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Courses: History (HIST)

Undergraduate Bulletin
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Undergraduate & Graduate Dates to Remember*

Fall Term 2010

August 20-22 MBA Orientation
August 25-29 Wolfpack Welcome
August 30 Classes begin
September 3 Add deadline
October 29 Last day to withdraw & last day
to apply for graduation
December 10 Last day of classes
December 11-17 Final Exams

Spring Term 2011

January 8 New Student Orientation; MBA Orientation
January 10 Classes begin
January 14 Add deadline
March 4 Last day to withdraw
May 4 Last day of classes for undergraduate students
May 5 Last day of classes for graduate students
May 6-12 Final Exams for day division
May 9-12 Final Exams for graduate and evening students
May 14 Commencement - all colleges

*College of Law dates on Law Bulletin

HIST A200 U.S. History to 1865 3 crs.

This course covers the exploration, the colonial experience, independence, the new republic, Jacksonian democracy, expansion, abolitionism, and the Civil War. The emphasis of the course is not only political but economic, social, and intellectual as well.

HIST A201 U.S. History from 1865 3 crs.

This course discusses the Reconstruction era, the Gilded Age, imperialism, progressivism, WWI, the ’20s, the New Deal, WWII, the Cold War, the new frontiers, the Great Society, and contemporary America. The emphasis of the course is not only political but economic, social, and intellectual as well.

HIST A202 Historical Methods Lab 3 crs.

A one-hour laboratory taken either freshman or sophomore year, with exceptions for transfer students. Linked with HIST A200, the lab director handles the basic tasks of teaching historical methods while the instructor of the survey would grade the research paper.

HIST A220 Latin America I 3 crs.

This course is a survey of pre-Columbian civilizations; European discovery and conquest; structure and problems of empire in Spanish and Portuguese America; the influence of the church; and the struggle for independence.

HIST A221 Modern Latin America 3 crs.

This course is a socio-economic, cultural, and political analysis of Latin American Republics since 1820. Emphasis is on the development of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Topics include problems and prospects, clash between the traditional and the modern, conflicts between church and state, and inter-American relations.

HIST A230 U.S. Legal History I 3 crs.

The major developments in American legal history from the Colonial period to the Civil War are discussed.

HIST A231 U.S. Legal History II 3 crs.

The major developments in American legal history from 1865 through the 20th century are discussed.

HIST A232 American Trials 3 crs.

This course focuses on famous American trials and uses them as a means to examine the broader historical context in which they took place. We will pay particular attention to why these trials captured the public’s attention at the time they occurred and why they still have a hold on the popular imagination today.

HIST A240 History of New Orleans 3 crs.

This course will not only explore the historical forces that have transformed New Orleans into one of the world's most distinctive cities, but also the ways in which the Crescent City has played an important role in shaping the broader historical events of both region and nation. Students will emerge from this course with a firm understanding of how diverse factors such as geography, economics, culture, ethnicity, and politics have produced New Orleans as we know it today.

HIST A245 Louisiana History 3 crs.

This course covers the political, economic, and social development of Louisiana from the colonial period to the present.

HIST A248 U.S. Military History 3 crs.

This course examines U.S. military policy from the American Revolution to the Cold War; the causes, events, and effects of major American conflicts; and the role of the military in American society and thought during the past two centuries.

HIST A260 Modern European Women’s History 3 crs.

This course will examine the history of European women from the 18th century to the present. It will analyze the diversities of women’s experiences based on nationality, class, and religion and will focus on women’s work, political and legal rights, sexuality, and on the impact of wars, revolutions, and movements such as nazism and communism.

HIST A276 African-American History to 1865 3 crs.

This course is a survey of the African-American experience from the African background to the end of the Civil War. It will focus on African-Americans’ quest for the American dream and how they attempted to deal with the problems and challenges posed by enslavement and racism.

HIST A277 African-American History Since 1865 3 crs.

