultural center in Europe during the period of 1900 to 1950. We will study the milieux and the works of modern writers and artists, focusing on intellectual and artistic concepts which have come to define modernism. When taught in Paris, the course makes use of museums and sites as resources.

Courses: German (GERM)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

GERM A100 First Year German I 3 crs.

Fundamental structure of the language is the focus of this course including development of the four basic skills - comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.

GERM A101 First Year German II 3 crs.

A continuation of A100.

Prerequisite GERM A100 or equivalent.

GERM A200 Second Year German I 3 crs.

Continued development of the four basic skills.  Readings in German culture with class discussion in German.

Prerequisite GERM A101 or equivalent.

GERM A 201 Second Year German II 3 crs.

Same description as A200.

Prerequisite GERM A200 or equivalent.

GERM A 300 Conversation and Composition I 3 crs.

Emphasis is made on oral and written expression, with vocabulary based on readings about everyday life in Germany.  Included in this course is a review of contemporary idiomatic expressions, frequent written assignments and oral presentations. 

GERM A 301 Conversation and Composition II 3 crs.

Same description as A300.

Prerequisite GERM A201 or equivalent.

GERM V230 German Culture and Civilization II 3 crs.

This course covers German history and culture from the end of the 18th century to the end of the 20th century.  Exercises in language skills are conducted in German.

Prerequisite GERM A201 or equivalent.

Courses: Greek (GREK)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

GREK A100 Beginning Greek I 3 crs.

Language tells us many things about a culture, not only in what people have to say but how they say it. This course introduces students to the world of the ancient Greeks through a study of their language.

GREK A101 Beginning Greek II 3 crs.

GREK A100 continued.

Prerequisite: GREK A100 or equivalent.

GREK A300 Homeric Greek 3 crs.

Students in this course will read selections from Homer and Hesiod as well as selections from the Homeric Hymns. Study will include examination of the epic meter and the impact of the epic poets on subsequent literature.

Prerequisite: GREK A101 or equivalent.

GREK A314 Greek Tragedy 3 crs.

This course examines the tragedy of ancient Athens. Study will focus on the mechanics of the language, the workings of the tragic stage, the historical background of the plays, and the larger issues about society that the plays raise. This course may be repeated with permission from the instructor.

Prerequisite: GREK A101 or equivalent.

GREK A315 Greek Comedy 3 crs.

This course examines both old and new comedy of ancient Athens. Study will focus on the mechanics of the language, the workings of the comic stage, the historic background of the plays, and the larger issues about society that the plays raise.

Prerequisite: GREK A101 or equivalent.

GREK A322 New Testament Greek 3 crs.

Students taking this course will read and discuss at least two books from the New Testament. In addition, they will compare a variety of modern translations to the original text.

Prerequisite: GREK A101 or equivalent.

GREK A340 Hellenistic Greek 3 crs.

This course examines the literature of the Hellenistic period (from the death of Alexander the Great). Works will include the genres of poetry, philosophy, and the novel. Students will study the historical and social contexts of each work.

Prerequisite: GREK A101 or equivalent.

GREK A402 Greek Historians 3 crs.

An intensive study of one or more ancient Greek historians. Students will examine the author’s style, influence, philosophy, and assessment regarding his topic. Repeatable with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite: GREK A101 or equivalent.

GREK A410 Greek Philosophy 3 crs.

This course is an intensive survey of one or two ancient Greek philosophers. Students will examine the author’s style, influence, and place within the historical and social context of philosophy. Repeatable with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite: GREK A101 or equivalent.

GREK A420 Greek Oratory 3 crs.

A survey of the speeches of the Greek orators. These readings reveal the development of early Greek prose and provide a window into many interesting scenarios from life in Classical Athens as well as provide evidence for the function of Greek oratory in Athenian democracy. Repeatable with instructor’s permission.

Prerequisite: GREK A101 or equivalent.

GREK A493 Directed Readings 3 crs.

GREK A498 Research Project 3 crs.

Independent study projects for qualified majors who develop interest in a special area.

GREK A499 Independent Study arr

Courses: History (HIST)

HIST A200 U.S. History to 1865 3 crs.

This course covers the exploration, the colonial experience, independence, the new republic, Jacksonian democracy, expansion, abolitionism, and the Civil War. The emphasis of the course is not only political but economic, social, and intellectual as well.

HIST A201 U.S. History from 1865 3 crs.

This course discusses the Reconstruction era, the Gilded Age, imperialism, progressivism, WWI, the ’20s, the New Deal, WWII, the Cold War, the new frontiers, the Great Society, and contemporary America. The emphasis of the course is not only political but economic, social, and intellectual as well.

HIST A202 Historical Methods Lab 3 crs.

A one-hour laboratory taken either freshman or sophomore year, with exceptions for transfer students. Linked with HIST A200, the lab director handles the basic tasks of teaching historical methods while the instructor of the survey would grade the research paper.

HIST A220 Latin America I 3 crs.

This course is a survey of pre-Columbian civilizations; European discovery and conquest; structure and problems of empire in Spanish and Portuguese America; the influence of the church; and the struggle for independence.

HIST A221 Modern Latin America 3 crs.

This course is a socio-economic, cultural, and political analysis of Latin American Republics since 1820. Emphasis is on the development of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Topics include problems and prospects, clash between the traditional and the modern, conflicts between church and state, and inter-American relations.

HIST A230 U.S. Legal History I 3 crs.

The major developments in American legal history from the Colonial period to the Civil War are discussed.

HIST A231 U.S. Legal History II 3 crs.

The major developments in American legal history from 1865 through the 20th century are discussed.

HIST A232 American Trials 3 crs.

This course focuses on famous American trials and uses them as a means to examine the broader historical context in which they took place. We will pay particular attention to why these trials captured the public’s attention at the time they occurred and why they still have a hold on the popular imagination today.

HIST A240 History of New Orleans 3 crs.

This course will not only explore the historical forces that have transformed New Orleans into one of the world's most distinctive cities, but also the ways in which the Crescent City has played an important role in shaping the broader historical events of both region and nation. Students will emerge from this course with a firm understanding of how diverse factors such as geography, economics, culture, ethnicity, and politics have produced New Orleans as we know it today.

HIST A245 Louisiana History 3 crs.

This course covers the political, economic, and social development of Louisiana from the colonial period to the present.

HIST A248 U.S. Military History 3 crs.

This course examines U.S. military policy from the American Revolution to the Cold War; the causes, events, and effects of major American conflicts; and the role of the military in American society and thought during the past two centuries.

HIST A260 Modern European Women’s History 3 crs.

This course will examine the history of European women from the 18th century to the present. It will analyze the diversities of women’s experiences based on nationality, class, and religion and will focus on women’s work, political and legal rights, sexuality, and on the impact of wars, revolutions, and movements such as nazism and communism.

HIST A276 African-American History to 1865 3 crs.

This course is a survey of the African-American experience from the African background to the end of the Civil War. It will focus on African-Americans’ quest for the American dream and how they attempted to deal with the problems and challenges posed by enslavement and racism.

HIST A277 African-American History Since 1865 3 crs.

This course is a study of the African-American experience since the Civil War. Students will examine the nature and effects of the changes wrought by the Civil War and Reconstruction. The course will address the themes of change and continuity in the black experience, the struggles against Jim Crow, the civil rights struggles, and post-civil rights developments.

HIST A288 History of the Middle East I 3 crs.

This course traces the major developments in the Middle East from the 7th to the 16th centuries. This period witnessed the transition to Islam in the Arabian Peninsula and its spread throughout the wider Middle East. Accordingly, we will study how Muslims shaped a unified civilization and interacted with non-Muslim communities and polities.

HIST A289 History of the Middle East II 3 crs.

This course is a continuation of Middle East I. It explores the main patterns and events that shaped the modern Middle East from the 16th century to the present, paying particular attention to the expansion of empire, the transformation of economies and institutions, changing gender relations, and conflicts over territory.

HIST A300 Ancient History 3 crs.

This course discusses the political, social, religious, economic, and cultural development of western culture from the Sumerians to the Romans.

HIST A304 Early Christianity 3 crs.

This course examines the apostolic age;  geographical expansion;  persecutions; organizational developments;  early heresies;  councils of Nicaea, Ephesus, and Chalcedon;  popular piety; church-state relations;  rise of Monasticism.

HIST A305 Medieval Crime and Community 3 crs.

This course explores the interaction between the development of criminal law and social change in the late medieval period.  Classes will be organized thematically and will focus on a broad range of subjects, from trial by ordeal to sanctuary. Emphasis will be placed on the creative ways litigants and jurors manipulated the law courts to their best advantage.

HIST A306 Middle Ages 3 crs.

European social, political, and cultural institutions from the fall of Rome to the 15th century will be examined.

HIST A307 Saints & Demons in Medieval Europe 3 crs.

The medieval church played a central role influencing the lives of Western Christians. This course examines the depth of that influence. Particular emphasis is placed on forms of religious expression, the development of ecclesiastical organization and hierarchy, the role of the church in everyday life, canon law, and lay involvement in the church.

HIST A308 Age of Renaissance 3 crs.

This course is a study of the social, political, economic, and intellectual developments of the Renaissance. Shifting attitudes mark a transition from the medieval to the early modern world and prepare the way for the upheavals of the Age of Reformation.

HIST A310 Age of Reformation 3 crs.

Discussions examine the shift in religious sensibilities in light of new economic, intellectual, and political developments. It treats the unique responses of Protestant and Catholic reformations.

HIST A315 Western Intellectual History 3 crs.

This course traces the history of western ideas, dealing with the major intellectual developments from the pre-Socratic Greeks to the crisis of European thought in the 19th century.

HIST A321 Modern Europe 1815 — 1914 3 crs.

This course covers the Congress of Vienna, era of revolutions, liberalism, nationalism, socialism, German and Italian unification, and the origins of World War I.

HIST A322 Modern Europe 1914 — 1945 3 crs.

World War I, the Russian revolution, Fascism, Nazism, and the origins of World War II will be examined.

HIST A323 Modern Europe 1945 — Present 3 crs.

Cold War; recovery; and political, economic, and social developments will be examined.

HIST A327 Hitler and Nazi Germany 3 crs.

This course will trace the development of Hitler through his rise to power to his subordination of Germany to his dictatorship.  It will examine the character of the Nazi state, its monopolization of power through terror, its racial agenda, its aggressive ethnic imperialism, and its ultimate defeat as a result of hubristic over-extension.

HIST A328 The Holocaust 3 crs.