This course is a study of the African-American experience since the Civil War. Students will examine the nature and effects of the changes wrought by the Civil War and Reconstruction. The course will address the themes of change and continuity in the black experience, the struggles against Jim Crow, the civil rights struggles, and post-civil rights developments.

HIST A288 History of the Middle East I 3 crs.

This course traces the major developments in the Middle East from the 7th to the 16th centuries. This period witnessed the transition to Islam in the Arabian Peninsula and its spread throughout the wider Middle East. Accordingly, we will study how Muslims shaped a unified civilization and interacted with non-Muslim communities and polities.

HIST A289 History of the Middle East II 3 crs.

This course is a continuation of Middle East I. It explores the main patterns and events that shaped the modern Middle East from the 16th century to the present, paying particular attention to the expansion of empire, the transformation of economies and institutions, changing gender relations, and conflicts over territory.

HIST A300 Ancient History 3 crs.

This course discusses the political, social, religious, economic, and cultural development of western culture from the Sumerians to the Romans.

HIST A304 Early Christianity 3 crs.

This course examines the apostolic age;  geographical expansion;  persecutions; organizational developments;  early heresies;  councils of Nicaea, Ephesus, and Chalcedon;  popular piety; church-state relations;  rise of Monasticism.

HIST A305 Medieval Crime and Community 3 crs.

This course explores the interaction between the development of criminal law and social change in the late medieval period.  Classes will be organized thematically and will focus on a broad range of subjects, from trial by ordeal to sanctuary. Emphasis will be placed on the creative ways litigants and jurors manipulated the law courts to their best advantage.

HIST A306 Middle Ages 3 crs.

European social, political, and cultural institutions from the fall of Rome to the 15th century will be examined.

HIST A307 Saints & Demons in Medieval Europe 3 crs.

The medieval church played a central role influencing the lives of Western Christians. This course examines the depth of that influence. Particular emphasis is placed on forms of religious expression, the development of ecclesiastical organization and hierarchy, the role of the church in everyday life, canon law, and lay involvement in the church.

HIST A308 Age of Renaissance 3 crs.

This course is a study of the social, political, economic, and intellectual developments of the Renaissance. Shifting attitudes mark a transition from the medieval to the early modern world and prepare the way for the upheavals of the Age of Reformation.

HIST A310 Age of Reformation 3 crs.

Discussions examine the shift in religious sensibilities in light of new economic, intellectual, and political developments. It treats the unique responses of Protestant and Catholic reformations.

HIST A315 Western Intellectual History 3 crs.

This course traces the history of western ideas, dealing with the major intellectual developments from the pre-Socratic Greeks to the crisis of European thought in the 19th century.

HIST A321 Modern Europe 1815 — 1914 3 crs.

This course covers the Congress of Vienna, era of revolutions, liberalism, nationalism, socialism, German and Italian unification, and the origins of World War I.

HIST A322 Modern Europe 1914 — 1945 3 crs.

World War I, the Russian revolution, Fascism, Nazism, and the origins of World War II will be examined.

HIST A323 Modern Europe 1945 — Present 3 crs.

Cold War; recovery; and political, economic, and social developments will be examined.

HIST A327 Hitler and Nazi Germany 3 crs.

This course will trace the development of Hitler through his rise to power to his subordination of Germany to his dictatorship.  It will examine the character of the Nazi state, its monopolization of power through terror, its racial agenda, its aggressive ethnic imperialism, and its ultimate defeat as a result of hubristic over-extension.

HIST A328 The Holocaust 3 crs.

A history of the anti-Semitism of the Nazi regime in Germany, its anti-Semitic measures, and finally its genocidal assault on the Jews of Europe. The origins of German and Nazi anti-Semitism, the course of Nazi anti-Semitic policy, and the consequences of the Holocaust will be examined.

HIST A330 Colonial America 3 crs.

This course explores the establishment of colonies in North America. Economic, political, social, and intellectual developments from prehistory to the end of the Seven Years’ War (1763) will be discussed.

HIST A332 Revolutionary America 1753 — 1815 3 crs.

This course considers the impact of revolutionary change in North America from the time of the Revolution to the end of the War of 1812. The course will explore the economic, political, social, and intellectual questions facing Americans from the beginnings of the drive to Independence through the formative years of nationhood.

HIST A334 Age of Jackson 1815 — 1845 3 crs.

This course is a study of the emerging conflict of nationalism and sectionalism in American democracy, including the conflicting theories of Jacksonian democracy.

HIST A336 History of the Old South 3 crs.

This course discusses the origins and evolution of the Old South as a distinctive region and section from its colonization through the collapse of the Confederacy.

HIST A337 The New South 3 crs.

This course is an investigation of the history of the New South. The course will ponder the definition of "New South," the New South Creed, and development of the South as a distinctive region from the collapse of the Confederacy to the Information Age.

HIST A338 Civil War and Reconstruction 3 crs.

This course covers 1845 — 1877 through examination of the forces leading to sectional conflict and to reestablishment of the Union.

HIST A340 U.S.: Gilded and Progressive Eras 3 crs.

This course is a study of America’s industrial age and emergence as a world power in the period 1877 — 1914. Emphasis, too, is on the reaction and reform which these changes brought about, e.g., the decline of laissez faire thought and the genteel tradition, and the rise of the Populist and Progressive movements.

HIST A342 U.S.: The ’20s and ’30s 3 crs.

This course is a study of America from 1914 to 1941; from the peak of optimism and the Progressive Movement to disillusionment and the brink of a second world war; from incredible prosperity to more incredible depression. Emphasis is on the social, political, and intellectual responses to the period’s tremendous economic, cultural, and technological changes.

HIST A343 U.S.: WWII to Present 3 crs.

This course is a study of America from 1941 to the present, including WWII, the Cold War, the hot wars of Korea and Vietnam, and the increasingly active foreign policy of the period. At home, it includes the problems of adjustment to the postwar world and to unprecedented affluence–in general to the vast changes of the past five decades.

HIST A347 The Early American West 3crs.

This course will survey the history of the early American West from its colonial origins to 1890. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of the West in the historical imagination.

HIST A349 Africa to 1880 3crs.

This course is a survey of the history of Africa from the earliest times. It will examine the evolution of African societies and states and interactions between Africans and the outside world.

HIST A350 Africa 1880 to Present 3 crs.

This course covers the interaction of Africa with the West. It also examines the processes and structures of colonialism, African reactions to colonialism, nationalist movements, and the economic and political structures of independent African states.

HIST A352 Women in African History 3 crs.

This course looks at women in African history from ancient times to the present, focusing on how religious practices, colonialism, and social class have impacted their lives. We will examine the construction of gender, social systems, reproduction, women’s exercise of power, and the attempt to control of the bodies of women and girls.

HIST A375 Eastern European History 3 crs.

This course is a study of the political, social, economic, religious, and cultural life of the peoples of Eastern Europe, (Poles, Czechs, Austrians, Hungarians, Romanians, Bulgarians, Yugoslavs, and Greeks) from 1500 to the present with an emphasis on the 20th century.

HIST A381 English History to 1688 3 crs.

This course is a study of political, social, cultural, and religious developments in England from the Roman Conquest to the Revolution of 1688. The focus will be on the emergence of Parliament and the English common law.

HIST A382 English History, 1688 to Present 3 crs.

This course is an analysis of the transformation of English society from 18th-century aristocratic dominance and the rise of the middle classes in the 19th century to the emergence of working-class power and the establishment of the welfare state in the 20th century. The changing role of England as a world power will also be examined.

HIST A390 Chinese History I 3 crs.

How the Chinese have viewed themselves, historically, politically, social-economically, religiously, and aesthetically from the Hsiao Dynasty c. 2200 B.C. to the Ming Dynasty 1640.