A history of the anti-Semitism of the Nazi regime in Germany, its anti-Semitic measures, and finally its genocidal assault on the Jews of Europe. The origins of German and Nazi anti-Semitism, the course of Nazi anti-Semitic policy, and the consequences of the Holocaust will be examined.

HIST A330 Colonial America 3 crs.

This course explores the establishment of colonies in North America. Economic, political, social, and intellectual developments from prehistory to the end of the Seven Years’ War (1763) will be discussed.

HIST A332 Revolutionary America 1753 — 1815 3 crs.

This course considers the impact of revolutionary change in North America from the time of the Revolution to the end of the War of 1812. The course will explore the economic, political, social, and intellectual questions facing Americans from the beginnings of the drive to Independence through the formative years of nationhood.

HIST A334 Age of Jackson 1815 — 1845 3 crs.

This course is a study of the emerging conflict of nationalism and sectionalism in American democracy, including the conflicting theories of Jacksonian democracy.

HIST A336 History of the Old South 3 crs.

This course discusses the origins and evolution of the Old South as a distinctive region and section from its colonization through the collapse of the Confederacy.

HIST A337 The New South 3 crs.

This course is an investigation of the history of the New South. The course will ponder the definition of "New South," the New South Creed, and development of the South as a distinctive region from the collapse of the Confederacy to the Information Age.

HIST A338 Civil War and Reconstruction 3 crs.

This course covers 1845 — 1877 through examination of the forces leading to sectional conflict and to reestablishment of the Union.

HIST A340 U.S.: Gilded and Progressive Eras 3 crs.

This course is a study of America’s industrial age and emergence as a world power in the period 1877 — 1914. Emphasis, too, is on the reaction and reform which these changes brought about, e.g., the decline of laissez faire thought and the genteel tradition, and the rise of the Populist and Progressive movements.

HIST A342 U.S.: The ’20s and ’30s 3 crs.

This course is a study of America from 1914 to 1941; from the peak of optimism and the Progressive Movement to disillusionment and the brink of a second world war; from incredible prosperity to more incredible depression. Emphasis is on the social, political, and intellectual responses to the period’s tremendous economic, cultural, and technological changes.

HIST A343 U.S.: WWII to Present 3 crs.

This course is a study of America from 1941 to the present, including WWII, the Cold War, the hot wars of Korea and Vietnam, and the increasingly active foreign policy of the period. At home, it includes the problems of adjustment to the postwar world and to unprecedented affluence–in general to the vast changes of the past five decades.

HIST A347 The Early American West 3crs.

This course will survey the history of the early American West from its colonial origins to 1890. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of the West in the historical imagination.

HIST A349 Africa to 1880 3crs.

This course is a survey of the history of Africa from the earliest times. It will examine the evolution of African societies and states and interactions between Africans and the outside world.

HIST A350 Africa 1880 to Present 3 crs.

This course covers the interaction of Africa with the West. It also examines the processes and structures of colonialism, African reactions to colonialism, nationalist movements, and the economic and political structures of independent African states.

HIST A352 Women in African History 3 crs.

This course looks at women in African history from ancient times to the present, focusing on how religious practices, colonialism, and social class have impacted their lives. We will examine the construction of gender, social systems, reproduction, women’s exercise of power, and the attempt to control of the bodies of women and girls.

HIST A375 Eastern European History 3 crs.

This course is a study of the political, social, economic, religious, and cultural life of the peoples of Eastern Europe, (Poles, Czechs, Austrians, Hungarians, Romanians, Bulgarians, Yugoslavs, and Greeks) from 1500 to the present with an emphasis on the 20th century.

HIST A381 English History to 1688 3 crs.

This course is a study of political, social, cultural, and religious developments in England from the Roman Conquest to the Revolution of 1688. The focus will be on the emergence of Parliament and the English common law.

HIST A382 English History, 1688 to Present 3 crs.

This course is an analysis of the transformation of English society from 18th-century aristocratic dominance and the rise of the middle classes in the 19th century to the emergence of working-class power and the establishment of the welfare state in the 20th century. The changing role of England as a world power will also be examined.

HIST A390 Chinese History I 3 crs.

How the Chinese have viewed themselves, historically, politically, social-economically, religiously, and aesthetically from the Hsiao Dynasty c. 2200 B.C. to the Ming Dynasty 1640.

HIST A391 Chinese History II 3 crs.

This course concerns how the Chinese continued to view themselves in relation to their earlier history and how the coming of the West influenced the Ching Dynasty (1644 — 1911) and the subsequent experience of the Chinese in the 20th century.

HIST A392 Japanese History I 3 crs.

Pre-Buddhistic Japan of the Jomon and Yayoi Eras, Nara, the "Golden Age" of Heian, the emergence of the Samurai in the Kamakura Era, Ashikaga Shogunate, and the arrival of the West are discussed in the course. Stress is given to the religious, political, and cultural life of Japan between c. 500 B.C. and 1600 A.D.

HIST A393 Japanese History II 3 crs.

This course examines the Tokugawa Era (1600 — 1868), the impact of the West and the subsequent emergence of Japan as a modern nation in the Meiji, Taisho, and Showa Eras. Stress is placed on the unique experience the Japanese have had, especially in their fine arts and culture.

HIST A394 East Asian History 3 crs.

This course is an introductory survey of the history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. It is a required course for all Asian Studies majors and minors. Students will study the cultural, literary, philosophical, and religious traditions of Asia as well as the historical conflicts that arose among the various Asian civilizations. The purpose of the course is to prepare students to study more in depth the civilizations of Asia, especially China and Japan, and provide a foundation for an understanding of modern Asia. The history of the development of international relations and the varied Asian responses to the West will be important themes discussed in class sessions. Students will also view and discuss video documentaries and film selections that illustrate how historical events influence art.

HIST A400 Historiography 3 crs.

This course is a study of the meaning of history through the eyes of philosophers, theologians, and historians; it studies both philosophies of history and the various approaches to historical investigation. Required of all students with a concentration in history.

HIST A404 New Orleans’ Oral Histories 3 crs.

The focus of this course will vary each semester. The class uses the methodology of oral history to explore an aspect of the history of New Orleans through interviews. Students use A/V equipment to preserve their interviews and they will use the information they gathered to write term papers and produce documentaries.

HIST A405 Early American Indians 3 crs.

This course will survey the history of North American Indians from the earliest periods of prehistory to the "closing" of the American frontier in 1890. Using the methodology of ethnohistory, the course will explore the history and culture of the diverse Indian peoples of early America as well as their interaction with other ethnic groups.

HIST A410 History of Mexico 3 crs.

This course covers the history of Mexico from Aztec times to the present. Emphasis on dominant social, economic, and cultural trends.

HIST A414 Northern South America 3 crs.

This course covers the history of Colombia, Venezuela, and Ecuador including pre-Columbian past, Spanish Conquest, Colonial Period, 19th and 20th century. Emphasis is on dominant political, social, economic, and cultural trends. The course surveys the impact of the gold, cacao, oil, coffee, and drug economies. Studies will include liberalism, conservatism, and radical challenges to the established order.

HIST A422 Victorian Culture and Society 3 crs.

This course is an interdisciplinary analysis of English culture and society in the 19th century. The emphasis will be on the formation of and challenges to Victorian values. Sexual morals, family dynamics, the role of women, class attitudes, education, and religion will be examined. Literature, art, and music will be integral parts of the course.

HIST A425 Modern Russia 3 crs.

This course is a study of modern Russia with emphasis on the 20th century.

HIST A435 Modern Germany Since 1866 3 crs.

This course covers unification to the present: Bismarck, World War I, revolution, Hitler, World War II, and post-war German developments.

HIST A440 African and Black Diaspora 3 crs

This course is a study of the history of blacks in Diaspora.  It will focus on a comparative examination of the black experience in different locations -- the U.S., Latin America, Africa, and the Carribean.

HIST A442 History of Southern Africa 3 crs.

HIST A493 Directed Reading Course 3 crs.

Course content varies but is keyed to student and faculty interests in relevant professional topics.

HIST A496 Seminar/Workshop arr.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

HIST A497 Internship/ Practicum arr.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory. Specific intern programs provide practical experience in archival and museum work.

HIST A498 Research Project arr.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

HIST A499 Independent Study arr.

HIST H233 Honors World Civilization I: to 1650 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: University Honors Program

This course is designed for university honors students. It intends to communicate the essential facts and generalizations of African, American, Asian, and European history from the dawn of humanities until 1650. The course aims to exercise the student’s ability to think and write historically, logically, critically, and synthetically.

HIST H234 Honors World Civilization II: from 1650 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: University Honors Program

This course is designed for university honors students. It intends to communicate the essential facts and generalizations of African, American, Asian, and European history since 1650. The course aims to exercise the student’s ability to think and write historically, logically, critically, and synthetically.

HIST H235 Seminar in Global Issues 1.5 crs.

This is an honors course open to all students by invitation who want the challenge of engaging macro questions of the human experience within the context of different moral and political values. The course is limited to 20 students and then only to second-semester freshmen through first-semester seniors. The course was created as a way to have an on-going process that would prepare Loyola’s most able students for success in scholarship and fellowship competitions.

HIST T122 World Civilization to 1650 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Introductory

This course aims to provide a universal perspective on the development of civilization up to 1650 and to study the people and values which have shaped our world.

HIST T124 World Civilization from 1650 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Introductory

This course is a continuation of HIST T122 and aims to study the people and values which have shaped our world from 1650 to the present day.

HIST W239 Catholics: Their History 3 crs.

This course is a study of the behavior of Catholics worldwide during the past 2,000 years–their religious, social, and cultural values and resulting actions. The course tries to elucidate the concrete results of the teachings of Christ and His followers on these Catholics.

HIST W240 Between Eve and Mary: Women in Medieval Europe 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Pre-modern

This class explores changes in women’s rights and roles in medieval society. Special emphasis is placed on the gap between prescription and reality, women’s contributions to medieval society, ideas and attitudes about women, and developments at the end of the medieval period to create a society tolerant of witchcraft persecutions.

HIST W255 Medieval Sex and Gender 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Pre-modern

Sex and gender are linked together throughout history as cultural constructs that evolve from a power relationship. In studying these aspects of a society, we are much better informed about its social mores, hierarchical relationships, even political strategies.  Because many ideas about sex and gender developed in the Middle Ages, a study of these aspects will help students better appreciate modern values.

HIST W256 The Crusades 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Pre-modern

Muslim terrorists today see attacks on Westerners as a continuation of the Wars of the Cross; Westerners know very little about them and feel no sense of continuity.  These attitudes are a legacy of the medieval period.  For Europe, the Crusades were a positive experience, encouraging scholarship, economic expansion, and Christian solidarity.  For Muslims, it hastened the fragmentation of an empire. A better understanding of the Crusades will illuminate current relations with the Middle East.