HIST A391 Chinese History II 3 crs.

This course concerns how the Chinese continued to view themselves in relation to their earlier history and how the coming of the West influenced the Ching Dynasty (1644 — 1911) and the subsequent experience of the Chinese in the 20th century.

HIST A392 Japanese History I 3 crs.

Pre-Buddhistic Japan of the Jomon and Yayoi Eras, Nara, the "Golden Age" of Heian, the emergence of the Samurai in the Kamakura Era, Ashikaga Shogunate, and the arrival of the West are discussed in the course. Stress is given to the religious, political, and cultural life of Japan between c. 500 B.C. and 1600 A.D.

HIST A393 Japanese History II 3 crs.

This course examines the Tokugawa Era (1600 — 1868), the impact of the West and the subsequent emergence of Japan as a modern nation in the Meiji, Taisho, and Showa Eras. Stress is placed on the unique experience the Japanese have had, especially in their fine arts and culture.

HIST A394 East Asian History 3 crs.

This course is an introductory survey of the history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. It is a required course for all Asian Studies majors and minors. Students will study the cultural, literary, philosophical, and religious traditions of Asia as well as the historical conflicts that arose among the various Asian civilizations. The purpose of the course is to prepare students to study more in depth the civilizations of Asia, especially China and Japan, and provide a foundation for an understanding of modern Asia. The history of the development of international relations and the varied Asian responses to the West will be important themes discussed in class sessions. Students will also view and discuss video documentaries and film selections that illustrate how historical events influence art.

HIST A400 Historiography 3 crs.

This course is a study of the meaning of history through the eyes of philosophers, theologians, and historians; it studies both philosophies of history and the various approaches to historical investigation. Required of all students with a concentration in history.

HIST A404 New Orleans’ Oral Histories 3 crs.

The focus of this course will vary each semester. The class uses the methodology of oral history to explore an aspect of the history of New Orleans through interviews. Students use A/V equipment to preserve their interviews and they will use the information they gathered to write term papers and produce documentaries.

HIST A405 Early American Indians 3 crs.

This course will survey the history of North American Indians from the earliest periods of prehistory to the "closing" of the American frontier in 1890. Using the methodology of ethnohistory, the course will explore the history and culture of the diverse Indian peoples of early America as well as their interaction with other ethnic groups.

HIST A410 History of Mexico 3 crs.

This course covers the history of Mexico from Aztec times to the present. Emphasis on dominant social, economic, and cultural trends.

HIST A414 Northern South America 3 crs.

This course covers the history of Colombia, Venezuela, and Ecuador including pre-Columbian past, Spanish Conquest, Colonial Period, 19th and 20th century. Emphasis is on dominant political, social, economic, and cultural trends. The course surveys the impact of the gold, cacao, oil, coffee, and drug economies. Studies will include liberalism, conservatism, and radical challenges to the established order.

HIST A422 Victorian Culture and Society 3 crs.

This course is an interdisciplinary analysis of English culture and society in the 19th century. The emphasis will be on the formation of and challenges to Victorian values. Sexual morals, family dynamics, the role of women, class attitudes, education, and religion will be examined. Literature, art, and music will be integral parts of the course.

HIST A425 Modern Russia 3 crs.

This course is a study of modern Russia with emphasis on the 20th century.

HIST A435 Modern Germany Since 1866 3 crs.

This course covers unification to the present: Bismarck, World War I, revolution, Hitler, World War II, and post-war German developments.

HIST A440 African and Black Diaspora 3 crs

This course is a study of the history of blacks in Diaspora.  It will focus on a comparative examination of the black experience in different locations -- the U.S., Latin America, Africa, and the Carribean.

HIST A442 History of Southern Africa 3 crs.

HIST A493 Directed Reading Course 3 crs.

Course content varies but is keyed to student and faculty interests in relevant professional topics.