HIST W266 The Quest for Empire 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Pre-modern

Should early European explorers and colonists be remembered primarily as folk heroes or as slave-trading exploiters of other cultures? In this course, we will let the early explorers and colonists speak for themselves through the vivid writings they have left. Group discussion of primary sources will be an important part of the course.

HIST W276 Culture in Pre-Modern Japan 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course will introduce the history, literature, religion, and philosophy that formed Japanese culture from the 10th to the 12th century.  English translations of contemporary texts by writers of the imperial court will be studied from a broad historical perspective.  Students will attain an appreciation of Japanese culture as it has evolved from the classical period to the present.

HIST W286 Discovering Africa 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Pre-modern

This course focuses on the history of pre-colonial Africa from the Bantu migration to the beginnings of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. By exploring the wealth, diversity and complexity of early African societies, students will not only be better informed and educated, they will be intellectually prepared to challenge some of the sweeping generalizations and assumptions about contemporary Africa.

HIST X241 Drugs, Terrorism, and Democracy 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

The U.S. has a complex relationship with Latin America. This course seeks to explain the three most important issues in that relationship today–drugs, democracy, and terrorism–from the widely divergent perspectives of the two cultures.

HIST X243 Social Revolutions in Latin America 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

This course analyzes social revolutions in Latin America including the 1910 Mexican Revolution, the 1959 Cuban Revolution, and the frustrated 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s revolutions in Central America. Works used are outstanding histories on the revolutions as well as recognized artistic works, including films, novels, and short stories. The course will consider the causes of revolutions, their leaders and ideology, their successes and failures, and the lessons to be learned.

HIST X246 American Revolution 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

Historians legitimately concern themselves with the nature of revolution, attending in large measure to the influence of impersonal factors. Using the American Revolution, the course will examine the reciprocal effect which certain people and revolution have had on each other. Motives, techniques, freedom of action, and alternatives available will be assessed.

HIST X254 Palestinians and Israelis 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

The course researches the cultural, religious, political, economic, and social values of and the relationships between the Palestinians and Israelis. The tensions resulting from the conflict are studied in their origins and evolution. The hopes of both peoples are evaluated, and the future is extrapolated.

HIST X256 American Heroes 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

The purpose of this course is to examine what constitutes a hero for Americans. The course will examine why people need heroes not only to survive but to progress and why in recent times people are becoming increasingly disillusioned with modern heroes.

HIST X260 WWI in History and Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

After viewing the experiences of soldiers through novels and memoirs written by participants, students will consider what this war did to those who fought; how they viewed their experiences; how it altered their visions of themselves, society, and their governments; how they related to their own civilian compatriots and the enemy.

HIST X261 Autobiography as History 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

A study of important historical autobiographies, the course treats the literary genre of autobiography, the historical context of major autobiographical works, the use of autobiography as a historical document, and the practice of autobiography as a tool for understanding the self.

HIST X264 American Left in the 20th Century 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

This course investigates the effects of the success of liberalism on values, views, and aspirations of Americans during this century–a time of affluence, the rise of mass culture, and the post industrial society. This course examines leftist criticism of liberalism during the 20th century.

HIST X270 The American Character 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

This course is a study of those characteristics of American culture that seem to define America as unique among nations. It will concentrate on contemporary American values and politics, but will begin with the observations of Franklin and Crevecoeur and include the writings of contemporary journalists, historians, social scientists, novelists, travel writers, and foreign observers.

HIST X277 Culture in Early Modern Japan 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course will introduce the history, literature, religion and philosophy that formed Japanese culture from the 17th to the 19th century, when Japan witnessed the rise of the merchant class but government was still controlled by the samurai.  English translations of historical and literary writings of the period will be used to give students a clearer insight into how Japanese cultural perspectives have evolved from early modern times to the present day.

HIST X278 Modern Japanese Culture 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course will explore the modern Japanese conflict between the desire to assimilate Western culture and the need to preserve traditional values.  The Japanese and Western understanding of the individual and of the individual's place in society will also be explored.  English translations of modern novels and essays will give students a clearer understanding of Japan's people and evolving culture. 

HIST X280 African-American Culture and History 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

This course studies the manner in which African-Americans have attempted to solve moral, religious, and pragmatic problems relating to the critical issue of survival in America from the colonial period to the present.

HIST X290 Women in American History 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

An exploration of the diverse historical experience of women in America from the colonial period to the present, the course will focus on changes in women’s work, legal and political status, education, religious experience, family life, and gender roles.

 

Courses: Honors

HONORS SEMINARS:  FALL 2010

Students in the University Honors Program take a total of 27 credit hours of Honors, including courses across eight disciplines (behavioral and social sciences, fine arts, history, literature, mathematics, natural sciences, philosophy, and religious studies) and a senior project.  The titles and descriptions of the courses offered vary from year to year

The following courses are available Fall 2010.   Spring 2010 courses are TBA and will be posted when available at http://www.loyno.edu/honors/UpcomingSeminars.html

CHEM H295 Radioactivity:  Bombs, Energy, Medicine, and the Environment 3 crs.
We will discuss recent growth of interest in nuclear questions: Should we build more Nuclear Power Plants to defend our energy independence? Should we be worried about Nuclear Weapons countries like Iran develop? Is Nuclear Medicine the way to new health?

ENGL H295 Ancient Epic 3 crs.
This course examines a number of classical epics, including the Iliad, Odyssey, and Æneid, and Beowulf.

ENGL H295 Capturing the Self, Interpreting Society 3 crs.
This course will be a comparative study of texts representative of interpreted realities, including novels, short fiction, drama, and Star Trek. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between self and society, with an emphasis on how the modern self is constructed and explored through narrative technique.

LAS H295 ¡Revolution!  Social Unrest in Guatemala and Iran in Literature and Film 3 crs.
We will focus on comparisons of literature and film between the Central American and Western Asian geographic regions with a special emphasis on Guatemala and Iran during the Marxist/indigenist and Islamic revolutions, respectively.

PHIL H295 Interpreting Sex, Constructing Gender 3 crs.
This course reexamines traditional notions about sex and gender by considering the problem of embodiment in philosophy; the conventional view that sex differences are biologically-based; social construction of gender; and the claim that lesbians are not women because they do not participate in the gender/class system of male/female.

PHIL H295 Freedom and the Self:  Themes in Existentialism 3crs.
This course examines major philosophical themes in existentialism, such as freedom and responsibility, bad faith and authenticity, values and nihilism, anxiety and affirmation, despair and joy.  Students will read the works of key proponents of the existentialist movement, including Kierkegaard, Marcel, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, and Ricoeur. 

PHYS H295 The Romance of Physics 3 crs.
With remarkable, but still limited, success, physicists can describe some weird and fascinating aspects of reality using two theories: Quantum Theory and General Relativity. Rather translating these theories into natural language, we will talk about the world they describe, cautiously using metaphors, and similar techniques.

RELS H295 Art Experience and the Poetics of Devotion in India 3 crs.
The course presents Indian ideas on what it means to experience art. Can art experience serve as a metaphor for knowing transcendent things? Can a poetics which organizes human emotions according to subjective hierarchies support a constructive theology? What is gained from organizing our subjective experiences of art?

VISA H295 Images of Masculinity; Questions of Desire 3 crs.
Drawing on queer theory and feminist narratives of gender together with literary theories of pleasure and the production of meaning, this course will seek to encourage theorized analysis of the representation of masculinity in visual culture.

HONS H491 Honors: Senior Project 3 crs.
Honors students do a senior project in the fall semester of their senior year.
 

Courses: Italian (ITAL)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

ITAL A100 First Year Italian I 3 crs.

This course covers the fundamentals of the language with primary emphasis on structure, morphology, and vocabulary.

ITAL A101 First Year Italian II 3 crs.

A continuation of Italian A100.

Prerequisite: ITAL A100 or equivalent.

ITAL A200 Second Year Italian I 3 crs.

This class is a third-semester Italian course with prerequisite ITAL 102 or departmental approval.  It will cover Italian grammar, vocabulary, and language structures at an intermediate level.  All four language skills will be practiced and advanced: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  The same textbook uses for Italian A100 and A101 will be used, as well as supplemental reading and listening materials. 

Courses: Japanese (JPNS)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

JPNS A100 Modern Japanese I 3 crs.

The fundamentals of modern spoken and written Japanese will be taught. Students will learn the kana syllabary, the basic grammatical structure and vocabulary that is used in every-day conversation. The language will be taught in its cultural context with emphasis on the use of polite and informal language. Approximately 50 Japanese characters will be introduced.

JPNS A101 Modern Japanese II 3 crs.

Continuing students of Japanese will learn to use the passive and potential forms of the Japanese verb. More specialized vocabulary will be introduced to refine the students’ grasp of the proper use of polite and informal usage. Approximately 100 Japanese characters and their use in Japanese sentence construction will be explained.

Prerequisite: JPNS A100 or equivalent.

JPNS A200 Intermediate Japanese I 3 crs.

Students will complete their introduction to all Japanese grammatical forms and read modern Japanese literary texts in their cultural context. Students will learn the vocabulary needed to read mass media publications so they will be able to read from Japanese magazines and newspapers. Approximately 200 additional Japanese characters will be introduced.

Prerequisite: JPNS A101 or equivalent.

JPNS A201 Intermediate Japanese II 3 crs.

This course will introduce readings from modern Japanese novels and literary journals. Students will be expected to discuss the readings in Japanese and write short Japanese critiques or reviews of the material. Each student will construct and master a specialized vocabulary list that pertains to his or her own interests. Approximately 300 additional Japanese characters will be introduced.

Prerequisite: JPNS A200 or equivalent.

JPNS A300 Japanese Conversation and Composition I 3 crs.

This course will focus on original Japanese compositions and short oral presentations. Students will develop a wide vocabulary and learn idiomatic expressions and continue to add to their knowledge of kanji characters. Readings about contemporary Japanese customs, business, and culture will be used for class discussion and for reviewing grammar.

Prerequisite: JPNS A201 or equivalent.

JPNS A301 Japanese Conversation and Composition II 3 crs.

This course will continue to develop students’ ability to converse on a more advanced level. Students will also continue to practice making short oral presentations on an increasingly broader range of topics. They will be challenged to improve their Japanese reading and writing ability as well by the study of kanji and kanji compounds.

Prerequisite: JPNS A300 or equivalent.

JPNS A392 Japanese History I 3 crs

JPNS A393 Japanese History II 3 crs

JPNS A495 Special Project 1 cr.

Capstone course required of all seniors. Student will work independently on a research paper in conjunction with a regular advanced course and under the supervision of a professor. Capstone work should reflect the skills and knowledge the student has acquired as a foreign language major.

JPNS U250 Culture in Pre-modern Japan 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course will introduce the history, literature, religion, and philosophy that formed Japanese culture from the 10th to the 12th century. English translations of contemporary texts by writers of the imperial court will be studied from a broad historical perspective. Students will attain an appreciation of Japanese culture as it has evolved from the classical period to the present.  Cross-listed with HIST W276.

JPNS V251 Culture in Early Modern Japan 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course will introduce the history, literature, religion, and philosophy that formed Japanese culture from the 17th to the 19th century, when Japan witnessed the rise of the merchant class but government was still controlled by the samurai. English translations of historical and literary writings of the period will be used to give students a clearer insight into how Japanese cultural perspectives have evolved from early modern times to the present day.  Cross-listed with HIST X277.

JPNS V252 Modern Japanese Culture 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course will explore the modern Japanese conflict between the desire to assimilate Western culture and the need to preserve traditional values. The Japanese and Western understanding of the individual and of the individual’s place in society will also be explored. English translations of modern novels and essays will give students a clearer understanding of Japan’s people and evolving culture.  Cross-listed with HIST X278.

JPNS V253 Japanese Animation and Culture 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

By viewing and discussing the most important Japanese anime films, students will receive a comprehensive introduction to the often misunderstood culture of modern Japan. This course will analyze the references in the films to both classical and modern Japanese culture, touching on everything from Japanese art, religion, literature, and history to body language, linguistic expressions, and daily life.

Courses: Latin (LATN)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

LATN A100 Beginning Latin I 3 crs.

Language tells us many things about a culture, not only in what people have to say but how they say it. This course introduces students to the world of the ancient Romans through a study of their language.

LATN A101 Beginning Latin II 3 crs.

Latin A100 is continued.

Prerequisite: LATN A100 or equivalent.

LATN A250 Intermediate Latin 3 crs.

Students will enhance their understanding of the basics of Latin grammar and syntax and increase their knowledge of Latin vocabulary in preparation for reading Latin literature. Readings will be drawn from both prose and poetry in order to prepare students for advanced courses in Latin authors.

Prerequisite: LATN A101 or equivalent.

LATN A304 Prose of Republican Rome 3 crs.

This course will survey works of prose writers who lived during the Roman Republic. Authors such as Cato, Nepos, Caesar, Sallust, and Cicero will provide insight into key political figures and military action of the Republic, as well as offer a variety of writing styles. Students may repeat this course with the instructor’s permission.

Prerequisite: LATN A250 or equivalent.

LATN A305 Poetry of Republican Rome 3 crs.

A survey of the works of poets who lived during the Roman Republic (509 B.C. to 31 B.C.). Readings will be selected from the works of Plautus, Terence, Lucretius, and Catullus. Assignments will focus on reading Latin and examining the response of these poets to the times in which they lived.

Prerequisite: LATN A250 or equivalent.

LATN A336 Augustan Prose 3 crs.

In this course, students will read the works of authors who lived during the Age of Augustus (31 B.C. to 14 A.D.). Readings will be selected from the works of Augustus, Livy, and/or Vitruvius. Assignments will focus on reading Latin and examining the response of these authors to the times in which they lived.

Prerequisite: LATN A250 or equivalent.

LATN A337 Augustan Poetry 3 crs.

This course examines the works of poets who lived during the Age of Augustus (31 B.C. to 14 A.D.). Readings will be selected from the works of Vergil, Horace, Tibullus, Propertius, and/or Ovid. Assignments will focus on reading Latin and examining the response of these poets to the times in which they lived.

Prerequisite: LATN A250 or equivalent.

LATN A342 Prose of Imperial Rome 3 crs.

This course will examine the prose works of the early imperial period. Study of these works will provide in—depth information about Roman life and politics in the first and second century A.D. and demonstrate the range of expression capable in Latin. Students may repeat this course with the instructor’s permission.

Prerequisite: LATN A250 or equivalent.

LATN A343 Poetry of Imperial Rome 3 crs.

This course will survey the works of poets who lived during the Roman Empire, specifically from the reign of Nero to the reign of Trajan. Genres will include epic, bucolics, and satire. Assignments will focus on reading Latin and examining the response of these poets to the times in which they lived. Students may repeat this course with the instructor’s permission.

Prerequisite: LATN A250 or equivalent.

LATN A430 Latin of Late Antiquity 3 crs.

This course will examine Latin works by writers who lived during the final years of the Roman Empire. Readings will include religious and secular texts such as the Passio Sanctorum Felicitatis et Perpetuae, Apollonius King of Tyre, and works by St. Augustine and Tertullian. Students may repeat this course with the instructor’s permission.

Prerequisite: LATN A250 or equivalent.

LATN A435 Medieval Latin 3 crs.

This course focuses on works from the authors who offer a glimpse into the intellectual world of the Medieval period. Discussions will include the influence of ancient authors as well as the historical and cultural contexts of the Medieval writers. Students may repeat this course with the instructor’s permission.

Prerequisite: LATN A250 or equivalent.

LATN A493 Directed Readings 3 crs.

LATN A498 Research Project arr.

This course involves independent study projects for qualified majors who develop interest in a certain area.

LATN A499 Independent Study arr.

Courses: Latin American Studies (LAS)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

LAS  H295 Revolution! Latin America/Middle East 3 hrs.

This course focuses on comparisons of literature and film between the Central American and Western Asian geographic regions (with a special emphasis on Guatemala and Iran the last time it was taught) during the Marxist/Indigenous and Islamic revolutions, respectively. Through novels, short stories and film the class engages critical analysis of the differences / similarities in terms of specific revolutionary issues in Latin America compared to a region that is the most violatile region in the world today. The class looks at how the variety in the nuanced human element of political unrest changes the dynamics of revolution in three different stages: before it becomes violent; during the event itself; and after the dust has settled. After all, revolutions attempt to change radically the way we read and write ourselves as individuals as well as how we define and portray our societies as complex combinations of varied elements. The class also considers what different effects US foreign policy has had on these revolutions in Latin America and Western Asia and brings this to bear on discussions of social justice.

LAS  V235 Women Writers of Spanish America 3 hrs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The purpose of this course is to present the students with a representative sample of important Spanish-American women writers of the 20th and 21st centuries, covering different literary periods, genres and countries (the emphasis will be on narrative).
Through detailed discussion of the texts, plus films (when appropriate) and oral presentations, the student will explore the complex cultural and historical realities that have shaped the writings of Spanish American authors in general and women in particular.

LAS V261 Latin American Thought 3 hrs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course will examine Latin American thought from its pre-Columbian roots, its colonial mixture with scholasticism, the Jesuit tradition in the 18th century, positivism of the late 19th and early 20th century, modern racial, Marxist, and nationalist ideologies to its presence in the U.S.

LAS  V294 Chicana/o, Latina/o Literature 3 hrs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course offers an introduction to the literature produced in the "Hispanic" borderlands of US culture.  THe early model for studying the production of literatures/cultures in the US "borderlands" centered on whether the resulting works advocated either assimilation or resistance to the hegemony of whitebread US culture.  By contrast, in this class we look closely at the historical trajectory of several texts (novels, poetry, short stories, film, visual arts, manifestos) and consider whether they offer viable alternatives to this binary model.

LAS V294 Civil Society & The Common Good 3 hrs.

Examining various socio-economic development issues within the context of Latin American, this course addresses the contentions between top-down, institutional approaches and grassroots, inter-personal solutions. While the former frequently focuses development practices and policies through technical economic and multi-lateral political applications toward development, the latter approach strives to incorporate ethical principles into action toward a more comprehensive, integral human development.

LAS V294 Economy and Politics of the Developing World 3 hrs.

This course examines the connections between politics and international economic development. The students will gain from this course a better understanding of the interaction between political and economic phenomena on an international and global scale, and learn useful tools for analyzing and assessing both current policy and historical developments.

In this class we will address questions such as: Why are tariffs and non-tariff barriers to trade high in some countries but low in others? Why do we have a free trade policy for most manufactured goods, but a protectionist policy for many agricultural goods? Why does the dollar go “up” or “down” vis-à-vis other currencies, and why is this a political issue? And does development aid help or harm developing countries? Does foreign direct investment by multinational corporations

LAS V294 Salsa! Music Dance & Culture 3 hrs.

In this course we are going to study Salsa as a musical form and a commercial concept that represents an urban lifestyle which has evolved according to the assimilation of the Puerto Rican minority in the United States, which has had a determining influence upon the whole Latino Caribbean sphere. The contents of Salsa music will be useful to explain the links between society and culture, enabling students to grasp the logic through which the recording industry interprets collective sensibilities and histories in order to conceive and trade aesthetic commodities.

LAS V294 Curriculum As A Political Text 3 hrs.

This course introduces participants to the notion of curriculum as the educational product of contending forces within the society out of which it emerges. It relies heavily on the work of Paulo Freire and his sharp critique of the banking approach to education where knowledge is simply deposited and withdrawn. It explores the forces by which learners are induced or seduced to comply with the dominant ideologies and social practices related to authority, behavior, morality and/or spirituality. It imagines possibilities where all citizens participate freely and fully in the creation and recreation of meaning and values that make democracy healthy.

Courses: Linguistics (LING)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

LING A499 Independent Study arr.

LING V134 Role of Language 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

How does language work? How does it affect our understanding of the world? How does a people’s language affect its culture? Is language the key factor separating us from other animals? Discussion of major theories about language which are of general importance and practical interest to students in a variety of disciplines.

Courses: Literature (LIT)

LIT C260 Introduction to Literary Forms 3 crs.

This course is a one-semester introduction to three literary genres–fiction, drama, and poetry–and to the basic tools of literary analysis.

Prerequisite: COMP C119 or equivalent.

LIT C345 British Literature I 3 crs.

This course is a survey of the literature of Britain from its beginnings to the 19th century. The British literary tradition is examined in its aesthetic, historic, and sociological contexts.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C347 Understanding Poetry 3 crs.

This course focuses on developing the skills necessary to read poetry appreciatively, including a consideration of different genres, historic contexts, and figurative language.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C350 British Literature II 3 crs.

A survey of the significant texts in the modern development of British literature, including their aesthetic, philosophical, and historic contexts, from the 19th century to the present.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C360 Literature and Social Change 3 crs.