HIST A496 Seminar/Workshop arr.

A seminar is a supervised group of students sharing the results of their research on a common topic. A workshop is a supervised group of students participating in a common effort.

HIST A497 Internship/ Practicum arr.

An internship is supervised practical experience. A practicum is supervised practical application of previously studied theory. Specific intern programs provide practical experience in archival and museum work.

HIST A498 Research Project arr.

This project focuses on empirical or historical investigation, culminating in a written report.

HIST A499 Independent Study arr.

HIST H233 Honors World Civilization I: to 1650 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: University Honors Program

This course is designed for university honors students. It intends to communicate the essential facts and generalizations of African, American, Asian, and European history from the dawn of humanities until 1650. The course aims to exercise the student’s ability to think and write historically, logically, critically, and synthetically.

HIST H234 Honors World Civilization II: from 1650 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: University Honors Program

This course is designed for university honors students. It intends to communicate the essential facts and generalizations of African, American, Asian, and European history since 1650. The course aims to exercise the student’s ability to think and write historically, logically, critically, and synthetically.

HIST H235 Seminar in Global Issues 1.5 crs.

This is an honors course open to all students by invitation who want the challenge of engaging macro questions of the human experience within the context of different moral and political values. The course is limited to 20 students and then only to second-semester freshmen through first-semester seniors. The course was created as a way to have an on-going process that would prepare Loyola’s most able students for success in scholarship and fellowship competitions.

HIST T122 World Civilization to 1650 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Introductory

This course aims to provide a universal perspective on the development of civilization up to 1650 and to study the people and values which have shaped our world.

HIST T124 World Civilization from 1650 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Introductory

This course is a continuation of HIST T122 and aims to study the people and values which have shaped our world from 1650 to the present day.

HIST W239 Catholics: Their History 3 crs.

This course is a study of the behavior of Catholics worldwide during the past 2,000 years–their religious, social, and cultural values and resulting actions. The course tries to elucidate the concrete results of the teachings of Christ and His followers on these Catholics.

HIST W240 Between Eve and Mary: Women in Medieval Europe 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Pre-modern

This class explores changes in women’s rights and roles in medieval society. Special emphasis is placed on the gap between prescription and reality, women’s contributions to medieval society, ideas and attitudes about women, and developments at the end of the medieval period to create a society tolerant of witchcraft persecutions.

HIST W255 Medieval Sex and Gender 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Pre-modern

Sex and gender are linked together throughout history as cultural constructs that evolve from a power relationship. In studying these aspects of a society, we are much better informed about its social mores, hierarchical relationships, even political strategies.  Because many ideas about sex and gender developed in the Middle Ages, a study of these aspects will help students better appreciate modern values.

HIST W256 The Crusades 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Pre-modern

Muslim terrorists today see attacks on Westerners as a continuation of the Wars of the Cross; Westerners know very little about them and feel no sense of continuity.  These attitudes are a legacy of the medieval period.  For Europe, the Crusades were a positive experience, encouraging scholarship, economic expansion, and Christian solidarity.  For Muslims, it hastened the fragmentation of an empire. A better understanding of the Crusades will illuminate current relations with the Middle East.

HIST W266 The Quest for Empire 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Pre-modern

Should early European explorers and colonists be remembered primarily as folk heroes or as slave-trading exploiters of other cultures? In this course, we will let the early explorers and colonists speak for themselves through the vivid writings they have left. Group discussion of primary sources will be an important part of the course.

HIST W276 Culture in Pre-Modern Japan 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Pre-modern

This course will introduce the history, literature, religion, and philosophy that formed Japanese culture from the 10th to the 12th century.  English translations of contemporary texts by writers of the imperial court will be studied from a broad historical perspective.  Students will attain an appreciation of Japanese culture as it has evolved from the classical period to the present.

HIST W286 Discovering Africa 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Pre-modern

This course focuses on the history of pre-colonial Africa from the Bantu migration to the beginnings of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. By exploring the wealth, diversity and complexity of early African societies, students will not only be better informed and educated, they will be intellectually prepared to challenge some of the sweeping generalizations and assumptions about contemporary Africa.

HIST X241 Drugs, Terrorism, and Democracy 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

The U.S. has a complex relationship with Latin America. This course seeks to explain the three most important issues in that relationship today–drugs, democracy, and terrorism–from the widely divergent perspectives of the two cultures.

HIST X243 Social Revolutions in Latin America 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

This course analyzes social revolutions in Latin America including the 1910 Mexican Revolution, the 1959 Cuban Revolution, and the frustrated 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s revolutions in Central America. Works used are outstanding histories on the revolutions as well as recognized artistic works, including films, novels, and short stories. The course will consider the causes of revolutions, their leaders and ideology, their successes and failures, and the lessons to be learned.

HIST X246 American Revolution 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

Historians legitimately concern themselves with the nature of revolution, attending in large measure to the influence of impersonal factors. Using the American Revolution, the course will examine the reciprocal effect which certain people and revolution have had on each other. Motives, techniques, freedom of action, and alternatives available will be assessed.

HIST X254 Palestinians and Israelis 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

The course researches the cultural, religious, political, economic, and social values of and the relationships between the Palestinians and Israelis. The tensions resulting from the conflict are studied in their origins and evolution. The hopes of both peoples are evaluated, and the future is extrapolated.

HIST X256 American Heroes 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

The purpose of this course is to examine what constitutes a hero for Americans. The course will examine why people need heroes not only to survive but to progress and why in recent times people are becoming increasingly disillusioned with modern heroes.

HIST X260 WWI in History and Literature 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

After viewing the experiences of soldiers through novels and memoirs written by participants, students will consider what this war did to those who fought; how they viewed their experiences; how it altered their visions of themselves, society, and their governments; how they related to their own civilian compatriots and the enemy.

HIST X261 Autobiography as History 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

A study of important historical autobiographies, the course treats the literary genre of autobiography, the historical context of major autobiographical works, the use of autobiography as a historical document, and the practice of autobiography as a tool for understanding the self.

HIST X264 American Left in the 20th Century 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

This course investigates the effects of the success of liberalism on values, views, and aspirations of Americans during this century–a time of affluence, the rise of mass culture, and the post industrial society. This course examines leftist criticism of liberalism during the 20th century.

HIST X270 The American Character 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

This course is a study of those characteristics of American culture that seem to define America as unique among nations. It will concentrate on contemporary American values and politics, but will begin with the observations of Franklin and Crevecoeur and include the writings of contemporary journalists, historians, social scientists, novelists, travel writers, and foreign observers.

HIST X277 Culture in Early Modern Japan 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course will introduce the history, literature, religion and philosophy that formed Japanese culture from the 17th to the 19th century, when Japan witnessed the rise of the merchant class but government was still controlled by the samurai.  English translations of historical and literary writings of the period will be used to give students a clearer insight into how Japanese cultural perspectives have evolved from early modern times to the present day.

HIST X278 Modern Japanese Culture 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Humanities/Arts Modern

This course will explore the modern Japanese conflict between the desire to assimilate Western culture and the need to preserve traditional values.  The Japanese and Western understanding of the individual and of the individual's place in society will also be explored.  English translations of modern novels and essays will give students a clearer understanding of Japan's people and evolving culture. 

HIST X280 African-American Culture and History 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

This course studies the manner in which African-Americans have attempted to solve moral, religious, and pragmatic problems relating to the critical issue of survival in America from the colonial period to the present.

HIST X290 Women in American History 3 crs.

Common Curriculum: Behavioral/Social Sciences Modern

An exploration of the diverse historical experience of women in America from the colonial period to the present, the course will focus on changes in women’s work, legal and political status, education, religious experience, family life, and gender roles.