An exploration of important literary texts as journals of change, as activist documents, and as indicators of social transformation.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C362 Contemporary Literature 3 crs.

A study of fiction and/or other literary genres from the last decades of the 20th century to the present.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C365 Detective Story 3 crs.

A study of the development of the detective story, with an emphasis on British and American authors, including an investigation of various theories of detective writing.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C366 Fiction: Short Story and Novel 3 crs.

This course explores the theory, practice, and general history of fiction as exemplified in two modern genres, the short story and the novel.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C370 How to Read a Film 3 crs.

This course introduces students to reading film in a variety of genres and provides an introduction to film criticism and the history of the cinema, including its development as an industry.

LIT C371 American Literature I 3 crs.

This course surveys major literary figures and texts of the United States from the Colonial period to the end of the 19th century, including a consideration of their cultural and historical contexts.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C372 American Literature II 3 crs.

This course surveys major literary figures and movements of the United States from the end of the 19th century to the present, including their cultural and historical contexts.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C373 The Black Writer in America 3 crs.

This course surveys the literature by African American writers from the period of slavery to the present, with particular attention to the distinctive social, cultural and aesthetic contexts of this literary tradition.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C385 Women Writers 3 crs.

This course surveys the literature written by women, reflecting their changing roles and visions, particularly in the English-speaking traditions, from the medieval period to the present.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C400 Southern Literature 3 crs.

This course is a consideration of the literary history and major writers of the American South, highlighting the ways that this region has defined one of the United States’ most distinctive cultures.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C405 Louisiana Literature 3 crs.

An exploration of the literary traditions of Louisiana, including works of fiction, drama, and poetry that prominently feature the state, both its past and present.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C411 Fiction Workshop 3 crs.

This course examines advanced topics in fiction writing, with some attention both to contemporary trends and publishing. In addition to writing short fiction, students will read and analyze contemporary fiction.

LIT C420 Shakespeare: Comedies 3 crs.

This course explores Shakespeare’s comedies and late romances, including an examination of contemporary notions of comedy.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C425 Shakespeare: Tragedies 3 crs.

This course is an intensive study of the tragedies with specific attention to the five "great" plays: Hamlet, Macbeth, Lear, Othello, and Antony and Cleopatra.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C429 19th-century British Novel 3 crs.

This course examines the development of the novel in 19th-century Britain, including works by Austen, the Brontës, Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, and other important writers.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C430 Shakespeare: Histories 3 crs.

This course covers the history plays of Shakespeare, including a consideration of the genres as well as the cultural and political contexts of the plays.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C460 World Theatre: Masterworks 3 crs.

This course examines drama from around the world, with some emphasis on the Western tradition from classical Greece to contemporary theater, and with attention to cultural contexts, genre theory, and the history of the form.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C465 Southern Women Writers 3 crs.

This course explores the literary contributions of women writers and their complex relationships with each other and with the traditional culture of the American South.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C470 Spirituality of Nature Writers 3 crs.

This course explores the literature of the nature writers for whom the natural world is the primary text and most accessible spiritual reality. Emphasis will be on the experience of nature and writing as the creation of sacred texts.

Crosslisted with RELS C470.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C475 American Women Playwrights 3 crs.

This course concerns female perspectives in modern American drama, including the work of such playwrights as Hellman, Hansberry, Glaspell, Childress, Terry, and Vogel.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C485 Studies in English Fiction 3 crs.

This course explores fiction in English from the origins of the novel in the 18th century to the present. Readings may focus on a more limited period, such as British fiction of the 20th century or novels of a single decade. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C487 Studies in American Fiction 3 crs.

This course covers literature by major American writers studied within specific cultural and historical contexts. Readings may focus on a specific genre, region, or decade. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

LIT C489 Literary Studies 3 crs.

An examination of a literary theme or topic, such as cross-cultural texts, the literature of war, or New World fictions; or an in-depth study of one or more influential writers, such as Dante, Milton, the Bröntes, Ibsen, Faulkner, or Toni Morrison. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: LIT C260 or permission of instructor.

Courses: Mathematics (MATH)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

MATH A092 Fundamentals of Algebra 3 crs.

This course is for those with one year of algebra, but who are not ready for MATH A115 or A118. Topics include arithmetic of signed numbers, polynomials, factoring, fractional and quadratic equations and applications. Credit from this course is not applicable to any degree program or to any math, Common Curriculum, or teacher certification requirement but will be added to normal total for student’s degree program. Students are assigned to this course based on placement test scores.

MATH A115 Introduction to Finite Mathematics 3 crs.

This course is designed to give social science and business students an introduction to the necessary analytic and quantitative tools in mathematics. Topics include elementary matrix theory and linear programming, life science models, and an introduction to probability.

MATH A116 Survey of Calculus 3 crs.

This course includes techniques in the calculus of algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions of one and two variables as met in the application fields of business, political science, and other social science fields.

MATH A117 Concepts in College Algebra 3 crs.

This course is designed to introduce the topics of college algebra. The course focuses on a conceptual understanding of the subject and includes a number of applications of algebra. Following a contemporary approach to mathematics education, this course includes exploration of real-world problems, group discussion of problems, and technological exploration of concepts with an emphasis on mathematical reasoning and communication.

MATH A118 Pre-calculus Mathematics 3 crs.

This course offers more preparation for those students who plan on taking calculus, but find themselves deficient in second-year high school algebra and trigonometry. Exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions are included.

MATH A200 Introduction to Linear Algebra 3 crs.

This course is designed to introduce topics in matrix algebra for applications that are basic to future coursework. Vector spaces, determinants, matrices, linear transformations, and eigenvectors are included.

Prerequisite: high school Algebra II.

MATH A204 Discrete Math Structures 3 crs.

This is a course that bridges infinitesimal calculus and the world of sets, relations, digraphs, lattices, logic, etc. Topics include algebraic flow chart language, syntax and semantics, isomorphisms and invariants, directed graphs, Boolean algebra, permutations and cyclic groups, polish expressions, etc.

Prerequisite: high school Algebra II.

MATH A211 Introduction to Programming I 3 crs.

An introduction to concepts and terminology in programming. Topics include interface builders and problem solving techniques in various programming environments. Emphasis is placed on the basics of software design and on elementary applications to Mathematics and other disciplines.

Prerequisite: Placement in Math T122 or higher.

MATH A212 Introduction to Programming II 3 crs.

This is a continuation of MATH A211. Topics will include object-oriented programming, software development, and data structures such as stacks, queues, trees and lists. Further applications to Mathematics and other disciplines will be explored.

Prerequisite: Placement in Math T122 or higher.

MATH A242 Introduction to Probability and Statistics II 3 crs.

Continuation of MATH A241.

Prerequisite: MATH A241.

MATH A257 Calculus I 4 crs.

This is a beginning course in the calculus of one variable and analytic geometry. The concept of limits and their use in differential and integral calculus, max and min values of functions, and solving for areas and volumes are treated.

Prerequisites: high school algebra (two years), geometry, trigonometry.

MATH A258 Calculus II 4 crs.

Topics include the Mean Value Theorem and its applications, applications of the integral, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, sequences and series, and conic sections.

Prerequisite: MATH A257.

MATH A259 Calculus III 3 crs.

This course addresses the calculus of several variables and vector analysis. Topics include differentiation of vector valued functions, extreme values, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integration, line and surface integrals, and an introduction to vector fields.

Prerequisites: MATH A200, A258.

MATH A260 Statistical Inference for Scientists 3 crs.

This is a first course in statistical methods for science students. Emphasis centers on the practical application of statistical inference and estimation in the quest for scientific knowledge. Topics include exploratory data analysis, techniques for data collection, summarization, and presentation, graphical techniques and numerical measures, the role of the Normal distribution, regression and correlation analysis, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, the analysis of variance, and distribution-free methods.

Prerequisites: MATH A257 or equivalent.

MATH A261 Statistical Inference for Scientists Lab 1 cr.

This is a first course in statistical methods for science students. Emphasis centers on the practical application of statistical inference and estimation in the quest for scientific knowledge. Topics include exploratory data analysis, techniques for data collection, summarization, and presentation, graphical techniques and numerical measures, the role of the Normal distribution, regression and correlation analysis, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, the analysis of variance, and distribution-free methods.

Prerequisites: MATH A257 or equivalent.

MATH A271 Applied Scientific Computing 3 crs

This course introduces students to techniques and methods commonly used by scientists to analyze, build models, visualize and make decisions based on data collected in laboratory and field experiments. It emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of scientific computing by applying the mathematical tools of statistics and numerical computations to hands on experiments from diverse areas of science. 

Prerequisites: MATH A257 (MATH A211 recommended) or instructor permission.

MATH A310 Introduction to Differential Equations 3 crs.

Topics include fundamental methods of solving elementary differential equations. Includes exact solutions, series solutions, numerical solutions, solutions using Laplace transforms, and other topics.

Prerequisite: MATH A258.

MATH A320 Linear Algebra 3 crs.

This second course expands on topics such as vector spaces, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues, linear functionals, bilinear forms, vector geometry, and their applications.

Prerequisite: MATH A200.

MATH A330 Theory of Numbers 3 crs.

Topics include divisibility, prime numbers, Euclidean algorithm, fundamental theorem of arithmetic, congruences, diophantine equations, and indices.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

MATH A340 Math Probability 3 crs.

This course introduces the theory of probability. Topics include combinatorial analysis, axioms of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, expectation, multivariate probability distributions, function of random variables, and basic limit theorems.

Prerequisite: MATH A310.

MATH A341 Statistics Theory and Methods 3 crs.

This course shows how statistics makes inferences about a population based on information from samples. Topics include estimation, hypothesis testing, linear models, and estimation by least squares. Experimental design, analysis of variance, analysis of enumerative data, and nonparametric statistics.

Prerequisites: MATH A340; permission of instructor.

MATH A345 Topics in Geometry 3 crs.

The course will include foundations of geometry, congruences, parallelism, similarities, measures, coordinate systems, axiom systems for the Euclidean, and projective planes.

Prerequisite: MATH A258.

MATH A350 Differential Equations 3 crs.

This course reviews and continues the introduction to ordinary differential equations met in MATH A310. Selected topics in partial differential equations and applications to various fields will be included.

Prerequisites: MATH A259, A310.

MATH A375 Computational Mathematics 3 crs

This course develops the computational procedures, which are fundamental to numeric applications.  The topics studied will be selected from but not limited to error analysis, numerical solutions of non-linear equations, systems of linear equations using direct and iterative methods, polynomial interpolation, quadrature, least squares curve fitting, and numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations.  This course will not count as a Mathematics elective for the Mathematics major.  It is a requirement for the Computational Science major and the Computational Science minor.

Prerequisites: MATH A211, A257 or instructor permission.

MATH A400 Abstract Algebra I 3 crs.

This is a general survey course in the concepts of algebra treating number systems, groups, rings, domains, fields, matrices over a field, elements of Galois theory, and canonical forms.

Prerequisite: MATH A200.

MATH A401 Abstract Algebra II 3 crs.

This course is a continuation of MATH A400.

Prerequisite: MATH A400.

MATH A410 Advanced Calculus I 3 crs.

This course offers a deeper look at analysis with special attention to linear methods as applied to the calculus of several variables. Topics include extrema, Jacobians, uniform continuity, line and surface integrals, differentials, integration theory, and series.

Prerequisites: MATH A259, A310.

MATH A411 Advanced Calculus II 3 crs.

This course is a continuation of MATH A410.

Prerequisite: MATH A410.

MATH A415 Complex Variables 3 crs.

This course studies the theory of analytic functions. Topics include Cauchy's integration theory, series representation, analytic continuation and conformal mappings.

Prerequisite: MATH A259, A310

MATH A425 General Topology 3 crs.

This course studies basic concepts from the topics of topological spaces, Hausdorff spaces, connectedness, metric spaces, continuous mappings, separability, compactness, and product spaces.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

MATH A430 Applied Math I 3 crs.

This course is designed to illustrate the application of mathematics to one or more fields by considering the aspects of model building and to further develop theory and techniques relevant to the needs of the field. Topics include partial differential equations, Eigen functions, Green’s functions, perturbation, and approximation methods.

Prerequisites: MATH A259, A310.

MATH A493 Directed Readings 3 crs.

MATH A495 Special Project arr.

This course focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

MATH A496 Math Seminar 1 cr.

Topics from various branches of mathematics will be presented, discussed, and argued by the students. By invitation only.

MATH A498 Research Project arr.

The research project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

MATH A499 Independent Study arr.

MATH H233 Honors Mathematics: Mathematics in Western Civilization 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: University Honors Program

The objective of this course is to present the development of mathematics in Western Civilization from a cultural, historical, and scientific perspective. The course material consists of important topics selected from the disciplines of number theory, logic, geometry, analysis, and probability theory. Not required of science or math majors.

MATH T122 Math Models 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Introductory

This course will treat the concepts of model building, model types, model construction and analysis, and practical aspects of mathematical model usage. Applications of modeling techniques will be made to everyday experiences and to larger world problems such as demographics.

MATH Z132 Problem Solving in Ecology 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

This course in environmental problem solving teaches students how to use relatively simple mathematical methods (often of the "back-of-the-envelope" type) to understand how planet Earth and its inhabitants interact. The problems will deal with issues such as pollution, the exhausting of fossil fuel resources, resources, and over-population.

MATH Z134 The Computer Impact 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

This course provides students with the basic knowledge to understand computer information technology and, more importantly, to understand the impact of this technology and its ethical implications on the individual, organizations and society.

Courses: Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL A201 Practical Logic 3 crs.

This course will introduce the student to the application of practical logical techniques in the analysis and formulation of rational arguments. Topics will include how to find premises and conclusions in an argument, definitions, informal fallacies, syllogisms, Venn diagrams, induction, Mill’s methods, etc.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A206 Introduction to Symbolic Logic 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to the techniques of symbolic logic in argument analysis and to the science of logic as the analysis of formal deductive systems.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A210 Metaphysics 3 crs.

This course is a historical and theoretical examination of the question, "What does it mean to be?" or "What is reality, as distinct from mere appearance?" The course begins with a study of ancient philosophical explanations of reality and goes on to study the historical evolution of both the problem of metaphysics and its various resolutions.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A215 Ethics 3 crs.

This course is a historical and problematic investigation of traditional ethical positions and texts, especially focusing on teleological, deontological theories, and virtue ethics and on contemporary responses to them.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A220 Epistemology 3 crs.

This course takes a historical and problematic approach to the problems of knowledge, with emphasis on the main theories of knowledge in ancient and modern philosophy as well as contemporary discussions of the nature of knowledge.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A225 Philosophy of Law 3 crs.

This course is an inquiry into the nature of law, the relevance of law to morality, the concepts of responsibility in the law, punishment, and the relevance to law of the concepts of justice, equality, and liberty. The philosophical assumptions that underlie criminal law and private law will be explored. Readings will be taken from classical and recent philosophers of law.

PHIL A230 Philosophy of Relgion 3 crs

This course is a study of several philosophical problems that arise from belief in the existence of God.  Topics to be examined include: evidentialism and religious belief, the meaningfulness of religious language, arguments for the existence of God, problems of divine omnipotence, the difficulty of reconciling divine ominiscience with human freedom, the problem of evil, and the conceivabiity of life after death.

PHIL A300 Philosophy of Science 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to basic themes of recent philosophy of science including scientific methodology, concepts and presuppositions. Through an examination of different models of scientific explanation, the course will expose the student to problems of justifying scientific theories, and the relationship between theories and reality.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A307 Philosophy of Mind 3 crs.

This course examines different theories of the nature of mind. It begins with an examination of the traditional mind-body problem in the works of Descartes. It will subsequently explore alternative positions which have been presented by Descartes’ contemporaries in the classical period, as well as contemporaries of our own. Emphasis will be placed on such areas as mind-body identity/interaction, brain process, language, perception, sensation, emotion, personal identity, and free will.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A320 Social and Political Philosophy 3 crs.

This course is an inquiry into the origin, nature, and necessity of political order. The relation of the individual to the social and political whole, the origin, nature, and just use of political authority, the nature of rights and duty, the problem of freedom, and the philosophical prerequisites of a just social order will be treated.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A330 Modern Political Theory 3 crs.

This course is an introduction to modern political theory through explication and critique of readings from classics of modern political thought. Readings will be selected from works by major theorists such as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Kant, Burke, Bentham, de Tocqueville, Hegel, Marx and Mill.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A400 History of Ancient Philosophy 3 crs.

The Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicurians, Sceptics, Stoics, Plotinus, and early Christian thought are discussed.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A405 History of Medieval Philosophy 3 crs.

Historical study of the main ideas of the medieval period from St. Augustine to the Renaissance.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A408 Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas 3 crs.

This course offers an introduction to the central philosophical positions of Thomas Aquinas. It examines Aquinas' views on the relationship between faith and reason, his metaphysics of being, his analysis of human knowledge, his theory of human nature, and his defense of human freedom. Special attention will also be devoted to the Greek and Arabic sources of Aquinas' philosophy and to his place in the history of medieval philosophy.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A410 History of Modern European Philosophy 3 crs.

This course will discuss readings from works of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

PHIL A416 History of 19th-century Philosophy 3 crs.

A survey of the major traditions in post-Kantian philosophy ending with Nietzsche, the course will explore the interrelations between different themes in 19th-century thought and how they laid the foundation for 20th-century philosophy.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A430 American Philosophy 3 crs.

This course is a study of the philosophies of Pierce, James, Dewey, Royce, Santayana, Mead, Lewis, and Whitehead, with emphasis on the emergence of classical American philosophy as a response to philosophic, social, and scientific developments.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A435 Existentialism 3 crs.

This course examines the treatment of the characteristic existential themes as exemplified in the writings of Kierkegard, Nietzsche, Heideggar, Jaspers, Marcel, and Sartre.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A440 Phenomenology 3 crs.

This course treats the problems which gave rise to contemporary phenomenology, existential phenomenology, and hermeneutic phenomenology, and various writers in that tradition, such as Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, and Ricoeur.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A465 Introduction to Analytic Philosophy 3 crs.

This course is a study of the movement of 20th-century Anglo-American analytic philosophy as practiced by Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, the logical positivists, ordinary language analysts, Quine, and contemporary language analysts.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL A490 Seminar: Ancient Philosophy 3 crs.

A detailed study of an author or texts from the ancient period.

PHIL A491 Seminar: Medieval Philosophy 3 crs.

A detailed study of an author or texts from the medieval period.

PHIL A492 Seminar: Modern Philosophy 3 crs.

A detailed study of an author or texts from the modern period.

PHIL A493 Seminar: Major Author 3 crs.

This course is an in-depth analysis of the thought of a major philosopher. Content varies.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

PHIL A495 Special Project arr.

This project focuses on the creative or productive efforts of one or more students. A special project is distinguished from a research project in its lack of the historical or experimental method and perspective characteristics of research.

PHIL A496 Seminar/Workshop arr.

In a seminar, a supervised group of students share the results of their research on a common topic. In a workshop, a supervised group of students participate in a common effort.

PHIL A498 Philosophy Honors Thesis 3 crs.

Students undertake a research project under the supervision of a professor that culminates in the writing of an undergraduate thesis.

PHIL A499 Independent Study arr.

PHIL H233 Honors Philosophy I: Ethics 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: University Honors Program

This course examines questions in ethics. The student will be introduced to philosophical inquiry through an investigation of basic ethical questions. The course will include some reading of primary texts and the examination of some contemporary ethical problems.

PHIL H234 Honors Philosophy II: Metaphysics 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: University Honors Program

This course examines questions in metaphysics. It will include a historical and theoretical examination of such questions as "What does it mean to be?" and "What is reality, as distinct from mere appearance?"

PHIL H235 Honors Philosophy III: Epistemology 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: University Honors Program

This course examines questions in the theory of knowledge. Involved is an intensive examination of basic issues concerning the foundations and justification of human knowledge, with a focus on such topics as perception, truth, and meaning.

PHIL H236 Honors Philosophy– Scientific Revolutions 3 crs.

The philosophical analysis of natural science has developed, in the past 40 years, from a field dominated by a single "received view" to an arena of volatile debate with no single dominant contender for an acceptable model of scientific knowledge. This course examines the somewhat chaotic present state of this pivotal debate in late 20th-century intellectual history and its implications for basic questions regarding knowledge, reality, and both cognitive and social values.

Students may not receive credit for both this course and PHIL V164, Scientific Revolutions.

PHIL T122 Introduction to Philosophy 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Introductory

This course will introduce the student to philosophy through a consideration of selected fundamental questions of ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics, as seen in the thoughts and writings of significant philosophers.

PHIL U230 Aesthetics 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course offers an introduction to the major issues of aesthetics. Topics for consideration include: a brief survey of the history of art, the nature of art, the nature of beauty, the criterion for aesthetic goodness, the interpretation of artwork, metaphor and representation in art, and the aesthetic experience.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL U234 Buddhist Philosophy 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course will consitute an introduction to Buddhist philosophy through the study of basic themses and concepts, classic texts, and major thinkers and schools.  We will investigate theories concerning the nature of reality, knowledge and value, and basic theoretical concepts such as emptiness, dependent origination, impermanence, selflessness, suffering and release.

PHIL U237 Indian Philosophy 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

A survey of philosophical traditions of India. This course is designed to help the student to extend his/her knowledge to the wisdom of the East. The study includes the philosophies of the Vedas, Upanishads, Buddhism, Jainism, Mimamsa, Nyaya, Vaisesika, Sankhya, Yoga, Vedanta, Bhagauadgita, and of some contemporary thinkers such as Aurobindo, Vivekanada, Tagore, Gandhi, and Radhakrishnan.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL U238 Philosophy and Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course acquaints students with the multifarious relationship between philosophy and literature as staged in some seminal texts of philosophy. The course also demonstrates that (the definition of) literature has often been inscribed in philosophical frameworks by tracing some concepts (metaphor, work, text, author) central to both philosophy and literature/literary theory.

PHIL U239 Divine Madness 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course is an exploration of the relationship among philosophy, mysticism, and madness following the theme of theosis (divine madness) introduced by Plato through a selective reading of the history of philosophy, Christian mysticism, and modern psychology.

PHIL U254 Postmodernism and Feminism 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

Masculinity and femininity are no longer accepted as fixed positions within ontologies mapped out by man’s objectifying look. Postmodernist deconstruction of traditional engendered representations discloses the exchangeability of genders and thus works toward a liberation of the "engendered subject" in the multitudinous affinities between beings.

Prerequisites: PHIL T122, ENGL T122.

PHIL U258 Philosophical Anthropology 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course acquaints students with basic issues in the philosophy of human nature. It also teaches students to think critically and constructively about philosophies of human nature by drawing out the implications of basic statements about the nature of human beings.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL U260 Worldviews and Ethics 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

Our morality cannot be divorced from our understanding of reality. This course will explore how our view of reality affects our moral judgments by examining the worldviews and moralities of both the ancient Greeks and subsequent Christian philosophers. Readings will be taken from Homer, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL U262 Classics in Moral Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course is a study of classics that reflect the gradual transformation of moral consciousness in antiquity, including readings from Plato and Aristotle. The implications of ancient moral thought and its abandonment by modernity will be examined in two classics of modern moral literature, one from Kant and the other from Nietzsche.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL U270 Philosophy and Religion in the Middle Ages

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course examines the nature and goals of philosophy as it was practiced in the medieval world.  It looks at the vaious ways in which philosophy was transformed by its encounter with Christianity and the extent to which it remained an autonomous discipline in the Middle Ages.

PHIL U286 Religious Experience and Philosophy 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

Accounts of religious experience unfold their fundamental meaning and structures in relation to those of human experience in general. Students will come to understand explicitly the nature, limits and implications, and the foundations in existence of religious experience.

PHIL V234 Medical Ethics 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

After a brief introduction to some basic principles useful in moral decision making, the course introduces the student to problems of general interest in bioethics such as: experimentation on humans, relations of patients and health care professionals, just allocation of health care, refusal of lifesaving treatment/euthanasia, abortion, and moral problems surrounding assisted reproduction, developments in genetics (e.g., cloning), etc.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL V235 Philosophy of Right 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course is a philosophical expose of the life, struggles, death, and ultimate transformation of the concept of "right." The central issue of the course: Is the violation of a human right a crime against nature?

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL V240 European World Views 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course attempts to clarify the philosophical framework underlying contemporary thought, expression, and science in contrast to the framework of the modern period of philosophy (17th — 18th centuries) by investigating four or five contemporary European philosophers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Marcel, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Sartre.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL V241 Philosophical Perspective on Woman 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course covers the philosophical development of three feminist theories–liberal, Marxist, and radical feminism. Various philosophical frameworks that have served as the basis of feminist critiques, such as positivism, liberalism, Marxism, functionalism, existentialism, and Freudism are discussed. Students will address critically a number of women’s issues, including women’s self-concept, their biology, their place in the public sphere, and their representation in language and culture.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL V243 Environmental Philosophy 3 crs.

Common Curriculum; Humanities/Arts Modern

This course offers an overview of the environmental crisis and evaluates the leading contemporary philosophical accounts of both the origins of the crisis and the ethical orientations needed for its resolution.

PHIL V245 Environmental Ethics 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The course will address the question: “What are our moral responsibilities in relation to the earth, ecosystems and eco-communities, other species and life forms, and future generations?” It discusses major theories in environmental ethics, consider the many dimensions of global ecological crisis, and examine carefully a number of important contemporary issues in environmental ethics.

 PHIL V252 Making Moral Decisions 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course treats the nature of personal and moral decision making leading to consideration of some ethical positions influential on the current philosophical scene (e.g., teleology, Kantian deontology, utilitarianism, natural law theory, etc.) and their application to contemporary moral problems.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL V260 Social Justice 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

An examination of the concept of social justice by means of a careful reading of classic texts from the Old Testament, New Testament, Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, and Locke.  Central issues of the course include interpretations of property rights (private, public, common), alternative economic systems (markets, planning, mixed economies), poverty and poverty alleviation, and governments' roles in establishing social justice.

PHIL V273 Auschwitz and After 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

The annihilation of six million European Jews by the Nazi totalitarian state constitutes the subject matter of the course. After exploring the history of anti-Semitism and the Nazi destruction process, the course turns to the ethical, religious, and philosophical dilemma posed by this mass murder.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL V277 Minds and Machines 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This is a course in philosophy that focuses on the structures and nature of human consciousness. It will serve as an introduction to contemporary discussion and issues associated with the philosophy of mind. Criteria for determining the nature and structure of consciousness will be developed through models employed in computers by artificial intelligence programs. No computer experience is required for this course.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL V278 Philosophy of God 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course will treat the existence and the nature of God according to the philosophies of Kant, Anselm, Aquinas, and Whitehead. Among the topics of discussion will be: atheism, agnosticism, theism, and the process philosophy.

Prerequisite: PHIL T122.

PHIL V281 Philosophical Reasons and Catholic Faith 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course considers the relation between reason and faith, and philosophy and theology, with special attention to Catholic faith. It will focus upon contrasting views of these relations in such authors as Augustine, Aquinas, Lonergan, Rahner, Kierkegaard, Peperzak, Ricoeur, Jean-Luc Marion, John Caputo, John Haldane, and John Paul II.

 

Courses: Physics (PHYS)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

PHYS A101 Introduction to Mechanics 4 crs.  

This is a calculus-based introductory course in Newtonian mechanics intended for physical science and math majors.

Co-requisite: PHYS A112, MATH A257

PHYS A102 Introduction to Electromagnetism 4 crs. 

This course is an introduction to the physics of electricity and magnetism culminating in an elementary treatment of Maxwell’s equations. We will then introduce students to Einstein’s special relativity.

Co-requisite: PHYS A113, MATH A258

PHYS A103 Mechanics Lab 1 cr.

Co-requisite: PHYS A101, A110 or A115.  Lab fee $50. 

PHYS A104 Electricity and Magnetism Lab 1 cr.

Co-requisite: PHYS A102, A111 or A116.  Lab fee $50.

PHYS A115 Physics of Life Sciences I 3 crs.

The principles of mechanics, heat, sound, light, magnetism, electricity, and fundamentals of atomic physics. In presenting these topics, the special interest of the biological sciences and the general education groups are kept in view. Included are three lectures per week.

Co-requisite: PHYS A112

PHYS A116 Physics of Life Sciences II 3 crs.

This course is a continuation PHYS A115

Prerequisite: PHYS A115

Co-requisite: PHYS A113

PHYS A195 Special Projects I 1 cr.

PHYS A240 Introduction to Waves and Quantum Physics 3 crs.

This is a sophomore level course that describes wave physics and introduces basic concepts of quantum physics.

Prerequisites: PHYS A102, MATH A258 

PHYS A241 Introduction to Thermal Physics 3 crs.

This is a sophomore level course that introduces the basic thermodynamic concepts of temperature, heat, and entropy. Classical thermodynamics as well as statistical mechanics will be covered.

Prerequisites: PHYS A102, MATH A258  

PHYS A295 Special Projects II arr. 

PHYS A295 Environmental Physics 3 crs.

This course discusses physical foundations of environmental science. It revisits basic physics principles relevant to environmental science and then applies them to phenomena such as climate change, pollution, energy conversion etc.

Prerequisite: PHYS A241 or PHYS A116 

PHYS A340 Classical Mechanics 4 crs.

This is a junior level course that introduces methods of classical mechanics. It gives a rigorous treatment of Newtonian and Lagrangian formulations of classical mechanics, including numerous applications. It is a continuation and extension of the introductory course (Introduction to Mechanics PHYS-A101).

Prerequisites: MATH A259, PHYS A240  

PHYS A350 Electromagnetism 4 crs.

This course gives a rigorous treatment of laws of electromagnetism. It covers applications of Maxwell’s equations, including electromagnetic waves. It is a continuation and extension of the introductory course (Introduction to Electromagnetism and Relativity PHYS-A102).

Prerequisites: MATH A259, PHYS A240  

PHYS A395 Special Projects III arr.

PHYS A425 Lasers and Modern Optics 3 crs.

Discussions will involve principles and practical aspects of laser operation and applications in modern optics; propagation of plane electromagnetic waves; diffraction and interference of light; gaussian beam propagation and optical resonators; theory of laser oscillation; gas, solid, semiconductor and dye lasers; detectors of optical radiation; nonlinear optics; applications in research and industry. Laboratory exercises include polarization, interference, Fourier optics, holography, gas, diode, and tunable lasers.

Prerequisite: PHYS A241 

PHYS A430 General Relativity 3 crs.

Beginning with Special relativity, we will review Einstein's development of his general relativistic theory of gravity in terms of the differential geometry of spacetime.

Prerequisite: PHYS A240, MATH A259  

PHYS A432 Solid State Physics 3 crs.

This course is an introductory course in solid state physics.  Some of the areas covered are thermal properties, free electron theory of metals, band theory, semiconductors, superconductivity and magnetic properties. 

Prerequisite: PHYS A241 

PHYS A436 Cellular Biophysics 3 crs.

This course is concerned with selected physiological phenomena occurring in biological cells, such as action potential in neurons. Although these are fundamentally biological phenomena, the analysis is inherently multidisciplinary, involving both physical and chemical principles. The course also introduces students to basic mathematical modeling of biophysical phenomena.

Prerequisite: PHYS A241 or PHYS A116  

PHYS A438 Introduction to Astrophysics 3 crs.

This introduction to astrophysics is an elective course for the physics major sequences.  Topics include the physical principles of the tools of astronomy; the physics of stars and planetary systems; galaxies and cosmology. 

Prerequisites: PHYS A240, PHYS A241, MATH A259

PHYS A445 Advanced Laboratory Physics 3 crs.

This is an advanced laboratory course for physics majors with the objective of training students to be self-reliant in planning and performing experiments not ordinarily done at the elementary level. Experiments are performed in such areas as electronics, mechanics, atomic physics and spectroscopy and emphasis will be placed on experimental error analysis.  Lab fee $50.

Prerequisites: PHYS A240, PHYS A241  

PHYS A450 Quantum Mechanics 4 crs.

This course gives an introductory treatment of quantum mechanics. Starting with the experimental evidence, it introduces the Schroedinger and Heisenberg formulations of quantum theory, discusses basic properties of the Schroedinger equation and provides an elementary introduction to axiomatic structure of quantum mechanics.

Prerequisites: MATH A259, PHYS A240  

PHYS A495 Special Projects IV arr.

Prerequisite: PHYS A395  

PHYS A496 Seminar/Workshop arr.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort. 

PHYS A497 Internship/Practicum arr.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory. 

PHYS A498 Research Project arr.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report. 

PHYS A499 Independent Study arr. 

PHYS H234 Faith, Science, and Religion 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

This course will critically analyze various ways of knowing: faith, science, and theology (critical analysis of faith). The methods of the physical sciences and the life sciences will be discussed. Topics will include the epic of creation, evolution, and quantum theory. 

PHYS H498 Honors Thesis 3 crs. 

PHYS T122 Introduction to Physics 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Introductory

The purposes of the course are (1) to familiarize the student with the behavior of physical reality, (2) to consider the manner in which scientists across the ages have philosophized on physical reality, (3) to contrast classical physics with modern physics, and (4) to foster within the students a scientific literacy.

PHYS Z130 Faith, Science, and Religion 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

This course will critically analyze various ways of knowing: faith, science, and theology (critical analysis of faith). The methods of the physical sciences and the life sciences will be discussed. Topics will include the epic of creation, evolution, and quantum theory. 

PHYS Z131 Physics of Sound 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

This course explores the science underlying the phenomena of sound, with particular emphasis on topics related to musical sound. Students will gain an understanding of basic physical and mathematical concepts relating to sound production, propagation and perception – as well as sound recording and sound reproduction.

 PHYS Z134 Astronomy 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

The purpose of this course is to place the participant in one of the cultural mainstreams of mankind’s past, present, and future by making available the rich mines of historical and practical astronomy, as well as modern space age discoveries and theories, in a comprehensive form.

Prerequisite: Any MATH A100 or above

Courses: Psychology (PSYC)

Humanities and Natural Sciences

PSYC A100 Introduction to Psychology 3 crs.

This course is a survey of the major fields of psychology. It is a prerequisite for all other psychology courses.

PSYC A230 Developmental Psychology 3 crs.

This course covers the development of behavior and psychological activity through the prenatal period, infancy, childhood, adolescence, maturity, and old age with emphasis on the normal person.

Prerequisite: PSYC A100.

PSYC A235 Abnormal Psychology 3 crs.

This course is a survey of psychological disorders with emphasis on clinical "picture," explanatory theories, and etiological research. Intervention procedures are briefly addressed.

Prerequisite: PSYC A100.

PSYC A240 Social Psychology 3 crs.

Social determinants of individual behavior and of group interaction are examined with emphasis on current research literature.

Prerequisite: PSYC A100.

PSYC A241 Psychology of Personal Adjustment 3 crs.

Good personal adjustment is defined as the effective solution of individual problems and the creation of a viable system of personal values. The constraints and conditions affecting these behaviors are examined.

Prerequisite: PSYC A100.

PSYC A301 Introduction to Research 3 crs.

This course concerns the application of scientific methods to psychology with emphasis on designing research and on report writing.

Prerequisite: 9 hrs. in PSYC, including PSYC A100, or 6 hrs. and concurrent enrollment in 3 PSYC hrs.

PSYC A303 Statistics and Methods 3 crs.

This course focuses on descriptive and inferential statistics. This course stresses the analysis and interpretation of data, frequency distribution analysis, tests of significance, correlational methods, analysis of variance, and selected nonparametric tests.

Prerequisites: PSYC A301; one college-level math course.

PSYC A315 Physiological Psychology 3 crs.

This course is an investigation of the biological basis of behavior. The focus is on neural and hormonal regulation and control of behavior.

Prerequisite: PSYC A303.

PSYC A316 Physiological Psychology Laboratory 1 cr.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences which approximately parallel the course content of PSYC A315. It is an optional lab to accompany PSYC A315.  Lab fee $50.

Co-requisite: PSYC A315.

PSYC A320 Psychology of Learning 3 crs.

This course is an examination of contemporary theories and problems of learning.

Prerequisite: PSYC A303.

Co-requisite: PSYC A321.

PSYC A321 Animal Operant Lab 1 cr.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences in the operant conditioning of the laboratory rat. It is an obligatory lab to accompany PSYC A320.  Lab fee $50.

Co-requisite: PSYC A320.

PSYC A322 Cognition 3 crs.

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the cognitive processes underlying human behavior, their experimental origins, and their theoretical significance.

Prerequisite: PSYC A303.

PSYC A323 Cognition Lab 1 cr.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences in traditional and contemporary areas of cognitive psychology. It is an optional lab to accompany PSYC A322.  Lab fee $50.

Co-requisite: PSYC A322.

PSYC A326 Environmental Psychology 3 crs.

This course is a survey of environmental psychology. Areas of focus include ambient envorinmental variables, environmental stressors, density and crowding, architecture and behavior, and pro-environmental behaviors. Living, learning, working, and recreational environments are considered, as are instiutional environments.

Prerequisite: PSYC A100.

PSYC A327 Studies in Psychology of Women 3 crs.

This course investigates the life span development of women. The predominant focus concerns the ways in which class, gender, race, and cultural background affect the individual. Also addressed are issues and factors related to societal stereotypes of women.

Prerequisite: PSYC A100.

PSYC A345 Psychology of Testing and Measurement 3 crs.

This course is a survey of the principles and practice of basic psychological testing, theory of measurement, test construction, and reliability/validity of test instruments. Emphasis is on tests of intelligence, aptitude, interests, organic brain dysfunction, and personality functions.

Prerequisite: PSYC A303.

PSYC A346 Test and Measurements Lab 1 cr.

This course involves supervised laboratory experience in administration, scoring, and interpretation of psychological tests. It is an obligatory lab to accompany PSYC A345.  Lab fee $50.

Co-requisite: PSYC A345.

PSYC A350 Industrial/ Organizational Psychology 3 crs.

This course involves applications of psychological principles to human problems in organizations, individual needs, and motives as they affect group achievement.

Prerequisite: PSYC A303.

PSYC A414 Health Psychology 3 crs.

This course focuses on the relationship between psychological theory, principles, and methods and the assessment, prevention, maintenance, and restoration of physical health. Doctor-patient relationships and their impact on health are also considered.

Prerequisite: PSYC A303 or permission of instructor.

PSYC A415 Psychopharmacology 3 crs.

This course covers principles of pharmacology and a detalied study of therapeutic and abused drug classes that affect psychological functioning and behavior. Mechanisms of action, neurobiological bases, clinical applications, tolerance and dependence, side effects, and abuse potentials are considered.

Prerequisites: PSYC A303, A315 or permission of instructor.

PSYC A416 Sensation and Perception 3 crs.

This course is an intensive study of sensory processes and perceptual organization. Prerequisite: PSYC A303.

PSYC A417 Sensation and Perception Lab 1 cr.

This course involves structured laboratory experiences in sensation and perception which parallels and complements PSYC A416. Included are experiments in classical psychophysics. It is an optional lab to accompany PSYC A416.  Lab fee $50.

PSYC A440 Theories of Personality 3 crs.

This course is a review and critical evaluation of major personality theories and their supporting evidence with readings from original sources.

Prerequisite: PSYC A235.

PSYC A441 Clinical Psychology 3 crs.

This course includes a brief history of clinical psychology, roles of the modern clinical psychologist, description of assessment and therapy techniques, current journal articles, experiential exercises to illustrate some areas of discussion, and an integrative final paper.

Prerequisites: PSYC A301, A235.

PSYC A455 Emotion and Motivation 3 crs.

This course is a survey of contemporary theories, research, and critical review of their relevant problems.

Prerequisites: PSYC A303 and A315 or A320 or A322.

PSYC A456 Comparative Psychology 3 crs.

This course is a topic-oriented survey of animal behavior. Opportunities for research are included.

Prerequisite: PSYC A303.

PSYC A459 Naturalistic Observation Lab 1 cr.

This laboratory course addresses the ways that behavioral data can be obtained through systematic, unbiased, naturalistic observations. Topics include sources of bias, scheduling observations, ethograms, and sampling techniques.

Prerequisite: PSYC A303 or permission of instructor.

PSYC A470 History and Systems of Psychology 3 crs.

This required capstone course for majors addresses those historical antecedents to contemporary psychology as well as the several systems or schools of psychology that have given direction to the discipline.

Prerequisite: PSYC A303.

PSYC A488 Senior Research 2 crs.

This course is an intensive literature review which culminates in the preparation of a formal written proposal for an undergraduate thesis.

Prerequisites: permission of instructor; advanced junior standing.

PSYC A489 Senior Thesis 1 cr.

This course involves the completion of an empirical research project and writing of an undergraduate thesis.

Prerequisites: PSYC A488 and permission of instructor.

PSYC A493 Directed Readings 3 crs.

Research and readings are on selected topics. Open only to second-semester junior or senior psychology students.

Prerequisite: permission of department chair.

PSYC A495 Special Project arr.

Learning experiences will be designed to meet the special needs of advanced majors. Content, activities, credit, and frequency of scheduling are variable.

Prerequisite: permission of department chair.

PSYC A496 Seminar 3 crs.

Course content varies each semester but is keyed to student and faculty interest.

Prerequisite: permission of department chair.

PSYC A497 Practicum in Applied Psychology 3 crs.

This course involves supervised field experience in cooperation with New Orleans area agencies. On-campus meetings and written assignments are required.

Prerequisites: advanced junior standing; permission of instructor.

PSYC A499 Independent Studies arr.

PSYC X230 Models of Human Behavior 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

This course provides a multidisciplinary survey of 10 theorists–Freud, Skinner,